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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



144
Aeschylus, Persians, 40-49


δεινοὶ πλῆθός τʼ ἀνάριθμοι. ΧορόςTo the stout oar. Next these the Lycian troops, Soft sons of luxury; and those that dwell Amid the inland forests, from the sea Far distant; these Metragathes commands, And virtuous Arceus, royal chiefs, that shine In burnish'd gold, and many a whirling car Drawn by six generous steeds from Sardis lead, A glorious and a dreadful spectacle. And from the foot of Tmolus, sacred mount, Eager to bind on Greece the servile yoke, Mardon and Tharybis the massy spear
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.87-2.93, 10.484, 12.164-12.172 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.87. /and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; 2.88. /and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; 2.89. /and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; 2.90. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 2.91. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 2.92. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 2.93. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 10.484. /to stand idle with thy weapons; nay, loose the horses; or do thou slay the men, and I will look to the horses. So spake he, and into the other's heart flashing-eyed Athene breathed might, and he fell to slaving on this side and on that, and from them uprose hideous groaning as they were smitten with the sword, and the earth grew red with blood. 12.164. /alike and Trojans; and helms rang harshly and bossed shields, as they were smitten with great stones. Then verily Asius, son of Hyrtacus, uttered a groan, and smote both his thighs, and in sore indignation he spake, saying:Father Zeus, of a surety thou too then art utterly a lover of lies 12.165. /for I deemed not that the Achaean warriors would stay our might and our invincible hands. But they like wasps of nimble waist, or bees that have made their nest in a rugged path, and leave not their hollow home, but abide 12.166. /for I deemed not that the Achaean warriors would stay our might and our invincible hands. But they like wasps of nimble waist, or bees that have made their nest in a rugged path, and leave not their hollow home, but abide 12.167. /for I deemed not that the Achaean warriors would stay our might and our invincible hands. But they like wasps of nimble waist, or bees that have made their nest in a rugged path, and leave not their hollow home, but abide 12.168. /for I deemed not that the Achaean warriors would stay our might and our invincible hands. But they like wasps of nimble waist, or bees that have made their nest in a rugged path, and leave not their hollow home, but abide 12.169. /for I deemed not that the Achaean warriors would stay our might and our invincible hands. But they like wasps of nimble waist, or bees that have made their nest in a rugged path, and leave not their hollow home, but abide 12.170. /and in defence of their young ward off hunter folk; even so these men, though they be but two, are not minded to give ground from the gate, till they either slay or be slain. So spake he, but with these words he moved not the mind of Zeus, for it was to Hector that Zeus willed to vouchsafe glory. 12.171. /and in defence of their young ward off hunter folk; even so these men, though they be but two, are not minded to give ground from the gate, till they either slay or be slain. So spake he, but with these words he moved not the mind of Zeus, for it was to Hector that Zeus willed to vouchsafe glory. 12.172. /and in defence of their young ward off hunter folk; even so these men, though they be but two, are not minded to give ground from the gate, till they either slay or be slain. So spake he, but with these words he moved not the mind of Zeus, for it was to Hector that Zeus willed to vouchsafe glory.
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 105-130, 135-137, 150-151, 160-183, 197-247, 250-251, 65, 67-71, 104 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

104. κύριός εἰμι θροεῖν ὅδιον κράτος αἴσιον ἀνδρῶν 104. Empowered am I to sing
3. Aeschylus, Persians, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14-15, 150-154, 16, 166, 17, 179, 18, 181-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20-28, 289, 29, 298, 3, 30-34, 349, 35-39, 4, 41-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-73, 730, 74-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Τάδε μὲν Περσῶν τῶν οἰχομένων 1. Here we are, the faithful Council of the Persians, who have gone to the land of placeName key=
4. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 10-19, 21-29, 40-49, 5-6, 66-69, 7, 70-76, 766-769, 77, 770-791, 8-9, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Κάδμου πολῖται, χρὴ λέγειν τὰ καίρια 1. Men of Cadmus’s city, he who guards from the stern the concerns of the State and guides its helm with eyes untouched by sleep must speak to the point. For if we succeed, the responsibility is heaven’s;
5. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 10-11, 115-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-162, 17-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-48, 5-9, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Old man, come here and stand before my dwelling. This edition starts with the traditional line 49. Traditional line 1 appears following line 114. Regular numbering resumes at line 115. The print source represents these lines in the usual order. Old man
6. Euripides, Rhesus, 361-367, 360 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

360. And men shall tell of thee, Ilion mine
7. Sophocles, Ajax, 1186-1222, 1185 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.879-1.885 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.879. ὡς δʼ ὅτε λείρια καλὰ περιβρομέουσι μέλισσαι 1.880. πέτρης ἐκχύμεναι σιμβληίδος, ἀμφὶ δὲ λειμὼν 1.881. ἑρσήεις γάνυται, ταὶ δὲ γλυκὺν ἄλλοτε ἄλλον 1.882. καρπὸν ἀμέργουσιν πεποτημέναι· ὧς ἄρα ταίγε 1.883. ἐνδυκὲς ἀνέρας ἀμφὶ κινυρόμεναι προχέοντο 1.884. χερσί τε καὶ μύθοισιν ἐδεικανόωντο ἕκαστον 1.885. εὐχόμεναι μακάρεσσιν ἀπήμονα νόστον ὀπάσσαι.
9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.9, 1.12-1.16, 1.46, 1.299, 1.340, 1.443, 4.667-4.668 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.9. to safe abode in Latium ; whence arose 1.12. O Muse, the causes tell! What sacrilege 1.13. or vengeful sorrow, moved the heavenly Queen 1.14. to thrust on dangers dark and endless toil 1.15. a man whose largest honor in men's eyes 1.46. and fierce Achilles; so she thrust them far 1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.340. behold our navy vilely wrecked, because 1.443. if haply ye have noted, as ye came 4.667. to bring him back to Iove, or set me free. 4.668. On Ocean's bound and next the setting sun


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 102, 104, 109
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
aeschylus, persae Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 102, 104, 109
aeschylus Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 96
agamemnon Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 104
apollonius of rhodes Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 104
argonauts Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 104
atossa, dream Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 109
carthage, and horses Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 104, 109
carthage, as persia Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 102, 104, 109
carthaginians, as bees Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 104
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 102, 104, 109
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 102, 104, 109
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
euripides, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
reliance on passages from earlier drama' Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, language and style Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 81