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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



144
Aeschylus, Persians, 605-851
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τιμὰς προπέμψω τάσδε νερτέροις θεοῖς. ΧορόςCHORUS chanting: Yes, royal lady, Persia's honour'd grace, To earth's dark chambers pour thy off'rings: we With choral hymns will supplicate the powers That guide the dead, to be propitious to us. And you, that o'er the realms of night extend Your sacred sway, thee mighty earth, and the Hermes; thee chief, tremendous king, whose throne Awes with supreme dominion, I adjure: Send, from your gloomy regions, send his shade Once more to visit this ethereal light; That he alone, if aught of dread event He sees yet threat'ning Persia, may disclose To us poor mortals Fate's extreme decree. Hears the honour'd godlike king? These barbaric notes of wo, Taught in descant sad to ring, Hears he in the shades below? Thou, O Earth, and you, that lead Through your sable realms the dead, Guide him as he takes his way, And give him to the ethereal light of day! Let the illustrious shade arise Glorious in his radiant state, More than blazed before our eyes, Ere sad Susa mourn'd his fate. Dear he lived, his tomb is dear, Shrining virtues we revere: Send then, monarch of the dead, Such as Darius was, Darius' shade. He in realm-unpeopling war Wasted not his subjects' blood, Godlike in his will to spare, In his councils wise and good. Rise then, sovereign lord, to light; On this mound's sepulchral height Lift thy sock in saffron died, And rear thy rich tiara's regal pride! Great and good, Darius, rise: Lord of Persia's lord, appear: Thus involved with thrilling cries Come, our tale of sorrow hear! War her Stygian pennons spreads, Brooding darkness o'er our heads; For stretch'd along the dreary shore The flow'r of Asia lies distain'd with gore. Rise, Darius, awful power; Long for thee our tears shall flow. Why thy ruin'd empire o'er Swells this double flood of wo? Sweeping o'er the azure tide Rode thy navy's gallant pride: Navy now no more, for all Beneath the whelming wave- ATOSSA performs her ritual by the tomb. As the song concludes the GHOST OF DARIUS appears from the tomb.
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Πέρσαι γεραιοί, τίνα πόλις πονεῖ πόνον;GHOST OF DARIUS: Ye faithful Persians, honour'd now in age, Once the companions of my youth, what ills Afflict the state? The firm earth groans, it opes, Disclosing its vast deeps; and near my tomb I see my wife: this shakes my troubled soul With fearful apprehensions; yet her off'rings Pleased I receive. And you around my tomb Chanting the lofty strain, whose solemn air Draws forth the dead, with grief-attemper'd notes Mournfully call me: not with ease the way Leads to this upper air; and the stern gods, Prompt to admit, yield not a passage back But with reluctance: much with them my power Availing, with no tardy step I come. Say then, with what new ill doth Persia groan? CHORUS: chanting My wonted awe o'ercomes me; in thy presence I dare not raise my eyes, I dare not speak. GHOST OF DARIUS: Since from the realms below, by thy sad strains Adjured, I come, speak; let thy words be brief; Say whence thy grief, tell me unawed by fear. I dread to forge a flattering tale, I dread To grieve thee with a harsh offensive truth.
