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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Aeschylus, Eumenides, 100-109
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34 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 23.58-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

23.58. /and speedily making ready each man his meal they supped, nor did thelr hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, they went each man to his hut to take his rest; but the son of Peleus upon the shore of the loud-resounding sea 23.59. /and speedily making ready each man his meal they supped, nor did thelr hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, they went each man to his hut to take his rest; but the son of Peleus upon the shore of the loud-resounding sea 23.60. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.61. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
2. Homer, Odyssey, 11.40-11.41, 19.515-19.533, 19.535-19.553, 19.559-19.569 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1073-1223, 1432-1433, 1580, 273-276, 420-428, 491, 889-894, 975, 1072 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1072. ὀτοτοτοῖ πόποι δᾶ. 1072. Otototoi, Gods, Earth, —
4. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 33-43, 523-552, 928-929, 973, 32 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

32. τορὸς δὲ Φοῖβος ὀρθόθριξ 32. For with a hair-raising shriek, Terror, the diviner of dreams for our house, breathing wrath out of sleep, uttered a cry of terror in the dead of night from the heart of the palace
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 102-139, 150-152, 155-172, 175-177, 235-243, 267-298, 321-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-402, 41, 414, 416-417, 419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-435, 439, 44, 445-449, 45, 450-452, 458, 46, 463-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49-51, 517-519, 52, 520-525, 53-68, 689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-706, 71-99, 101 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

101. οὐδεὶς ὑπέρ μου δαιμόνων μηνίεται
6. Aeschylus, Persians, 177-200, 205, 633-842, 176 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

176. πολλοῖς μὲν αἰεὶ νυκτέροις ὀνείρασιν 176. I have been haunted by a multitude of dreams at night since the time when my son, having despatched his army, departed with intent to lay waste the land of the Ionians. But never yet have I beheld so distinct a vision
7. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 646-673, 645 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

