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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Anon., Didache, 11.5-11.6
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25 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 10.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10.19. בְּרֹב דְּבָרִים לֹא יֶחְדַּל־פָּשַׁע וְחֹשֵׂךְ שְׂפָתָיו מַשְׂכִּיל׃ 10.19. In the multitude of words there wanteth not transgression; But he that refraineth his lips is wise."
2. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 49.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

49.1. לֹא יִרְעָבוּ וְלֹא יִצְמָאוּ וְלֹא־יַכֵּם שָׁרָב וָשָׁמֶשׁ כִּי־מְרַחֲמָם יְנַהֲגֵם וְעַל־מַבּוּעֵי מַיִם יְנַהֲלֵם׃ 49.1. שִׁמְעוּ אִיִּים אֵלַי וְהַקְשִׁיבוּ לְאֻמִּים מֵרָחוֹק יְהוָה מִבֶּטֶן קְרָאָנִי מִמְּעֵי אִמִּי הִזְכִּיר שְׁמִי׃ 49.1. Listen, O isles, unto me, And hearken, ye peoples, from far: The LORD hath called me from the womb, From the bowels of my mother hath He made mention of my name;"
3. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 1.5 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.5. בְּטֶרֶם אצורך [אֶצָּרְךָ] בַבֶּטֶן יְדַעְתִּיךָ וּבְטֶרֶם תֵּצֵא מֵרֶחֶם הִקְדַּשְׁתִּיךָ נָבִיא לַגּוֹיִם נְתַתִּיךָ׃ 1.5. Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee, And before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee; I have appointed thee a prophet unto the nations."
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

130. And we must understand in the case of every thing else which is decided on by the external senses, there were elder forms and motions previously existing, according to which the things which were created were fashioned and measured out. For although Moses did not describe everything collectively, but only a part of what existed, as he was desirous of brevity, beyond all men that ever wrote, still the few things which he has mentioned are examples of the nature of all, for nature perfects none of those which are perceptible to the outward senses without an incorporeal model. XLV.
5. Anon., Didache, 2.2, 3.1, 4.1, 4.9, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.1, 7.1-10.7, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 9.1-10.7, 9.4, 10.5, 11, 11.1, 11.1-15.4, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 11.6, 11.7, 11.8, 11.9, 11.10, 11.11, 11.12, 12, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 13, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 13.5, 13.6, 13.7, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 9.13, 12.28, 16.1-16.12, 16.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.13. Don't you know that those who serve around sacred thingseat from the things of the temple, and those who wait on the altar havetheir portion with the altar? 12.28. God has set some in the assembly: first apostles, secondprophets, third teachers, then miracle workers, then gifts of healings,helps, governments, and various kinds of languages. 16.1. Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I commandedthe assemblies of Galatia, you do likewise. 16.2. On the first day ofthe week, let each one of you save, as he may prosper, that nocollections be made when I come. 16.3. When I arrive, I will sendwhoever you approve with letters to carry your gracious gift toJerusalem. 16.4. If it is appropriate for me to go also, they will gowith me. 16.5. But I will come to you when I have passed throughMacedonia, for I am passing through Macedonia. 16.6. But with you itmay be that I will stay, or even winter, that you may send me on myjourney wherever I go. 16.7. For I do not wish to see you now inpassing, but I hope to stay a while with you, if the Lord permits. 16.8. But I will stay at Ephesus until Pentecost 16.9. for a greatand effective door has opened to me, and there are many adversaries. 16.10. Now if Timothy comes, see that he is with you without fear, forhe does the work of the Lord, as I also do. 16.11. Therefore let noone despise him. But set him forward on his journey in peace, that hemay come to me; for I expect him with the brothers. 16.12. Now concerning Apollos, the brother, I begged him much tocome to you with the brothers; and it was not at all his desire to comenow; but he will come when he has an opportunity. 16.19. The assemblies of Asia greet you. Aquila and Priscilla greetyou much in the Lord, together with the assembly that is in theirhouse.
8. New Testament, 2 John, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 9.1-9.3, 9.5, 11.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 4.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.19. Greet Prisca and Aquila, and the house of Onesiphorus.
