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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



145
Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 944-996


σὲ τὸν σοφιστήν, τὸν πικρῶς ὑπέρπικρονTo you, the clever and crafty, bitter beyond all bitterness


τὸν ἐξαμαρτόντʼ εἰς θεοὺς ἐφημέροιςwho has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day—to you, thief of fire, I speak. The Father commands that you tell what marriage you boast of, whereby he is to be hurled from power—and this, mark well, set forth in no riddling fashion


πορόντα τιμάς, τὸν πυρὸς κλέπτην λέγω·who has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day—to you, thief of fire, I speak. The Father commands that you tell what marriage you boast of, whereby he is to be hurled from power—and this, mark well, set forth in no riddling fashion


πατὴρ ἄνωγέ σʼ οὕστινας κομπεῖς γάμουςwho has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day—to you, thief of fire, I speak. The Father commands that you tell what marriage you boast of, whereby he is to be hurled from power—and this, mark well, set forth in no riddling fashion


αὐδᾶν, πρὸς ὧν ἐκεῖνος ἐκπίπτει κράτους.who has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day—to you, thief of fire, I speak. The Father commands that you tell what marriage you boast of, whereby he is to be hurled from power—and this, mark well, set forth in no riddling fashion


καὶ ταῦτα μέντοι μηδὲν αἰνικτηρίωςwho has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day—to you, thief of fire, I speak. The Father commands that you tell what marriage you boast of, whereby he is to be hurled from power—and this, mark well, set forth in no riddling fashion


ἀλλʼ αὔθʼ ἕκαστα φράζε· μηδέ μοι διπλᾶςbut point by point, as the case exactly stands; and do not impose upon me a double journey, Prometheus—you see Zeus is not appeased by dealings such as yours. Prometheus


ὁδούς, Προμηθεῦ, προσβάλῃς· ὁρᾷς δʼ ὅτιbut point by point, as the case exactly stands; and do not impose upon me a double journey, Prometheus—you see Zeus is not appeased by dealings such as yours. Prometheus


Ζεὺς τοῖς τοιούτοις οὐχὶ μαλθακίζεται. Προμηθεύςbut point by point, as the case exactly stands; and do not impose upon me a double journey, Prometheus—you see Zeus is not appeased by dealings such as yours. Prometheus


σεμνόστομός γε καὶ φρονήματος πλέωςBravely spoken, in truth, and swollen with pride is your speech, as befits a minion of the gods.


ὁ μῦθός ἐστιν, ὡς θεῶν ὑπηρέτου.Bravely spoken, in truth, and swollen with pride is your speech, as befits a minion of the gods.


νέον νέοι κρατεῖτε καὶ δοκεῖτε δὴYoung you are, as young your power, and you think indeed that you inhabit heights beyond the reach of grief. Have I not seen two sovereigns cast out from these heights? A third, the present lord, I shall live to see cast out in ruin most shameful and most swift. Do you think


ναίειν ἀπενθῆ πέργαμʼ· οὐκ ἐκ τῶνδʼ ἐγὼYoung you are, as young your power, and you think indeed that you inhabit heights beyond the reach of grief. Have I not seen two sovereigns cast out from these heights? A third, the present lord, I shall live to see cast out in ruin most shameful and most swift. Do you think


δισσοὺς τυράννους ἐκπεσόντας ᾐσθόμην;Young you are, as young your power, and you think indeed that you inhabit heights beyond the reach of grief. Have I not seen two sovereigns cast out from these heights? A third, the present lord, I shall live to see cast out in ruin most shameful and most swift. Do you think


τρίτον δὲ τὸν νῦν κοιρανοῦντʼ ἐπόψομαιYoung you are, as young your power, and you think indeed that you inhabit heights beyond the reach of grief. Have I not seen two sovereigns cast out from these heights? A third, the present lord, I shall live to see cast out in ruin most shameful and most swift. Do you think


αἴσχιστα καὶ τάχιστα. μή τί σοι δοκῶYoung you are, as young your power, and you think indeed that you inhabit heights beyond the reach of grief. Have I not seen two sovereigns cast out from these heights? A third, the present lord, I shall live to see cast out in ruin most shameful and most swift. Do you think


ταρβεῖν ὑποπτήσσειν τε τε τοὺς νέους θεούς;I quail, perhaps, and cower before these upstart gods? Far from it—no, not at all. But scurry back the way you came; for you shall learn nothing about which you question me. Hermes


πολλοῦ γε καὶ τοῦ παντὸς ἐλλείπω. σὺ δὲI quail, perhaps, and cower before these upstart gods? Far from it—no, not at all. But scurry back the way you came; for you shall learn nothing about which you question me. Hermes


κέλευθον ἥνπερ ἦλθες ἐγκόνει πάλιν·I quail, perhaps, and cower before these upstart gods? Far from it—no, not at all. But scurry back the way you came; for you shall learn nothing about which you question me. Hermes


