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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



479
Anon., 4 Ezra, 10.21-10.22


nanFor you see that our sanctuary has been laid waste, our altar thrown down, our temple destroyed;


nanour harp has been laid low, our song has been silenced, and our rejoicing has been ended; the light of our lampstand has been put out, the ark of our covenant has been plundered, our holy things have been polluted, and the name by which we are called has been profaned; our free men have suffered abuse, our priests have been burned to death, our Levites have gone into captivity, our virgins have been defiled, and our wives have been ravished; our righteous men have been carried off, our little ones have been cast out, our young men have been enslaved and our strong men made powerless.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Septuagint, Tobit, 5.10, 11.11 (10th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.10. Then Tobit said to him, "My brother, to what tribe and family do you belong? Tell me. 11.11. and took hold of his father, and he sprinkled the gall upon his fathers eyes, saying, "Be of good cheer, father.
2. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 31.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

31.21. וְהָיָה כִּי־תִמְצֶאןָ אֹתוֹ רָעוֹת רַבּוֹת וְצָרוֹת וְעָנְתָה הַשִּׁירָה הַזֹּאת לְפָנָיו לְעֵד כִּי לֹא תִשָּׁכַח מִפִּי זַרְעוֹ כִּי יָדַעְתִּי אֶת־יִצְרוֹ אֲשֶׁר הוּא עֹשֶׂה הַיּוֹם בְּטֶרֶם אֲבִיאֶנּוּ אֶל־הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר נִשְׁבָּעְתִּי׃ 31.21. then it shall come to pass, when many evils and troubles are come upon them, that this song shall testify before them as a witness; for it shall not be forgotten out of the mouths of their seed; for I know their imagination how they do even now, before I have brought them into the land which I swore.’"
3. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 74, 79, 137 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 4.9 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.9. הִתְחַזְּקוּ וִהְיוּ לַאֲנָשִׁים פְּלִשְׁתִּים פֶּן תַּעַבְדוּ לָעִבְרִים כַּאֲשֶׁר עָבְדוּ לָכֶם וִהְיִיתֶם לַאֲנָשִׁים וְנִלְחַמְתֶּם׃ 4.9. Strengthen yourselves and act like men, O Pelishtim, lest you fall slaves to the Hebrews, as they have been slaves to you: quit yourselves like men, and fight."
5. Hebrew Bible, 2 Chronicles, 35.25 (5th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

35.25. וַיְקוֹנֵן יִרְמְיָהוּ עַל־יֹאשִׁיָּהוּ וַיֹּאמְרוּ כָל־הַשָּׁרִים וְהַשָּׁרוֹת בְּקִינוֹתֵיהֶם עַל־יֹאשִׁיָּהוּ עַד־הַיּוֹם וַיִּתְּנוּם לְחֹק עַל־יִשְׂרָאֵל וְהִנָּם כְּתוּבִים עַל־הַקִּינוֹת׃ 35.25. And Jeremiah lamented for Josiah; and all the singing men and singing women spoke of Josiah in their lamentations, unto this day; and they made them an ordice in Israel; and, behold, they are written in the lamentations."
6. Septuagint, Tobit, 5.10, 11.11 (4th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.10. Then Tobit said to him, "My brother, to what tribe and family do you belong? Tell me. 11.11. and took hold of his father, and he sprinkled the gall upon his fathers eyes, saying, "Be of good cheer, father.
7. Anon., 1 Enoch, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 8.4, 91.11, 91.12, 91.13, 91.14, 91.15, 91.16, 91.17, 98.3, 98.10, 102.4-104.8, 103.1, 104.1, 104.2, 104.6, 108.3, 108.7 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

8. Septuagint, Judith, 11.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

11.1. Then Holofernes said to her, "Take courage, woman, and do not be afraid in your heart, for I have never hurt any one who chose to serve Nebuchadnezzar, the king of all the earth.
9. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 17.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

