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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



998
Antisthenes Of Rhodes, Fragments, 14
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.312-9.313 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.312. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.313. /and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best.
2. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.9-7.27, 7.30, 8.19-8.34, 8.44 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Antisthenes, Fragments, 15, 181, 51, 14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Antisthenes, Fragments, 15, 181, 51, 14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Plato, Lesser Hippias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

365b. is he who hides one thing in his heart and says another. But I shall speak that which shall be accomplished. Hom. Il. 308 ff. In these lines he makes plain the character of each of the men, that Achilles is true and simple, and Odysseus wily and false for he represents Achilles as saying these lines to Odysseus. Soc. Now at last, Hippias, I think I understand what you mean; you mean that the wily man is false, apparently.
6. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

59b. and his character. Echecrates. To be sure I do. Phaedo. He was quite unrestrained, and I was much agitated myself, as were the others. Echecrates. Who were these, Phaedo? Phaedo. of native Athenians there was this Apollodorus, and Critobulus and his father, and Hermogenes and Epiganes and Aeschines and Antisthenes; and Ctesippus the Paeanian was there too, and Menexenus and some other Athenians. But Plato, I think, was ill.
7. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.1.12-2.1.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.1.12. Ah, said Socrates, if only that path can avoid the world as well as rule and slavery, there may be something in what you say. But, since you are in the world, if you intend neither to rule nor to be ruled, and do not choose to truckle to the rulers 2.1.13. — I think you must see that the stronger have a way of making the weaker rue their lot both in public and in private life, and treating them like slaves. You cannot be unaware that where some have sown and planted, others cut their corn and fell their trees, and in all manner of ways harass the weaker if they refuse to bow down, until they are persuaded to accept slavery as an escape from war with the stronger. So, too, in private life do not brave and mighty men enslave and plunder the cowardly and feeble folk? Yes, but my plan for avoiding such treatment is this. I do not shut myself up in the four corners of a community, but am a stranger in every land.
8. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Antisthenes of Rhodes, Fragments, 181, 51, 15 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.4-6.5, 9.101 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.4. When he was being initiated into the Orphic mysteries, the priest said that those admitted into these rites would be partakers of many good things in Hades. Why then, said he, don't you die? Being reproached because his parents were not both free-born, Nor were they both wrestlers, quoth he, but yet I am a wrestler. To the question why he had but few disciples he replied, Because I use a silver rod to eject them. When he was asked why he was so bitter in reproving his pupils he replied, Physicians are just the same with their patients. One day upon seeing an adulterer running for his life he exclaimed, Poor wretch, what peril you might have escaped at the price of an obol. He used to say, as we learn from Hecato in his Anecdotes, that it is better to fall in with crows than with flatterers; for in the one case you are devoured when dead, in the other case while alive. 6.5. Being asked what was the height of human bliss, he replied, To die happy. When a friend complained to him that he had lost his notes, You should have inscribed them, said he, on your mind instead of on paper. As iron is eaten away by rust, so, said he, the envious are consumed by their own passion. Those who would fain be immortal must, he declared, live piously and justly. States, said he, are doomed when they are unable to distinguish good men from bad. Once, when he was applauded by rascals, he remarked, I am horribly afraid I have done something wrong.When brothers agree, no fortress is so strong as their common life, he said. The right outfit for a voyage, he said, is such as, even if you are shipwrecked, will go through the water with you. 9.101. There is nothing good or bad by nature, for if there is anything good or bad by nature, it must be good or bad for all persons alike, just as snow is cold to all. But there is no good or bad which is such to all persons in common; therefore there is no such thing as good or bad by nature. For either all that is thought good by anyone whatever must be called good, or not all. Certainly all cannot be so called; since one and the same thing is thought good by one person and bad by another; for instance, Epicurus thought pleasure good and Antisthenes thought it bad; thus on our supposition it will follow that the same thing is both good and bad. But if we say that not all that anyone thinks good is good, we shall have to judge the different opinions; and this is impossible because of the equal validity of opposing arguments. Therefore the good by nature is unknowable.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, in homer, in plato Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
achilles Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
aeschines Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
aeschylus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 119
ajax, in antisthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 119, 120, 121
ajax, in pindar Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
ajax, in sophocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
antiphon, antisthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118, 119, 120, 121
antisthenes, and rejection of pleasure Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
antisthenes, aretē in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
antisthenes, homeric criticism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
antisthenes, on body and soul Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
antisthenes, post-classical reception Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
antisthenes, works and themes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326, 356
antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326, 331, 356, 358
aretē/-a (virtue, excellence), in antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
armament Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
ascension, christs Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
banausic activity Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
bravery Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
christian sources for antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331, 356
codrus, on kylix vase Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
codrus, significance of his trickery Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
codrus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
deception, as banausic Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
deception, negotiability of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
deception, opposed to hoplitism Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118, 121
desire, erotic Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
foucault, m. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
freedom (ἐλευθερία\u200e), in antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
homer, and deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
homer, antisthenes interpretations of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
homer, odysseus in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118, 121
hoplites, ideology of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
hoplites, tactics opposed to deception Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
immortality, in antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
individualism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 358
isocrates, and antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
madness Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
marriage, antisthenes on Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
negotiability, use of term defended Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
odysseus, in antisthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118, 119, 120, 121
odysseus, in plato Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
odysseus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
phaedo Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
pindar Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
plato, and other socratic writers Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
plato, works, hippias minor Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 121
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
pleasure (ἡδονή\u200e), in antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
pyrrho, on antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
pyrrho Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
reputation, of philosopher Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
self-sufficiency (autarkeia) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326
skepticism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
sophocles Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 118
truth (alētheia), skepticism and Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 331
unity of virtue Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 356
virtue Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
war Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
weapon Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
word/the word, man of words Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
words and deeds' Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 144
xenophon Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 326