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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 115
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 122 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

122. of health, away from grief, they took delight
2. Homer, Iliad, 19.259-19.260, 23.58-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 23.58. /and speedily making ready each man his meal they supped, nor did thelr hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, they went each man to his hut to take his rest; but the son of Peleus upon the shore of the loud-resounding sea 23.59. /and speedily making ready each man his meal they supped, nor did thelr hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, they went each man to his hut to take his rest; but the son of Peleus upon the shore of the loud-resounding sea 23.60. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.61. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
3. Homer, Odyssey, 72, 71 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1433, 1545, 1580, 273-276, 420-421, 491, 889-894, 1432 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1432. μὰ τὴν τέλειον τῆς ἐμῆς παιδὸς Δίκην 1432. By who fulfilled things for my daughter, Justice
5. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 307-318, 354-362, 483, 486-488, 306 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

306. ἀλλʼ ὦ μεγάλαι Μοῖραι, Διόθεν 306. You mighty Fates, through the power of Zeus grant fulfilment in the way to which Justice now turns. q type=
6. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 101-114, 116-139, 150-152, 155-172, 175-177, 230, 235-243, 276-298, 312, 321-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-402, 41, 414, 416-417, 419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-435, 439, 44, 445-449, 45, 450-452, 458, 46, 463-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490, 50, 500, 51, 512, 516-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-531, 538-539, 54, 540-548, 55-56, 560, 564-565, 57-68, 689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-706, 71-100 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. παθοῦσα δʼ οὕτω δεινὰ πρὸς τῶν φιλτάτων 100. And yet, although I have suffered cruelly in this way from my nearest kin, no divine power is angry on my behalf, slaughtered as I have been by the hands of a matricide. See these gashes in my heart, and from where they came! For the sleeping mind has clear vision
7. Aeschylus, Persians, 608-842, 607 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

607. τοιγὰρ κέλευθον τήνδʼ ἄνευ τʼ ὀχημάτων
8. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 70 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

70. Ἀρά τʼ Ἐρινὺς πατρὸς ἡ μεγασθενής 70. and Curse, note anchored=
9. Euripides, Electra, 107-115, 37-38, 55-56, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ὦ γῆς παλαιὸν ἄργος, ̓Ινάχου ῥοαί 1. O ancient plain of land, the streams of Inachus, from which king Agamemnon once mounted war on a thousand ships and sailed to the land of Troy . After he had slain Priam, the ruler of Ilium
10. Euripides, Epigrams, 109, 108 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 107-109, 11, 110-115, 12-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-58, 6-9, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
12. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1330, 1329 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Medea, 1390-1391, 1389 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1389. The curse of our sons’ avenging spirit and of Justice
14. Euripides, Orestes, 265, 264 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

264. Let me go! you are one of my Furies
15. Herodotus, Histories, 4.149 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.149. But as Theras' son would not sail with him, his father said that he would leave him behind as a sheep among wolves; after which saying the boy got the nickname of Oeolycus, and it so happened that this became his customary name. He had a son, Aegeus, from whom the Aegidae, a great Spartan clan, take their name. ,The men of this clan, finding that none of their children lived, set up a temple of the avenging spirits of Laïus and Oedipus, by the instruction of an oracle, after which their children lived. It fared thus, too, with the children of the Aegidae at Thera.
16. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

202e. Through it are conveyed all divination and priestcraft concerning sacrifice and ritual
17. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1299, 1434, 466, 1298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Aeschines, Letters, 3.11 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Heraclitus of Ephesus (Attributed Author), Letters, 9.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

361b. Xenocrates also is of the opinion that such days as are days of ill omen, and such festivals as have associated with them either beatings or lamentations or fastings or scurrilous language or ribald jests have no relation to the honours paid to the gods or to worthy demigods, but he believes that there exist in the space about us certain great and powerful natures, obdurate, however, and morose, which take pleasure in such things as these, and, if they succeed in obtaining them, resort to nothing worse. Then again, Hesiod calls the worthy and good demigods "holy deities" and "guardians of mortals" and Givers of wealth, and having therein a reward that is kingly.
22. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, 94



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
agamemnon, murder of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
agamemnon, mutilation of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 171
agamemnon Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
apollo Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
arai (curses) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
areopagus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
aristophanes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
assembly Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
athena Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
battle Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
burial Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
chorus of elders Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
chorus of slave women Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 171
clytaemestra, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
clytaemestra Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
clytemnestra Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
curse-tablets Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
daimones Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
daimons Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
dike Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
dikē Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
electra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
elpenor, ghost of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158
epic Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
erinyes, and clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 150, 151, 152, 158, 159, 167, 171
erinyes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
ethics, normative Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 171
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
funerary practice Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
gender, women Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
ghost of clytemnestra, and blame, dishonor, shame Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 167
ghost of clytemnestra, as dream, onar Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 151, 158, 159
ghost of clytemnestra, ethical claims of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 151, 171
ghost of clytemnestra, psukhē of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 151, 169, 170, 171
ghost of clytemnestra, rhetorical inventiveness of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 167
ghost of clytemnestra, wounds of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 158
ghost of clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 150, 151, 152, 158, 159, 167, 169, 170, 171
ghost of darius Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
greece Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
hades, realm of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 167
heraclitus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
herodotus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
heroes and heroines and battle Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
justice Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 167, 171
kommos Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
libation Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
material culture Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
military Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
monuments Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
odysseus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158
oedipus, in sophocles oc Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
orestes, trial of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 171
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 170
patroclus, ghost of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158
poetry Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
politicians Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
psukhē Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 151, 158, 169, 170, 171
revenge curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
ritual Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
servants of the gods (minor deities) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
slavery Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33
thucydides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
thyestes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
tragedy, and athenian religion' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
visual art Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
war Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
zeus, supervises dikē Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
μάγοι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 33