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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



138
Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 160-183


Ζεύς, ὅστις ποτʼ ἐστίν, εἰ τόδʼ αὐ-Zeus, whosoe’er he be, — if that express


τῷ φίλον κεκλημένῳAught dear to him on whom I call —


τοῦτό νιν προσεννέπω.So do I him address.


οὐκ ἔχω προσεικάσαιI cannot liken out, by all


πάντʼ ἐπισταθμώμενοςAdmeasurement of powers


πλὴν Διός, εἰ τὸ μάταν ἀπὸ φροντίδος ἄχθοςAny but Zeus for refuge at such hours


πλὴν Διός, εἰ τὸ μάταν ἀπὸ φροντίδος ἄχθοςIf veritably needs I must


χρὴ βαλεῖν ἐτητύμως. ΧορόςFrom off my soul its vague care-burthen thrust.


οὐδʼ ὅστις πάροιθεν ἦν μέγαςNot — whosoever was the great of yore


παμμάχῳ θράσει βρύωνBursting to bloom with bravery all round —


nanIs in our mouths: he was, but is no more.


οὐδὲ λέξεται πρὶν ὤν·And who it was that after came to be


ὃς δʼ ἔπειτʼ ἔφυ, τρια-Met the thrice-throwing wrestler, — he


κτῆρος οἴχεται τυχών.Is also gone to ground.


Ζῆνα δέ τις προφρόνως ἐπινίκια κλάζωνBut


nanShouting the triumph-praise — proclaim


τεύξεται φρενῶν τὸ πᾶν· ΧορόςComplete in judgment shall that man be found.


τὸν φρονεῖν βροτοὺς ὁδώ-Zeus, who leads onward mortals to be wise


σαντα, τὸν πάθει μάθοςAppoints that suffering masterfully teach.


θέντα κυρίως ἔχειν.In sleep, before the heart of each


στάζει δʼ ἔν θʼ ὕπνῳ πρὸ καρδίαςA woe-remembering travail sheds in dew


μνησιπήμων πόνος· καὶ παρʼ ἄ-Discretion, — ay, and melts the unwilling too


κοντας ἦλθε σωφρονεῖν.By what, perchance, may be a graciousness


δαιμόνων δέ που χάρις βίαιοςOf gods, enforced no less, —


σέλμα σεμνὸν ἡμένων. ΧορόςAs they, commanders of the crew


σέλμα σεμνὸν ἡμένων. ΧορόςAssume the awful seat.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 256 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

256. The son of Cronus sends from heaven distress
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 616, 902, 615 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

615. Said cleverly, “Take any part that you
3. Homer, Iliad, 24.527-24.528 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.527. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.528. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot
4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 105-144, 146, 150-151, 161-247, 250-251, 65, 67-71, 104 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

104. κύριός εἰμι θροεῖν ὅδιον κράτος αἴσιον ἀνδρῶν 104. Empowered am I to sing
5. Aeschylus, Persians, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Τάδε μὲν Περσῶν τῶν οἰχομένων 1. Here we are, the faithful Council of the Persians, who have gone to the land of placeName key=
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 767-791, 766 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

766. τελειᾶν γὰρ παλαιφάτων ἀρᾶν 766. For the compensation is heavy when curses uttered long ago are fulfilled, and once the deadly curse has come into existence, it does not pass away. When the fortune of seafaring merchants has grown too great
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 733 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

733. ἔχεις τι; μὰ Δί' οὐ δῆτ' ἔγωγ'. οὐδὲν
8. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 503-516, 502 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

502. ἑτέραν δ' ἐγᾦδ' ἣ 'φασκεν ὠδίνειν γυνὴ
9. Euripides, Alcestis, 122-129, 3-4, 836, 911, 962-972, 121 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Bacchae, 894, 1001 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1001. τἀνίκατον ὡς κρατήσων βίᾳ
11. Euripides, Helen, 1342-1345, 1341 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1341. βᾶτε, σεμναὶ Χάριτες
12. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1263 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Orestes, 397, 418, 396 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

