Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 273
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

35 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 56.8, 139.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

56.8. עַל־אָוֶן פַּלֶּט־לָמוֹ בְּאַף עַמִּים הוֹרֵד אֱלֹהִים׃ 139.16. גָּלְמִי רָאוּ עֵינֶיךָ וְעַל־סִפְרְךָ כֻּלָּם יִכָּתֵבוּ יָמִים יֻצָּרוּ ולא [וְלוֹ] אֶחָד בָּהֶם׃ 56.8. Because of iniquity cast them out; In anger bring down the peoples, O God." 139.16. Thine eyes did see mine unformed substance, And in Thy book they were all written— Even the days that were fashioned, When as yet there was none of them."
2. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 65.6 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

65.6. הִנֵּה כְתוּבָה לְפָנָי לֹא אֶחֱשֶׂה כִּי אִם־שִׁלַּמְתִּי וְשִׁלַּמְתִּי עַל־חֵיקָם׃ 65.6. Behold, it is written before Me; I will not keep silence, except I have requited, Yea, I will requite into their bosom,"
3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 169-173, 168 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

168. The flocks of Oedipus, found death. The sea
4. Hesiod, Theogony, 101-103, 55, 770-775, 93-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Employing gentle words persuasively
5. Hesiod, Catalogue of Women, 30 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6. Homer, Iliad, 3.278-3.279, 9.454-9.457, 9.569, 9.571, 19.259-19.260, 23.62-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.278. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.279. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 9.454. /whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. I hearkened to her and did the deed, but my father was ware thereof forthwith and cursed me mightily, and invoked the dire Erinyes 9.455. /that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.456. /that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.457. /that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.569. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.571. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
7. Homer, Odyssey, 4.561-4.569, 11.568, 11.576-11.600 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

8. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1020-1024, 1156-1161, 1386-1387, 1409-1411, 1433, 1526-1527, 1558, 1019 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1019. Who may, by singing spells, call back?
9. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 294-299, 382-385, 555-559, 59-65, 944, 1024 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1024. φρένες δύσαρκτοι· πρὸς δὲ καρδίᾳ φόβος
10. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 1000-1002, 1007-1008, 101-103, 1045, 117-128, 163-172, 175-177, 230, 232-234, 244, 254-272, 274-275, 298, 307-396, 422-423, 463-464, 467-469, 517-528, 538-548, 604, 608, 620, 641-642, 644-651, 657-666, 736, 762-777, 850, 893, 903-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. παθοῦσα δʼ οὕτω δεινὰ πρὸς τῶν φιλτάτων 100. And yet, although I have suffered cruelly in this way from my nearest kin, no divine power is angry on my behalf, slaughtered as I have been by the hands of a matricide. See these gashes in my heart, and from where they came! For the sleeping mind has clear vision
11. Aeschylus, Persians, 827-828, 213 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

213. κακῶς δὲ πράξας, οὐχ ὑπεύθυνος πόλει
12. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 227-231, 413-416, 701-709, 226 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

226. ὄρνιθος ὄρνις πῶς ἂν ἁγνεύοι φαγών;
13. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 59-60, 58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 205-240, 280-327, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. τῇδε πᾶς ἕπου δίωκε καὶ τὸν ἄνδρα πυνθάνου
15. Aristophanes, Frogs, 146-151, 373, 145 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

145. δεινότατα. μή μ' ἔκπληττε μηδὲ δειμάτου:
16. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 656-666, 655 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

655. ἡμᾶς τοίνυν μετὰ τοῦτ' ἤδη τὰς λαμπάδας ἁψαμένας χρὴ
17. Aristophanes, Wasps, 179 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

179. κάνθων τί κλάεις; ὅτι πεπράσει τήμερον;
18. Euripides, Alcestis, 358-362, 357 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Andromache, 1165, 1164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1164. ἐμνημόνευσε δ', ὥσπερ ἄνθρωπος κακός
20. Euripides, Rhesus, 12-19, 2, 20-28, 284-289, 29, 290-291, 294-295, 30, 301, 31, 310, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-341, 36-38, 388-399, 4, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-499, 5, 500-526, 595-599, 6, 600-681, 683-691, 736-737, 762-769, 773-774, 780-789, 792-793, 802-803, 809, 816, 824, 833-855, 906-982, 11 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Lysias, Orations, 12.63, 12.66 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

41a. after leaving behind these who claim to be judges, shall find those who are really judges who are said to sit in judgment there, Minos and Rhadamanthus, and Aeacus and Triptolemus, and all the other demigods who were just men in their lives, would the change of habitation be undesirable? Or again, what would any of you give to meet with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer? I am willing to die many times over, if these things are true; for I personally should find the life there wonderful
23. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