17.5. The moon in heaven, with the stars, does not stand so august as you, who, after lighting the way of your star-like seven sons to piety, stand in honor before God and are firmly set in heaven with them.
10. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 5.396-5.413 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

5.396. Overwhelm ships. And up-turned Ephesu 5.397. Shall wail aloud, lament beside her banks 5.398. And for her temple search which is no more. 5.399. And then incensed shall God the imperishable 5.400. 400 Who dwells on high, hurl thunderbolts from heaven 5.401. Down on the head of him that is impure. 5.402. And in the place of winter there shall be 5.403. In that day summer. And to mortal men 5.404. Shall then be great woe; for the Thunderer 5.405. 405 Shall utterly destroy all shameless men 5.406. And with his thunders and with lightning-flame 5.407. And blazing thunderbolts men of ill-will 5.408. And thus shall he destroy the impious ones 5.409. So that there shall remain upon the earth 5.410. 410 Dead bodies more in number than the sand. 5.411. For Smyrna also, weeping her Lycurgus 5.412. Shall come unto the gates of Ephesu 5.413. And she herself shall perish even more.
11. Anon., 2 Baruch, 35.1-35.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 5.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.19. And now, “O most wretched city, what misery so great as this didst thou suffer from the Romans, when they came to purify thee from thy intestine hatred! For thou couldst be no longer a place fit for God, nor couldst thou long continue in being, after thou hadst been a sepulchre for the bodies of thy own people, and hadst made the holy house itself a burying-place in this civil war of thine. Yet mayst thou again grow better, if perchance thou wilt hereafter appease the anger of that God who is the author of thy destruction.” 5.19. 2. Now, for the works that were above these foundations, these were not unworthy of such foundations; for all the cloisters were double, and the pillars to them belonging were twenty-five cubits in height, and supported the cloisters. These pillars were of one entire stone each of them, and that stone was white marble;
13. New Testament, Romans, 8.18-8.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.18. For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which will be revealed toward us. 8.19. For the creation waits with eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. 8.20. For the creation was subjected to vanity, not of its own will, but because of him who subjected it, in hope 8.21. that the creation itself also will be delivered from the bondage of decay into the liberty of the glory of the children of God. 8.22. For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain together until now.
14. Babylonian Talmud, Bava Batra, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

