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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



484
Anon., Avot Derabbi Nathan A, 41
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1. Tosefta, Bava Metzia, 3.25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Palestinian Talmud, Taanit, 4.1 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3. Babylonian Talmud, Kiddushin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

69a. With regard to bone who says to hispregt Canaanite bmaidservant: You are hereby a free woman but your offspringshall remain ba slave, the offspring isemancipated blike her.This is bthe statement of Rabbi Yosei HaGelili. And the Rabbis say:The master’s bstatement is upheld, because it is stated: “The wife and her children shall be her master’s”(Exodus 21:4).,The Gemara expresses surprise at this ruling: bWhat is thebiblical bderivationhere? How do the Rabbis learn from here that the child of an emancipated maidservant remains a slave in this case? bRava said:The proof from the verse beginning with: “The wife and her children,” is not the source of the opinion of the Rabbis. Rather, this is referring btothe statement bof Rabbi Yosei HaGelili,who claims that the children follow their mother, as indicated by this verse. Consequently, if she is emancipated, her offspring do not retain the status of slaves., strongMISHNA: /strong bRabbi Tarfon says: iMamzerimcan be purified,so that their offspring will not be imamzerim /i. bHow so?With regard to ba imamzerwho marrieda Canaanite bmaidservant,their boffspring is a slave.If his master subsequently bemancipates him,that bson is foundto be ba freeman,rather than a imamzer /i. bRabbi Eliezer says:This method is not effective, as bthisson bis a imamzerslave. /b, strongGEMARA: /strong bA dilemma was raised beforethe Sages: Did bRabbi Tarfon statehis ihalakha bab initio/i b,i.e., a imamzeris permitted to marry a maidservant, bordid bhe stateit only bafter the fact,but he does not permit a imamzerto marry a maidservant iab initio /i? The Gemara answers: bComeand bhearproof from a ibaraita /i: The other Sages bsaid to Rabbi Tarfon: You havethereby bpurified the maleoffspring of a imamzer /i, bbut you have not purified the femalechildren of imamzerim /i, as your solution does not apply to them.,The Gemara explains the apparent proof from this ibaraita /i. bAnd if you saythat Rabbi Tarfon bstatedhis ihalakha bab initio/i and permitted a imamzerto marry a Canaanite maidservant, ba imamzeretshould alsobe allowed to bmarrya Canaanite bslaveand her child can then be emancipated as well. The Gemara answers: bA slave has no lineage.Even if she were to marry a slave, their child would not be considered his, but would be a Jewish imamzerlike her. Consequently, this source provides no proof with regard to the Gemara’s question.,The Gemara further suggests: bComeand bhear, as Rabbi Simlai’s host was a imamzer /i, andRabbi Simlai bsaid to him: Had Ifound out about your status bearlier,before you married and had children, bI would have purified your sonsby advising you to marry a Canaanite maidservant, as suggested by Rabbi Tarfon. The Gemara explains the proof: bGranted, if you saythat Rabbi Tarfon spoke iab initio /i,it is bwellthat Rabbi Simlai would suggest this. bBut if you saythat he meant only that this method is effective bafter the fact, what wasthe advice that Rabbi Simlai would have given his host?,The Gemara answers bthatRabbi Simlai would have badvised him by saying: Go steal, and be sold as a Hebrew slave,which would mean you could marry a Canaanite maidservant and your offspring would be slaves. The Gemara asks: bBut in the days of Rabbi Simlai, wasthe ihalakhaof ba Hebrew slaveobserved in practice? bBut didn’t the Master say:The ihalakhaof ba Hebrew slave is practiced only when the JubileeYear bis practiced,and Rabbi Simlai lived many years after the observance of the Jubilee Year ceased. bRather, isn’t itcorrect to bconclude fromit that bRabbi Tarfon spoke iab initio /i,i.e., it is permitted for a imamzerto marry a Canaanite maidservant? The Gemara affirms: Indeed, bconclude fromthe ibaraitathat this is the case. bRav Yehuda saysthat bShmuel says:The ihalakha /iis bin accordance withthe opinion of bRabbi Tarfon. /b,§ The mishna teaches that bRabbi Eliezer says: Thisson bis a imamzerslave. Rabbi Elazar said: What is the reason of Rabbi Eliezer? As the verse stateswith regard to a imamzer /i: “Even to the tenth generation none bof hisshall