11. New Testament, Acts, 4.36-4.37, 6.5, 8.1, 8.4, 8.14, 11.27-11.28, 13.1, 15.29, 18.2, 18.18, 18.26, 21.10-21.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.36. Joses, who by the apostles was surnamed Barnabas (which is, being interpreted, Son of Exhortation), a Levite, a man of Cyprus by race 4.37. having a field, sold it, and brought the money and laid it at the apostles' feet. 6.5. These words pleased the whole multitude. They chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch; 8.1. Saul was consenting to his death. A great persecution arose against the assembly which was in Jerusalem in that day. They were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except for the apostles. 8.4. Therefore those who were scattered abroad went around preaching the word. 8.14. Now when the apostles who were at Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent Peter and John to them 11.27. Now in these days, prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. 11.28. One of them named Agabus stood up, and indicated by the Spirit that there should be a great famine over all the world, which also happened in the days of Claudius. 13.1. Now in the assembly that was at Antioch there were some prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul. 15.29. that you abstain from things sacrificed to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality, from which if you keep yourselves, it will be well with you. Farewell. 18.2. He found a certain Jew named Aquila, a man of Pontus by race, who had recently come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to depart from Rome. He came to them 18.18. Paul, having stayed after this yet many days, took his leave of the brothers, and sailed from there for Syria, with Priscilla and Aquila with him. He shaved his head in Cenchreae, for he had a vow. 18.26. He began to speak boldly in the synagogue. But when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him aside, and explained to him the way of God more accurately. 21.10. As we stayed there some days, a certain prophet named Agabus came down from Judea. 21.11. Coming to us, and taking Paul's belt, he bound his own feet and hands, and said, "Thus says the Holy Spirit: 'So will the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and will deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.'
12. New Testament, Apocalypse, 2.15-2.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.15. So you also have some who hold to the teaching of the Nicolaitans in the same way. 2.16. Repent therefore, or else I am coming to you quickly, and I will make war against them with the sword of my mouth. 2.17. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the assemblies. To him who overcomes, to him I will give of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone, and on the stone a new name written, which no one knows but he who receives it. 2.18. To the angel of the assembly in Thyatira write: "The Son of God, who has his eyes like a flame of fire, and his feet are like burnished brass, says these things: 2.19. I know your works, your love, faith, service, patient endurance, and that your last works are more than the first. 2.20. But I have this against you, that you tolerate your woman, Jezebel, who calls herself a prophetess. She teaches and seduces my servants to commit sexual immorality, and to eat things sacrificed to idols.
13. New Testament, Galatians, 1.15-1.16, 2.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.15. Butwhen it was the good pleasure of God, who separated me from my mother'swomb, and called me through his grace 1.16. to reveal his Son in me,that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I didn't immediately conferwith flesh and blood 2.13. And the rest of the Jews joined him in his hypocrisy; so that evenBarnabas was carried away with their hypocrisy.
14. New Testament, Romans, 15.24, 16.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.24. whenever I journey to Spain, I will come to you. For I hope to see you on my journey, and to be helped on my way there by you, if first I may enjoy your company for a while. 16.3. Greet Prisca and Aquila, my fellow workers in Christ Jesus
15. New Testament, John, 4.44 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.44. For Jesus himself testified that a prophet has no honor in his own country.