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λέξας δύσλεκτα φίλοισιν. ΔαρεῖοςGHOST OF DARIUS: Since fear hath chained his tongue, high-honour'd dame, Once my imperial consort, check thy tears, Thy griefs, and speak distinctly. Mortal man Must bear his lot of wo; afflictions rise Many from sea, many from land, if life Be haply measured through a lengthen'd course. ATOSSA: O thou that graced with Fortune's choicest gifts Surpassing mortals, while thine eye beheld Yon sun's ethereal rays, lived'st like a god Bless'd amid thy Persians; bless'd I deem thee now In death, ere sunk in this abyss of ills, Darius, hear at once our sum of wo; Ruin through all her states hath crush'd thy Persia. GHOST OF DARIUS: By pestilence, or faction's furious storms? ATOSSA: Not so: near Athens perish'd all our troops. GHOST OF DARIUS: Say, of my sons, which led the forces thither? ATOSSA: The impetuous Xerxes, thinning all the land. GHOST OF DARIUS: By sea or land dared he this rash attempt? ATOSSA: By both: a double front the war presented. GHOST OF DARIUS: A host so vast what march conducted o'er? ATOSSA: From shore to shore he bridged the Hellespont. GHOST OF DARIUS: What! could he chain the mighty Bosphorus? ATOSSA: Ev'n so, some god assisting his design. GHOST OF DARIUS: Some god of power to cloud his better sense. ATOSSA: The event now shows what mischiefs he achieved. GHOST OF DARIUS: What suffer'd they, for whom your sorrows flow? ATOSSA: His navy sunk spreads ruin through the camp. GHOST OF DARIUS: Fell all his host beneath the slaught'ring spear? ATOSSA: Susa, through all her streets, mourns her lost sons. GHOST OF DARIUS: How vain the succour, the defence of arms? ATOSSA: In Bactra age and grief are only left. GHOST OF DARIUS: Ah, what a train of warlike youth is lost! ATOSSA: Xerxes, astonished, desolate, alone- GHOST OF DARIUS: How will this end? Nay, pause not. Is he safe? ATOSSA: Fled o'er the bridge, that join'd the adverse strands. GHOST OF DARIUS: And reach'd this shore in safety? Is this true? ATOSSA: True are thy words, and not to be gainsay'd.
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φεῦ, ταχεῖά γʼ ἦλθε χρησμῶν πρᾶξις, ἐς δὲ παῖδʼ ἐμὸνGHOST OF DARIUS: With what a winged course the oracles Haste their completion! With the lightning's speed Jove on my son hath hurled his threaten'd vengeance: Yet I implored the gods that it might fall In time's late process: but when rashness drives Impetuous on, the scourge of Heaven upraised Lashes the Fury forward; hence these ills Pour headlong on my friends. Not weighing this, My son, with all the fiery pride of youth, Hath quickened their arrival, while he hoped To bind the sacred Hellespont, to hold The raging Bosphorus, like a slave, in chains, And dared the advent'rous passage, bridging firm With links of solid iron his wondrous way, To lead his numerous host; and swell'd with thoughts Presumptuous, deem'd, vain mortal! that his power Should rise above the gods, and Neptune's might. And was riot this the phrensy of the soul? But much I fear lest all my treasured wealth Fall to some daring hand an easy prey.
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οὑμὸς ἀνθρώποις γένηται τοῦ φθάσαντος ἁρπαγή. ἌτοσσαATOSSA: This from too frequent converse with bad men The impetuous Xerxes learn'd; these caught his ear With thy great deeds, as winning for thy sons Vast riches with thy conquering spear, while he Tim'rous and slothful, never, save in sport, Lifted his lance, nor added to the wealth Won by his noble fathers. This reproach Oft by bad men repeated, urged his soul To attempt this war, and lead his troops to Greece.
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τοιγάρ σφιν ἔργον ἐστὶν ἐξειργασμένονGHOST OF DARIUS: Great deeds have they achieved, and memorable For ages: never hath this wasted state Suffer'd such ruin, since heaven's awful king Gave to one lord Asia's extended plains White with innumerous flocks, and to his hands Consign'd the imperial sceptre. Her brave hosts A Mede first led; the virtues of his son Fix'd firm the empire, for his temperate soul Breathed prudence. Cyrus next, by fortune graced, Adorn'd the throne, and bless'd his grateful friends With peace: he to his mighty monarchy Join'd Lydia, and the Phrygians; to his power Ionia bent reluctant; but the gods His son then wore the regal diadem. With victory his gentle virtues crown'd His son then wore the regal diadem. Next to disgrace his country, and to stain The splendid glories of this ancient throne, Rose Mardus: him, with righteous vengeance fired Artaphernes, and his confederate chiefs Crush'd in his palace: Maraphis assumed The sceptre: after him Artaphernes. Me next to this exalted eminence, Crowning my great ambition, Fortune raised. In many a glorious field my glittering spear Flamed in the van of Persia's numerous hosts; But never wrought such ruin to the state. Xerxes, my son, in all the pride of youth Listens to youthful counsels, my commands No more remember'd; hence, my hoary friends, Not the whole line of Persia's sceptred lords, You know it well, so wasted her brave sons.