645. αἰεὶ γὰρ ὄψεις ἔννυχοι πωλεύμεναι 645. For visions of the night, always haunting my maiden chamber, sought to beguile me with seductive words, saying: q type=
8. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 885-895, 884 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. ὁλκὴ γὰρ οὔτοι πλόκαμον οὐδάμʼ ἅζεται. Χορός
9. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1332-1344, 1331 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1331. ὦ νυκτὸς κελαινοφαὴς
10. Aristophanes, Wasps, 11-53, 8-10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. τὸν αὐτὸν ἄρ' ἐμοὶ βουκολεῖς Σαβάζιον.
11. Euripides, Alcestis, 355-357, 354 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Electra, 107-115, 37-38, 55-56, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ὦ γῆς παλαιὸν ἄργος, ̓Ινάχου ῥοαί 1. O ancient plain of land, the streams of Inachus, from which king Agamemnon once mounted war on a thousand ships and sailed to the land of Troy . After he had slain Priam, the ruler of Ilium
13. Euripides, Epigrams, 109, 108 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Euripides, Hecuba, 10, 107-109, 11, 110-115, 12-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-58, 6-9, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ̔́Ηκω νεκρῶν κευθμῶνα καὶ σκότου πύλας 1. I have come from out of the charnel-house and gates of gloom, where Hades dwells apart from gods, I Polydorus, a son of Hecuba, the daughter of Cisseus, and of Priam. Now my father, when Phrygia ’s capital
15. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1330, 1329 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 349-350, 42-56, 569, 57, 570-575, 58-60, 348 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Euripides, Rhesus, 781-789, 780 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Herodotus, Histories, 1.120, 6.117, 7.17-7.18 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.120. Thus Astyages punished Harpagus. But, to help him to decide about Cyrus, he summoned the same Magi who had interpreted his dream as I have said: and when they came, Astyages asked them how they had interpreted his dream. They answered as before, and said that the boy must have been made king had he lived and not died first. ,Then Astyages said, “The boy is safe and alive, and when he was living in the country the boys of his village made him king, and he duly did all that is done by true kings: for he assigned to each individually the roles of bodyguards and sentinels and messengers and everything else, and so ruled. And what do you think is the significance of this?” ,“If the boy is alive,” said the Magi, “and has been made king without premeditation, then be confident on this score and keep an untroubled heart: he will not be made king a second time. Even in our prophecies, it is often but a small thing that has been foretold and the consequences of dreams come to nothing in the end.” ,“I too, Magi,” said Astyages, “am very much of your opinion: that the dream came true when the boy was called king, and that I have no more to fear from him. Nevertheless consider well and advise me what will be safest both for my house and for you.” ,The Magi said, “O King, we too are very anxious that your sovereignty prosper: for otherwise, it passes from your nation to this boy who is a Persian, and so we Medes are enslaved and held of no account by the Persians, as we are of another blood, but while you, our countryman, are established king, we have our share of power, and great honor is shown us by you. ,Thus, then, we ought by all means to watch out for you and for your sovereignty. And if at the present time we saw any danger we would declare everything to you: but now the dream has had a trifling conclusion, and we ourselves are confident and advise you to be so also. As for this boy, send him out of your sight to the Persians and to his parents.” 6.117. In the battle at Marathon about six thousand four hundred men of the foreigners were killed, and one hundred and ninety-two Athenians; that many fell on each side. ,The following marvel happened there: an Athenian, Epizelus son of Couphagoras, was fighting as a brave man in the battle when he was deprived of his sight, though struck or hit nowhere on his body, and from that time on he spent the rest of his life in blindness. ,I have heard that he tells this story about his misfortune: he saw opposing him a tall armed man, whose beard overshadowed his shield, but the phantom passed him by and killed the man next to him. I learned by inquiry that this is the story Epizelus tells. 7.17. So spoke Artabanus and did as he was bid, hoping to prove Xerxes' words vain; he put on Xerxes' robes and sat on the king's throne. Then while he slept there came to him in his sleep the same dream that had haunted Xerxes; it stood over him and spoke thus: ,“Are you the one who dissuades Xerxes from marching against Hellas, because you care for him? Neither in the future nor now will you escape with impunity for striving to turn aside what must be. To Xerxes himself it has been declared what will befall him if he disobeys.” 7.18. With this threat (so it seemed to Artabanus) the vision was about to burn his eyes with hot irons. He leapt up with a loud cry, then sat by Xerxes and told him the whole story of what he had seen in his dream, and next he said: ,“O King, since I have seen, as much as a man may, how the greater has often been brought low by the lesser, I forbade you to always give rein to your youthful spirit, knowing how evil a thing it is to have many desires, and remembering the end of Cyrus' expedition against the Massagetae and of Cambyses' against the Ethiopians, and I myself marched with Darius against the Scythians. ,Knowing this, I judged that you had only to remain in peace for all men to deem you fortunate. But since there is some divine motivation, and it seems that the gods mark Hellas for destruction, I myself change and correct my judgment. Now declare the gods' message to the Persians, and bid them obey your first command for all due preparation. Do this, so that nothing on your part be lacking to the fulfillment of the gods' commission.” ,After this was said, they were incited by the vision, and when daylight came Xerxes imparted all this to the Persians. Artabanus now openly encouraged that course which he alone had before openly discouraged.
19. Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Sophocles, Electra, 411, 417-425, 431-437, 449-452, 459, 472-501, 410 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 981-983, 980 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Aeschines, Letters, 3.11 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.616-3.635 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.616. κούρην δʼ ἐξ ἀχέων ἀδινὸς κατελώφεεν ὕπνος 3.617. λέκτρῳ ἀνακλινθεῖσαν. ἄφαρ δέ μιν ἠπεροπῆες 3.618. οἷά τʼ ἀκηχεμένην, ὀλοοὶ ἐρέθεσκον ὄνειροι. 3.619. τὸν ξεῖνον δʼ ἐδόκησεν ὑφεστάμεναι τὸν ἄεθλον 3.620. οὔτι μάλʼ ὁρμαίνοντα δέρος κριοῖο κομίσσαι 3.621. οὐδέ τι τοῖο ἕκητι μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 3.622. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δέ μιν σφέτερον δόμον εἰσαγάγοιτο 3.623. κουριδίην παράκοιτιν· ὀίετο δʼ ἀμφὶ βόεσσιν 3.624. αὐτὴ ἀεθλεύουσα μάλʼ εὐμαρέως πονέεσθαι· 3.625. σφωιτέρους δὲ τοκῆας ὑποσχεσίης ἀθερίζειν 3.626. οὕνεκεν οὐ κούρῃ ζεῦξαι βόας, ἀλλά οἱ αὐτῷ 3.627. προύθεσαν· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα τοῦ νεῖκος πέλεν ἀμφήριστον 3.628. πατρί τε καὶ ξείνοις· αὐτῇ δʼ ἐπιέτρεπον ἄμφω 3.629. τὼς ἔμεν, ὥς κεν ἑῇσι μετὰ φρεσὶν ἰθύσειεν. 3.630. ἡ δʼ ἄφνω τὸν ξεῖνον, ἀφειδήσασα τοκήων 3.631. εἵλετο· τοὺς δʼ ἀμέγαρτον ἄχος λάβεν, ἐκ δʼ ἐβόησαν 3.632. χωόμενοι· τὴν δʼ ὕπνος ἅμα κλαγγῇ μεθέηκεν. 3.633. παλλομένη δʼ ἀνόρουσε φόβῳ, περί τʼ ἀμφί τε τοίχους 3.634. πάπτηνεν θαλάμοιο· μόλις δʼ ἐσαγείρατο θυμὸν 3.635. ὡς πάρος ἐν στέρνοις, ἀδινὴν δʼ ἀνενείκατο φωνήν·
24. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 18, 17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

25. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 20.12.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20.12.2.  Disturbed by this vision and divining that some great misfortune would ensue, since he had already on an earlier occasion beheld a similar vision in a dream and some dire disaster had followed, he wished to hold back that day, but was not strong enough to defeat fate; for his friends opposed the delay and demanded that he should not let the favourable opportunity slip from his grasp.
26. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.415-7.466 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea
27. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. New Testament, Acts, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. New Testament, Matthew, 27.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.19. While he was sitting on the judgment seat, his wife sent to him, saying, "Have nothing to do with that righteous man, for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.
30. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 63.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.6.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.7, 48.32 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 3.7.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

34. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.18-1.19, 2.16 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
agamemnon, in the odyssey Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 162
agamemnon, murder of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
agamemnon Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 164
anxiety dreams and nightmares, greek tragedy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 385
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174, 383, 385
apollo Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
arai (curses) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
areopagus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
argos Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 168
aristophanes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
assembly Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
athena Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 168
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
battle Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
burial Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
cassandra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 165
children of thyestes Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 160, 162
chorus of elders Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 165
clytaemestra, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
clytaemestra Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
clytemnestra, as mother of hades, Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 165
clytemnestra Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 165
curse-tablets Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
curse Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 165
daimones Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
dikē Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 385
dreams and visions, examples, tragedy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 383, 385
eidōlon Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 147, 148
elpenor, ghost of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158
epic Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
erinyes, and clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 148, 149, 158, 159, 163, 166, 167, 168
erinyes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
fiction, hellenistic and roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
funerary practice Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
gender, women Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
ghost of clytemnestra, and blame, dishonor, shame Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 166, 167, 168
ghost of clytemnestra, and metatheater Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 163
ghost of clytemnestra, as dream, onar Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 148, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164
ghost of clytemnestra, as image, eidōlon Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 147, 148
ghost of clytemnestra, ethical claims of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 160, 162, 164
ghost of clytemnestra, psukhē of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 168
ghost of clytemnestra, rhetorical inventiveness of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 164, 165, 166, 167, 168
ghost of clytemnestra, wounds of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 149, 158, 160, 161, 162, 163
ghost of clytemnestra Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 147, 148, 149, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168
greece Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
hades, as euthunos Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 166
hades, realm of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 164, 165, 166, 167, 168
herodotus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
heroes and heroines and battle Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
iliad Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 162
iphigeneia Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 164
justice Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 161, 167
libation Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
material culture Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
military Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
monuments Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
murder Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
natural dreaming, in literary settings Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
natural dreaming Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
odysseus Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158, 163
oedipus, in sophocles oc Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
patroclus, ghost of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158, 162, 166
poetry Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
politicians Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
prophecy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 174
psukhē Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 158, 162, 168
restless dead, violently dead (biaothanatoi) Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 174
restless dead Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 174
revenge curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
ritual Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
slavery Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
thucydides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391
thyestes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15
tragedy, and athenian religion' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 145
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 391; Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
visual art Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
war Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 183
zeus, supervises dikē Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 15