enter the assembly of the Lord” (Deuteronomy 23:3), which indicates that in the case of the child of a imamzerand a Canaanite maidservant, one bfollows hisparent with the bflawedlineage, and the child is a imamzer /i.,The Gemara asks: bAndhow do bthe Rabbis,i.e., Rabbi Tarfon, respond to this claim? Rabbi Tarfon maintains bthatthis verse is referring bto a Jewof unflawed lineage bwho married a imamzeret /i.It might benter your mind to saythat as bit is written: “By their families, by their fathers’ houses”(Numbers 4:2), the child should follow his father’s lineage rather than that of his mother. Therefore, the term b“of his”in the previously cited verse bcomes to exclude himfrom his father’s lineage, as it indicates that his lineage follows his mother when she is a imamzeret /i., bAndhow does bRabbi Eliezerrespond to this claim? Is it bnotthe case that beven thoughthe Torah bwrote: “By their families, by their fathers’ houses,”nevertheless, the term b“of his” comes and excludes him? Here too, although it is written: “The wife and her children shall be her master’s”(Exodus 21:4), from which it is derived that the child of a Canaanite maidservant is like her, nevertheless the term b“of his” comes and excludes him. Andhow do bthe Rabbis,Rabbi Tarfon, respond to this claim? They say: bAny offspring in the womb of a Canaanite maidservant is considered like the offspring in an animal’s womb.Consequently, her children do not inherit the father’s status, even if his is the flawed lineage.,, strongMISHNA: /strong There were btencategories of blineage,with varying restrictions on marriage, among the Jews who bascended from Babyloniato Eretz Yisrael with Ezra before the building of the Second Temple. They are as follows: bPriests; Levites; Israelites; priests disqualified due to flawed lineage [ iḥalalim /i]; converts, and emancipated slaves; imamzerim /i; Gibeonites,i.e., the descendants of the Gibeonites who converted in the time of Joshua; bchildren of unknown paternity [ ishetuki /i]; and foundlings. /b,The mishna proceeds to detail their ihalakhot /i: With regard to bpriests, Levites, and Israelites,it is bpermittedfor men and women in these categories bto marry one another.With regard to bLeviteswho are not priests, bIsraelites, iḥalalim /i, converts, and emancipated slaves,it is bpermittedfor men and women in these categories bto marry one another. /b,With regard to bconverts, and emancipated slaves, imamzerim /i, and Gibeonites, children of unknown paternity [ ishetuki /i], and foundlings,it is bpermittedfor ball ofthe men and women in these categories bto marry one another. And these arethe last two categories: bA ishetuki /iis banyperson bwho knowsthe identity of bhis mother but does not knowthe identity of bhis father. A foundlingis banyone who was collected from the marketplace and doesn’t knowthe identity of his parents, bneitherthat of bhis father northat of bhis mother.These two categories are people whose status is uncertain; they may be imamzerim /i. bAbba Shaul would call a ishetuki /iby the label of ibeduki /i. /b, strongGEMARA: /strong The mishna teaches: There were btencategories of blineageamong the Jews who bascended from Babylonia.The Gemara asks: bWhy doesthe itanna bspecifically teachthe phrase: bAscended from Babylonia?Why was it important for the itannato specify their place of origin? bLet him teachthat they bwent to Eretz Yisrael.The Gemara answers: bHe teaches us a matter in passing, as it is taughtin a ibaraita /i: The verse states: b“And you shall arise and go up to the place that the Lord, your God, shall choose”(Deuteronomy 17:8). This bteaches that the Temple is higher than all of Eretz Yisrael,which is why the verse speaks of ascending from the cities of Eretz Yisrael to the Temple. bAndit teaches that bEretz Yisrael is higher than all of the lands. /b,The Gemara asks: bGranted, the Temple is higher than all of Eretz Yisrael. This isderived from bthat which is written: /b
4. Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