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τί οὖν, ἄναξ Δαρεῖε, ποῖ καταστρέφειςLEADER OF THE CHORUS: Why this? To what fair end are these thy words Directed? Sovereign lord, instruct thy Persians How, mid this ruin, best to guide their state.
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εἰ μὴ στρατεύοισθʼ ἐς τὸν Ἑλλήνων τόπονGHOST OF DARIUS: No more 'gainst Greece lead your embattled hosts; Not though your deep'ning phalanx spreads the field Outnumb'ring theirs: their very earth fights for them. LEADER: What may thy words import? How fight for them? GHOST OF DARIUS: With famine it destroys your cumbrous train. LEADER: Choice levies, prompt for action, will we send, GHOST OF DARIUS: Those, in the fields of Greece that now remain, Shall not revisit safe the Persian shore. LEADER: What! shall not all the host of Persia pass Again from Europe o'er the Hellespont?
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περᾷ τὸν Ἕλλης πορθμὸν Εὐρώπης ἄπο; ΔαρεῖοςGHOST OF DARIUS: Of all their numbers few, if aught avails The faith of heaven-sent oracles to him That weighs the past, in their accomplishment Not partial: hence he left, in faithless hope Confiding, his selected train of heroes. These have their station where Asopus flows Wat'ring the plain, whose grateful currents roll Diffusing plenty through Boeotia's fields. There misery waits to crush them with the load Of heaviest ills, in vengeance for their proud And impious daring; for where'er they held Through Greece their march, they fear'd not to profane The statues of the gods; their hallow'd shrines Emblazed, o'erturn'd their altars, and in ruins, Rent from their firm foundations, to the ground Levell'd their temples; such their frantic deeds, Nor less their suff'rings; greater still await them; For Vengeance hath not wasted all her stores; The heap yet swells; for in Plataea's plains Beneath the Doric spear the clotted mass Of carnage shall arise, that the high mounds, Piled o'er the dead, to late posterity Shall give this silent record to men's eyes, That proud aspiring thoughts but ill beseem Weak mortals: for oppression, when it springs, Puts forth the blade of vengeance, and its fruit Yields a ripe harvest of repentant wo. Behold this vengeance, and remember Greece, Remember Athens: henceforth let not pride, Her present state disdaining, strive to grasp Another's, and her treasured happiness Shed on the ground: such insolent attempts Awake the vengeance of offended Jove. But you, whose age demands more temperate thoughts, With words of well-placed counsel teach his youth To curb that pride, which from the gods calls down Destruction on his head. To ATOSSA: And thou, whose age The miseries of thy Xerxes sink with sorrow, Go to thy house, thence choose the richest robe, And meet thy son; for through the rage of grief His gorgeous vestments from his royal limbs Are foully rent. With gentlest courtesy Soothe his affliction; for is duteous ear, I know, will listen to thy voice alone. Now to the realms of darkness I descend. My ancient friends, farewell, and mid these ills Each day in pleasures battle your drooping spirits, For treasured riches naught avail the dead.
