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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 764
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1. Homer, Iliad, 2.257-2.264, 3.245-3.301, 5.212-5.216, 14.271-14.279, 19.175-19.177, 19.196-19.197, 19.242-19.268 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.257. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.258. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.259. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.260. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 3.245. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.246. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.247. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.248. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.249. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.250. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.251. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.252. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.253. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.254. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.255. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.256. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.257. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.258. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.259. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.260. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.261. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.262. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.263. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.264. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. But when they were now come to the Trojans and Achaeans 3.265. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.266. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.267. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.268. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.269. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.270. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.271. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.272. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.273. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.274. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.275. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.276. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.277. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.278. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.279. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.280. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.281. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.282. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.283. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.284. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.285. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.286. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.287. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.288. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.289. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.290. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.291. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.292. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.293. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.294. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.295. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.296. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.297. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.298. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.299. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.300. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 3.301. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 5.212. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.213. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.214. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.215. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 5.216. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 14.271. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.272. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.273. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.274. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.275. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.276. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.277. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.278. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.279. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 19.175. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.176. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.177. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.196. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.197. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.242. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.243. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.244. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.245. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.246. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.247. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.248. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.249. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.250. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.251. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.252. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.253. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.254. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.255. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.256. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.257. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.258. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.261. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.262. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.263. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.264. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.265. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.266. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.267. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.268. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives:
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1432 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1432. μὰ τὴν τέλειον τῆς ἐμῆς παιδὸς Δίκην 1432. By who fulfilled things for my daughter, Justice
3. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 1047, 552, 555-559, 973, 1046 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1046. ἐλευθερώσας πᾶσαν Ἀργείων πόλιν
4. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 1001-1002, 1007-1008, 1011, 1021-1047, 267-275, 287-291, 425-432, 483, 489, 595, 609, 621, 669-673, 680, 710, 754-763, 765-777, 916-1000 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. σωφρονοῦντες ἐν χρόνῳ. 1000. learning at last the way of wisdom. The Father stands in awe of you, since you are under Pallas’ wings. Athena
5. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 265, 264 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

264. τήνδʼ ἐκκαθαίρει κνωδάλων βροτοφθόρων
6. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.62-2.63 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 476-478, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

324. ἐξολοίμην, ἢν ἀκούσω. μηδαμῶς ὦχαρνικοί.
8. Aristophanes, Birds, 445-447, 444 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

444. τόν —; οὐδαμῶς. οὔκ, ἀλλὰ τὠφθαλμὼ λέγω.
9. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 182-238, 181 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

181. τί δῆτα ταῦτ' οὐχ ὡς τάχιστ' ὦ Λαμπιτοῖ
10. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1255 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1255. θήσω πρυτανεῖ' ἢ μηκέτι ζῴην ἐγώ.
11. Aristophanes, Frogs, 586-588, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. λάβ' ἐννέ' ὀβολούς. ἀναβιοίην νυν πάλιν.
12. Euripides, Andromache, 38, 37 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

37. νῦν δ' ἐκλέλοιπα: Ζεὺς τάδ' εἰδείη μέγας
13. Euripides, Cyclops, 270-272, 261 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

261. ἐγώ; κακῶς γ' ἄρ' ἐξόλοι'. 261. I? Perdition catch thee! Odysseu
14. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1026-1031, 1191, 1025 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1025. Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!
15. Euripides, Ion, 1001-1019, 1555-1559, 457, 998-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. Him whom Earth produced, the founder of thy race? Creusa
16. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1007, 948-954, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 738-752, 974, 737 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Euripides, Medea, 736-755, 735 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

735. Wherefore, if thou art bound by an oath, thou wilt not give To avoid the very doubtful form μεθεῖς = μεθείης some read μεθεῖ’ ἂν . me up to them when they come to drag me from the land, but, having entered into a compact and sworn Reading ἐνώμοτος . Hermann changes καὶ into μὴ . A simpler change, supported by a Schol., and one MS., would be to read ἀνωμοτος = whereas if thou only make a verbal compact, without oath, thou mightest be persuaded, etc. The whole passage is, as it stands, probably corrupt; numerous emendations have been proposed. If the above emendation be adopted, it will be necessary to alter οὐκ ἂν πίθοιο for which Munro proposed ὀκνῶν πίθοιο = and fearing their demands of surrender thou mightest yield. Wecklein, τάχ’ ἂν τίθοι σε (adopted by Nauck), is tempting. by heaven as well, thou wilt become my friend and disregard their overtures. Weak is any aid of mine
19. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1007-1008, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1006. No, by Zeus and all his stars, by Ares, god of blood, who established the Sown-men that sprung one day from earth as lords of this land! I will go, and standing on the topmost battlements
20. Euripides, Rhesus, 816 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

