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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



235
Alciphron, Letters, 4.8-4.9


nanSimalion to Petale: If you think it brings you any pleasure or distinction from some of your lovers to have me often coming to your door and cry my heart out to the servants sent to the lovers more lucky than I, then you're mocking me not without reason. But know this: although I know I'm doing myself a disservice, I'm behaving like few of your present lovers would behave if they were being neglected. I really thought I would find comfort in the unmixed wine that I was pouring down in great quantities two nights ago at the house of Euphronius, in order to drive away the thoughts that trouble me by night. But it turned out the opposite. For it rekindled my yearning so that my weeping and wailing aroused pity in the decent but laughter in the rest. I have a small consolation and comfort that is already withering, that which you ripped from your very curls and threw at me during the quarrel which distressed the guests, as if you were annoyed with everything I have sent you. If this really brings you joy, then enjoy my distress, and if it should please you, then do tell those who at the moment are happier than me but who will shortly experience pain, that is to say if they are like me. Pray, however, that Aphrodite will not be angry with you for this scorn. Another man would have written reviling and threatening, but I write begging and praying. For I'm in love, Petale, badly. And I fear that if it gets any worse I shall imitate someone more unfortunate in erotic complaints.


nanPetale to Simalion: I wish a courtesan's house could be maintained by tears; I would indeed have been very well off enjoying an abundance of these from you. But now we have need of gold, garments, jewellery and servants; all livelihood comes from that. I don't have a small paternal estate in Myrrhinus, nor a stake in the silver mines, but only my small fees and these unfortunate and lamentable gifts from my stupid lovers. I'm sorely troubled having been sleeping with you for a year now, and my head is filthy not having even seen an unguent within that time, and wearing the old and ragged shawl I feel shame before my friends; may I therefore have some luck! By what should I then make a living, if I'm idly sitting by your side? You are crying, but you will soon stop. I, however, if I don't have a generous lover I will surely starve. I'm also surprised how unconvincing your tears are. O Lady Aphrodite! You say that you're in love, my good man, and wish that your mistress would sleep with you because you can't live without her. So what! Are there no wine-cups in your house? Is there no one who is going to bring back money from your mother or loans from your father? Happy Philotis! The Graces looked on her with more favourable eyes. What a lover she has in Menecleides, who gives her something each day! That's sure better than weeping. But I, miserable creature, have a dirge-singer, not a lover. He sends garlands and roses to me as if I were in an early grave and says he cries all through the night. If you bring me something, come without weeping; otherwise you're going to torture not me but yourself.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Alciphron, Letters, 1.9, 1.11-1.12, 2.15-2.16, 2.24-2.25, 4.9, 4.18-4.19 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2. Philostratus The Athenian, Letters, 14-15, 19, 35, 39, 58, 11 (2nd cent. CE



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alciphron Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
allusion Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
apaturia Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
chronology Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
city Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
correspondence Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
desire Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
egypt Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
eros (sexual desire), in letters Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 466, 469
farmer Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
festival Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
fisherman Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
fragment Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
friendship, in love letters Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 466
glycera Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
haloa (festival) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
hetaera Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
hetaira Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 469
history Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
innuendo Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 466
lenaia Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
menander Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
oschophoria (festival) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
pederasty, and the roman empire' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 469
poet Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
ptolemy i soter Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
pyanepsion Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
reference Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
rejection Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
response (to a letter) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
sequence of letters Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
shortness Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
slave Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
thesmophoria (festival) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
time (temporality) Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
vagueness Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
wealth Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36
woman Marquis, Epistolary Fiction in Ancient Greek Literature (2023) 36