523a. Soc. Give ear then, as they say, to a right fine story, which you will regard as a fable, I fancy, but I as an actual account; for what I am about to tell you I mean to offer as the truth. By Homer’s account, Zeus, Poseidon, and Pluto divided the sovereignty amongst them when they took it over from their father. Now in the time of Cronos there was a law concerning mankind, and it holds to this very day amongst the gods, that every man who has passed a just and holy life departs after his decease
24. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

107d. from evil or be saved in any other way than by becoming as good and wise as possible. For the soul takes with it to the other world nothing but its education and nurture, and these are said to benefit or injure the departed greatly from the very beginning of his journey thither. And so it is said that after death, the tutelary genius of each person, to whom he had been allotted in life, leads him to a place where the dead are gathered together; then they are judged and depart to the other world
25. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

26. Sophocles, Ajax, 867-878, 866 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

27. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28. Anon., 1 Enoch, 81.1-81.2, 89.61-89.64, 90.14, 90.20, 94.8, 97.2, 97.8, 98.7-98.8, 99.3, 99.16, 102.6-102.8, 103.2-103.3, 103.5-103.6, 103.9, 103.15, 104.1, 104.7, 104.9 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

81.1. And he said unto me: ' Observe, Enoch, these heavenly tablets, And read what is written thereon, And mark every individual fact.' 81.1. And in those days they ceased to speak to me, and I came to my people, blessing the Lord of the world. 81.2. And I observed the heavenly tablets, and read everything which was written (thereon) and understood everything, and read the book of all the deeds of mankind, and of all the children of flesh 89.61. He gave over unto them those sheep. And He called another and spake unto him: ' Observe and mark everything that the shepherds will do to those sheep; for they will destroy more of them than 89.62. I have commanded them. And every excess and the destruction which will be wrought through the shepherds, record (namely) how many they destroy according to my command, and how many according to their own caprice: record against every individual shepherd all the destruction he 89.63. effects. And read out before me by number how many they destroy, and how many they deliver over for destruction, that I may have this as a testimony against them, and know every deed of the shepherds, that I may comprehend and see what they do, whether or not they abide by my 89.64. command which I have commanded them. But they shall not know it, and thou shalt not declare it to them, nor admonish them, but only record against each individual all the destruction which 94.8. Woe to you, ye rich, for ye have trusted in your riches, And from your riches shall ye depart, Because ye have not remembered the Most High in the days of your riches. 97.2. Be it known unto you (ye sinners) that the Most High is mindful of your destruction, And the angels of heaven rejoice over your destruction. 97.8. Woe to you who acquire silver and gold in unrighteousness and say: ' We have become rich with riches and have possessions; And have acquired everything we have desired. 98.7. And do not think in your spirit nor say in your heart that ye do not know and that ye do not see 98.8. that every sin is every day recorded in heaven in the presence of the Most High. From henceforth ye know that all your oppression wherewith ye oppress is written down every day till the day of your judgement. 99.3. In those days make ready, ye righteous, to raise your prayers as a memorial, And place them as a testimony before the angels, That they may place the sin of the sinners for a memorial before the Most High. 99.16. For He shall cast down your glory, And bring affliction on your hearts, And shall arouse His fierce indignation And destroy you all with the sword; And all the holy and righteous shall remember your sins. 102.6. And yet when ye die the sinners speak over you: ' As we die, so die the righteous, And what benefit do they reap for their deed 102.7. Behold, even as we, so do they die in grief and darkness, And what have they more than we From henceforth we are equal. 102.8. And what will they receive and what will they see for ever Behold, they too have died, And henceforth for ever shall they see no light. 103.2. Mighty One in dominion, and by His greatness I swear to you. I know a mystery And have read the heavenly tablets, And have seen the holy books, And have found written therein and inscribed regarding them: 103.3. That all goodness and joy and glory are prepared for them, And written down for the spirits of those who have died in righteousness, And that manifold good shall be given to you in recompense for your labours, And that your lot is abundantly beyond the lot of the living. 103.5. Woe to you, ye sinners, when ye have died, If ye die in the wealth of your sins, And those who are like you say regarding you: ' Blessed are the sinners: they have seen all their days. 103.6. And how they have died in prosperity and in wealth, And have not seen tribulation or murder in their life; And they have died in honour, And judgement has not been executed on them during their life. 103.9. Say not in regard to the righteous and good who are in life: ' In our troubled days we have toiled laboriously and experienced every trouble, And met with much evil and been consumed, And have become few and our spirit small. 