816. For this deed—I have sworn by Zeus our Lord !—
21. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1175, 1187-1204, 1174 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Herodotus, Histories, 6.89 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.89. Later Nicodromus, according to his agreement with the Athenians, took possession of the Old City, as it was called; but the Athenians were not there at the right time, for they did not have ships worthy to fight the Aeginetans. While they were asking the Corinthians to lend them ships, the affair was ruined. The Corinthians at that time were their close friends, so they consented to the Athenians' plea and gave them twenty ships, at a price of five drachmas apiece; by their law they could not make a free gift of them. Taking these ships and their own, the Athenians manned seventy in all and sailed for Aegina, but they came a day later than the time agreed.
23. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

842e. which deal with marriage, and with the birth and nurture and education of the children, and with the appointment of magistrates in the State. For the present he must turn, in his legislating, to the subject of food and of those whose labors contribute to its supply. First, then, let there be a code of laws termed agricultural. Ath. The first law—that of Zeus the Boundary-god—shall be stated thus: No man shall move boundary-marks of land, whether they be those of a neighbor who is a native citizen or those of a foreigner
25. Sophocles, Electra, 1239 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

26. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 250-251, 644-645, 660-662, 249 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

27. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1182-1188, 1217, 1222-1248, 1181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1181. First of all, put your right hand in mine. Hyllus:
28. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.41-1.42 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

29. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 25.1, 27.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

30. Demosthenes, Orations, 59.73, 59.78 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

31. Plutarch, Pericles, 9.2-9.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.2. In the beginning, as has been said, pitted as he was against the reputation of Cimon, he tried to ingratiate himself with the people. And since he was the inferior in wealth and property, by means of which Cimon would win over the poor,—furnishing a dinner every day to any Athenian who wanted it, bestowing raiment on the elderly men, and removing the fences from his estates that whosoever wished might pluck the fruit,—Pericles, outdone in popular arts of this sort, had recourse to the distribution of the people’s own wealth. This was on the advice of Damonides, of the deme Oa, as Aristotle has stated. Aristot. Const. Ath. 27.4 .
32. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 2318

33. Epigraphy, Ml, 5.40-5.51



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accused/defendant Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 45
adrastus, king of argos Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392; Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 111; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
aetiology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
agamemnon Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 45; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
aitiological myths in tragedy Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
aitiology in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
alliance with argos Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
alliance with argos (tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
alliance with athens (political, reality) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14, 150
alliance with athens (tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
alliances between states Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
alopeke deme, athens, altars, swearing at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
amphictyonic league Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
andromache Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
apollo, temple at delphi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136, 150
apollo Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
areopagus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
areopagus as setting for oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
argos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
aristotle aristotle Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
aristotles constitution of the athenians (athenaion politeia) Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
athena, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 1, 136
athena Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 111; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 138, 139, 140
athena nike Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
athena the gorgon-slayer, oaths, invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
athenian exceptionalism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
athens and argos Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14, 150
athens and argos (in tragedy) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
authority Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 140
autochthony, athenian Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
character, tragic Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 140
cimon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
clytemnestra Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
colophon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
context-specifity, of divinities invoked Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 1
context-specifity, of location Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 150
creusa (ion) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
cult, in euripides Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 140
curse-tablets Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
cyrene Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
delphi, oaths at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
delphi, temple of apollo Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136, 150
demeter, temples Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
democracy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
dikē Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
eideshort Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 6
eideshorte Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 1
eikadeus koine Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
eleusis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
encomium Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
erinyes, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
erinyes Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 138
euthynoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
gender and oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
gerarai oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
ghost, embodied Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 45
gorgon-slayer (athena), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
gortyn Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
heroes, cult of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 141
heroes Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
heroic ideal Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
homicide trials, oaths in Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
host gods or found cults in tragedy Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
inscribed oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
ion Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
law-courts, dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
location of rituals associated with oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 150
marriage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
myth, and geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
narrative (or retrospection) Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 140
oath-challenges Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 14
oath particle Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 6
oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 1, 14, 136, 150
oedipus, in sophocles oc Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
official oaths, citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, gerarai oath in athens Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
official oaths, phratry oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, secretaries Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, tagoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
orchomenus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
orestes, as afterlife hero Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
orestes, trial of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 139, 141
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392; Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 45; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
pericles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
persian wars, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
plants as oath witnesses, plataea, oath of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
plutarch Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
politics Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
priestesses oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
reconciliation oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
revenant Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 45
rhodes, p. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
satyr-dramas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
secretaries oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
self-curses, voluntary Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
snake motif Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 141
sparta Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
spectre Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 45
thebes Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
thera Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
theseus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
thesmophoria festival, thetis, shrine of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
thudippus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 45
tragedy, and athenian religion Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
tragedy, and athenian religion and hero-cults' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
tragedy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
tripods Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 136
tyranny Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 141
victory Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 140
voluntary self-curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
women, in athens Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 100
written oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
zeus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 136