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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10023
Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 1.13-1.14
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 8.73 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.73. Seven nations inhabit the Peloponnese. Two of these are aboriginal and are now settled in the land where they lived in the old days, the Arcadians and Cynurians. One nation, the Achaean, has never left the Peloponnese, but it has left its own country and inhabits another nation's land. ,The four remaining nations of the seven are immigrants, the Dorians and Aetolians and Dryopians and Lemnians. The Dorians have many famous cities, the Aetolians only Elis, the Dryopians Hermione and Asine near Laconian Cardamyle, the Lemnians all the Paroreatae. ,The Cynurians are aboriginal and seem to be the only Ionians, but they have been Dorianized by time and by Argive rule. They are the Orneatae and the perioikoi. All the remaining cities of these seven nations, except those I enumerated, stayed neutral. If I may speak freely, by staying neutral they medized.
2. Xenophon, Hellenica, 6.5.25 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.5.25. But when people had come from Caryae telling of the dearth of men, promising that they would themselves act as guides, and bidding the Thebans slay them if they were found to be practising any deception, and when, further, some of the Perioeci appeared, asking the Thebans to come to their aid, engaging to revolt if only they would show themselves in the land, and saying also that even now the Perioeci when summoned by the Spartiatae were refusing to go and help them — as a result, then, of hearing all these reports, in which all agreed, the Thebans were won over, and pushed in with their own forces by way of Caryae, while the Arcadians went by way of Oeum, in Sciritis.
3. Ennius, Annales, 216 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, On Invention, 1.27, 1.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.27. Narratio est rerum gestarum aut ut gestarum expo- sitio. narrationum genera tria sunt: unum genus est, in quo ipsa causa et omnis ratio controversiae con- tinetur; alterum, in quo digressio aliqua extra causam aut criminationis aut similitudinis aut delectationis non alienae ab eo negotio, quo de agitur, aut amplificationis causa interponitur. tertium genus est remotum a civi- libus causis, quod delectationis causa non inutili cum exercitatione dicitur et scribitur. eius partes sunt duae, quarum altera in negotiis, altera in personis maxime versatur. ea, quae in negotiorum expositione posita est, tres habet partes: fabulam, historiam, argumen- tum. fabula est, in qua nec verae nec veri similes res continentur, cuiusmodi est: Angues ingentes alites, iuncti iugo historia est gesta res, ab aetatis nostrae memoria remota; quod genus: Appius indixit Cartha- giniensibus bellum. argumentum est ficta res, quae tamen fieri potuit. huiusmodi apud Terentium: Nam is postquam excessit ex ephebis, Sosia illa autem narratio, quae versatur in personis, eiusmodi est, ut in ea simul cum rebus ipsis personarum sermones et animi perspici possint, hoc modo: Venit ad me saepe clam it ans: Quid agis, Micio? Cur perdis adulescentem nobis? cur amat? Cur potat? cur tu his rebus sumptum suggeris, Vestitu nimio indulges? nimium ineptus es. Nimium ipse est durus praeter aequumque et bonum. hoc in genere narrationis multa debet inesse festivitas, confecta ex rerum varietate, animorum dissimilitudine, gravitate, lenitate, spe, metu, suspicione, desiderio, dissimulatione, errore, misericordia, fortunae commu- tatione, insperato incommodo, subita laetitia, iucundo exitu rerum. verum haec ex iis, quae postea de elocu- tione praecipientur, ornamenta sumentur. 1.34. Confirmatio est, per quam argumentando nostrae causae fidem et auctoritatem et firmamentum adiungit oratio. huius partis certa sunt praecepta, quae in singula causarum genera dividentur. verumtamen non incommodum videtur quandam silvam atque materiam universam ante permixtim et confuse exponere omnium argumentationum, post autem tradere, quemadmodum unum quodque causae genus hinc omnibus argumen- tandi rationibus tractis confirmari oporteat. Omnes res argumentando confirmantur aut ex eo, quod personis, aut ex eo, quod negotiis est adtributum. Ac personis has res adtributas putamus: nomen, na- turam, victum, fortunam, habitum, affectionem, studia, consilia, facta, casus, orationes. nomen est, quod uni cuique personae datur, quo suo quaeque proprio et certo vocabulo appellatur. naturam ipsam definire difficile est;
5. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 5.12.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Terence, Andria, 51 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 1.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.791 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me
9. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5-1.1.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 4.2.3, 4.2.36, 10.1.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.2.3.  Further they style some statements of facts "complete," and others "incomplete," a distinction which is self-evident. To this they add that our explanation may refer to the past (which is of course the commonest form), the present (for which compare Cicero's remarks about the excitement caused among the friends of Chrysogonus when his name was mentioned), or of the future (a form permissible only to prophets): for hypotyposis or picturesque description cannot be regarded as a statement of facts. 4.2.36.  We shall achieve lucidity and clearness in our statement of facts, first by setting forth our story in words which are appropriate, significant and free from any taint of meanness, but not on the other hand farfetched or unusual, and secondly by giving a distinct account of facts, persons, times, places and causes, while our delivery must be adapted to our matter, so that the judge will take in what we say with the utmost readiness.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneid (vergil) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 5
aetiology Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
apud Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
argumentum, intended for writing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 80
argumentum, truth-content Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 80, 81
argumentum Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 80, 81
artisans Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 80
artless, topics Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 157
caria Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
carya, historicity of sack Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
carya Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
caryatids, function in de architectura Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
caryatids Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 81
ciceromarcus tullius cicero, and historiography Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
citation, from books Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
clodia Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
debrohun, j. b. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
ennius Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
etymology Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
exemplarity Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
fabula Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98; Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 80, 81
fiction Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
genres of latin poetry, comedy Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
genres of latin poetry, epic Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
genres of latin poetry, tragedy Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
heiden, b. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
historia, anceps and triceps Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
historia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 80, 81
historicity, of vitruvian exempla Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
leuctra Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
lucceius Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
maecenas, c. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
medism Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
memoria, relationship with historia Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 5
miller, p. a. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
milnor, kristina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
narratio, topoi Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 157
narratio Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98; Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 157; Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79, 80, 81
oratorical training Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
pacuvius, medus Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
persians Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
relationship of history with memory' Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 5
rhetorica ad herennium Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
rhetorical handbooks Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 157
rhetorical topoi Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 157
sparta Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
sullivan, j. p. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
terence, andria Culík-Baird, Cicero and the Early Latin Poets (2022) 98
thebes Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
tibullus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
triumphs Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
valerius messalla corninus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148
varietas variety or vicissitude Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
varro marcus terentius varro Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 79
vergil (p. vergilius maro), aeneid Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 5
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 81
wyke, m. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 148