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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



479
Anon., 4 Ezra, 12.46


nanTake courage, O Israel; and do not be sorrowful, O house of Jacob;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.37-1.42 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.37. and this is justly, or rather necessarily done, because every one is not permitted of his own accord to be a writer, nor is there any disagreement in what is written; they being only prophets that have written the original and earliest accounts of things as they learned them of God himself by inspiration; and others have written what hath happened in their own times, and that in a very distinct manner also. 8. 1.38. For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another [as the Greeks have], but only twenty-two books, which contain the records of all the past times; which are justly believed to be divine; 1.39. and of them five belong to Moses, which contain his laws and the traditions of the origin of mankind till his death. This interval of time was little short of three thousand years; 1.41. It is true, our history hath been written since Artaxerxes very particularly, but hath not been esteemed of the like authority with the former by our forefathers, because there hath not been an exact succession of prophets since that time; 1.42. and how firmly we have given credit to those books of our own nation, is evident by what we do; for during so many ages as have already passed, no one has been so bold as either to add any thing to them, to take any thing from them, or to make any change in them; but it becomes natural to all Jews, immediately and from their very birth, to esteem those books to contain divine doctrines, and to persist in them, and, if occasion be, willingly to die for them.
2. Mishnah, Yadayim, 4.6-4.8 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.6. The Sadducees say: we complain against you, Pharisees, because you say that the Holy Scriptures defile the hands, but the books of Homer do not defile the hands. Rabban Yoha ben Zakkai said: Have we nothing against the Pharisees but this? Behold they say that the bones of a donkey are clean, yet the bones of Yoha the high priest are unclean. They said to him: according to the affection for them, so is their impurity, so that nobody should make spoons out of the bones of his father or mother. He said to them: so also are the Holy Scriptures according to the affection for them, so is their uncleanness. The books of Homer which are not precious do not defile the hands." 4.7. The Sadducees say: we complain against you, Pharisees, that you declare an uninterrupted flow of a liquid to be clean. The Pharisees say: we complain against you, Sadducees, that you declare a stream of water which flows from a burial-ground to be clean? The Sadducees say: we complain against you, Pharisees, that you say, my ox or donkey which has done injury is liable, yet my male or female slave who has done injury is not liable. Now if in the case of my ox or my donkey for which I am not responsible if they do not fulfill religious duties, yet I am responsible for their damages, in the case of my male or female slave for whom I am responsible to see that they fulfill mitzvot, how much more so that I should be responsible for their damages? They said to them: No, if you argue about my ox or my donkey which have no understanding, can you deduce from there anything concerning a male or female slave who do have understanding? So that if I were to anger either of them and they would go and burn another person's stack, should I be liable to make restitution?" 4.8. A Galilean min said: I complain against you Pharisees, that you write the name of the ruler and the name of Moses together on a divorce document. The Pharisees said: we complain against you, Galilean min, that you write the name of the ruler together with the divine name on a single page [of Torah]? And furthermore that you write the name of the ruler above and the divine name below? As it is said, \"And Pharoah said, Who is the Lord that I should hearken to his voice to let Israel go?\" (Exodus 5:2) But when he was smitten what did he say? \"The Lord is righteous\" (Exodus 9:27)."
3. Anon., 4 Ezra, 10.20, 14.27-14.36

10.20. Do not say that, but let yourself be persuaded because of the troubles of Zion, and be consoled because of the sorrow of Jerusalem. 14.27. Then I went as he commanded me, and I gathered all the people together, and said 14.28. Hear these words, O Israel 14.29. At first our fathers dwelt as aliens in Egypt, and they were delivered from there 14.30. and received the law of life, which they did not keep, which you also have transgressed after them. 14.31. Then land was given to you for a possession in the land of Zion; but you and your fathers committed iniquity and did not keep the ways which the Most High commanded you. 14.32. And because he is a righteous judge, in due time he took from you what he had given. 14.33. And now you are here, and your brethren are farther in the interior. 14.34. If you, then, will rule over your minds and discipline your hearts, you shall be kept alive, and after death you shall obtain mercy. 14.35. For after death the judgment will come, when we shall live again; and then the names of the righteous will become manifest, and the deeds of the ungodly will be disclosed. 14.36. But let no one come to me now, and let no one seek me for forty days.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
afterlife, reward Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
age/era, present Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
aristotle, pain as an emotion Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
babylonian empire van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
calendar, canon, scripture as Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
emotion, in the classical world Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
emotion, in the hebrew bible Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
esau van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
eschatology/eschatological, punishment/destruction Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
ethnicity (common features), proper name van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
exile van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
god, great one Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
greek, knowledge and attitude toward Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
grief, power and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
grief, relationship to pity Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
heavens, windows/gates of Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
hellenism/hellenistic culture, rabbinic knowledge of greek literature Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
hope/hopelessness Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
impurity and expiation, in bible, and physical tora Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
jacob van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
lights, of heaven Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
noah van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
pain, emotion and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
pharisees, on sanctity of tora Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
pity, connection to grief Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
pity, divine Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
pity, power and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
purity, and physical tora Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
roman empire van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
sadducees and debates with pharisees Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
scripture, sacred status Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
scripture as canon Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
shame Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
sophrosyne, among women Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142
tablets, heavenly' Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
ten northern tribes van Maaren, The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE (2022) 222
tora, as physical artifact Hayes, The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning (2022) 326
zeal for the law Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 142