91b. בכורות נאות והושיב בו שני שומרים אחד חיגר ואחד סומא אמר לו חיגר לסומא בכורות נאות אני רואה בפרדס בא והרכיבני ונביאם לאכלם רכב חיגר על גבי סומא והביאום ואכלום,לימים בא בעל פרדס אמר להן בכורות נאות היכן הן אמר לו חיגר כלום יש לי רגלים להלך בהן אמר לו סומא כלום יש לי עינים לראות מה עשה הרכיב חיגר על גבי סומא ודן אותם כאחד,אף הקב"ה מביא נשמה וזורקה בגוף ודן אותם כאחד שנאמר (תהלים נ, ד) יקרא אל השמים מעל ואל הארץ לדין עמו יקרא אל השמים מעל זו נשמה ואל הארץ לדין עמו זה הגוף:,א"ל אנטונינוס לרבי מפני מה חמה יוצאה במזרח ושוקעת במערב א"ל אי הוה איפכא נמי הכי הוה אמרת לי א"ל הכי קאמינא לך מפני מה שוקעת במערב,א"ל כדי ליתן שלום לקונה שנאמר (נחמיה ט, ו) וצבא השמים לך משתחוים א"ל ותיתי עד פלגא דרקיע ותתן שלמא ותיעול משום פועלים ומשום עוברי דרכים,וא"ל אנטונינוס לרבי נשמה מאימתי ניתנה באדם משעת פקידה או משעת יצירה א"ל משעת יצירה א"ל אפשר חתיכה של בשר עומדת שלשה ימים בלא מלח ואינה מסרחת אלא משעת פקידה אמר רבי דבר זה למדני אנטונינוס ומקרא מסייעו שנאמר (איוב י, יב) ופקודתך שמרה רוחי,ואמר ליה אנטונינוס לרבי מאימתי יצה"ר שולט באדם משעת יצירה או משעת יציאה א"ל משעת יצירה א"ל א"כ בועט במעי אמו ויוצא אלא משעת יציאה אמר רבי דבר זה למדני אנטונינוס ומקרא מסייעו שנאמר (בראשית ד, ז) לפתח חטאת רובץ,ר"ל רמי כתיב (ירמיהו לא, ח) בם עור ופסח הרה ויולדת יחדו וכתיב (ישעיהו לה, ו) אז ידלג כאיל פסח ותרון לשון אלם כי נבקעו במדבר מים ונחלים בערבה הא כיצד עומדין במומן ומתרפאין,עולא רמי כתיב (ישעיהו כה, ח) בלע המות לנצח ומחה ה' דמעה מעל כל פנים וכתיב (ישעיהו סה, כ) כי הנער בן מאה שנה ימות לא יהיה משם עוד עול ימים לא קשיא כאן בישראל כאן בעובדי כוכבים ועובדי כוכבים מאי בעו התם הנך דכתיב בהו (ישעיהו סא, ה) ועמדו זרים ורעו צאנכם ובני נכר אכריכם וכורמיכם,רב חסדא רמי כתיב (ישעיהו כד, כג) וחפרה הלבנה ובושה החמה כי מלך ה' צבאות וכתיב (ישעיהו ל, כו) והיה אור הלבנה כאור החמה ואור החמה יהיה שבעתים כאור שבעת הימים לא קשיא כאן לימות המשיח כאן לעוה"ב,ולשמואל דאמר אין בין העוה"ז לימות המשיח אלא שיעבוד גליות בלבד לא קשיא כאן במחנה צדיקים כאן במחנה שכינה,רבא רמי כתיב (דברים לב, לט) אני אמית ואחיה וכתיב (דברים לב, לט) מחצתי ואני ארפא אמר הקב"ה מה שאני ממית אני מחיה והדר מה שמחצתי ואני ארפא,ת"ר אני אמית ואחיה יכול שתהא מיתה באחד וחיים באחד כדרך שהעולם נוהג ת"ל מחצתי ואני ארפא מה מחיצה ורפואה באחד אף מיתה וחיים באחד מיכן תשובה לאומרין אין תחיית המתים מן התורה,תניא אמר רבי מאיר מניין לתחיית המתים מן התורה שנאמר (שמות טו, א) אז ישיר משה ובני ישראל את השירה הזאת לה' שר לא נאמר אלא ישיר מכאן לתחיית המתים מן התורה כיוצא בדבר אתה אומר (יהושע ח, ל) אז יבנה יהושע מזבח לה' בנה לא נאמר אלא יבנה מכאן לתחיית המתים מן התורה,אלא מעתה (מלכים א יא, ז) אז יבנה שלמה במה לכמוש שקוץ מואב הכי נמי דיבנה אלא מעלה עליו הכתוב כאילו בנה,א"ר יהושע בן לוי מניין לתחיית המתים מן התורה שנאמר (תהלים פד, ה) אשרי יושבי ביתך עוד יהללוך סלה היללוך לא נאמר אלא יהללוך מכאן לתחיית המתים מן התורה וא"ר יהושע בן לוי כל האומר שירה בעוה"ז זוכה ואומרה לעולם הבא שנאמר אשרי יושבי ביתך עוד יהללוך סלה,א"ר חייא בר אבא א"ר יוחנן מניין לתחיית המתים מן התורה שנאמר (ישעיהו נב, ח) קול צופיך נשאו קול יחדו ירננו וגו' ריננו לא נאמר אלא ירננו מכאן לתחיית המתים מן התורה וא"ר חייא בר אבא א"ר יוחנן עתידין כל הנביאים כולן אומרים שירה בקול אחד שנאמר קול צופיך נשאו קול יחדו ירננו,אמר רב יהודה אמר רב כל המונע הלכה מפי תלמיד כאילו גוזלו מנחלת אבותיו שנאמר (דברים לג, ד) תורה צוה לנו משה מורשה קהילת יעקב מורשה היא לכל ישראל מששת ימי בראשית אמר רב חנא בר ביזנא אמר רבי שמעון חסידא כל המונע הלכה מפי תלמיד אפילו עוברין שבמעי אמו מקללין אותו שנאמר (משלי יא, כו) מונע בר 91b. bfine first fruitsof a fig tree, band he stationed two guards inthe orchard, bone lame,who was unable to walk, band one blind.Neither was capable of reaching the fruit on the trees in the orchard without the assistance of the other. bThe lameperson bsaid to the blindperson: bI see fine first fruitsof a fig tree bin the orchard; come and place meupon your shoulders. I will guide you to the tree, band we will bringthe figs bto eat them. The lameperson brode uponthe shoulders of bthe blindperson band they broughtthe figs band ate them. /b, bSometimelater bthe owner of the orchard cameto the orchard. bHe said tothe guards: bThe fine first fruitsof a fig tree that were in the orchard, bwhere are they? The lameperson bsaid: Do I have any legs with whichI would be able bto walkand take the figs? bThe blindperson bsaid: Do I have any eyeswith which I would be able bto seethe way to the figs? bWhat didthe owner of the orchard bdo? He placed the lameperson buponthe shoulders of bthe blindperson just as they did when they stole the figs, band he judged them as one. /b, bSo too, the Holy One, Blessed be He, brings the soulon the day of judgment band casts itback binto the body,as they were when they sinned, band He judges them as one, as it is stated: “He calls to the heavens above and to the earth that He may judge His people”(Psalms 50:4). b“He calls to the heavens above”; this is the soul,which is heavenly. b“And to the earth that He may judge His people”; this is the body,which is earthly.,The Gemara relates another exchange. bAntoninos said to RabbiYehuda HaNasi: bFor whatreason bdoes the sun emerge in the east and set in the west?Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bsaid to him: If it were the reverse, you would have also said that to me,as the sun must emerge from one direction and set in the other. Antoninos bsaid to him: This is what I am saying to you: For whatreason bdoesthe sun bset in the westand not occasionally deviate and set elsewhere?,Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bsaid to him:The sun always sets in the west bin order to greet its Creator, as it is stated: “And the hosts of heaven worship You”(Nehemiah 9:6). Setting is a form of worship; it is as though the sun is bowing to God. The Divine Presence rests in the west, as is evident from the fact that the Holy of Holies in the Temple, in which the Ark, the resting place of the Divine Presence, is located in the west. Antoninos bsaid to him:If so, bletthe sun bcome until the midpoint of the sky,set slightly band greetits Creator, and return band enterits place of origin in the east and set there. Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi answered him: The sun sets in the west bdue to workers and due to travelers,as, if the sun did not proceed from east to west with the light of day gradually waning, they would not know that it is time to return home or to find an inn., bAnd Antoninos said to RabbiYehuda HaNasi: bFrom when isthe bsoul placed in a person?Is it bfrom the moment of conception or from the moment ofthe bformationof the embryo, forty days after conception? Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bsaid to him:It is bfrom the moment ofthe bformationof the embryo. Antoninos bsaid to him:That is inconceivable. Is it bpossiblethat ba piece of meatcould bstandfor even bthree days without saltas a preservative bandwould bnot rot?The embryo could not exist for forty days without a soul. bRather,the soul is placed in man bfrom the moment of conception. RabbiYehuda HaNasi bsaid: Antoninos taught me this matter, andthere is ba versethat bsupports him, as it is stated: “And Your Providence [ ipekudatekha /i] has preserved my spirit”(Job 10:12) indicating that it is from the moment of conception [ ipekida /i] that the soul is preserved within a person., bAnd Antoninos said to RabbiYehuda HaNasi: bFrom when does the evil inclination dominate a person?Is it bfrom the moment ofthe bformationof the embryo bor from the moment of emergencefrom the womb? Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bsaid to him:It is bfrom the moment ofthe bformationof the embryo. Antoninos bsaid to him: If so,the evil inclination would cause the fetus to bkick his mother’s innards and emergefrom the womb. bRather, the evil inclination dominates a person from the moment of emergencefrom the womb. bRabbiYehuda HaNasi bsaid: Antoninos taught me this matter, andthere is ba versethat bsupports him, as it is stated: “Sin crouches at the entrance”(Genesis 4:7), indicating that it is from the moment of birth, when the newborn emerges from the entrance of his mother’s womb, that the evil inclination lurks.,§ bReish Lakish raises a contradictionbetween two verses written with regard to the resurrection of the dead. bIt is written:“I will bring them from the north country and gather them from the ends of the earth, band with them the blind and the lame, the woman with child and the woman giving birth together”(Jeremiah 31:7), indicating that at the end of days there will still be people with physical defects. bAnd it is written: “Then shall the lame man leap as a deer and the tongue of the mute sing; for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert”(Isaiah 35:6), indicating that at the end of days there will be no people with physical defects. bHow so?When resurrected, the dead bwill arisestill afflicted bwith their defects, andthey bwillthen bbe healed. /b, bUlla raises a contradiction. It is written: “He will swallow death forever; and the LordGod bwill wipe tears from all faces”(Isaiah 25:8), indicating that death will no longer exist at the end of days. bAnd it is written: “There shall be no more an infant a few days old then…for the youngest shall die one hundred years old”(Isaiah 65:20). The Gemara answers that this contradiction is bnot difficult.The verse bhere,in Isaiah chapter 25, is written bwith regard to the Jewish people,who will live forever after resurrection; the verse bthere,in Isaiah chapter 65, is written bwith regard to gentiles,who will ultimately die after an