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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10023
Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 2.47


nan Conclusions, among the Greeks called epilogoi, are tripartite, consisting of the Summing Up, Amplification, and Appeal to Pity. We can in four places use a Conclusion: in the Direct Opening, after the Statement of Facts, after the strongest argument, and in the Conclusion of the speech. The Summing Up gathers together and recalls the points we have made — briefly, that the speech may not be repeated in entirety, but that the memory of it may be refreshed; and we shall reproduce all the points in the order in which they have been presented, so that the hearer, if he has committed them to memory, is brought back to what he remembers. Again, we must take care that the Summary should not be carried back to the Introduction or the Statement of Facts. Otherwise the speech will appear to have been fabricated and devised with elaborate pains so as to demonstrate the speaker's skill, advertise his wit, and display his memory. Therefore the Summary must take its beginning from the Division. Then we must in order and briefly set forth the points treated in the Proof and Refutation. Amplification is the principle of using Commonplaces to stir the hearers. To amplify an accusation it will be most advantageous to draw commonplaces from ten formulae. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, Topica, 98 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

98. quae autem sequitur consequitur Af narrationem fides, ea persuadendo quoniam efficitur, qui ad persuadendum loci maxime valeant dictum est in eis his codd. : is Af in quibus de omni ratione dicendi. Peroratio autem et et om. AO alia quaedam habet et maxime amplificationem, cuius effectus hic debet esse, ut aut perturbentur animi aut tranquillentur et, si ita adfecti iam ante sint, ut aut augeat eorum motus aut sedet oratio.
2. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 2.49 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.49.  (6) By means of the sixth commonplace we show that the act was done with premeditation, and declare that for an intentional crime there is no excuse, although a rightful plea of mercy is provided for an unpremeditated act. (7) By means of the seventh commonplace we show it is a foul crime, cruel, sacrilegious, and tyrannical; such a crime as the outraging of women, or one of those crimes that incite wars and life-and‑death struggles with enemies of the state. (8) By means of the eighth commonplace we show that it is not a common but a unique crime, base, nefarious, and unheard‑of, and therefore must be the more promptly and drastically avenged. (9) The ninth commonplace consists of comparison of wrongs, as when we shall say it is a more heinous crime to debauch a free-born person than to steal a sacred object, because the one is done from unbridled licentiousness and the other from need. (10) By the tenth commonplace we shall examine sharply, incriminatingly, and precisely, everything that took place in the actual execution of the deed and all the circumstances that usually attend such an act, so that by the enumeration of the attendant circumstances the crime may seem to be taking place and the action to unfold before our eyes.
3. Horace, Sermones, 2.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.8. 2. Now, although I cannot but think that I have already demonstrated, and that abundantly, more than was necessary, that our fathers were not originally Egyptians, nor were thence expelled, either on account of bodily diseases, or any other calamities of that sort 2.8. for Apion hath the impudence to pretend, that “the Jews placed an ass’s head in their holy place;” and he affirms that this was discovered when Antiochus Epiphanes spoiled our temple, and found that ass’s head there made of gold, and worth a great deal of money.
4. Juvenal, Satires, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. New Testament, Hebrews, 4.14-4.16, 12.14-12.17, 13.1-13.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.14. Having then a great high priest, who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold tightly to our confession. 4.15. For we don't have a high priest who can't be touched with the feeling of our infirmities, but one who has been in all points tempted like we are, yet without sin. 4.16. Let us therefore draw near with boldness to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy, and may find grace for help in time of need. 12.14. Follow after peace with all men, and the sanctification without which no man will see the Lord 12.15. looking carefully lest there be any man who falls short of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby the many be defiled; 12.16. lest there be any sexually immoral person, or profane person, as Esau, who sold his birthright for one meal. 12.17. For you know that even when he afterward desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no place for a change of mind though he sought it diligently with tears. 13.1. Let brotherly love continue. 13.2. Don't forget to show hospitality to strangers, for in doing so, some have entertained angels without knowing it. 13.3. Remember those who are in bonds, as bound with them; and those who are ill-treated, since you are also in the body. 13.4. Let marriage be held in honor among all, and let the bed be undefiled: but God will judge the sexually immoral and adulterers. 13.5. Be free from the love of money, content with such things as you have, for he has said, "I will in no way leave you, neither will I in any way forsake you. 13.6. So that with good courage we say, "The Lord is my helper. I will not fear. What can man do to me? 13.7. Remember your leaders, men who spoke to you the word of God, and considering the results of their conduct, imitate their faith. 13.8. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. 13.9. Don't be carried away by various and strange teachings, for it is good that the heart be established by grace, not by food, through which those who were so occupied were not benefited. 13.10. We have an altar from which those who serve the holy tabernacle have no right to eat. 13.11. For the bodies of those animals, whose blood is brought into the holy place by the high priest as an offering for sin, are burned outside of the camp. 13.12. Therefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people through his own blood, suffered outside of the gate. 13.13. Let us therefore go forth to him outside of the camp, bearing his reproach. 13.14. For we don't have here an enduring city, but we seek that which is to come. 13.15. Through him, then, let us offer up a sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of lips which make confession to his name. 13.16. But don't forget to be doing good and sharing, for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. 13.17. Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they watch on behalf of your souls, as those who will give account, that they may do this with joy, and not with groaning, for that would be unprofitable for you. 13.18. Pray for us, for we are persuaded that we have a good conscience, desiring to live honorably in all things. 13.19. I strongly urge you to do this, that I may be restored to you sooner. 13.20. Now may the God of peace, who brought again from the dead the great shepherd of the sheep with the blood of an eternal covet, our Lord Jesus 13.21. make you complete in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is well pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be the glory forever and ever. Amen. 13.22. But I exhort you, brothers, endure the word of exhortation, for I have written to you in few words. 13.23. Know that our brother Timothy has been freed, with whom, if he comes shortly, I will see you. 13.24. Greet all of your leaders and all the saints. The Italians greet you. 13.25. Grace be with you all. Amen.
6. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 6.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
addressee, victimization of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
adviser, satirist as, on clienthood Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
aims, proofs Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225, 226
amplification Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225; Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
anger, conditions for dramatized Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
anger, symptoms of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
apostrophe (exclamatio) Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
conmiseratio Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
covenant Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225
deliberative Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 247
disjointed structure Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 224
emotions Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
enargeia Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
enumeratio Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
epilogue Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 224
exordium, secondary exordium Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225
exposition Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 226
favor Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225, 226
fear, of satiric abuse Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
horace Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
italy and italians Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
lucilius, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
narratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 224
orosius, audience Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
patronage Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
peroratio' Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
peroratio, length Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 247
peroratio, location Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225
peroratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 224, 225, 226, 247
primary peroratio, secondary peroratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 225
primary peroratio Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 224, 225
rhetorica ad herrenium Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
rhetorical theory, emotion in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
sermo, as one-sided Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64
social war Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
spartacus Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
sulla Van Nuffelen, Orosius and the Rhetoric of History (2012) 129
weeping" Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 64