16. New Testament, Luke, 9.1-9.11, 10.1-10.12, 12.49-12.53, 13.33, 14.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.1. He called the twelve together, and gave them power and authority over all demons, and to cure diseases. 9.2. He sent them forth to preach the Kingdom of God, and to heal the sick. 9.3. He said to them, "Take nothing for your journey -- neither staffs, nor wallet, nor bread, nor money; neither have two coats apiece. 9.4. Into whatever house you enter, stay there, and depart from there. 9.5. As many as don't receive you, when you depart from that city, shake off even the dust from your feet for a testimony against them. 9.6. They departed, and went throughout the villages, preaching the gospel, and healing everywhere. 9.7. Now Herod the tetrarch heard of all that was done by him; and he was very perplexed, because it was said by some that John had risen from the dead 9.8. and by some that Elijah had appeared, and by others that one of the old prophets had risen again. 9.9. Herod said, "John I beheaded, but who is this, about whom I hear such things?" He sought to see him. 9.10. The apostles, when they had returned, told him what things they had done. He took them, and withdrew apart to a deserted place of a city called Bethsaida. 9.11. But the multitudes, perceiving it, followed him. He welcomed them, and spoke to them of the Kingdom of God, and he cured those who needed healing. 10.1. Now after these things, the Lord also appointed seventy others, and sent them two by two before his face into every city and place, where he was about to come. 10.2. Then he said to them, "The harvest is indeed plentiful, but the laborers are few. Pray therefore to the Lord of the harvest, that he may send out laborers into his harvest. 10.3. Go your ways. Behold, I send you out as lambs among wolves. 10.4. Carry no purse, nor wallet, nor sandals. Greet no one on the way. 10.5. Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace be to this house.' 10.6. If a son of peace is there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you. 10.7. Remain in that same house, eating and drinking the things they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Don't go from house to house. 10.8. Into whatever city you enter, and they receive you, eat the things that are set before you. 10.9. Heal the sick who are therein, and tell them, 'The Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.10. But into whatever city you enter, and they don't receive you, go out into the streets of it and say 10.11. 'Even the dust from your city that clings to us, we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.12. I tell you, it will be more tolerable in that day for Sodom than for that city. 12.49. I came to throw fire on the earth. I wish it were already kindled. 12.50. But I have a baptism to be baptized with, and how distressed I am until it is accomplished! 12.51. Do you think that I have come to give peace in the earth? I tell you, no, but rather division. 12.52. For from now on, there will be five in one house divided, three against two, and two against three. 12.53. They will be divided, father against son, and son against father; mother against daughter, and daughter against her mother; mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law, and daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. 13.33. Nevertheless I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the next day, for it can't be that a prophet perish outside of Jerusalem.' 14.26. If anyone comes to me, and doesn't hate his own father, mother, wife, children, brothers, and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he can't be my disciple.
17. New Testament, Mark, 1.16-1.20, 6.4-6.56, 10.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.16. Passing along by the sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net in the sea, for they were fishermen. 1.17. Jesus said to them, "Come after me, and I will make you into fishers for men. 1.18. Immediately they left their nets, and followed him. 1.19. Going on a little further from there, he saw James the son of Zebedee, and John, his brother, who were also in the boat mending the nets. 1.20. Immediately he called them, and they left their father, Zebedee, in the boat with the hired servants, and went after him. 6.4. Jesus said to them, "A prophet is not without honor, except in his own country, and among his own relatives, and in his own house. 6.5. He could do no mighty work there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick folk, and healed them. 6.6. He marveled because of their unbelief. He went around the villages teaching. 6.7. He called to himself the twelve, and began to send them out two by two; and he gave them authority over the unclean spirits. 6.8. He charged them that they should take nothing for their journey, except a staff only: no bread, no wallet, no money in their purse 6.9. but to wear sandals, and not put on two tunics. 6.10. He said to them, "Wherever you enter into a house, stay there until you depart from there. 6.11. Whoever will not receive you nor hear you, as you depart from there, shake off the dust that is under your feet for a testimony against them. Assuredly, I tell you, it will be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city! 6.12. They went out and preached that people should repent. 6.13. They cast out many demons, and anointed many with oil who were sick, and healed them. 6.14. King Herod heard this, for his name had become known, and he said, "John the Baptizer has risen from the dead, and therefore these powers are at work in him. 6.15. But others said, "It is Elijah." Others said, "It is the Prophet, or like one of the prophets. 6.16. But Herod, when he heard this, said, "This is John, whom I beheaded. He has risen from the dead. 6.17. For Herod himself had sent out and arrested John, and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife, for he had married her. 6.18. For John said to Herod, "It is not lawful for you to have your brother's wife. 6.19. Herodias set herself against him, and desired to kill him, but she couldn't 6.20. for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and kept him safe. When he heard him, he did many things, and he heard him gladly. 6.21. Then a convenient day came, that Herod on his birthday made a supper for his nobles, the high officers, and the chief men of Galilee. 6.22. When the daughter of Herodias herself came in and danced, she pleased Herod and those sitting with him. The king said to the young lady, "Ask me whatever you want, and I will give it to you. 6.23. He swore to her, "Whatever you shall ask of me, I will give you, up to half of my kingdom. 6.24. She went out, and said to her mother, "What shall I ask?"She said, "The head of John the Baptizer. 6.25. She came in immediately with haste to the king, and asked, "I want you to give me right now the head of John the Baptizer on a platter. 6.26. The king was exceedingly sorry, but for the sake of his oaths, and of his dinner guests, he didn't wish to refuse her. 6.27. Immediately the king sent out a soldier of his guard, and commanded to bring John's head, and he went and beheaded him in the prison 6.28. and brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the young lady; and the young lady gave it to her mother. 