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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



139
Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 908


ἐγώ σʼ ἔθρεψα, σὺν δὲ γηράναι θέλω. ὈρέστηςIt was I who nourished you, and with you I would grow old. Orestes


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 23.83-23.93, 23.243-23.244, 24.76 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.243. /and easy they are to discern, for he lay in the midst of the pyre, while the others burned apart on the edges thereof, horses and men mingled together. Then let us place the bones in a golden urn wrapped in a double layer of fat until such time as I myself be hidden in Hades. 23.244. /and easy they are to discern, for he lay in the midst of the pyre, while the others burned apart on the edges thereof, horses and men mingled together. Then let us place the bones in a golden urn wrapped in a double layer of fat until such time as I myself be hidden in Hades. 24.76. /that I may speak to her a word of wisdom, to the end that Achilles may accept gifts from Priam, and give Hector back. So spake he, and storm-footed Iris hasted to bear his message, and midway between Samos and rugged Imbros she leapt into the dark sea, and the waters sounded loud above her.
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1179-1330, 1178 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1178. καὶ μὴν ὁ χρησμὸς οὐκέτʼ ἐκ καλυμμάτων 1178. Well then, the oracle from veils no longer
3. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 559, 900-902, 928, 558 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

558. θανόντες, καὶ Λοξίας ἐφήμισεν
4. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 892 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Electra, 1207-1232, 1206 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1206. κατεῖδες, οἷον ἁ τάλαιν' ἔξω πέπλων 1206. Did you see how the unhappy one threw off her robe and showed her bosom in the slaughter, alas, hurling to the ground the limbs that gave me birth? And her hair, I— Choru
6. Euripides, Orestes, 1368 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
alcestis, double burial in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
apollo Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
cassandra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
chorus of choephori Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
chorus of suppliants Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
clytemnestra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
death, funeral/burial of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
death, in suppliant women Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
double burial in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
electra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
eros, self, dispossession of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
eros, self-immolation of evadne in suppliant women and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
music/song, self-immolation of evadne in suppliant women and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
orestes Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
oxymora' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
pseudos Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196
suppliant women self-immolation of evadne in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 70
truth, and reciprocity Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 196