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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 305-396
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ἄγε δὴ καὶ χορὸν ἅψωμεν, ἐπεὶCome now, let us also join the dance, since we are resolved to display our hated song and to declare our allotted office, how our party directs the affairs of men. We claim to be just and upright. No wrath from us will come stealthily to the one who holds out clean hands, and he will go through life unharmed; but whoever sins, as this man has, and hides his blood-stained hands, as avengers of bloodshed we appear against him to the end, presenting ourselves as upright witnesses for the dead. O mother Night, hear me, mother who gave birth to me as a retribution for the blind and the seeing. For Leto's son dishonors me by snatching away this cowering wretch, a proper expiation for his mother's blood. This is our song over the sacrificial victim — frenzied, maddened, destroying the mind, the Furies' hymn, a spell to bind the soul, not tuned to the lyre, withering the life of mortals. For this is the office that relentless Fate spun for us to hold securely: when rash murders of kin come upon mortals, we pursue them until they go under the earth; and after death, they have no great freedom. This is our song over the sacrificial victim — frenzied, maddened, destroying the mind, the Furies' hymn, a spell to bind the soul, not tuned to the lyre, withering the life of mortals. This office was ordained for us at birth; but the immortal gods must hold back their hands from us, nor does any of them share a feast in common with us; and I have neither lot nor portion of pure white ceremonial robes . . . For I have chosen the overthrow of houses, whenever violence raised in the home seizes someone near and dear. So speeding after this man, we weaken him, even though he is strong, because of the fresh blood.
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σπεύδομεν αἵδʼ ἀφελεῖν τινὰ τάσδε μερίμναςWe are eager to take these cares away from another, and to establish for the gods exemption from my concerns, so that it will not come to trial; for Zeus has considered us, a blood-dripping, hateful band, unworthy of his council. For I have chosen the overthrow of houses, whenever violence raised in the home seizes someone near and dear. Speeding after this man, we weaken him, even though he is strong, because of the fresh blood. And men's thoughts, very proud under the sky, waste away and dwindle in dishonor beneath the earth, at our attack in black robes and the vindictive dance of our feet. For surely with a great leap from above I bring down the heavily falling force of my foot, my limbs that trip even swift runners — unendurable ruin. But, as he falls, he does not know it, because of his senseless folly; pollution hovers over the man in such darkness, and mournful rumor speaks of a dark mist over his house. — unendurable ruin. For it remains. We are skilled in plotting, powerful in execution, and we remember evil deeds; we are revered and hard for mortals to appease, pursuing our allotted office which is without rights, without honor, separated from the gods in sunless light — our office that makes the path rough for seeing and dim-sighted alike. What mortal, then, does not stand in awe and dread of this, when he hears from me the law ordained by Fate, given by the gods for perfect fulfilment? My ancient privilege still remains, I do not meet with dishonor, although I have my place under the earth and in sunless darkness. (Enter Athena, wearing the aegis.]
