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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12326
Aeschines, Or., 3.122


nanThese words I spoke, and many more. And when now I had finished and gone out from the council, there was great outcry and excitement among the Amphictyons, and nothing more was said about the shields that we had dedicated, but from now on the subject was the punishment of the Amphissians. As it was already late in the day, the herald came forward and made proclamation that all the men of Delphi who were of full age, slaves and free men alike, should come at daybreak on the morrow with shovels and mattocks to the place that is there called the Thyteion. And again the same herald proclaimed that all the hieromnemons and the pylagori should come to the same place to the aid of the god and the sacred land; “And whatever city shall fail to appear, shall he debarred from the shrine and shall be impure and under the curse.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 241-245, 240 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

240. However, when to both the foreigner
2. Herodotus, Histories, 1.172, 6.21 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.172. I think the Caunians are aborigines of the soil, but they say that they came from Crete . Their speech has become like the Carian, or the Carian like theirs (for I cannot clearly decide), but in their customs they diverge widely from the Carians, as from all other men. Their chief pleasure is to assemble for drinking-bouts in groups according to their ages and friendships: men, women, and children. ,Certain foreign rites of worship were established among them; but afterwards, when they were inclined otherwise, and wanted to worship only the gods of their fathers, all Caunian men of full age put on their armor and went together as far as the boundaries of Calynda, striking the air with their spears and saying that they were casting out the alien gods. 6.21. Now when the Milesians suffered all this at the hands of the Persians, the Sybarites (who had lost their city and dwelt in Laus and Scidrus) did not give them equal return for what they had done. When Sybaris was taken by the Crotoniates, all the people of Miletus, young and old, shaved their heads and made great public lamentation; no cities which we know were ever so closely joined in friendship as these. ,The Athenians acted very differently. The Athenians made clear their deep grief for the taking of Miletus in many ways, but especially in this: when Phrynichus wrote a play entitled “The Fall of Miletus” and produced it, the whole theater fell to weeping; they fined Phrynichus a thousand drachmas for bringing to mind a calamity that affected them so personally, and forbade the performance of that play forever.
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 5.32.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.32.1. About the same time in this summer Athens succeeded in reducing Scione, put the adult males to death, and making slaves of the women and children, gave the land for the Plataeans to live in. She also brought back the Delians to Delos, moved by her misfortunes in the field and by the commands of the god at Delphi .
4. Xenophon, On Household Management, 1.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.22. Yes, they too are slaves, and hard indeed are their masters: some are in bondage to gluttony, some to lechery, some to drink, and some to foolish and costly ambitions. And so hard is the rule of these passions over every man who falls into their clutches, that so long as they see that he is strong and capable of work, they force him to pay over all the profits of his toil, and to spend it on their own desires; but no sooner do they find that he is too old to work, than they leave him to an old age of misery, and try to fasten the yoke on other shoulders.
5. Demosthenes, Orations, 9.32 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.2. After the statues of the eponymoi come statues of gods, Amphiaraus, and Eirene (Peace) carrying the boy Plutus (Wealth). Here stands a bronze figure of Lycurgus, An Athenian orator who did great service to Athens when Demosthenes was trying to stir up his countrymen against Philip of Macedon . son of Lycophron, and of Callias, who, as most of the Athenians say, brought about the peace between the Greeks and Artaxerxes, son of Xerxes. c. 448 B.C. Here also is Demosthenes, whom the Athenians forced to retire to Calauria, the island off Troezen, and then, after receiving him back, banished again after the disaster at Lamia .
7. Aeschines, Or., 3.108-3.113, 3.116, 3.118-3.121, 3.125-3.126

8. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40

9. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aiskhines Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 4
aliterios Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
amphictyonies Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
amphissa Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
calauria, poseidon of Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
creusa Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
curse Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
daimon Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
delphi, amphictyony Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
delphi, apollo of Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
delphi, as place of cult Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
delphi Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 14
demosthenes Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
denigration, after chaeroneia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
initiation/rites of passage Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 4
miaros (pollution, impurity), demosthenes Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
solon Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 4
temple, of apollo at delphi Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
themistokles Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 14
tyche (fortune), demosthenes' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 89
von wiliamowitz, u. Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 203
xenophon Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 14