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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



147
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 1001-1002, 1007-1008, 1011, 1021-1047, 255-256, 683, 762, 916-1000 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. σωφρονοῦντες ἐν χρόνῳ. 1000. learning at last the way of wisdom. The Father stands in awe of you, since you are under Pallas’ wings. Athena
2. Aeschylus, Persians, 620-624, 619 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

619. ἀλλʼ, ὦ φίλοι, χοαῖσι ταῖσδε νερτέρων
3. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 369, 375, 407-417, 468-479, 483-485, 600-629, 656, 659, 663-666, 676-677, 693-698, 700-709, 368 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

368. ἐγὼ δʼ ἂν οὐ κραίνοιμʼ ὑπόσχεσιν πάρος
4. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.86-2.88 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Clouds, 564-574, 563 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

563. ὑψιμέδοντα μὲν θεῶν
6. Euripides, Fragments, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
9. Euripides, Orestes, 908-913, 907 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567, 549 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

549. Why do you honor to excess tyranny, a prosperous injustice
11. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 239-245, 414-416, 442-455, 238 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Herodotus, Histories, 3.80.6, 5.78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.80.6. But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.” 5.78. So the Athenians grew in power and proved, not in one respect only but in all, that equality is a good thing. Evidence for this is the fact that while they were under tyrannical rulers, the Athenians were no better in war than any of their neighbors, yet once they got rid of their tyrants, they were by far the best of all. This, then, shows that while they were oppressed, they were, as men working for a master, cowardly, but when they were freed, each one was eager to achieve for himself.
13. Sophocles, Ajax, 712 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Antigone, 1278-1283, 1312-1316, 1334-1338, 159-160, 843, 940, 988, 1277 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.102 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 7.3-7.4, 25.1-25.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Plutarch, Cimon, 14.3-14.4, 15.3, 16.9-16.10, 17.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Plutarch, Solon, 18.1-18.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18.1. In the second place, wishing to leave all the magistracies in the hands of the well-to-do, as they were, but to give the common people a share in the rest of the government, of which they had hitherto been deprived, Solon made an appraisement of the property of the citizens. Cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 7.3 f. Those who enjoyed a yearly increase of five hundred measures (wet and dry), he placed in the first class, and called them Pentakosiomedimnoi; the second class was composed of those who were able to keep a horse, or had a yearly increase of three hundred measures 18.2. and they were called Hippada Telountes, since they paid a Knight’s tax; the members of the third class, whose yearly increase amounted to two hundred measures (wet and dry together), were called Zeugitai. All the rest were called Thetes, they were not allowed to hold any office, but took part in the administration only as members of the assembly and as jurors. This last privilege seemed at first of no moment, but afterwards proved to be of the very highest importance, since most disputes finally came into the hands of these jurors. For even in cases which Solon assigned to the magistrates for decision, he allowed also an appeal to a popular court when any one desired it.
19. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and character withdrawals Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 721
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112, 113
archons, archons, qualifications for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
areopagus, council of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 113
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112
aristodikos of tanagra Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
aristotle Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
army Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
assembly, athenian (ekklesia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 113
athenaion politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
booty Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
cimon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
cleisthenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112
commoi, examples of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 721
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112, 151
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
debate Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 113
demagogue Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
democracy, ancient and modern, in the united states Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
demokrates Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
demokratia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112, 151
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 112
demos (damos) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
dikasteria Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
divides year with apollo? and drama Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
ephialtes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
eunomia (eunomie) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
foreign policy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
helots Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
herodotus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
hoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
isagoras Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
isocrates Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
isomoiria. see land, redistribution of isonomia (isonomie) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
jurors, juries, athenian (dikastai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
kings Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 113
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
libation bearers, the (aeschylus), and character withdrawals Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 721
metics Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
monarchy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
old oligarch (pseudo-xenophon) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 151
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
participation in government, by all citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 113
participation in government, military service and Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
pericles, citizenship law of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
persian wars Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
persuasion Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
plethos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
plutarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
pnyx Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
public office, officials, accountability of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 151
reform Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
religion Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
satyr-play Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
solon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sources Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
thucydides Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
timocracy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
tragedy, and athenian religion Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
tragedy, and athenian religion dionysiac?' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
voting Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
wallace, robert, viii Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 151
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112, 113
withdrawal, of characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 721
women Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 112
xerxes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113