6.29. When his disciples heard this, they came and took up his corpse, and laid it in a tomb. 6.30. The apostles gathered themselves together to Jesus, and they told him all things, whatever they had done, and whatever they had taught. 6.31. He said to them, "You come apart into a deserted place, and rest awhile." For there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat. 6.32. They went away in the boat to a desert place by themselves. 6.33. They saw them going, and many recognized him and ran there on foot from all the cities. They arrived before them and came together to him. 6.34. Jesus came out, saw a great multitude, and he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he began to teach them many things. 6.35. When it was late in the day, his disciples came to him, and said, "This place is deserted, and it is late in the day. 6.36. Send them away, that they may go into the surrounding country and villages, and buy themselves bread, for they have nothing to eat. 6.37. But he answered them, "You give them something to eat."They asked him, "Shall we go and buy two hundred denarii worth of bread, and give them something to eat? 6.38. He said to them, "How many loaves do you have? Go see."When they knew, they said, "Five, and two fish. 6.39. He commanded them that everyone should sit down in groups on the green grass. 6.40. They sat down in ranks, by hundreds and by fifties. 6.41. He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, he blessed and broke the loaves, and he gave to his disciples to set before them, and he divided the two fish among them all. 6.42. They all ate, and were filled. 6.43. They took up twelve baskets full of broken pieces and also of the fish. 6.44. Those who ate the loaves were five thousand men. 6.45. Immediately he made his disciples get into the boat, and to go ahead to the other side, to Bethsaida, while he himself sent the multitude away. 6.46. After he had taken leave of them, he went up the mountain to pray. 6.47. When evening had come, the boat was in the midst of the sea, and he was alone on the land. 6.48. Seeing them distressed in rowing, for the wind was contrary to them, about the fourth watch of the night he came to them, walking on the sea, and he would have passed by them 6.49. but they, when they saw him walking on the sea, supposed that it was a ghost, and cried out; 6.50. for they all saw him, and were troubled. But he immediately spoke with them, and said to them, "Cheer up! It is I! Don't be afraid. 6.51. He got into the boat with them; and the wind ceased, and they were very amazed among themselves, and marveled; 6.52. for they hadn't understood about the loaves, but their hearts were hardened. 6.53. When they had crossed over, they came to land at Gennesaret, and moored to the shore. 6.54. When they had come out of the boat, immediately the people recognized him 6.55. and ran around that whole region, and began to bring those who were sick, on their mats, to where they heard he was. 6.56. Wherever he entered, into villages, or into cities, or into the country, they laid the sick in the marketplaces, and begged him that they might touch just the fringe of his garment; and as many as touched him were made well. 10.28. Peter began to tell him, "Behold, we have left all, and have followed you.
18. New Testament, Matthew, 6.1-6.18, 8.20-8.22, 10.1-10.16, 11.29-11.30, 23.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.1. Be careful that you don't do your charitable giving before men, to be seen by them, or else you have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. 6.2. Therefore when you do merciful deeds, don't sound a trumpet before yourself, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may get glory from men. Most assuredly I tell you, they have received their reward. 6.3. But when you do merciful deeds, don't let your left hand know what your right hand does 6.4. so that your merciful deeds may be in secret, then your Father who sees in secret will reward you openly. 6.5. When you pray, you shall not be as the hypocrites, for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen by men. Most assuredly, I tell you, they have received their reward. 6.6. But you, when you pray, enter into your inner chamber, and having shut your door, pray to your Father who is in secret, and your Father who sees in secret will reward you openly. 6.7. In praying, don't use vain repetitions, as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard for their much speaking. 6.8. Therefore don't be like them, for your Father knows what things you need, before you ask him. 6.9. Pray like this: 'Our Father in heaven, may your name be kept holy. 6.10. Let your kingdom come. Let your will be done, as in heaven, so on earth. 6.11. Give us today our daily bread. 6.12. Forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors. 6.13. Bring us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one. For yours is the kingdom, the power, and the glory forever. Amen.' 6.14. For if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. 6.15. But if you don't forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. 6.16. Moreover when you fast, don't be like the hypocrites, with sad faces. For they disfigure their faces, that they may be seen by men to be fasting. Most assuredly I tell you, they have received their reward. 6.17. But you, when you fast, anoint your head, and wash your face; 6.18. so that you are not seen by men to be fasting, but by your Father who is in secret, and your Father, who sees in secret, will reward you. 8.20. Jesus said to him, "The foxes have holes, and the birds of the sky have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head. 8.21. Another of his disciples said to him, "Lord, allow me first to go and bury my father. 8.22. But Jesus said to him, "Follow me, and leave the dead to bury their own dead. 10.1. He called to himself his twelve disciples, and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to heal every disease and every sickness. 10.2. Now the names of the twelve apostles are these. The first, Simon, who is called Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the son of Zebedee; John, his brother; 10.3. Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew the tax collector; James the son of Alphaeus; and Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus; 10.4. Simon the Canaanite; and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him. 10.5. Jesus sent these twelve out, and charged them, saying, "Don't go among the Gentiles, and don't enter into any city of the Samaritans. 10.6. Rather, go to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. 10.7. As you go, preach, saying, 'The Kingdom of Heaven is at hand!' 10.8. Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, and cast out demons. Freely you received, so freely give. 10.9. Don't take any gold, nor silver, nor brass in your money belts. 10.10. Take no bag for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the laborer is worthy of his food. 10.11. Into whatever city or village you enter, find out who in it is worthy; and stay there until you go on. 10.12. As you enter into the household, greet it. 10.13. If the household is worthy, let your peace come on it, but if it isn't worthy, let your peace return to you. 10.14. Whoever doesn't receive you, nor hear your words, as you go out out of that house or that city, shake off the dust from your feet. 10.15. Most assuredly I tell you, it will be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city. 10.16. Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves. Therefore be wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. 11.29. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am humble and lowly in heart; and you will find rest for your souls. 11.30. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. 23.35. that on you may come all the righteous blood shed on the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zachariah son of Barachiah, whom you killed between the sanctuary and the altar.