15a. ועל ידי שלשה בני קרח,ירמיה כתב ספרו וספר מלכים וקינות חזקיה וסיעתו כתבו (ימש"ק סימן) ישעיה משלי שיר השירים וקהלת אנשי כנסת הגדולה כתבו (קנד"ג סימן) יחזקאל ושנים עשר דניאל ומגילת אסתר עזרא כתב ספרו ויחס של דברי הימים עד לו,מסייעא ליה לרב דאמר רב יהודה אמר רב לא עלה עזרא מבבל עד שיחס עצמו ועלה ומאן אסקיה נחמיה בן חכליה,אמר מר יהושע כתב ספרו ושמונה פסוקים שבתורה תניא כמאן דאמר שמונה פסוקים שבתורה יהושע כתבן דתניא (דברים לד, ה) וימת שם משה עבד ה' אפשר משה (מת) וכתב וימת שם משה אלא עד כאן כתב משה מכאן ואילך כתב יהושע דברי ר"י ואמרי לה ר' נחמיה,אמר לו ר"ש אפשר ס"ת חסר אות אחת וכתיב (דברים לא, כו) לקוח את ספר התורה הזה אלא עד כאן הקב"ה אומר ומשה אומר וכותב מכאן ואילך הקב"ה אומר ומשה כותב בדמע כמו שנאמר להלן (ירמיהו לו, יח) ויאמר להם ברוך מפיו יקרא אלי את כל הדברים האלה ואני כותב על הספר בדיו,כמאן אזלא הא דא"ר יהושע בר אבא אמר רב גידל אמר רב שמונה פסוקים שבתורה יחיד קורא אותן לימא (ר"י היא) ודלא כר"ש אפילו תימא ר"ש הואיל ואשתנו אשתנו:,יהושע כתב ספרו והכתיב (יהושע כד, כט) וימת יהושע בן נון עבד ה' דאסקיה אלעזר והכתיב (יהושע כד, לג) ואלעזר בן אהרן מת דאסקיה פנחס,שמואל כתב ספרו והכתיב (שמואל א כח, ג) ושמואל מת דאסקיה גד החוזה ונתן הנביא,דוד כתב ספר תהלים על ידי עשרה זקנים וליחשוב נמי איתן האזרחי אמר רב איתן האזרחי זה הוא אברהם כתיב הכא (תהלים פט, א) איתן האזרחי וכתיב התם (ישעיהו מא, ב) מי העיר ממזרח צדק [וגו'],קא חשיב משה וקא חשיב הימן והאמר רב הימן זה משה כתיב הכא הימן וכתיב התם (במדבר יב, ז) בכל ביתי נאמן הוא תרי הימן הוו,משה כתב ספרו ופרשת בלעם ואיוב מסייעא ליה לר' לוי בר לחמא דא"ר לוי בר לחמא איוב בימי משה היה כתיב הכא (איוב יט, כג) מי יתן אפוא ויכתבון מלי וכתיב התם (שמות לג, טז) ובמה יודע אפוא,ואימא בימי יצחק דכתיב (בראשית כז, לג) מי אפוא הוא הצד ציד ואימא בימי יעקב דכתיב (בראשית מג, יא) אם כן אפוא זאת עשו ואימא בימי יוסף דכתיב (בראשית לז, טז) איפה הם רועים,לא ס"ד דכתיב (איוב יט, כג) מי יתן בספר ויוחקו ומשה הוא דאיקרי מחוקק דכתיב (דברים לג, כא) וירא ראשית לו כי שם חלקת מחוקק ספון,רבא אמר איוב בימי מרגלים היה כתיב הכא (איוב א, א) איש היה בארץ עוץ איוב שמו וכתיב התם (במדבר יג, כ) היש בה עץ מי דמי הכא עוץ התם עץ הכי קאמר להו משה לישראל ישנו לאותו אדם ששנותיו ארוכות כעץ ומגין על דורו כעץ,יתיב ההוא מרבנן קמיה דר' שמואל בר נחמני ויתיב וקאמר איוב לא היה ולא נברא אלא משל היה אמר ליה עליך אמר קרא איש היה בארץ עוץ איוב שמו,אלא מעתה (שמואל ב יב, ג) ולרש אין כל כי אם כבשה אחת קטנה אשר קנה ויחיה וגו' מי הוה אלא משל בעלמא הכא נמי משל בעלמא א"כ שמו ושם עירו למה,רבי יוחנן ורבי אלעזר דאמרי תרוייהו איוב מעולי גולה היה ובית מדרשו בטבריא היה מיתיבי ימי שנותיו של איוב משעה שנכנסו ישראל למצרים ועד שיצאו 15a. band by the three sons of Korah. /b, bJeremiah wrote his own book, and the book of Kings, and Lamentations. Hezekiah and his colleagues wrotethe following, and ba mnemonicto remember which books they wrote is iyod /i, imem /i, ishin /i, ikuf /i: Isaiah [ iYeshaya /i], Proverbs [ iMishlei /i], Song of Songs [ iShir HaShirim /i], and Ecclesiastes [ iKohelet /i]. The members of the Great Assembly wrotethe following, and ba mnemonicto remember these books is ikuf /i, inun /i, idalet /i, igimmel /i: Ezekiel [ iYeḥezkel], and the Twelve Prophets [ iSheneim Asar /i], Daniel[iDaniel /i], band the Scroll of Esther [ iMegillat Ester /i]. Ezra wrote his own book and the genealogy ofthe book of bChronicles until hisperiod.,The Gemara comments: This bsupports Rav, as Rav Yehuda saysthat bRav says: Ezra did not ascend from Babyloniato Eretz Yisrael buntil he established his own genealogy, andafter that he bascended.This genealogy is what is written in the book of Chronicles. bAnd who completedthe book of Chronicles for the generations following Ezra? bNehemiah, son of Hacaliah. /b,The Gemara elaborates on the particulars of this ibaraita /i: bThe Master saidabove that bJoshua wrote his own book and eight verses of the Torah.The Gemara comments: This ibaraita bis taught in accordance with the one who says thatit was bJoshuawho bwrote thelast beight verses in