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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 679-681
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κλύοιτʼ ἂν ἤδη θεσμόν, Ἀττικὸς λεώςATHENA: Hear now my ordinance, people of Attica, as you judge the first trial for bloodshed. In the future, even as now, this court of judges will always exist for the people of Aegeus. And this Hill of Ares, the seat and camp of the Amazons, when they came with an army in resentment against Theseus, and in those days built up this new citadel with lofty towers to rival his, and sacrificed to Ares, from which this rock takes its name, the Areiopagos: on this hill, the reverence of the citizens, and fear, its kinsman, will hold them back from doing wrong by day and night alike, so long as they themselves do not pollute the laws with evil streams; if you stain clear water with filth, you will never find a drink. Neither anarchy nor tyranny — this I counsel my citizens to support and respect, and not to drive fear wholly out of the city. For who among mortals, if he fears nothing, is righteous? Stand in just awe of such majesty, and you will have a defense for your land and salvation of your city, such as no man has, either among the Scythians or in Pelops' realm. I establish this tribunal, untouched by greed, worthy of reverence, quick to anger, awake on behalf of those who sleep, a guardian of the land. I have prolonged this advice to my citizens for the future; but now you must rise and take a ballot, and decide the case under the sacred obligation of your oath. My word has been spoken. (The judges rise from their seats and cast their ballots one by one during the following altercation.] CHORUS: And I counsel you not to dishonor us in any way, since our company can be a burden to your land. APOLLO: And I, for my part, command you to stand in fear of the oracles, both mine and Zeus', and not cause them to be unfulfilled. CHORUS: Although it is not your office, you have respect for deeds of bloodshed. You will prophesy, dispensing prophecies that are no longer pure. APOLLO: Then was my father mistaken in any way in his purposes when Ixion, who first shed blood, was a suppliant?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 471-524, 526-531, 585, 595, 604-606, 609-675, 680-681, 683, 689-706, 708-710, 723-728, 736-740, 470 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

470. τὸ πρᾶγμα μεῖζον, εἴ τις οἴεται τόδε 470. The matter is too great, if any mortal thinks to pass judgment on it; no, it is not lawful even for me to decide on cases of murder that is followed by the quick anger of the Furies, especially since you, by rites fully performed, have come a pure and harmless suppliant to my house;
2. Euripides, Orestes, 867-956, 866 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

866. I had just come from the country and was entering the gates, needing to learn what was decided about you and Orestes, for I was always well disposed to your father when he was alive, and it was your house that reared me


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accused/defendant Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 45
areopagus council Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 286
demeter, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 286
dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 286
law-courts, dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 286
law and literature Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 374
thudippus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 45
tragedy, and law' Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 374