Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12032
Andocides, Orations, 1.45
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Antiphon, Orations, 5.48 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Knights, 1226-1254, 573-576, 1225 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1225. ἐγὼ δέ τυ ἐστεφάνιξα κἀδωρησάμαν.
3. Euripides, Andromache, 694-702, 693 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

693. οἴμοι, καθ' ̔Ελλάδ' ὡς κακῶς νομίζεται:
4. Isaeus, Orations, 2.31-2.33 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Isocrates, Orations, 9.57, 15.94, 18.61, 18.65 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Lysias, Orations, 5.3-5.5, 6.4, 7.16 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19b. Meletus trusted when he brought this suit against me. What did those who aroused the prejudice say to arouse it? I must, as it were, read their sworn statement as if they were plaintiffs: Socrates is a criminal and a busybody, investigating the things beneath the earth and in the heavens and making the weaker argument stronger and
8. Plato, Hipparchus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

228d. he proceeded next, with the design of educating those of the countryside, to set up figures of Hermes for them along the roads in the midst of the city and every district town; and then, after selecting from his own wise lore, both learnt from others and discovered for himself, the things that he considered the wisest, he threw these into elegiac form and inscribed them on the figures as verses of his own and testimonies of his wisdom, so that in the first place
9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20.2, 3.38, 4.121.1, 6.27-6.29, 6.53-6.61, 6.57.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.20.2. The general Athenian public fancy that Hipparchus was tyrant when he fell by the hands of Harmodius and Aristogiton; not knowing that Hippias, the eldest of the sons of Pisistratus, was really supreme, and that Hipparchus and Thessalus were his brothers; and that Harmodius and Aristogiton suspecting, on the very day, nay at the very moment fixed on for the deed, that information had been conveyed to Hippias by their accomplices, concluded that he had been warned, and did not attack him, yet, not liking to be apprehended and risk their lives for nothing, fell upon Hipparchus near the temple of the daughters of Leos, and slew him as he was arranging the Panathenaic procession. 4.121.1. The Scionaeans were elated by his language, and even those who had at first disapproved of what was being done catching the general confidence, they determined on a vigorous conduct of the war, and welcomed Brasidas with all possible honours, publicly crowning him with a crown of gold as the liberator of Hellas ; while private persons crowded round him and decked him with garlands as though he had been an athlete. 6.57.3. and eager if possible to be revenged first upon the man who had wronged them and for whom they had undertaken all this risk, they rushed, as they were, within the gates, and meeting with Hipparchus by the Leocorium recklessly fell upon him at once, infuriated, Aristogiton by love, and Harmodius by insult, and smote him and slew him.
10. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.33, 2.4.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired.
11. Aeschines, Letters, 1.159, 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.187-3.190, 3.243 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 18.3, 57.1-57.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.265, 20.70, 20.75, 20.79, 20.86, 20.127-20.131, 20.146, 20.159, 21.62, 22.72, 23.130, 23.136, 24.180, 50.13, 54.7-54.8 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.33.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.33.4.  After this Agesilaüs returned with his army to the Peloponnese, while the Thebans, saved by the generalship of Chabrias, though he had performed many gallant deeds in war, was particularly proud of this bit of strategy and he caused the statues which had been granted to him by his people to be erected to display that posture.
15. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33.2. At this time, In the early summer of 408 B.C. therefore, the people had only to meet in assembly, and Alcibiades addressed them. He lamented and bewailed his own lot, but had only little and moderate blame to lay upon the people. The entire mischief he ascribed to a certain evil fortune and envious genius of his own. Then he descanted at great length upon the vain hopes which their enemies were cherishing, and wrought his hearers up to courage. At last they crowned him with crowns of gold, and elected him general with sole powers by land and sea.
16. Plutarch, Theseus, 24.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.2, 1.5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians. 1.5.2. The eponymoi That is, “those after whom others are named.” —this is the name given to them—are Hippothoon son of Poseidon and Alope daughter of Cercyon, Antiochus, one of the children of Heracles borne to him by Meda daughter of Phylas, thirdly, Ajax son of Telamon, and to the Athenians belongs Leos, who is said to have given up his daughters, at the command of the oracle, for the safety of the commonwealth. Among the eponymoi is Erechtheus, who conquered the Eleusinians in battle, and killed their general, Immaradus the son of Eumolpus. There is Aegeus also and Oeneus the bastard son of Pandion, and Acamas, one of the children of Theseus.
18. Aeschines, Or., 3.143, 3.178-3.179, 3.187-3.190, 3.243

19. Andocides, Orations, 1.12-1.14, 1.16, 1.27-1.29, 1.35, 1.37-1.38, 1.41-1.44, 1.46-1.53, 1.62, 1.67, 1.111, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

20. Andocides, Orations, 1.12-1.14, 1.16, 1.27-1.29, 1.35, 1.37-1.38, 1.41-1.53, 1.62, 1.67, 1.111, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

21. Epigraphy, Cid, 4.12

22. Epigraphy, Ig I , 102, 125, 131, 101

23. Epigraphy, Ig I , 102, 125, 131, 101

24. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 13, 1563, 40, 70, 1

25. Epigraphy, Seg, 28.45



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
agariste (of alkmaionid family) Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
alcibiades Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82
alkibiades, and the mysteries Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237, 244
andokides, genos, herms/mysteries Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
andromachos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
antiphon Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
apollodoros son of pasion, and family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 163, 171
apollodorus, trierarch in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237, 244
archeneüs, money-lender Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
archinus decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
aristotle Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
arrian Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
asebeia Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
asty Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
ateleia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
athenian agora Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
athens, its resources in the fourth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
athens Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
brasidas Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
cleon Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
collective memory, manipulation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188, 244
crowns, olive crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
cult/cultic Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
cultic regulations Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188, 237, 244
delian league Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
demosthenes, lawsuits Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
denunciation Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
diocleides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188, 244
diokleidis Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
division of inheritance Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 163
doctor Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 171
dôreai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
eisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
ephēgēsis Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
epicerdes of cyrene Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
freedman/woman Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 171
friendship Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
harmodius Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188, 244
herm Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
herms, mutilation Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
herms Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
hetaira Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 163
hetairos/eia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
hipparchus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
homicide Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
kunst, karl v Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
language, punishment' Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
law Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 53
leokorion Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
liturgies, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
lydos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
metics Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184, 188
misgolas Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 163
money, distribution of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
mysteries, parody of Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
nikias, family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
oath, of hetairoi Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
oligarchies Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
oligarchy Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 443
ostracism Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
peloponnesian war Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
pericles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
phrynichus, oligarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184, 188
phyle Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
piraeus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
proxenia, proxenoi, and xenia (hospitality meal) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
prytaneion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
prytaneion decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
public praise Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
scione Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
slaves, in banking Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 171
slaves, manumission Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 163
statues, of chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of timotheus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
symposion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 447
teukros Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 310
thirty tyrants Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188, 244
thrasybulus, son of lycus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 188
thrasybulus of calydon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184, 188
thrasylochus, money-lender Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
thucydides, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184
thucydides Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 397
triêrarchiai, triêrarchoi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
xenia (hospitality meal) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 237
xenophon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 184