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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



771
Anon., The Acts Of John, 59-61


nanAnd having so said, and bidden farewell to them, and left much money with the brethren for distribution, he went forth unto Ephesus, while all the brethren lamented and groaned. And there accompanied him, of Ephesus, both Andronicus and Drusiana and Lycomedes and Cleobius and their families. And there followed him Aristobula also, who had heard that her husband Tertullus had died on the way, and Aristippus with Xenophon, and the harlot that was chaste, and many others, whom he exhorted at all times to cleave to the Lord, and they would no more be parted from him.


nanNow on the first day we arrived at a deserted inn, and when we were at a loss for a bed for John, we saw a droll matter. There was one bedstead lying somewhere there without coverings, whereon we spread the cloaks which we were wearing, and we prayed him to lie down upon it and rest, while the rest of us all slept upon the floor. But he when he lay down was troubled by the bugs, and as they continued to become yet more troublesome to him, when it was now about the middle of the night, in the hearing of us all he said to them: I say unto you, O bugs, behave yourselves, one and all, and leave your abode for this night and remain quiet in one place, and keep your distance from the servants of God. And as we laughed, and went on talking for some time, John addressed himself to sleep; and we, talking low, gave him no disturbance (or, thanks to him we were not disturbed).


nanBut when the day was now dawning I arose first, and with me Verus and Andronicus, and we saw at the door of the house which we had taken a great number of bugs standing, and while we wondered at the great sight of them, and all the brethren were roused up because of them, John continued sleeping. And when he was awaked we declared to him what we had seen. And he sat up on the bed and looked at them and said: Since ye have well behaved yourselves in hearkening to my rebuke, come unto your place. And when he had said this, and risen from the bed, the bugs running from the door hasted to the bed and climbed up by the legs thereof and disappeared into the joints. And John said again: This creature hearkened unto the voice of a man, and abode by itself and was quiet and trespassed not; but we which hear the voice and commandments of God disobey and are light-minded: and for how long?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Strabo, Geography, 12.8.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.8.17. Carura forms a boundary between Phrygia and Caria. It is a village; and it has inns, and also fountains of boiling-hot waters, some in the Maeander River and some above its banks. Moreover, it is said that once, when a brothel-keeper had taken lodging in the inns along with a large number of women, an earthquake took place by night, and that he, together with all the women, disappeared from sight. And I might almost say that the whole of the territory in the neighborhood of the Maeander is subject to earthquakes and is undermined with both fire and water as far as the interior; for, beginning at the plains, all these conditions extend through that country to the Charonia, I mean the Charonium at Hierapolis and that at Acharaca in Nysais and that near Magnesia and Myus. In fact, the soil is not only friable and crumbly but is also full of salts and easy to burn out. And perhaps the Maeander is winding for this reason, because the stream often changes its course and, carrying down much silt, adds the silt at different times to different parts of the shore; however, it forcibly thrusts a part of the silt out to the high sea. And, in fact, by its deposits of silt, extending forty stadia, it has made Priene, which in earlier times was on the sea, an inland city.
2. Anon., The Acts of John, 31, 59-61, 63-86, 20 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

20. Now when Lycomedes came with John into the house wherein his wife lay, he caught hold again of his feet and said: See, lord, the withering of the beauty, see the youth, see the renowned flower of my poor wife, whereat all Ephesus was wont to marvel: wretched me, I have suffered envy, I have been humbled, the eye of mine enemies hath smitten me: I have never wronged any, though I might have injured many, for I looked before to this very thing, and took care, lest I should see any evil or any such ill fortune as this. What profit, then, hath Cleopatra from my anxiety? what have I gained by being known for a pious man until this day? nay, I suffer more than the impious, in that I see thee, Cleopatra, lying in such plight. The sun in his course shall no more see me conversing with thee: I will go before thee, Cleopatra, and rid myself of life: I will not spare mine own safety though it be yet young. I will defend myself before Justice, that I have rightly deserted, for I may indict her as judging unrighteously. I will be avenged on her when I come before her as a ghost of life. I will say to her: Thou didst force me to leave the light when thou didst rob me of Cleopatra: thou didst cause me to become a corpse when thou sentest me this ill fortune: thou didst compel me to insult Providence, by cutting off my joy in life (my con- fidence).
3. Anon., Acts of John, 31, 60-61, 63-86, 20 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

20. Now when Lycomedes came with John into the house wherein his wife lay, he caught hold again of his feet and said: See, lord, the withering of the beauty, see the youth, see the renowned flower of my poor wife, whereat all Ephesus was wont to marvel: wretched me, I have suffered envy, I have been humbled, the eye of mine enemies hath smitten me: I have never wronged any, though I might have injured many, for I looked before to this very thing, and took care, lest I should see any evil or any such ill fortune as this. What profit, then, hath Cleopatra from my anxiety? what have I gained by being known for a pious man until this day? nay, I suffer more than the impious, in that I see thee, Cleopatra, lying in such plight. The sun in his course shall no more see me conversing with thee: I will go before thee, Cleopatra, and rid myself of life: I will not spare mine own safety though it be yet young. I will defend myself before Justice, that I have rightly deserted, for I may indict her as judging unrighteously. I will be avenged on her when I come before her as a ghost of life. I will say to her: Thou didst force me to leave the light when thou didst rob me of Cleopatra: thou didst cause me to become a corpse when thou sentest me this ill fortune: thou didst compel me to insult Providence, by cutting off my joy in life (my con- fidence).


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of andrew Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
acts of john, women Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
acts of john Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
acts of paul Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
acts of paul and thecla Pinheiro et al., The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative: Fictional Intersections (2012b) 155
acts of the apostles Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187
andronicus Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
apocryphal texts, armenian Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece, Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent: New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 (2015) 262
apocryphal texts, syriac' Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece, Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent: New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 (2015) 262
aristippe Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
aristippus (laodicea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187
aristobula Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
aristobula (laodicea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
cleopatra Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
drusiana Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 102
drusiane (ephesos) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
ephesus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
john (apostle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
latin language Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
mani Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
miracles Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187
pilgrim psalms Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
prostitutes Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
strabo Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
tertullus / tertyllos (laodicea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187, 188
thecla Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 188
xenophon (laodicea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 187