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ὡς τοῖς θανοῦσι πλοῦτος οὐδὲν ὠφελεῖ. ΧορόςThe GHOST OF DARIUS vanishes into the tomb. LEADER: These many present, many future ills Denounced on Persia, sink my soul with grief. ATOSSA: Unhappy fortune, what a tide of ills Bursts o'er me! Chief this foul disgrace, which shows My son divested of his rich attire, His royal robes all rent, distracts my thoughts. But I will go, choose the most gorgeous vest, And haste to meet my son. Never in his woes Will I forsake whom my soul holds most dear. ATOSSA: departs as the CHORUS begins its song.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 11.51-11.80, 11.90-11.151 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aeschylus, Persians, 606-851, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. ἐν ὄμμασιν τἀνταῖα φαίνεται θεῶν
3. Herodotus, Histories, 3.30-3.32, 3.68, 5.92, 5.92.7, 7.69 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.30. But Cambyses, the Egyptians say, owing to this wrongful act immediately went mad, although even before he had not been sensible. His first evil act was to destroy his full brother Smerdis, whom he had sent away from Egypt to Persia out of jealousy, because Smerdis alone could draw the bow brought from the Ethiopian by the Fish-eaters as far as two fingerbreadths, but no other Persian could draw it. ,Smerdis having gone to Persia, Cambyses saw in a dream a vision, in which it seemed to him that a messenger came from Persia and told him that Smerdis sitting on the royal throne touched heaven with his head. ,Fearing therefore for himself, lest his brother might slay him and so be king, he sent Prexaspes, the most trusted of his Persians, to Persia to kill him. Prexaspes went up to Susa and killed Smerdis; some say that he took Smerdis out hunting, others that he brought him to the Red Sea and there drowned him. 3.31. This, they say, was the first of Cambyses' evil acts; next, he destroyed his full sister, who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he had taken to wife. ,He married her in this way (for before this, it had by no means been customary for Persians to marry their sisters): Cambyses was infatuated with one of his sisters and when he wanted to marry her, because his intention was contrary to usage, he summoned the royal judges and inquired whether there were any law enjoining one, that so desired, to marry his sister. ,These royal judges are men chosen out from the Persians to function until they die or are detected in some injustice; it is they who decide suits in Persia and interpret the laws of the land; all matters are referred to them. ,These then replied to Cambyses with an answer which was both just and prudent, namely, that they could find no law enjoining a brother to marry his sister; but that they had found a law permitting the King of Persia to do whatever he liked. ,Thus, although they feared Cambyses they did not break the law, and, to save themselves from death for keeping it, they found another law abetting one who wished to marry sisters. ,So Cambyses married the object of his desire; yet not long afterwards he took another sister as well. It was the younger of these who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he now killed. 3.32. There are two tales of her death, as there are of the death of Smerdis. The Greeks say that Cambyses had set a lion cub to fight a puppy, and that this woman was watching too; and that as the puppy was losing, its brother broke its leash and came to help, and the two dogs together got the better of the cub. ,Cambyses, they say, was pleased with the sight, but the woman wept as she sat by. Cambyses perceiving it asked why she wept, and she said that when she saw the puppy help its brother she had wept, recalling Smerdis and knowing that there would be no avenger for him. ,For saying this, according to the Greek story, she was killed by Cambyses. But the Egyptian tale is that as the two sat at table the woman took a lettuce and plucked off the leaves, then asked her husband whether he preferred the look of it with or without leaves. “With the leaves,” he said; whereupon she answered: ,“Yet you have stripped Cyrus' house as bare as this lettuce.” Angered at this, they say, he sprang upon her, who was great with child, and she miscarried and died of the hurt he gave her. 3.68. Such was his proclamation at the beginning of his reign; but in the eighth month he was exposed in the following manner. There was one Otanes, son of Pharnaspes, as well-born and rich a man as any Persian. ,This Otanes was the first to guess that the Magus was not Cyrus' son Smerdis and who, in fact, he was; the reason was, that he never left the acropolis nor summoned any notable Persian into his presence. And having formed this suspicion Otanes did as follows: ,Cambyses had taken his daughter, whose name was Phaedyme; this same girl the Magus had now and he lived with her and with all Cambyses' other wives. Otanes sent to this daughter, asking at what man's side she lay, with Smerdis, Cyrus' son, or with some other? ,She sent back a message that she did not know; for (she said) she had never seen Cyrus' son Smerdis, nor did she know who her bedfellow was. Then Otanes sent a second message, to this effect: “If you do not know Cyrus' son Smerdis yourself, then find out from Atossa who it is that she and you are living with; for surely she knows her own brother.” ,To this his daughter replied: “I cannot communicate with Atossa, nor can I see any other of the women of the household; for no sooner had this man, whoever he is, made himself king, than he sent us to live apart, each in her own appointed place.” 