extremely long life. The Gemara asks: bAnd what do gentiles seek,i.e., why will they merit to live, in bthatera? The Gemara answers that the verse is referring to bthosegentiles babout whom it is written: “And strangers shall stand and feed your flocks, and aliens shall be your plowmen and vinedressers”(Isaiah 61:5)., bRav Ḥisda raises a contradiction. It is written: “Then the moon shall be confounded and the sun ashamed, when the Lord of hosts will reignin Mount Zion and in Jerusalem, and before His elders shall be His glory” (Isaiah 24:23), indicating that the sun and the moon will no longer shine at the end of days. bAnd it is written: “And the light of the moon shall be as the light of the sun, and the light of the sun shall be sevenfold, as the light of seven days”(Isaiah 30:26), indicating that the sun and the moon will exist then and they will shine more brightly. The Gemara answers that this is bnot difficult.The verse bhere,in Isaiah chapter 30, is written with regard bto the days of the Messiah,when the sun and moon will shine more brightly; the verse bthere,in Isaiah chapter 24, is written with regard bto the World-to-Come,when the only light will be the light of God.,The Gemara asks: bAnd according to Shmuel, who says: The difference between this world and the messianic era is only subjugation of the exiles,as during that era the Jewish people will be freed from that subjugation, how is the contradiction resolved? The Gemara answers that even according to Shmuel this contradiction is bnot difficult.The verse bhere,in Isaiah chapter 30, is written with regard to the light bin the camp of the righteous;the verse bthere,in Isaiah chapter 24, the verse is written with regard bto the camp of the Divine Presence,when the only light will be the light of God., bRava raises a contradiction. It is written: “I will kill and I will bring to life”(Deuteronomy 32:39), indicating that God is capable of reviving the dead. bAnd it is writtenimmediately afterward: b“I wounded and I will heal,”which indicates that God will only heal the wounded. Rather, it should be understood: bThe Holy One, Blessed be He, is saying: What I kill, I bring to life,indicating that God revives the dead. bAnd then what I wounded, I will heal. /b,§ bThe Sages taughtin a ibaraitawith regard to the verse: b“I will kill and I will bring to life.”One bmighthave thought that it means bthat there will be deathfor boneperson band lifefor boneother bperson, in thetypical bmanner that the world operates.Therefore, bthe verse states: “I wounded and I will heal.” Just as wounding and healingtake place bin oneperson, bso too, death andbringing back to blifetake place bin oneperson. bFrom herethere is ba response tothose who bsaythat bthere is no resurrection of the deadderived bfrom the Torah. /b, bIt is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Meir said: From whereis bresurrection of the deadderived bfrom the Torah?It is derived from a verse, bas it is stated: “Then Moses and the children of Israel will sing this song to the Lord”(Exodus 15:1). It bis not stated: Sang,in the verse; brather,the term b“they will sing”is stated, indicating that Moses will come back to life and sing the song in the future. bFrom hereit is proved that bresurrection of the deadis derived bfrom the Torah. On a similar note, youcan bsay: “Then Joshua will build an altar to the LordGod of Israel on Mount Ebal” (Joshua 8:30). It bis not stated: Built,in the verse; brather,the term b“will build”is stated. bFrom here, resurrection of the deadis derived bfrom the Torah. /b,The Gemara challenges: bIf that is so,then in the verse: b“Then Solomon will build an altar for Chemosh the abomination of Moab”(I Kings 11:7), does this balsomean that Solomon bwill buildin the future? Rather, the use of the future tense here should be understood differently. Solomon did not build an altar to the idol; brather,the use of the future tense teaches that bthe verse ascribes himblame bas though he built it,since he did not prevent his wives from doing so. Therefore, no proof for the resurrection of the dead may be cited from this verse., bRabbi Yehoshua ben Levi says: From whereis bresurrection of the deadderived bfrom the Torah?It is derived from a verse, bas it is stated: “Happy are they who dwell in Your house; they will yet praise You, Selah”(Psalms 84:5). It bis not stated: They praised you,in the verse; brather,the term b“they will praise you”is stated. bFrom here, resurrection of the deadis