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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



260
Alexander Of Aphrodisias, On Mixture, 217.31
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.39. Chrysippus, who is deemed to be the most skilful interpreter of the Stoic dreams, musters an enormous mob of unknown gods — so utterly unknown that even imagination cannot guess at their form and nature, although our mind appears capable of visualizing anything; for he says that divine power resides in reason, and in the soul and mind of the universe; he calls the world itself a god, and also the all‑pervading world-soul, and again the guiding principle of that soul, which operates in the intellect and reason, and the common and all‑embracing nature of things; beside this, the fire that I previously termed aether; and also the power of Fate, and the Necessity that governs future events; and also all fluid and soluble substances, such as water, earth, air, the sun, moon and stars, and the all‑embracing unity of things; and even those human beings who have attained immortality.
2. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, On Common Conceptions Against The Stoics, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Alexander of Aphrodisias, On Mixture, 224.14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.138-7.139, 7.147, 7.151, 7.157 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.138. Again, they give the name of cosmos to the orderly arrangement of the heavenly bodies in itself as such; and (3) in the third place to that whole of which these two are parts. Again, the cosmos is defined as the individual being qualifying the whole of substance, or, in the words of Posidonius in his elementary treatise on Celestial Phenomena, a system made up of heaven and earth and the natures in them, or, again, as a system constituted by gods and men and all things created for their sake. By heaven is meant the extreme circumference or ring in which the deity has his seat.The world, in their view, is ordered by reason and providence: so says Chrysippus in the fifth book of his treatise On Providence and Posidonius in his work On the Gods, book iii. – inasmuch as reason pervades every part of it, just as does the soul in us. Only there is a difference of degree; in some parts there is more of it, in others less. 7.139. For through some parts it passes as a hold or containing force, as is the case with our bones and sinews; while through others it passes as intelligence, as in the ruling part of the soul. Thus, then, the whole world is a living being, endowed with soul and reason, and having aether for its ruling principle: so says Antipater of Tyre in the eighth book of his treatise On the Cosmos. Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Providence and Posidonius in his book On the Gods say that the heaven, but Cleanthes that the sun, is the ruling power of the world. Chrysippus, however, in the course of the same work gives a somewhat different account, namely, that it is the purer part of the aether; the same which they declare to be preeminently God and always to have, as it were in sensible fashion, pervaded all that is in the air, all animals and plants, and also the earth itself, as a principle of cohesion. 7.147. The deity, say they, is a living being, immortal, rational, perfect or intelligent in happiness, admitting nothing evil, taking providential care of the world and all that therein is, but he is not of human shape. He is, however, the artificer of the universe and, as it were, the father of all, both in general and in that particular part of him which is all-pervading, and which is called many names according to its various powers. They give the name Dia (Δία) because all things are due to (διά) him; Zeus (Ζῆνα) in so far as he is the cause of life (ζῆν) or pervades all life; the name Athena is given, because the ruling part of the divinity extends to the aether; the name Hera marks its extension to the air; he is called Hephaestus since it spreads to the creative fire; Poseidon, since it stretches to the sea; Demeter, since it reaches to the earth. Similarly men have given the deity his other titles, fastening, as best they can, on some one or other of his peculiar attributes. 7.151. Hence, again, their explanation of the mixture of two substances is, according to Chrysippus in the third book of his Physics, that they permeate each other through and through, and that the particles of the one do not merely surround those of the other or lie beside them. Thus, if a little drop of wine be thrown into the sea, it will be equally diffused over the whole sea for a while and then will be blended with it.Also they hold that there are daemons (δαίμονες) who are in sympathy with mankind and watch over human affairs. They believe too in heroes, that is, the souls of the righteous that have survived their bodies.of the changes which go on in the air, they describe winter as the cooling of the air above the earth due to the sun's departure to a distance from the earth; spring as the right temperature of the air consequent upon his approach to us; 7.157. Zeno of Citium and Antipater, in their treatises De anima, and Posidonius define the soul as a warm breath; for by this we become animate and this enables us to move. Cleanthes indeed holds that all souls continue to exist until the general conflagration; but Chrysippus says that only the souls of the wise do so.They count eight parts of the soul: the five senses, the generative power in us, our power of speech, and that of reasoning. They hold that we see when the light between the visual organ and the object stretches in the form of a cone: so Chrysippus in the second book of his Physics and Apollodorus. The apex of the cone in the air is at the eye, the base at the object seen. Thus the thing seen is reported to us by the medium of the air stretching out towards it, as if by a stick.
6. Stobaeus, Anthology, 1.79.1-1.79.2, 1.155.7-1.155.11 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.138, 2.442, 2.473, 2.786



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
algra, keimpe Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
body Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
chrysippus Celykte, The Stoic Theory of Beauty (2020) 137
cleanthes Celykte, The Stoic Theory of Beauty (2020) 137
nature Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
techne Celykte, The Stoic Theory of Beauty (2020) 137
tenor' Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
wildberger, jula Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
zeno Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 177
zeno of citium Celykte, The Stoic Theory of Beauty (2020) 137