5.92. These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Eetion,worthy of honor, no man honors you. /l l Labda is with child, and her child will be a millstone /l lWhich will fall upon the rulers and will bring justice to Corinth. /l /quote ,This oracle which was given to Eetion was in some way made known to the Bacchiadae. The earlier oracle sent to Corinth had not been understood by them, despite the fact that its meaning was the same as the meaning of the oracle of Eetion, and it read as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"An eagle in the rocks has conceived, and will bring forth a lion, /l lStrong and fierce. The knees of many will it loose. /l lThis consider well, Corinthians, /l lYou who dwell by lovely Pirene and the overhanging heights of Corinth. /l /quote ,This earlier prophecy had been unintelligible to the Bacchiadae, but as soon as they heard the one which was given to Eetion, they understood it at once, recognizing its similarity with the oracle of Eetion. Now understanding both oracles, they kept quiet but resolved to do away with the offspring of Eetion. Then, as soon as his wife had given birth, they sent ten men of their clan to the township where Eetion dwelt to kill the child. ,These men came to Petra and passing into Eetion's courtyard, asked for the child. Labda, knowing nothing of the purpose of their coming and thinking that they wished to see the baby out of affection for its father, brought it and placed it into the hands of one of them. Now they had planned on their way that the first of them who received the child should dash it to the ground. ,When, however, Labda brought and handed over the child, by divine chance it smiled at the man who took it. This he saw, and compassion prevented him from killing it. Filled with pity, he handed it to a second, and this man again to a third.In fact it passed from hand to hand to each of the ten, for none would make an end of it. ,They then gave the child back to its mother, and after going out, they stood before the door reproaching and upbraiding one another, but chiefly him who had first received it since he had not acted in accordance with their agreement. Finally they resolved to go in again and all have a hand in the killing. ,Fate, however, had decreed that Eetion's offspring should be the source of ills for Corinth, for Labda, standing close to this door, heard all this. Fearing that they would change their minds and that they would take and actually kill the child, she took it away and hid it where she thought it would be hardest to find, in a chest, for she knew that if they returned and set about searching they would seek in every place—which in fact they did. ,They came and searched, but when they did not find it, they resolved to go off and say to those who had sent them that they had carried out their orders. They then went away and said this. ,Eetion's son, however, grew up, and because of his escape from that danger, he was called Cypselus, after the chest. When he had reached manhood and was seeking a divination, an oracle of double meaning was given him at Delphi. Putting faith in this, he made an attempt on Corinth and won it. ,The oracle was as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"That man is fortunate who steps into my house, /l l Cypselus, son of Eetion, the king of noble Corinth, /l lHe himself and his children, but not the sons of his sons. /l /quote Such was the oracle. Cypselus, however, when he had gained the tyranny, conducted himself in this way: many of the Corinthians he drove into exile, many he deprived of their wealth, and by far the most he had killed. ,After a reign of thirty years, he died in the height of prosperity, and was succeeded by his son Periander. Now Periander was to begin with milder than his father, but after he had held converse by messenger with Thrasybulus the tyrant of Miletus, he became much more bloodthirsty than Cypselus. ,He had sent a herald to Thrasybulus and inquired in what way he would best and most safely govern his city. Thrasybulus led the man who had come from Periander outside the town, and entered into a sown field. As he walked through the corn, continually asking why the messenger had come to him from Corinth, he kept cutting off all the tallest ears of wheat which he could see, and throwing them away, until he had destroyed the best and richest part of the crop. ,Then, after passing through the place and speaking no word of counsel, he sent the herald away. When the herald returned to Corinth, Periander desired to hear what counsel he brought, but the man said that Thrasybulus had given him none. The herald added that it was a strange man to whom he had been sent, a madman and a destroyer of his own possessions, telling Periander what he had seen Thrasybulus do. ,Periander, however, understood what had been done, and perceived that Thrasybulus had counselled him to slay those of his townsmen who were outstanding in influence or ability; with that he began to deal with his citizens in an evil manner. Whatever act of slaughter or banishment Cypselus had left undone, that Periander brought to accomplishment. In a single day he stripped all the women of Corinth naked, because of his own wife Melissa. ,Periander had sent messengers to the Oracle of the Dead on the river Acheron in Thesprotia to enquire concerning a deposit that a friend had left, but Melissa, in an apparition, said that she would tell him nothing, nor reveal where the deposit lay, for she was cold and naked. The garments, she said, with which Periander had buried with her had never been burnt, and were of no use to her. Then, as evidence for her husband that she spoke the truth, she added that