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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



140
Aeschylus, Eumenides, 1021-1029
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 555 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

555. αἰνῶ δὲ κρύπτειν τάσδε συνθήκας ἐμάς 555. o that as by craft they killed a worthy man, so by craft they may likewise be caught and perish in the very same snare, even as Loxias decreed, lord Apollo, the prophet who has never before been false.
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 10, 1000-1002, 1007-1008, 1011, 1022-1047, 11-16, 163, 17-19, 198-199, 2, 20, 200, 208-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-221, 225, 227, 23, 230-234, 24-29, 3, 30-31, 312, 32-33, 350, 4, 46, 465, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 5, 50-59, 594-595, 6, 614-621, 681, 683, 685-699, 7, 700-710, 763-771, 8, 804-807, 851-857, 9, 916-999, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. πρῶτον μὲν εὐχῇ τῇδε πρεσβεύω θεῶν 1. First, in this prayer of mine, I give the place of highest honor among the gods to the first prophet, Earth; and after her to Themis, for she was the second to take this oracular seat of her mother, as legend tells.
3. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 626-627, 656, 659, 676-677, 693-700, 625 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

625. ἄγε δή, λέξωμεν ἐπʼ Ἀργείοις 625. Come, let us invoke blessings upon the Argives in return for blessings. And may Zeus, god of strangers, behold the offerings of gratitude voiced by a stranger’s lips, that they may in true fulfilment reach their perfect goal. Chorus
4. Aristophanes, Clouds, 563-574, 1055 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1055. εἶτ' ἐν ἀγορᾷ τὴν διατριβὴν ψέγεις: ἐγὼ δ' ἐπαινῶ.
5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 479 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

479. οὗτος τί δέδρακας; ἐγκέχοδα: κάλει θεόν.
6. Euripides, Alcestis, 1130 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Bacchae, 944 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

944. αἴρειν νιν· αἰνῶ δʼ ὅτι μεθέστηκας φρενῶν. Πενθεύς
8. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1450-1461, 1449 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Medea, 884 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 614 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Rhesus, 191 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

191. I thank thee.—’Tis indeed a prize more fine
12. Euripides, Trojan Women, 890 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Electra, 562 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.15.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.15.2. In Theseus, however, they had a king of equal intelligence and power; and one of the chief features in his organization of the country was to abolish the council chambers and magistrates of the petty cities, and to merge them in the single council-chamber and town-hall of the present capital. Individuals might still enjoy their private property just as before, but they were henceforth compelled to have only one political center, viz. Athens ; which thus counted all the inhabitants of Attica among her citizens, so that when Theseus died he left a great state behind him. Indeed, from him dates the Synoecia, or Feast of Union; which is paid for by the state, and which the Athenians still keep in honor of the goddess.
15. Menander, Dyscolus, 413-417, 412 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16. Plutarch, Themistocles, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.23.1-10.23.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.23.1. Brennus and his army were now faced by the Greeks who had mustered at Delphi, and soon portents boding no good to the barbarians were sent by the god, the clearest recorded in history. For the whole ground occupied by the Gallic army was shaken violently most of the day, with continuous thunder and lightning. 10.23.2. The thunder both terrified the Gauls and prevented them hearing their orders, while the bolts from heaven set on fire not only those whom they struck but also their neighbors, themselves and their armour alike. Then there were seen by them ghosts of the heroes Hyperochus, Laodocus and Pyrrhus; according to some a fourth appeared, Phylacus, a local hero of Delphi . 10.23.3. Among the many Phocians who were killed in the action was Aleximachus, who in this battle excelled all the other Greeks in devoting youth, physical strength, and a stout heart, to slaying the barbarians. The Phocians made a statue of Aleximachus and sent it to Delphi as an offering to Apollo. 10.23.4. All the day the barbarians were beset by calamities and terrors of this kind. But the night was to bring upon them experiences far more painful. For there came on a severe frost, and snow with it; and great rocks slipping from Parnassus, and crags breaking away, made the barbarians their target, the crash of which brought destruction, not on one or two at a time, but on thirty or even more, as they chanced to be gathered in groups, keeping guard or taking rest. 10.23.5. At sunrise the Greeks came on from Delphi, making a frontal attack with the exception of the Phocians, who, being more familiar with the district, descended through the snow down the precipitous parts of Parnassus, and surprised the Celts in their rear, shooting them down with arrows and javelins without anything to fear from the barbarians. 10.23.6. At the beginning of the fight the Gauls offered a spirited resistance, especially the company attached to Brennus, which was composed of the tallest and bravest of the Gauls, and that though they were shot at from all sides, and no less distressed by the frost, especially the wounded men. But when Brennus himself was wounded, he was carried fainting from the battle, and the barbarians, harassed on all sides by the Greeks, fell back reluctantly, putting to the sword those who, disabled by wounds or sickness, could not go with them. 10.23.7. They encamped where night overtook them in their retreat, and during the night there fell on them a “panic.” For causeless terrors are said to come from the god Pan. It was when evening was turning to night that the confusion fell on the army, and at first only a few became mad, and these imagined that they heard the trampling of horses at a gallop, and the attack of advancing enemies; but after a little time the delusion spread to all. 10.23.8. So rushing to arms they divided into two parties, killing and being killed, neither understanding their mother tongue nor recognizing one another's forms or the shape of their shields. Both parties alike under the present delusion thought that their opponents were Greek, men and armour, and that the language they spoke was Greek, so that a great mutual slaughter was wrought among the Gauls by the madness sent by the god. 10.23.9. Those Phocians who had been left behind in the fields to guard the flocks were the first to perceive and report to the Greeks the panic that had seized the barbarians in the night. The Phocians were thus encouraged to attack the Celts with yet greater spirit, keeping a more careful watch on their encampments, and not letting them take from the country the necessities of life without a struggle, so that the whole Gallic army suffered at once from a pressing shortage of corn and other food.
18. Epigraphy, Syll. , 398.14-398.20

19. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 24.8.4-24.8.7



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
aetiology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
agamemnon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
aitiological myths Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 382
aitiological myths in tragedy Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
aitiology in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
areopagus, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
artemis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
attica Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
clytemnestra Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
complementation de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
cos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
demeter Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
divides year with apollo? and drama Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
electra de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
eleusis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
emotional restraint, self-expression of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
emotional restraint, verbal de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
emotions, wonder de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
erinys Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
foundation, of cults Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
gaul Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
host gods or found cults in tragedy Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
immortality Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
justice Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
justin Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
oedipus, in sophocles oc Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
orestes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
pan Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
pausanias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
procession Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
prometheia Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 382
pythia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
satyr-play Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
semnai procession for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 382
smyrnaeans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
soteria Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 48
thargelia aitia for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 382
tragedy, and athenian religion Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138, 141
tragedy, and athenian religion and hero-cults' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 141
tragedy, and athenian religion dionysiac? Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 138
venerable ones Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 101
verbs, performative verbs de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
verbs, pragmatics of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
verbs, semantics of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316
verbs of emotion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 316