the Torah.This point is subject to a tannaitic dispute, bas it is taughtin another ibaraita /i: b“And Moses the servant of the Lord died there”(Deuteronomy 34:5); bis it possible thatafter bMoses died, hehimself bwrote “And Moses died there”? Rather, Moses wrotethe entire Torah buntil this point,and bJoshua wrote from thispoint bforward;this is bthe statement of Rabbi Yehuda. And some saythat bRabbi Neḥemyastated this opinion., bRabbi Shimon said to him: Is it possiblethat the bTorah scroll was missing a single letter? But it is written: “Take this Torah scroll”(Deuteronomy 31:26), indicating that the Torah was complete as is and that nothing further would be added to it. bRather, until this point the Holy One, Blessed be He, dictated and Moses repeatedafter Him band wrotethe text. bFrom thispoint bforward,with respect to Moses’ death, bthe Holy One, Blessed be He, dictated and Moses wrote with tears.The fact that the Torah was written by way of dictation can be seen blater, as it is statedconcerning the writing of the Prophets: b“And Baruch said to them: He dictated all these words to me, and I wrote them with ink in the scroll”(Jeremiah 36:18).,The Gemara asks: bIn accordance with whoseopinion bis that which Rabbi Yehoshua bar Abba saysthat bRav Giddel saysthat bRav says:When the Torah is read publicly in the synagogue, boneperson breads thelast beight verses in the Torah,and that section may not be divided between two readers? bShall we saythat bthis isin accordance with the opinion of bRabbi Yehuda and not in accordance withthe opinion of bRabbi Shimon,as according to Rabbi Shimon these verses are an integral part of the Torah, written by Moses just like the rest? The Gemara answers: bEvenif byou saythat this was said in accordance with the opinion of bRabbi Shimon, since they differfrom the rest of the Torah in one way, as Moses wrote them with tears, bthey differfrom the rest of the Torah in this way as well, i.e., they may not be divided between two readers.,It is stated in the ibaraitathat bJoshua wrote his own book.The Gemara asks: bBut isn’t it writtentoward the end of the book: b“And Joshua, son of Nun, the servant of the Lord, died”(Joshua 24:29)? Is it possible that Joshua wrote this? The Gemara answers: Aaron’s son bEleazar completed it.The Gemara asks: bBut isn’t italso bwritten: “And Eleazar, son of Aaron, died”(Joshua 24:33)? The Gemara answers: bPinehas completed it. /b,It is also stated in the ibaraitathat bSamuel wrote his own book.The Gemara asks: bBut isn’t it written: “And Samuel died”(I Samuel 28:3)? The Gemara answers: bGad the seer and Nathan the prophet finished it. /b,It is further stated that bDavid wrote the book of Psalms by means of ten elders,whom the ibaraitaproceeds to list. The Gemara asks: bButthen blet it also count Ethan the Ezrahiteamong the contributors to the book of Psalms, as it is he who is credited with Psalms, chapter 89. bRav says: Ethan the Ezrahite isthe same person as bAbraham.Proof for this is the fact that bit is written here:“A Maskil of bEthan the Ezrahite”(Psalms 89:1), band it is written there: “Who raised up one from the east [ imizraḥ /i], whom righteousnessmet wherever he set his foot” (Isaiah 41:2). The latter verse is understood as referring to Abraham, who came from the east, and for that reason he is called Ethan the Ezrahite in the former verse.,The Gemara asks: The ibaraita bcounts Mosesamong the ten elders whose works are included in the book of Psalms, band italso bcounts Heman. But doesn’t Rav say:The bHemanmentioned in the Bible (I Kings 5:11) bisthe same person as bMoses?This is proven by the fact that bit is written here: “Heman”(Psalms 88:1), which is Aramaic for trusted, band it is written thereabout Moses: b“For he is the trusted one in all My house”(Numbers 12:7). The Gemara answers: bThere were two Hemans,one of whom was Moses, and the other a