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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10023
Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 2.49-2.50


nan (6) By means of the sixth commonplace we show that the act was done with premeditation, and declare that for an intentional crime there is no excuse, although a rightful plea of mercy is provided for an unpremeditated act. (7) By means of the seventh commonplace we show it is a foul crime, cruel, sacrilegious, and tyrannical; such a crime as the outraging of women, or one of those crimes that incite wars and life-and‑death struggles with enemies of the state. (8) By means of the eighth commonplace we show that it is not a common but a unique crime, base, nefarious, and unheard‑of, and therefore must be the more promptly and drastically avenged. (9) The ninth commonplace consists of comparison of wrongs, as when we shall say it is a more heinous crime to debauch a free-born person than to steal a sacred object, because the one is done from unbridled licentiousness and the other from need. (10) By the tenth commonplace we shall examine sharply, incriminatingly, and precisely, everything that took place in the actual execution of the deed and all the circumstances that usually attend such an act, so that by the enumeration of the attendant circumstances the crime may seem to be taking place and the action to unfold before our eyes. <


nan We shall stir Pity in our hearers by recalling the vicissitudes of fortune; by comparing the prosperity we once enjoyed with our present adversity; by enumerating and explaining the results that will follow for us if we lose the case; by entreating those whose pity we seek to win, and by submitting ourselves to their mercy; by revealing what will befall our parents, children, and other kinsmen through our disgrace, and at the same time showing that we grieve not because of our own straits but because of their anxiety and misery; by disclosing the kindness, humanity, and sympathy we have dispensed to others; by showing that we have ever, or for a long time, been in adverse circumstances; by deploring our fate or bad fortune; by showing that our heart will be brave and patient of adversities. The Appeal to Pity must be brief, for nothing dries more quickly than a tear. In the present Book I have treated virtually the most obscure topics in the whole art of rhetoric; therefore this Book must end here. The remaining rules, so far as seems best, I shall carry over to Book III. If you study the material that I have presented, both with and without me, with care equal to the pains I have taken in assembling it, I, on my part, shall reap the fruit of my labour in your sharing the knowledge with me, and you, on yours, will praise my diligence and rejoice in the learning you have acquired. You will have greater understanding of the precepts of rhetoric, and I shall be more eager to discharge the rest of my task. But that this will be so I know quite well, for I know you well. Let me turn at once to the other rules, so that I may gratify your very proper wish — and this it gives me the greatest pleasure to do.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Invention, 1.100 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.100. res autem inducetur, si alicui rei huiusmodi, legi, loco, urbi, mo- numento oratio attribuetur per enumerationem, hoc modo: quid? si leges loqui possent, nonne haec apud vos quererentur: quidnam amplius desideratis, iudi- ces, cum vobis hoc et hoc planum factum sit? in hoc quoque genere omnibus isdem modis uti licebit. com- mune autem praeceptum hoc datur ad enumerationem, ut ex una quaque argumentatione, quoniam tota iterum dici non potest, id eligatur, quod erit gravissimum, et unum quidque quam brevissime transeatur, ut me- moria, non oratio renovata videatur. Indignatio est oratio, per quam conficitur, ut in aliquem hominem magnum odium aut in rem gravis offensio concitetur. in hoc genere illud primum in- tellegi volumus, posse omnibus ex locis iis, quos in confirmandi praeceptione posuimus, tractari indigna- tionem. nam ex iis rebus, quae personis aut quae negotiis sunt attributae, quaevis amplificationes et indignationes nasci possunt, sed tamen ea, quae se- paratim de indignatione praecipi possunt, considere-
2. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 2.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.47.  Conclusions, among the Greeks called epilogoi, are tripartite, consisting of the Summing Up, Amplification, and Appeal to Pity. We can in four places use a Conclusion: in the Direct Opening, after the Statement of Facts, after the strongest argument, and in the Conclusion of the speech. The Summing Up gathers together and recalls the points we have made — briefly, that the speech may not be repeated in entirety, but that the memory of it may be refreshed; and we shall reproduce all the points in the order in which they have been presented, so that the hearer, if he has committed them to memory, is brought back to what he remembers. Again, we must take care that the Summary should not be carried back to the Introduction or the Statement of Facts. Otherwise the speech will appear to have been fabricated and devised with elaborate pains so as to demonstrate the speaker's skill, advertise his wit, and display his memory. Therefore the Summary must take its beginning from the Division. Then we must in order and briefly set forth the points treated in the Proof and Refutation. Amplification is the principle of using Commonplaces to stir the hearers. To amplify an accusation it will be most advantageous to draw commonplaces from ten formulae.