πεύσῃ γὰρ οὐδὲν ὧν ἀνιστορεῖς ἐμέ. ἙρμῆςI quail, perhaps, and cower before these upstart gods? Far from it—no, not at all. But scurry back the way you came; for you shall learn nothing about which you question me. Hermes


τοιοῖσδε μέντοι καὶ πρὶν αὐθαδίσμασινYet it was by such proud wilfulness before, too


ἐς τάσδε σαυτὸν πημονὰς καθώρμισας. Προμηθεύςthat you brought yourself to this harbor of distress. Prometheus


τῆς σῆς λατρείας τὴν ἐμὴν δυσπραξίανFor your servitude, rest assured, I’d not barter my hard lot, not I. Hermes


σαφῶς ἐπίστασʼ, οὐκ ἂν ἀλλάξαιμʼ ἐγώ. ἙρμῆςFor your servitude, rest assured, I’d not barter my hard lot, not I. Hermes


κρεῖσσον γὰρ οἶμαι τῇδε λατρεύειν πέτρᾳBetter, no doubt, to serve this rock than be the trusted messenger of Father Zeus! Prometheu


ἢ πατρὶ φῦναι Ζηνὶ πιστὸν ἄγγελον. ΠρομηθεύςBetter, no doubt, to serve this rock than be the trusted messenger of Father Zeus! Prometheu


οὕτως ὑβρίζειν τοὺς ὑβρίζοντας χρεών. ἙρμῆςSuch is the proper style for the insolent to offer insult. Hermes


χλιδᾶν ἔοικας τοῖς παροῦσι πράγμασι. ΠρομηθεύςI think you revel in your present plight. Prometheus


χλιδῶ; χλιδῶντας ὧδε τοὺς ἐμοὺς ἐγὼI revel? Oh, I wish that I might see my enemies revelling in this way! And you, too, I count among them. Hermes


ἐχθροὺς ἴδοιμι· καὶ σὲ δʼ ἐν τούτοις λέγω. ἙρμῆςI revel? Oh, I wish that I might see my enemies revelling in this way! And you, too, I count among them. Hermes


ἦ κἀμὲ γάρ τι συμφοραῖς ἐπαιτιᾷ; ΠρομηθεύςWhat! You blame me in some way for your calamities? Prometheus


ἁπλῷ λόγῳ τοὺς πάντας ἐχθαίρω θεούςIn one word, I hate all the gods that received good at my hands and with ill requite me wrongfully. Hermes


ὅσοι παθόντες εὖ κακοῦσί μʼ ἐκδίκως. ἙρμῆςIn one word, I hate all the gods that received good at my hands and with ill requite me wrongfully. Hermes


κλύω σʼ ἐγὼ μεμηνότʼ οὐ σμικρὰν νόσον. ΠρομηθεύςYour words declare you stricken with no slight madness. Prometheus


νοσοῖμʼ ἄν, εἰ νόσημα τοὺς ἐχθροὺς στυγεῖν. ἙρμῆςMad I may be—if it is madness to loathe one’s enemies. Hermes


εἴης φορητὸς οὐκ ἄν, εἰ πράσσοις καλῶς. ΠρομηθεύςYou would be unbearable if you were prosperous. Prometheus


ὤμοι. ἙρμῆςAlas! Hermes


ὤμοι. ἙρμῆςPrometheus


ὤμοι; τόδε Ζεὺς τοὔπος οὐκ ἐπίσταται. ΠρομηθεύςAlas! Hermes


ὤμοι; τόδε Ζεὺς τοὔπος οὐκ ἐπίσταται. ΠρομηθεύςPrometheus


ἀλλʼ ἐκδιδάσκει πάνθʼ ὁ γηράσκων χρόνος. ἙρμῆςBut ever-ageing Time teaches all things. Hermes


καὶ μὴν σύ γʼ οὔπω σωφρονεῖν ἐπίστασαι. ΠρομηθεύςYes, but you at least have not yet learned to keep a sober mind. Prometheus


σὲ γὰρ προσηύδων οὐκ ἂν ὄνθʼ ὑπηρέτην. ἙρμῆςOr else I would not have addressed you, an underling. Hermes


ἐρεῖν ἔοικας οὐδὲν ὧν χρῄζει πατήρ. ΠρομηθεύςIt seems you will answer nothing that the Father demands. Prometheus


καὶ μὴν ὀφείλων γʼ ἂν τίνοιμʼ αὐτῷ χάριν. ἙρμῆςYes, truly, I am his debtor and I should repay favor to him. Hermes


ἐκερτόμησας δῆθεν ὡς παῖδʼ ὄντα με. ΠρομηθεύςYou taunt me as though, indeed, I were a child. Prometheus