103.15. And they helped those who robbed us and devoured us and those who made us few; and they concealed their oppression, and they did not remove from us the yoke of those that devoured us and dispersed us and murdered us, and they concealed their murder, and remembered not that they had lifted up their hands against us. 104.1. I swear unto you, that in heaven the angels remember you for good before the glory of the Great 104.1. idols; for all your lying and all your godlessness issue not in righteousness but in great sin. And now I know this mystery, that sinners will alter and pervert the words of righteousness in many ways, and will speak wicked words, and lie, and practice great deceits, and write books concerning 104.7. but keep afar from their violence; for ye shall become companions of the hosts of heaven. And, although ye sinners say: ' All our sins shall not be searched out and be written down, nevertheless 104.9. day and night, see all your sins. Be not godless in your hearts, and lie not and alter not the words of uprightness, nor charge with lying the words of the Holy Great One, nor take account of your
29. Anon., Jubilees, 5.13-5.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.13. And He sent His sword into their midst that each should slay his neighbour, and they began to slay each other till they all fell by the sword and were destroyed from the earth. 5.14. And their fathers were witnesses (of their destruction), and after this they were bound in the depths of the earth for ever, until the day of the great condemnation when judgment is executed on all those who have corrupted their ways and their works before the Lord. 5.15. And He destroyed all from their places, and there was not left one of them whom He judged not according to all their wickedness. 5.16. And He made for all His works a new and righteous nature, so that they should not sin in their whole nature for ever, but should be all righteous each in his kind alway.
30. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 7.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7.10. A fiery stream issued And came forth from before him; thousand thousands ministered unto him, And ten thousand times ten thousand stood before him; The judgment was set, And the books were opened."
31. New Testament, Apocalypse, 20.12, 20.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.12. I saw the dead, the great and the small, standing before the throne, and they opened books. Another book was opened, which is the book of life. The dead were judged out of the things which were written in the books, according to their works. 20.15. If anyone was not found written in the book of life, he was cast into the lake of fire.
32. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.28.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.28.7. Higher up than the figures I have enumerated comes Eurynomus, said by the Delphian guides to be one of the demons in Hades, who eats off all the flesh of the corpses, leaving only their bones. But Homer's Odyssey, the poem called the Minyad, and the Returns, although they tell of Hades, and its horrors, know of no demon called Eurynomus. However, I will describe what he is like and his attitude in the painting. He is of a color between blue and black, like that of meat flies; he is showing his teeth and is seated, and under him is spread a vulture's skin.
33. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.39, 8.32 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.39. To one who by argument had proved conclusively that he had horns, he said, touching his forehead, Well, I for my part don't see any. In like manner, when somebody declared that there is no such thing as motion, he got up and walked about. When some one was discoursing on celestial phenomena, How many days, asked Diogenes, were you in coming from the sky? A eunuch of bad character had inscribed on his door the words, Let nothing evil enter. How then, he asked, is the master of the house to get in? When he had anointed his feet with unguent, he declared that from his head the unguent passed into the air, but from his feet into his nostrils. The Athenians urged him to become initiated, and told him that in Hades those who have been initiated take precedence. It would be ludicrous, quoth he, if Agesilaus and Epaminondas are to dwell in the mire, while certain folk of no account will live in the Isles of the Blest because they have been initiated. 8.32. The whole air is full of souls which are called genii or heroes; these are they who send men dreams and signs of future disease and health, and not to men alone, but to sheep also and cattle as well; and it is to them that purifications and lustrations, all divination, omens and the like, have reference. The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or to evil. Blest are the men who acquire a good soul; they can never be at rest, nor ever keep the same course two days together.
34. Anon., 4 Ezra, 6.20

6.20. and when the seal is placed upon the age which is about to pass away, then I will show these signs: the books shall be opened before the firmament, and all shall see it together.
35. Anon., Apocalypse of Zephaniah, 3.9