Temple singer from among the descendants of Samuel.,The ibaraitafurther states that bMoses wrote his own book,i.e., the Torah, bthe portion of Balaam, andthe book of bJob. This supports Rabbi Levi bar Laḥma, as Rabbi Levi bar Laḥma says: Joblived bin the time of Moses. It is written herewith regard to Job: b“Oh, that my words were written now [ ieifo /i]”(Job 19:23), band it is written therein Moses’ words to God: b“For in what shall it be known here [ ieifo /i]”(Exodus 33:16). The unusual use of the word ieifoin these two places indicates that Job and Moses lived in the same generation.,The Gemara comments: bButif that is the proof, bsaythat Job lived bin the time of Isaac, as it is writtenin connection with Isaac: b“Who then [ ieifo /i] is he that has taken venison”(Genesis 27:33). bOr saythat he lived bin the time of Jacob, as it is writtenwith respect to Jacob: b“If it must be so now [ ieifo /i], do this”(Genesis 43:11). bOr saythat he lived bin the time of Joseph, as it is writtenwith respect to Joseph: “Tell me, I pray you, bwhere [ ieifo /i] are they feeding their flocks?”(Genesis 37:16).,The Gemara answers: It could bnot enter your mindto say this, bas it is writtenin the continuation of the previously mentioned verse: b“Oh, thatmy words bwere inscribed [ iveyuḥaku /i] in a book”(Job 19:23), band it is Moses who is called the inscriber, as it is writtenwith regard to him: b“And he provided the first part for himself, for there was the inscriber’s [ imeḥokek /i] portion reserved”(Deuteronomy 33:21)., bRava says: Joblived bat the time of the spieswhom Moses sent to scout the land of Canaan. This is proven by the fact that bit is written here: “There was a man in the land of Utz, whose name was Job”(Job 1:1), band it is written therein the account of the spies: b“Whether there are trees [ ieitz /i] in it”(Numbers 13:20). The Gemara asks: bIs it comparable? Herethe word that is used is iUtz /i,whereas btherethe word is ieitz /i.The Gemara answers: bThis is what Moses said to Israel,i.e., to the spies: bIs that mannamed Job still alive, bhe whose years are as long asthe years bof a tree and who protects his generation like a tree?This is why the allusion to him here is through the word ieitz /i, rather than iUtz /i.,The Gemara relates that bone of the Sages sat before Rabbi Shmuel bar Naḥmani and he sat and said: Job never existed and was never created;there was never such a person as Job. bRather,his story bwas a parable.Rabbi Shmuel bar Naḥmani bsaid to him:In rebuttal bto you, the verse states: “There was a man in the Land of Utz whose name was Job”(Job 1:1), which indicates that such a man did indeed exist.,The Gemara asks: bBut if that is so,that the words “there was” prove that Job existed, what shall we say about the parable that Natan the prophet presented to David: “There were two men in one city; the one rich and the other poor. The rich man had very many flocks and herds, bbut the poor man had nothing except one little lamb, which he had bought and reared”(II Samuel 12:3)? bWas therereally such a person? bRather, it was merely a parable; here too it is merely a parable.The Gemara answers: bIf so,that it is a parable, bwhystate bhis name and the name of his city?Rather, Job was clearly a real person.,The Gemara cites another opinion with regard to the time when Job lived. bRabbi Yoḥa and Rabbi Elazar both say: Job was among those who ascended from the exileto Eretz Yisrael at the start of the Second Temple period, band his house of study was in Tiberias.The Gemara braises an objectionfrom what is taught in a ibaraita /i: bThe days of Job’s lifeextended bfrom when Israel entered Egypt until they left,indicating that this is the period during which he lived and not, as suggested, in the early days of the Second Temple.
15. Anon., 4 Ezra, 9.38, 10.16-10.17, 10.19-10.20, 10.22-10.29, 10.38, 10.51-10.54, 12.42, 14.35