οὐ γὰρ σὺ παῖς τε κἄτι τοῦδʼ ἀνούστεροςAnd are you not a child and even more witless than a child if you expect to learn anything from me? There is no torment or device by which


εἰ προσδοκᾷς ἐμοῦ τι πεύσεσθαι πάρα;And are you not a child and even more witless than a child if you expect to learn anything from me? There is no torment or device by which


οὐκ ἔστιν αἴκισμʼ οὐδὲ μηχάνημʼ ὅτῳAnd are you not a child and even more witless than a child if you expect to learn anything from me? There is no torment or device by which


προτρέψεταί με Ζεὺς γεγωνῆσαι τάδεZeus shall induce me to utter this until these injurious fetters are loosed. So then, let his blazing lightning be hurled, and with the white wings of the snow and thunders of earthquake let him confound the reeling world.


πρὶν ἂν χαλασθῇ δεσμὰ λυμαντήρια.Zeus shall induce me to utter this until these injurious fetters are loosed. So then, let his blazing lightning be hurled, and with the white wings of the snow and thunders of earthquake let him confound the reeling world.


πρὸς ταῦτα ῥιπτέσθω μὲν αἰθαλοῦσσα φλόξZeus shall induce me to utter this until these injurious fetters are loosed. So then, let his blazing lightning be hurled, and with the white wings of the snow and thunders of earthquake let him confound the reeling world.


λευκοπτέρῳ δὲ νιφάδι καὶ βροντήμασιZeus shall induce me to utter this until these injurious fetters are loosed. So then, let his blazing lightning be hurled, and with the white wings of the snow and thunders of earthquake let him confound the reeling world.


χθονίοις κυκάτω πάντα καὶ ταρασσέτω.Zeus shall induce me to utter this until these injurious fetters are loosed. So then, let his blazing lightning be hurled, and with the white wings of the snow and thunders of earthquake let him confound the reeling world.


γνάμψει γὰρ οὐδὲν τῶνδέ μʼ ὥστε καὶ φράσαιFor nothing of this shall bend my will even to tell at whose hands he is fated to be hurled from his sovereignty. Hermes


πρὸς οὗ χρεών νιν ἐκπεσεῖν τυραννίδος. ἙρμῆςFor nothing of this shall bend my will even to tell at whose hands he is fated to be hurled from his sovereignty. Hermes


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 19 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Διὸς προφήτης δʼ ἐστὶ Λοξίας πατρός.
2. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 1016-1021, 1026, 1043-1054, 11, 62, 908-940, 945-996, 10 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. ὡς ἂν διδαχθῇ τὴν Διὸς τυραννίδα 10. o that he may learn to bear with the sovereignty of Zeus and cease his man-loving ways. Hephaestus
3. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Birds, 1643, 1706-1765, 1605 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1605. ἀποστερεῖς τὸν πατέρα τῆς τυραννίδος;
5. Aristophanes, Clouds, 366-382, 563-565, 816-828, 365 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

365. αὗται γάρ τοι μόναι εἰσὶ θεαί, τἄλλα δὲ πάντ' ἐστὶ φλύαρος.
6. Euripides, Ion, 68-73, 67 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.32.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.32.1. Thus Solon granted second place in happiness to these men. Croesus was vexed and said, “My Athenian guest, do you so much despise our happiness that you do not even make us worth as much as common men?” Solon replied, “Croesus, you ask me about human affairs, and I know that the divine is entirely grudging and troublesome to us.
8. Isocrates, Antidosis, 268 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.38.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.38.7. asking, if I may so say, for something different from the conditions under which we live, and yet comprehending inadequately those very conditions; very slaves to the pleasure of the ear, and more like the audience of a rhetorician than the council of a city.
10. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 28.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plautus, Amphitruo, 465-498, 464 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, prometheus bound Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
aeschylus Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
amphitryo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
aniconism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
apollo, loxias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
apology Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
aristophanes, birds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
aristophanes, clouds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
athenian democracy Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
athens and athenians, tyranny and Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
basileia (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
chaerephon Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
change Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
croesus, fall of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
cronus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
democracy Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
democritus Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
demosthenes Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
empty-space-aniconism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
herodotus, historical perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
herodotus, on tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
ionian cosmology and science Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
iris Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
isis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
isocrates Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
lysias Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
men tyrannos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
mt olympus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
oracle (site) clarus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
orphic rites and mysticism Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
parmenides Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
peace / eirene (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
peisetaerus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
peloponnesian war Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
pericles Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
presocratics Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
prometheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
prophecy and prophets Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
ritual Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
sacred marriage Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
sophistic movement Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
sovereignty, concept of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
thirty oligarchs (tyrants) Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
thunderbolt Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
trygaeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
tyrannos, men Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
tyranny, theology of' Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
uranus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
war (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
xanthias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 124
xenophon Ebrey and Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed (2022) 76
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
zeus, and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
zeus, and victory Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20
zeus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 20