derived bfrom the Torah. And Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi says: Anyone who recites songto God bin this world is privileged and recites it in the World-to-Come, as it is stated: “Happy are they who dwell in Your house; they will yet praise You, Selah.” /b, bRabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba saysthat bRabbi Yoḥa says: From whereis bresurrection of the deadderived bfrom the Torah?It is derived from a verse, bas it is stated: “Your watchmen, they raise the voice; together shall they sing,for they shall see eye to eye the Lord returning to Zion” (Isaiah 52:8). It bis not stated: They sang,in the verse; brather,the term “together bshall they sing”is stated. bFrom here resurrection of the deadis derived bfrom the Torah. And Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba saysthat bRabbi Yoḥa says: All the prophets are all destined to recite song in one voice, as it is stated: “Your watchmen, they raise the voice; together shall they sing.” /b, bRav Yehuda saysthat bRav says:With regard to banyone who withholds ihalakhafrombeing studied by bthe mouth of a studentwho seeks to study Torah, bit is as though he robs him of the inheritance of his ancestors, as it is stated: “Moses commanded us the Torah, an inheritance of the congregation of Jacob”(Deuteronomy 33:4), indicating that the Torah bis an inheritance for all of the Jewish people from the six days of Creation. Rav Ḥana bar Bizna saysthat bRabbi Shimon Ḥasida says:With regard to banyone who withholds ihalakhafrombeing studied by bthe mouth of a studentwho seeks to study Torah, beven fetuses in their mother’s womb curse him, as it is stated: “He who withholds ibar /i, /b
5. Anon., Avot Derabbi Nathan A, 17 (6th cent. CE - 8th cent. CE)

6. Anon., Avot Derabbi Nathan B, 48, 30 (6th cent. CE - 8th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiochene Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
babylonia, babylonians, accused of refusal to settle in palestine, role of synagogue in israel and, distinguished Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
babylonian rabbis, sages, parallel to sophists, rhetors Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
betrothal Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
body, and sexual activity Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman, Religion and the Self in Antiquity (2005) 207
body, care for Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman, Religion and the Self in Antiquity (2005) 207
bridal procession Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
bride, and dress Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
bride, and jewelry Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
bride Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
ceremony Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
gentile Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
israel, role of synagogue in babylonia and, distinguished Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
luke Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
marriage Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
palestine, fluidity of class system Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
palestine, role of synagogue in babylonia and, distinguished Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
rhetors, paralleled in babylonian rabbis Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
ritual Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
rome, roman empire, social mobility in Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
samaritan Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
sex, rabbinic estimate of' Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman, Religion and the Self in Antiquity (2005) 207
shimon ben elazar Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
sophists, paralleled in babylonian rabbis Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
synagogues, role in babylonia, israel, distinguished Kalmin, The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity (1998) 131
synoptic, gospels Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
synoptic, tradition Tomson, Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries (2019) 177
tarfon Rubin Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives (2008) 108
the fathers according to rabbi nathan (r. nathan), and list, regimen Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman, Religion and the Self in Antiquity (2005) 207