9.38. When I said these things in my heart, I lifted up my eyes and saw a woman on my right, and behold, she was mourning and weeping with a loud voice, and was deeply grieved at heart, and her clothes were rent, and there were ashes on her head. 10.16. For if you acknowledge the decree of God to be just, you will receive your son back in due time, and will be praised among women. 10.17. Therefore go into the city to your husband. 10.19. So I spoke again to her, and said 10.20. Do not say that, but let yourself be persuaded because of the troubles of Zion, and be consoled because of the sorrow of Jerusalem. 10.22. our harp has been laid low, our song has been silenced, and our rejoicing has been ended; the light of our lampstand has been put out, the ark of our covet has been plundered, our holy things have been polluted, and the name by which we are called has been profaned; our free men have suffered abuse, our priests have been burned to death, our Levites have gone into captivity, our virgins have been defiled, and our wives have been ravished; our righteous men have been carried off, our little ones have been cast out, our young men have been enslaved and our strong men made powerless. 10.23. And, what is more than all, the seal of Zion -- for she has now lost the seal of her glory, and has been given over into the hands of those that hate us. 10.24. Therefore shake off your great sadness and lay aside your many sorrows, so that the Mighty One may be merciful to you again, and the Most High may give you rest, a relief from your troubles. 10.25. While I was talking to her, behold, her face suddenly shone exceedingly, and her countece flashed like lightning, so that I was too frightened to approach her, and my heart was terrified. While I was wondering what this meant 10.26. behold, she suddenly uttered a loud and fearful cry, so that the earth shook at the sound. 10.27. And I looked, and behold, the woman was no longer visible to me, but there was an established city, and a place of huge foundations showed itself. Then I was afraid, and cried with a loud voice and said 10.28. Where is the angel Uriel, who came to me at first? For it was he who brought me into this overpowering bewilderment; my end has become corruption, and my prayer a reproach. 10.29. As I was speaking these words, behold, the angel who had come to me at first came to me, and he looked upon me; 10.38. He answered me and said, "Listen to me and I will inform you, and tell you about the things which you fear, for the Most High has revealed many secrets to you. 10.51. Therefore I told you to remain in the field where no house had been built 10.52. for I knew that the Most High would reveal these things to you. 10.53. Therefore I told you to go into the field where there was no foundation of any building 10.54. for no work of man's building could endure in a place where the city of the Most High was to be revealed. 12.42. For of all the prophets you alone are left to us, like a cluster of grapes from the vintage, and like a lamp in a dark place, and like a haven for a ship saved from a storm. 14.35. For after death the judgment will come, when we shall live again; and then the names of the righteous will become manifest, and the deeds of the ungodly will be disclosed.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham, isaac, and jacob/patriarchs Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
abraham Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
afterlife, reward Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
age/era, present Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
angels Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 233
apocalypse/apocalyptic Beyerle and Goff, Notions of Time in Deuterocanonical and Cognate Literature (2022) 481
death Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 232, 233, 239
destruction Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 232, 233, 239
destruction of\n, jerusalem/jerusalem temple Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 300
divine Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 233
eschatology/eschatological, punishment/destruction Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
exemplars Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 239
exile, recovery from Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 239
ezra Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 232, 233, 239
god, great one Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
heavens, windows/gates of Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
hope/hopelessness Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
jerusalem, temple Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 300
law, mosaic (law of moses) Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 239
lights, of heaven Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
mosaic Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 239
perfectionism, path to perfection Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 232, 233
perfectionism Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 232, 233
pseudepigraphy Najman, The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity (2010) 239
shame Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
sin/sinner Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
sitting (posture) Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
tablets, heavenly' Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 572
temple in jerusalem, destruction of Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
temple in jerusalem Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194
zion, glorious Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 300
zion Allison, 4 Baruch (2018) 194