396. My conscience; I know that I am guilty of a dreadful crime. Menelau
14. Euripides, Trojan Women, 885-888, 884 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

884. O you that do support the earth and rest thereupon
15. Herodotus, Histories, 2.40-2.41, 2.43 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.40. But in regard to the disembowelling and burning of the victims, there is a different way for each sacrifice. I shall now, however, speak of that goddess whom they consider the greatest, and in whose honor they keep highest festival. ,After praying in the foregoing way, they take the whole stomach out of the flayed bull, leaving the entrails and the fat in the carcass, and cut off the legs, the end of the loin, the shoulders, and the neck. ,Having done this, they fill what remains of the carcass with pure bread, honey, raisins, figs, frankincense, myrrh, and other kinds of incense, and then burn it, pouring a lot of oil on it. ,They fast before the sacrifice, and while it is burning, they all make lamentation; and when their lamentation is over, they set out a meal of what is left of the victim. 2.41. All Egyptians sacrifice unblemished bulls and bull-calves; they may not sacrifice cows: these are sacred to Isis. ,For the images of Isis are in woman's form, horned like a cow, exactly as the Greeks picture Io, and cows are held by far the most sacred of all beasts of the herd by all Egyptians alike. ,For this reason, no Egyptian man or woman will kiss a Greek man, or use a knife, or a spit, or a cauldron belonging to a Greek, or taste the flesh of an unblemished bull that has been cut up with a Greek knife. ,Cattle that die are dealt with in the following way. Cows are cast into the river, bulls are buried by each city in its suburbs, with one or both horns uncovered for a sign; then, when the carcass is decomposed, and the time appointed is at hand, a boat comes to each city from the island called Prosopitis, ,an island in the Delta, nine schoeni in circumference. There are many other towns on Prosopitis; the one from which the boats come to gather the bones of the bulls is called Atarbekhis; a temple of Aphrodite stands in it of great sanctity. ,From this town many go out, some to one town and some to another, to dig up the bones, which they then carry away and all bury in one place. As they bury the cattle, so do they all other beasts at death. Such is their ordice respecting these also; for they, too, may not be killed. 2.43. Concerning Heracles, I heard it said that he was one of the twelve gods. But nowhere in Egypt could I hear anything about the other Heracles, whom the Greeks know. ,I have indeed a lot of other evidence that the name of Heracles did not come from Hellas to Egypt, but from Egypt to Hellas (and in Hellas to those Greeks who gave the name Heracles to the son of Amphitryon), besides this: that Amphitryon and Alcmene, the parents of this Heracles, were both Egyptian by descent ; and that the Egyptians deny knowing the names Poseidon and the Dioscuri, nor are these gods reckoned among the gods of Egypt . ,Yet if they got the name of any deity from the Greeks, of these not least but in particular would they preserve a recollection, if indeed they were already making sea voyages and some Greeks, too, were seafaring men, as I expect and judge; so that the names of these gods would have been even better known to the Egyptians than the name of Heracles. ,But Heracles is a very ancient god in Egypt ; as the Egyptians themselves say, the change of the eight gods to the twelve, one of whom they acknowledge Heracles to be, was made seventeen thousand years before the reign of Amasis.
16. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

149c. THEAET. Very likely. SOC. Is it not, then, also likely and even necessary, that midwives should know better than anyone else who are pregt and who are not? THEAET. Certainly. SOC. And furthermore, the midwives, by means of drug
18. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1624-1630, 1657-1662, 1623 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1160-1161, 1164-1173, 161-172, 1159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1159. Hear, then, your task. You have come to where you will reveal what sort of man you are, who are called my son. It was foreshown to me by my father far in the past that I would
20. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.158, 21.16, 21.222 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 2.707-2.709 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.707. κοῦρος ἐὼν ἔτι γυμνός, ἔτι πλοκάμοισι γεγηθώς. 2.708. ἱλήκοις· αἰεί τοι, ἄναξ, ἄτμητοι ἔθειραι 2.709. αἰὲν ἀδήλητοι· τὼς γὰρ θέμις. οἰόθι δʼ αὐτὴ
22. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.576 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.576. was thine, when from the towering citadel
23. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 6.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