19. Hermas, Mandates, 11.1-11.2, 11.4, 11.7, 11.11-11.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Justin, First Apology, 14.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Thomas, 42, 14 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 14 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. Ambrose, Enarrationes In Xii Paslmos, 36.28 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

25. Anon., Gospel of Thomas, 42, 14



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambrose Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
apostle, in the didache Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 118, 119
apostle Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 91
apostles Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
authority, christian sources, early, role of non-intellectual authority in Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
authority, prophetic or revelatory Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
authority Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
babble / babbling Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
bishop, as heir to teachers Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 135
brachylogy Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
brevity Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270; Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
christian, authors Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
christian, early Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
clement of alexandria Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
concision Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
didache, and baptism Bird and Harrower, The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers (2021) 252
didache, and church order Bird and Harrower, The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers (2021) 167
didache, structure Bird and Harrower, The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers (2021) 251, 254
didache, use of luke Bird and Harrower, The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers (2021) 251
didache Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167; Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26, 27; Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 117, 118, 119, 135; Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
disciples, of jesus Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
ecclesia, hospitality Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
false prophet Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 119
gentiles, judaism, interest in Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
gentiles Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
graeco-roman, world Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
hairesis Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 27
hospitality, ecclesia Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
ignatius of antioch, on terminology for heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 27
imitation motif Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
in the morning Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 91
interest in, on prophetic authority Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
itinerancy Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
jesus, as teacher Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 135
jesus Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
jesus christ Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
jesus movement Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
jewish christianity Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26, 27
judaism, gentile interest in Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
justin Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
kretschmar, g. Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 118
lucian Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
marcus aurelius Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
money Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
moral / morality, graeco-roman Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
moses Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
paul, on prophetic authority Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
peshitta Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
philo Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
piety / pious Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
plato Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
plotinus Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
plutarch Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
prayers Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
prophet' Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 91
prophet, in the didache Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 135
prophetic or revelatory authority, use of, in early christian sources Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
prophets, false Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
pythagorean / pythagoreans, tradition Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
pythagorean / pythagoreans Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
qumran sect and texts Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167
sextus sotidius strabo libuscidianus Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
shepherd of hermas Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 167; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
son as christological title Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
sunday Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 91
synoptic gospels Tite, Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (2009) 271
syria–palestine Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 119
teacher, gender of Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 135
teacher, relationship to bishops Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 135
teacher, διδάσκαλος Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 117
travel, missionary activity Nasrallah, Archaeology and the Letters of Paul (2019) 102
true prophet Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
verbosity Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
vulgate Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 270
wordiness Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 152
χριστέμπορος Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26, 27