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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



138
Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 105-110


ἐκτελέων· ἔτι γὰρ θεόθεν καταπνεύειThe omens, what their force which, journeying


πειθὼ μολπᾶνRejoiced the potentates:


ἀλκὰν σύμφυτος αἰών·(For still, from God, inflates


ὅπως Ἀχαι-My breast song-suasion: age


ῶν δίθρονον κράτος, Ἑλλάδος ἥβαςBorn to the business, still such war can wage)


ξύμφρονα ταγάν— How the fierce bird against the Teukris land


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 17.541, 20.105-20.120 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 106-130, 135-137, 150-151, 160-183, 197-247, 250-251, 513, 65, 67-71, 88-90, 104 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

104. κύριός εἰμι θροεῖν ὅδιον κράτος αἴσιον ἀνδρῶν 104. Empowered am I to sing
3. Aeschylus, Persians, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Τάδε μὲν Περσῶν τῶν οἰχομένων 1. Here we are, the faithful Council of the Persians, who have gone to the land of placeName key=
4. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 767-791, 766 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

766. τελειᾶν γὰρ παλαιφάτων ἀρᾶν 766. For the compensation is heavy when curses uttered long ago are fulfilled, and once the deadly curse has come into existence, it does not pass away. When the fortune of seafaring merchants has grown too great
5. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.7, 1.9 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Callimachus, Fragments, 612 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9. Callimachus, Fragments, 612 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Callimachus, Fragments, 612 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11. Cicero, On Divination, 1.34.76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Strabo, Geography, 6.3.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.3.9. From Barium to the Aufidus River, on which is the Emporium of the Canusitae is four hundred stadia and the voyage inland to Emporium is ninety. Near by is also Salapia, the seaport of the Argyrippini. For not far above the sea (in the plain, at all events) are situated two cities, Canusium and Argyrippa, which in earlier times were the largest of the Italiote cities, as is clear from the circuits of their walls. Now, however, Argyrippa is smaller; it was called Argos Hippium at first, then Argyrippa, and then by the present name Arpi. Both are said to have been founded by Diomedes. And as signs of the dominion of Diomedes in these regions are to be seen the Plain of Diomedes and many other things, among which are the old votive offerings in the sanctuary of Athene at Luceria — a place which likewise was in ancient times a city of the Daunii, but is now reduced — and, in the sea near by, two islands that are called the Islands of Diomedes, of which one is inhabited, while the other, it is said, is desert; on the latter, according to certain narrators of myths, Diomedes was caused to disappear, and his companions were changed to birds, and to this day, in fact, remain tame and live a sort of human life, not only in their orderly ways but also in their tameness towards honorable men and in their flight from wicked and knavish men. But I have already mentioned the stories constantly told among the Heneti about this hero and the rites which are observed in his honor. It is thought that Sipus also was founded by Diomedes, which is about one hundred and forty stadia distant from Salapia; at any rate it was named Sepius in Greek after the sepia that are cast ashore by the waves. Between Salapia and Sipus is a navigable river, and also a large lake that opens into the sea; and the merchandise from Sipus, particularly grain, is brought down on both. In Daunia, on a hill by the name of Drium, are to be seen two hero-temples: one, to Calchas, on the very summit, where those who consult the oracle sacrifice to his shade a black ram and sleep in the hide, and the other, to Podaleirius, down near the base of the hill, this sanctuary being about one hundred stadia distant from the sea; and from it flows a stream which is a cure-all for diseases of animals. In front of this gulf is a promontory, Garganum, which extends towards the east for a distance of three hundred stadia into the high sea; doubling the headland, one comes to a small town, Urium, and off the headland are to be seen the Islands of Diomedes. This whole country produces everything in great quantity, and is excellent for horses and sheep; but though the wool is softer than the Tarantine, it is not so glossy. And the country is well sheltered, because the plains lie in hollows. According to some, Diomedes even tried to cut a canal as far as the sea, but left behind both this and the rest of his undertakings only half-finished, because he was summoned home and there ended his life. This is one account of him; but there is also a second, that he stayed here till the end of his life; and a third, the aforesaid mythical account, which tells of his disappearance in the island; and as a fourth one might set down the account of the Heneti, for they too tell a mythical story of how he in some way came to his end in their country, and they call it his apotheosis.
13. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 204



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, language of synaesthesia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
aeschylus, prometheus bound Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
aeschylus Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 96; Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
animals as divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
apollo (god), sanctuary at delphi Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
atreids Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
aulis Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
bird interpreters Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
choregia, medium for interaction of myth and ritual Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
cultural memory, oracles and divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
daulia Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
delphi, oracle Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
delphi, sanctuary of apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
eidinow, esther Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 64
farts as divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
healing, incubation (healing dreams and visions) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
helen Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
kleisthenes (statesman) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
lhôte, éric Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
melampus (pseudo-) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
merging in choral performance Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
moans as divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
mopsus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 64
myth-ritual nexus, ritual moment Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
myth and ritual, interaction rather than relationship Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
myth without rituals and vice versa, pinned down in performance Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
myth without rituals and vice versa, relationship constantly reconfigured Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
oracles, delphi Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
oracles, divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
oracles, dodona Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
oracles, drawing of lots Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
oracles, incubation Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
oracles, natural vs. technical methods' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479
performance, aesthetic appeal of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
performances of myth and ritual (also song), and social and power relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
philomela Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
phocis Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
procne Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
religion, greek, general considerations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
ritual, aesthetic, sensory experience Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
rodighiero, andrea Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
sacrifice, sensual orchestration of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
selloi Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 64
sneezes as divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
song-culture, and social convictions Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
song-culture, producing gradual structural change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 393
teres Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
tereus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
tragedy, as continued song-culture Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 392, 393
troy xvi Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
twitches as divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
weasel Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 130
zeus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 53
zeus (god), sanctuary at dodona Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 479