3. Juvenal, Satires, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. New Testament, Hebrews, 12.14-12.17, 13.1-13.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.14. Follow after peace with all men, and the sanctification without which no man will see the Lord 12.15. looking carefully lest there be any man who falls short of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby the many be defiled; 12.16. lest there be any sexually immoral person, or profane person, as Esau, who sold his birthright for one meal. 12.17. For you know that even when he afterward desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no place for a change of mind though he sought it diligently with tears. 13.1. Let brotherly love continue. 13.2. Don't forget to show hospitality to strangers, for in doing so, some have entertained angels without knowing it. 13.3. Remember those who are in bonds, as bound with them; and those who are ill-treated, since you are also in the body. 13.4. Let marriage be held in honor among all, and let the bed be undefiled: but God will judge the sexually immoral and adulterers. 13.5. Be free from the love of money, content with such things as you have, for he has said, "I will in no way leave you, neither will I in any way forsake you. 13.6. So that with good courage we say, "The Lord is my helper. I will not fear. What can man do to me? 13.7. Remember your leaders, men who spoke to you the word of God, and considering the results of their conduct, imitate their faith. 13.8. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. 13.9. Don't be carried away by various and strange teachings, for it is good that the heart be established by grace, not by food, through which those who were so occupied were not benefited. 13.10. We have an altar from which those who serve the holy tabernacle have no right to eat. 13.11. For the bodies of those animals, whose blood is brought into the holy place by the high priest as an offering for sin, are burned outside of the camp. 13.12. Therefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people through his own blood, suffered outside of the gate. 13.13. Let us therefore go forth to him outside of the camp, bearing his reproach. 13.14. For we don't have here an enduring city, but we seek that which is to come. 13.15. Through him, then, let us offer up a sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of lips which make confession to his name. 13.16. But don't forget to be doing good and sharing, for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. 13.17. Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they watch on behalf of your souls, as those who will give account, that they may do this with joy, and not with groaning, for that would be unprofitable for you. 13.18. Pray for us, for we are persuaded that we have a good conscience, desiring to live honorably in all things. 13.19. I strongly urge you to do this, that I may be restored to you sooner. 13.20. Now may the God of peace, who brought again from the dead the great shepherd of the sheep with the blood of an eternal covet, our Lord Jesus 13.21. make you complete in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is well pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be the glory forever and ever. Amen. 13.22. But I exhort you, brothers, endure the word of exhortation, for I have written to you in few words. 13.23. Know that our brother Timothy has been freed, with whom, if he comes shortly, I will see you. 13.24. Greet all of your leaders and all the saints. The Italians greet you. 13.25. Grace be with you all. Amen.
5. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 3.5, 6.2.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.2.32.  From such impressions arises that ἐνάργεια which Cicero calls illumination and actuality, which makes us seem not so much to narrate as to exhibit the actual scene, while our emotions will be no less actively stirred than if we were present at the actual occurrence. Is it not from visions such as these that Vergil was inspired to write â€” "Sudden her fingers let the shuttle fall And all the thread was spilled


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ammianus marcellinus Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
amplification Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239; Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
apostrophe (exclamatio) Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
asyndeton Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
babylon Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
conmiseratio Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
emotions Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
enargeia Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
enumeratio Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
example Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
exhortation Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
four empire theory Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
italy and italians Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
livy Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
orosius, audience Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
peroratio, asyndeton Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
peroratio, concluding exhortations Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
peroratio, doubling Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
peroratio, metaphorical language Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
peroratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239; Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
poets Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
polybius Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
primary peroratio, vivid description Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 239
refoundation, sack (410)' Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
revenge, satire as Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
rhetorica ad herrenium Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
rhetorical education, and performance of emotions Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27
social war Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
spartacus Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
sulla Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 27; Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
troy Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62
vergil Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 62