Periander had put his loaves into a cold oven. ,When this message was brought back to Periander (for he had had intercourse with the dead body of Melissa and knew her token for true), immediately after the message he made a proclamation that all the Corinthian women should come out into the temple of Hera. They then came out as to a festival, wearing their most beautiful garments, and Periander set his guards there and stripped them all alike, ladies and serving-women, and heaped all the clothes in a pit, where, as he prayed to Melissa, he burnt them. ,When he had done this and sent a second message, the ghost of Melissa told him where the deposit of the friend had been laid. “This, then, Lacedaimonians, is the nature of tyranny, and such are its deeds. ,We Corinthians marvelled greatly when we saw that you were sending for Hippias, and now we marvel yet more at your words to us. We entreat you earnestly in the name of the gods of Hellas not to establish tyranny in the cities, but if you do not cease from so doing and unrighteously attempt to bring Hippias back, be assured that you are proceeding without the Corinthians' consent.” 7.69. The Arabians wore mantles girded up, and carried at their right side long bows curving backwards. The Ethiopians were wrapped in skins of leopards and lions, and carried bows made of palmwood strips, no less than four cubits long, and short arrows pointed not with iron but with a sharpened stone that they use to carve seals; furthermore, they had spears pointed with a gazelle's horn sharpened like a lance, and also studded clubs. ,When they went into battle they painted half their bodies with gypsum and the other half with vermilion. The Arabians and the Ethiopians who dwell above Egypt had as commander Arsames, the son of Darius and Artystone daughter of Cyrus, whom Darius loved best of his wives; he had an image made of her of hammered gold.
4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.498, 4.215, 4.420-4.423, 4.469-4.473 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.420. his stratagem, and all the coming change 4.421. perceived ere it began. Her jealous fear 4.422. counted no hour secure. That unclean tongue 4.423. of Rumor told her fevered heart the fleet 4.469. then thus the silence broke: “O Queen, not one 4.470. of my unnumbered debts so strongly urged 4.471. would I gainsay. Elissa's memory 4.472. will be my treasure Iong as memory holds 4.473. or breath of life is mine. Hear my brief plea!
5. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 6.14-6.15 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

6. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 27 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
aeneas, and anna Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
aeneas, as paris Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
aeschylus, persae Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406; Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
aeschylus Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
anna, didos sister Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
artystone, atossas sister Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
atossa, as dido Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
broadhead, henry d. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
cambyses Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
carthage, as persia Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 115
cultic ritual practice, curse tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
cultic ritual practice, magic Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
daimon/daimones Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
death and the afterlife, communication with souls of the dead Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
death and the afterlife, conceptions of death Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
death and the afterlife, curse tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
death and the afterlife, ghosts/restless spirits/revenants Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
death and the afterlife, hades (underworld) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
death and the afterlife, magic Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
death and the afterlife, necromancy and oracles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
death and the afterlife, summoning of souls' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
death and the afterlife, summoning of souls Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
eidinow, esther Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
gasparro, giulia s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
graf, fritz Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
hall, e. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
herodotos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
initiation and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
johnston, sarah iles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
jouan, f. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
lucian Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
necromancy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
ogden, daniel Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406
periander and his wife Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
persephone (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
persian culture and religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 406, 407
trophonius Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407
voutiras, emmanuel Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 407