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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



131
Aeschines, Letters, 1.64


nanBut when now Hegesandrus was coming before you as a public speaker, being at the same time engaged in his attack on Aristophon of Azenia, an attack which he kept up until Aristophon threatened to institute against him before the people the same process that I have instituted against Timarchus, and when Hegesandrus' brother CrobylusCrobylus, “Top-knot,” was the nickname of Hegesippus, associate of Demosthenes in the anti-Macedonian agitation. He owed his name to his old-fashioned way of wearing his hair. was coming forward as a public man, when, in short, these men had the effrontery to advise you as to international questions, then at last Pittalacus, losing confidence in himself and asking himself who he was that he should attempt to fight against such men as these, came to a wise decision—for I must speak the truth: he gave up, and considered himself lucky if his ill-treatment should stop there.So now when Hegesandrus had won this glorious victory—without a fight!—he kept possession of the defendant, Timarchus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.1.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.1.22. and sat pondering which road to take. And there appeared two women of great stature making towards him. The one was fair to see and of high bearing; and her limbs were adorned with purity, her eyes with modesty; sober was her figure, and her robe was white. The other was plump and soft, with high feeding. Her face was made up to heighten its natural white and pink, her figure to exaggerate her height. Open-eyed was she; and dressed so as to disclose all her charms. Now she eyed herself; anon looked whether any noticed her; and often stole a glance at her own shadow.
2. Aeschines, Letters, 1.39-1.40, 1.44, 1.49, 1.59, 1.65, 1.70, 1.72, 1.77-1.79, 1.87-1.88, 1.90-1.91, 1.94, 1.112, 1.114, 1.132, 2.23 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.183, 25.37 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Dinarchus, Or., 1.101 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Aeschines, Or., 1.39-1.40, 1.42, 1.44-1.50, 1.54, 1.58-1.60, 1.62-1.64, 1.67, 1.69-1.70, 1.72, 1.81, 1.87, 1.112, 1.114-1.115, 1.132, 2.23



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84; Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
demades Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84
demosthenes Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84; Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
dinarchus Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84
education Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
eisangelia (impeachment)' Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84
gymnasia Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
heracles Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
keos, keans Liddel, Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives (2020) 84
philosophy Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
phēmē Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
property Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
rhetoric Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
seriousness Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48
timarchus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 48