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acheron Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 181
aeacus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
aeschylus, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
aeschylus Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22, 75; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
afterlife, punishment in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556, 603
afterlife, reward in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
afterlife, ritual absolution and Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556, 603
afterlife lots, filth and muck Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 136
andromache Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22
angels, human-like appearance Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
angels, mediators of revelation Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
anger, divine Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
apollo Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 73, 196, 197, 198, 200, 201, 202
ara Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
argos Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139
asebeia Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 73, 185, 193
athena Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139, 177, 189, 194, 198
athens Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
aulos Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
blood, and miasma Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
books, heavenly Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
books, of deeds Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
boule/council Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
cassandra, curse of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 73, 181
cassandra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 73, 181
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, dolon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, furies (erinyes) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, hector Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, odysseus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
chiasm Carr, Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature (2004) 98
children of thyestes Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 187
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
chorus, ancient, greek, comic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43, 44
chorus of choephori Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200
chorus of elders Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 182, 183
chorus of slave women Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 183, 184, 185
clytemnestra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 180, 181, 187, 196, 197, 199
comedy, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43, 44
cult songs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 44
curse Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 73, 181, 201
curse (ara), of erinyes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
dactyloepitrites Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 44
death and the afterlife, funerary inscriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, funerary reliefs Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, hades (underworld) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, isles of the blessed/elysian fields Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, judgement and punishment Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, link between living and the dead Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
death and the afterlife, tartaros (abyss below hades) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
deeds, of truth/righteousness Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
deeds, wicked of humans Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
delphi, polygnotus paintings Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556
didaskalia Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43, 44
dikē Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200
dionysus Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
dochmiacs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 44
electra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200
erinyes, and clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166
erinyes, and curse Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61
erinyes Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 73, 177, 178, 179, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 194, 195, 202, 203, 204; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 556, 603
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
execution Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
fear Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 186, 188, 204
fluchzustand/loimos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
ghost of clytemnestra, and blame, dishonor, shame Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166
ghost of clytemnestra, rhetorical inventiveness of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166
ghost of clytemnestra, wounds of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 187
ghost of clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166, 181, 186
ghost of darius Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 192
god, most high Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
hades, as double of zeus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 179, 180, 181
hades, as euthunos Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166, 191, 192
hades, as invisible Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61
hades, ethical code of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 73, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198
hades, judgment of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 176, 177
hades, legal process Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 191, 192, 193, 200, 202, 203, 204
hades, miastōr Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 185, 186, 198, 199, 200, 203
hades, polluted Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 198, 199, 200
hades, punishing the bloodless Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 187
hades, realm of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61, 73, 166, 181
hades, vision of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 177, 178, 179
hades/pluto Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
hades Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 142; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204; Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
hades (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
hagnos, of mouth Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
hearts Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
hecate Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
hermes Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
heroes Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
homer, afterlife in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556, 603
hope/hopelessness Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
iambic tetrameters, catalectic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
identity, proclamation of Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
identity, slave vs. citizen Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 136
iliad Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 201
imprisonment Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
inscriptions, funerary Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
ionics Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
iphigeneia Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 181
isle of the blessed Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
judgement of the dead Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
justice, as goddess Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 183, 184, 185
justice, divine Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
justice Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 176, 177, 178, 179, 182, 187, 189, 190
kaibel, georg Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
katad(e)o Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
katochos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
killing Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
kin-killing Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
kinship Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 193, 196, 197
lex talionis Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 191
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43, 44
litigant Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
madness, in the oresteia Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
marks of scripture, memorization, indicators of Carr, Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature (2004) 98
matricide, and pursuit by erinyes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
memorial/remembrance Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
memory techniques' Carr, Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature (2004) 98
minos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
mystery cults, and afterlife in pindar Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
odysseus, underworld journey Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
odysseus Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
orestes, afterlife punishment of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 177, 178, 179
orestes, as afterlife hero Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139
orestes, trial of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139, 177, 196, 197, 198, 202, 203, 204
orestes Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 200; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 139, 187, 188, 189, 190
orphic tradition, bacchic gold tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
paths, choice of, losing the way Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 136
patroclus, ghost of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166
persephone Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
persians, aeschylus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 192
petelia, hipponion Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
philia Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 193
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the oresteia Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
phrēn Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 188, 189, 195
pindar, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 603
pindar Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
plato, conception of the afterlife Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
plato, on fear of dying Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
plato, republic Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
polygnotus, underworld painting Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556
polyvalence, cf. openness, semantic prayer for justice Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
prayer, orestes in the eumenides Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
psuchopompos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
punishment, in the afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 556
record of Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
remember Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
resurrection Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 61
rhadamanthys Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, dramaturgy and stagecraft Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
salvation, orestes prayer for in the eumenides Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
satyr drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
scribe, angelic Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
search scenes Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43, 44
sins / iniquity, recording of Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
sisyphos, punishment of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 75
suffering Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 142
suppliants, aeschylus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 179, 180
supplication, in the eumenides Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 150
supplication Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 191, 200
syncope Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
tablets, heavenly Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 349
tantalus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
the eleven Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
thönges-stringaris, r. n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 557
timē Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 204
tityos, punishment of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
tragedy, attic/greek Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 43
triptolemus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
trochaic tetrameters, catalectic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 44
underworld, confrontation with, rulers Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 56
vengeance Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 215
voting Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 201
xenia Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 193, 197
zeus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 142; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 179, 180, 181, 192, 193, 197