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 306-396, 512, 75-93, 304 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

304. ἐμοὶ τραφείς τε καὶ καθιερωμένος;
2. Euripides, Orestes, 395-396, 259 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, On Invention, 1.15, 2.89-2.91, 2.94 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.15. cui diligentiae praeesse apud nos iure consulti existimantur. ac iuridicialis quidem ipsa et in duas tribuitur partes, absolutam et adsumptivam. absoluta est, quae ipsa in se continet iuris et iniuriae quae- stionem; adsumptiva, quae ipsa ex se nihil dat firmi ad recusationem, foris autem aliquid defensionis ad- sumit. eius partes sunt quattuor, concessio, remotio criminis, relatio criminis, conparatio. concessio est, cum reus non id, quod factum est, defendit, sed ut ignoscatur, postulat. haec in duas partes dividitur, purgationem et deprecationem. purgatio est, cum fac- tum conceditur, culpa removetur. haec partes habet tres, inprudentiam, casum, necessitatem. deprecatio est, cum et peccasse et consulto peccasse reus se con- fitetur et tamen, ut ignoscatur, postulat; quod genus perraro potest accidere. remotio criminis est, cum id crimen, quod infertur, ab se et ab sua culpa et potestate in alium reus removere conatur. id dupliciter fieri pot- erit, si aut causa aut factum in alium transferetur. causa transferetur, cum aliena dicitur vi et potestate fac- tum, factum autem, cum alius aut debuisse aut potuisse facere dicitur. relatio criminis est, cum ideo iure fac- tum dicitur, quod aliquis ante iniuria lacessierit. con- paratio est, cum aliud aliquid factum rectum aut utile contenditur, quod ut fieret, illud, quod arguitur, dicitur esse commissum. 2.89. gumentabitur: primum, cuius acciderit culpa, demon- strabit; deinde, cum id aliena culpa accidisset, ostendet se aut non potuisse aut non debuisse id facere, quod accusator dicat oportuisse; quid potuerit, ex utilitatis partibus, in quibus est necessitudinis vis implicata, demonstrabit quid debuerit, ex honestate considera- bitur. de utroque distinctius in deliberativo genere dicetur. deinde omnia facta esse ab reo, quae in ipsius fuerint potestate; 2.90. quod minus, quam convenerit, fac- tum sit, culpa id alterius accidisse. deinde alterius culpa exponenda demonstrandum est, quantum volun- tatis et studii fuerit in ipso, et id signis confirman- dum huiusmodi: ex cetera diligentia, ex ante factis aut dictis; atque hoc ipsi utile fuisse facere, inutile autem non facere, et cum cetera vita fuisse hoc magis consentaneum, quam quod propter alterius culpam non fecerit. si autem non in hominem certum, sed in rem aliquam causa demovebitur, ut in hac eadem re, si quaestor mortuus esset et idcirco legatis pe- cunia data non esset, accusatione alterius et culpae depulsione dempta ceteris similiter uti locis oportebit et ex concessionis partibus, quae convenient, assumere; de quibus nobis dicendum erit. 2.91. Loci autem communes idem utrisque fere, qui in superioribus assumptivis, incident; hi tamen certissi- me: accusatoris, facti indignatio; defensoris, cum in alio culpa sit, aut in ipso non sit, supplicio se affici non oportere. Ipsius autem rei fit remotio, cum id, quod datur crimini, negat neque ad se neque ad officium suum reus pertinuisse; nec, si quid in eo sit delictum, sibi adtribui oportere. id causae genus est huiusmodi: in eo foedere, quod factum est quondam cum Samnitibus, quidam adulescens nobilis porcum sustinuit iussu im- peratoris. foedere autem ab senatu inprobato et im- peratore Samnitibus dedito quidam in senatu eum quoque dicit, qui porcum tenuerit, dedi oportere.
4. Cicero, Pro S. Roscio Amerino, 63, 66-67, 6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.1928-4.2125, 4.2441-4.2621, 4.2786-4.2870 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
apollo Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
artemis Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
athena Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
binding hymn, of the erinyes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
blood, and miasma Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
blood Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
cicero, condemnation of p. clodius pulcher Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
cicero, pro sex. roscio amerino Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
cicero, references to the furies Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
citizenship Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
clodia Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
clodius pulcher, p. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
cornelius chrysogonus, l. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
curse (ara), of erinyes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
daimon of the dead Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
dyck, a. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
egypt Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
eros Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
euripides Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
furies Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
hekate-selene-artemis Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
hekate Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
ionia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
kleroterion, cf. allotment machine koine Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
loimos, cf. fluchzustand magos, cf. magician, shaman, sorcerer, witch Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
madness, in the oresteia Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
magic, malign Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
magic Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
magician, cf. magos, shaman, sorcerer, witch Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
matricide, and pursuit by erinyes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
mysteries Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
orestes Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
papyri graecae magicae hymns Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
parakopa Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
pericles Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
persia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 223
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the oresteia Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 151
roscius, sex. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 138
selene Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
spirit Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
zeus' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133