1.7. Apollo, indeed, whom they think divine above all others, and especially prophetic, giving responses at Colophon - I suppose because, induced by the pleasantness of Asia, he had removed from Delphi - to some one who asked who He was, or what God was at all, replied in twenty-one verses, of which this is the beginning:- Self-produced, untaught, without a mother, unshaken, A name not even to be comprised in word, dwelling in fire, This is God; and we His messengers are a slight portion of God.Can any one suspect that this is spoken of Jupiter, who had both a mother and a name? Why should I say that Mercury, that thrice greatest, of whom I have made mention above, not only speaks of God as without a mother, as Apollo does, but also as without a father, because He has no origin from any other source but Himself? For He cannot be produced from any one, who Himself produced all things. I have, as I think, sufficiently taught by arguments, and confirmed by witnesses, that which is sufficiently plain by itself, that there is one only King of the universe, one Father, one God. But perchance some one may ask of us the same question which Hortensius asks in Cicero: If God is one only, what solitude can be happy? As though we, in asserting that He is one, say that He is desolate and solitary. Undoubtedly He has ministers, whom we call messengers. And that is true, which I have before related, that Seneca said in his Exhortations that God produced ministers of His kingdom. But these are neither gods, nor do they wish to be called gods or to be worshipped, inasmuch as they do nothing but execute the command and will of God. Nor, however, are they gods who are worshipped in common, whose number is small and fixed. But if the worshippers of the gods think that they worship those beings whom we call the ministers of the Supreme God, there is no reason why they should envy us who say that there is one God, and deny that there are many. If a multitude of gods delights them, we do not speak of twelve, or three hundred and sixty-five as Orpheus did; but we convict them of innumerable errors on the other side, in thinking that they are so few. Let them know, however, by what name they ought to be called, lest they do injury to the true God, whose name they set forth, while they assign it to more than one. Let them believe their own Apollo, who in that same response took away from the other gods their name, as he took away the dominion from Jupiter. For the third verse shows that the ministers of God ought not to be called gods, but angels. He spoke falsely respecting himself, indeed; for though he was of the number of demons, he reckoned himself among the angels of God, and then in other responses he confessed himself a demon. For when he was asked how he wished to be supplicated, he thus answered:- O all-wise, all-learned, versed in many pursuits, hear, O demon.And so, again, when at the entreaty of some one he uttered an imprecation against the Sminthian Apollo, he began with this verse:- O harmony of the world, bearing light, all-wise demon. What therefore remains, except that by his own confession he is subject to the scourge of the true God and to everlasting punishment? For in another response he also said:- The demons who go about the earth and about the sea Without weariness, are subdued beneath the scourge of God.We speak on the subject of both in the second book. In the meantime it is enough for us, that while he wishes to honour and place himself in heaven, he has confessed, as the nature of the matter is, in what manner they are to be named who always stand beside God. Therefore let men withdraw themselves from errors; and laying aside corrupt superstitions, let them acknowledge their Father and Lord, whose excellence cannot be estimated, nor His greatness perceived, nor His beginning comprehended. When the earnest attention of the human mind and its acute sagacity and memory has reached Him, all ways being, as it were, summed up and exhausted, it stops, it is at a loss, it fails; nor is there anything beyond to which it can proceed. But because that which exists must of necessity have had a beginning, it follows that since there was nothing before Him, He was produced from Himself before all things. Therefore He is called by Apollo self-produced, by the Sibyl self-created, uncreated, and unmade. And Seneca, an acute man, saw and expressed this in his Exhortations. We, he said, are dependent upon another. Therefore we look to some one to whom we owe that which is most excellent in us. Another brought us into being, another formed us; but God of His own power made Himself.
25. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 3.9.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 3.9.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

27. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 27-38, 26 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

28. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1514



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, zeus and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
acropolis, athens, temples of athena on Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
aeschylus, agamemnon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
aeschylus, zeus as portrayed by Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
aeschylus Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 96
aither, zeus identified with Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
ajax painter, protocorinthian leythos with zeus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
alcestis, anthropomorphism and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
alcmene Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
allegory deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 326
amasis ii (pharaoh) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
amulets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
ananke(necessity) Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5, 12
anthropology Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
anthropomorphism, conflation/split of divine image with cosmic principle Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
anthropomorphism and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
apollo (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
apollonios rhodios Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
artemis (goddess), sanctuary at brauron Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
artemis (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
asklepios Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
athenians at sparta (speech of), and greatest things (fear, honour, and advantage) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 151
athens, aulis, portent at Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 125
birth / gonai plays (comic / tragic) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
cultural memory, oracles and divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
daimon/daimones Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
death, necessity and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
delphi, pythian apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
demand, nancy Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
deus ex machina Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
dionysos (bacchus, god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13, 525
divine, the (τὸ θεῖον, τὸ δαιμόνιον etc.), in euripides Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 151
divinity, name Hickson, Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil (1993) 41
dodona Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
egyptian culture and religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
ellis-hansen, a. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
epic narrative Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
epithets, cultic, choice of Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
epithets, cultic, functions of Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
epithets, related to soter/soteira, iater Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
epithets, related to soter/soteira, phylake Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
epithets, related to soter/soteira, prostaterios Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
epithets, related to soter/soteira Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
euripides, and naturalistic representation of divine forces Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 151
fate/justice/scales, association of zeus with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
festivals, artemis brauronia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
force (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
fraenkel, eduard Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
gods and goddesses, naming and identifying Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
gods and goddesses, universal and local nature of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
hera, and carthage Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 120
heracles, statue of zeus interpreted as Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
herakles (god/mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
herodotos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
homer Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
imagery Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 125
informal oaths, in law-court speeches Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 336
isis (goddess and cult) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
judaism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
justice Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121; Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
justice and political life, scales of justice/fate, association of zeus with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
king, helen Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
kyrieleis, h. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
leitao, david Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals, adolescence and puberty Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals, hairstyles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals, marriage and death rituals Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals, pregnancy and birth Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals, symbolic clothing Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
life-change rituals Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
marxism-leninism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
mercury, heralds staff of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 120
metaphor Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 125
myth/mythology Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
naukratis Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 50
necessity, zeus and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5, 12
neils, jenifer Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
nous (mind) Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
oedipus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
olympia, temple of zeus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
oracles, pythia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
oracles, pythian apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
oracles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
oracles (chaldean) deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 326
osiris (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
ouranos, gender of Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 40
ouranos, physical extension of Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 40
philosophy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
pindar Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
plato, kratylos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
plato Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 326
poetic usage Hickson, Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil (1993) 41
poetry/poetic performance Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
prayer, dubitative formulas Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 50
prayer, of contestation Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 50
priam Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
prometheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
protagoras Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
psyche, prayer of, to ceres Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 120
psyche, to hera' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 120
pulleyn, simon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
pythia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
pötscher, w. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
quisquis Hickson, Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil (1993) 41
religion/theology, diversity/plurality Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
religious experience, epiphany Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
rhapsodies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 326
sacrifice (thysia) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
sanctuaries/temples Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 13
sanctuaries and temples, of zeus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
scales Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 125
scales of justice/fate, association of zeus with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
si divus si diva Hickson, Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil (1993) 41
sive quo alio nomine te appellari volueris Hickson, Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil (1993) 41
sophists Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
soter, uneven distribution in the greek pantheon Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 236
sourvinou-inwood, christiane Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
substantivized neuter phrases, based on adjectives Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 151
thunderbolt Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
troades hecubas appeal to Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
typhon Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
tyranny Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
women, dedication of clothing (peplos) to goddesses Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
women, divine protection in childbirth Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
women, marriage Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
women, physiological change and pollution Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 525
xenophanes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 292
zeus, cult and rites Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
zeus, images and iconography Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 354
zeus, justice/scales/ fate, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
zeus, sanctuaries and temples Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24
zeus Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 125; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 24; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 326
zeus as nous Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
zeus asklepios killed by Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5
zeus in troades Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
zeus multiple attributes in troades Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 12
zeus necessity and Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 5, 12
βία / violence (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
κράτος / force (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 121
νικάω Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 151