Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12326
Aeschines, Or., 3.178-3.179


nanIf any one should ask you whether our city seems to you more glorious in our own time or in the time of our fathers, you would all agree, in the time of our fathers. And were there better men then than now? Then, eminent men; but now, far inferior. But rewards and crowns and proclamations, and maintenance in the Prytaneum—were these things more common then than now? Then, honors were rare among us, and the name of virtue was itself an honor. But now the custom is already completely faded out, and you do the crowning as a matter of habit, not deliberately.


nanAre you not therefore surprised, when you look at it in this light, that the rewards are now more numerous, but the city was then more prosperous? And that the men are now inferior, but were better then? I will try to explain this to you. Do you think, fellow citizens, that any man would ever have been willing to train for the pancratium or any other of the harder contests in the Olympic games, or any of the other games that confer a crown, if the crown were given, not to the best man, but to the man who had successfully intrigued for it? No man would ever have been willing.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Aristophanes, Knights, 574-576, 573 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

573. ἀλλὰ διεπάλαιον αὖθις. καὶ στρατηγὸς οὐδ' ἂν εἷς
2. Herodotus, Histories, 7.107 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.107. The only one of those who were driven out by the Greeks whom king Xerxes considered a valiant man was Boges, from whom they took Eion. He never ceased praising this man, and gave very great honor to his sons who were left alive in Persia; indeed Boges proved himself worthy of all praise. When he was besieged by the Athenians under Cimon son of Miltiades, he could have departed under treaty from Eion and returned to Asia, but he refused, lest the king think that he had saved his life out of cowardice; instead he resisted to the last. ,When there was no food left within his walls, he piled up a great pyre and slew his children and wife and concubines and servants and cast them into the fire; after that, he took all the gold and silver from the city and scattered it from the walls into the Strymon; after he had done this, he cast himself into the fire. Thus he is justly praised by the Persians to this day.
3. Isocrates, Orations, 18.59-18.60, 18.65-18.66 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.98 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.33, 2.4.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired.
6. Aeschines, Letters, 3.178-3.188 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Demosthenes, Orations, 13.21-13.23, 18.79, 18.83, 18.88, 18.102, 18.112-18.113, 18.117, 18.119, 18.257, 18.299, 18.303, 18.311-18.312, 18.316, 20.68, 20.70, 20.74-20.75, 20.81-20.82, 20.112, 20.114-20.117, 20.120-20.122, 23.196-23.206, 59.104-59.106 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Dinarchus, Or., 1.14-1.15 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33.2. At this time, In the early summer of 408 B.C. therefore, the people had only to meet in assembly, and Alcibiades addressed them. He lamented and bewailed his own lot, but had only little and moderate blame to lay upon the people. The entire mischief he ascribed to a certain evil fortune and envious genius of his own. Then he descanted at great length upon the vain hopes which their enemies were cherishing, and wrought his hearers up to courage. At last they crowned him with crowns of gold, and elected him general with sole powers by land and sea.
10. Plutarch, Cimon, 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Aeschines, Or., 3.179-3.188

12. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 2.17-2.18

13. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 2.17-2.18

14. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

15. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

16. Epigraphy, Seg, 28.45

17. Lycurgus, Orations, 1.86-1.89, 1.102-1.104, 1.125-1.127



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 144; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176, 242
alcibiades Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 144; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82
athens Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81
benefactors, citizens as Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
cimon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
cleon Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
demos, in athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
demosthenes, orator Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
demosthenes Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
eion Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
elite, ideological agency Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
herms Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176, 242
honors, negotiation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
justice Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
lawcourt, character evidence Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
lawcourt, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
lawcourt, historical allusions Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
leadership, as benefaction Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176, 242
leadership Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
mass, ideological agency Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
megistai timai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
orator, role in ideological practice Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
orator, use of the past Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 68
peloponnesian war Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82
persia, persians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
persian wars Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
prytaneion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 81, 82; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
rewards, collective Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
rich, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
stoa of the herms (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 176
theôrikon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242
thirty tyrants Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 82
walls' Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 242