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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 50.97-50.98
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

33c. to spend much of their time with me? You have heard the reason, men of Athens ; for I told you the whole truth; it is because they like to listen when those are examined who think they are wise and are not so; for it is amusing. But, as I believe, I have been commanded to do this by the God through oracles and dreams and in every way in which any man was ever commanded by divine power to do anything whatsoever. This, Athenians, is true and easily tested. For if I am corrupting some of the young men
2. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 5.66 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 38.1-38.3, 42.11, 47.7, 47.9-47.10, 47.13, 47.15-47.18, 47.22-47.23, 47.26, 47.30, 47.40-47.42, 47.45, 47.51-47.52, 47.54, 47.56, 47.58, 47.64-47.66, 47.71, 48.1-48.4, 48.8-48.9, 48.18, 48.27, 48.29, 48.41-48.42, 48.47, 48.51, 48.68, 48.71, 49.4, 49.12-49.15, 49.20, 49.23-49.24, 49.26, 49.29, 49.37, 49.44-49.46, 50.1, 50.5, 50.11, 50.14-50.31, 50.34, 50.38-50.62, 50.64-50.66, 50.69-50.96, 50.98-50.104, 51.8, 51.16, 51.18, 51.22, 51.24, 51.31, 51.36, 51.44-51.45, 51.47, 51.52, 51.61, 51.63, 51.65-51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.4, 8.30, 11.5-11.6, 11.28, 11.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.5. “Behold, Lucius, I have come! Your weeping and prayers have moved me to succor you. I am she who is the natural mother of all things, mistress and governess of all the elements, the initial progeny of worlds, chief of powers divine, queen of heaven! I am the principal of the celestial gods, the light of the goddesses. At my will the planets of the heavens, the wholesome winds of the seas, and the silences of hell are disposed. My name and my divinity is adored throughout all the world in diverse manners. I am worshipped by various customs and by many names. The Phrygians call me the mother of the gods. The Athenians, Minerva. The Cyprians, Venus. The Cretans, Diana. The Sicilians, Proserpina. The Eleusians, Ceres. Some call me Juno, other Bellona, and yet others Hecate. And principally the Aethiopians who dwell in the Orient, and the Aegyptians who are excellent in all kind of ancient doctrine and by their proper ceremonies are accustomed to worship me, call me Queen Isis. Behold, I have come to take pity of your fortune and tribulation. Behold, I am present to favor and aid you. Leave off your weeping and lamentation, put away all your sorrow. For behold, the day which is ordained by my providence is at hand. Therefore be ready to attend to my command. This day which shall come after this night is dedicated to my service by an eternal religion. My priests and ministers are accustomed, after the tempests of the sea have ceased, to offer in my name a new ship as a first fruit of my navigation. I command you not to profane or despise the sacrifice in any way. 11.6. “The great priest shall carry this day, following in procession by my exhortation, a garland of roses next the rattle in his right hand. Follow my procession amongst the people and, when you come to the priest, make as though you would kiss his hand. But snatch at the roses, whereby I will put away the skin and shape of an ass. This kind of beast I have long abhorred and despised. But above all things beware that you do not doubt or fear any of those things as being hard and difficult to bring to pass. For in the same hour as I have come to you, I have commanded the priest, by a vision, of what he shall do. And all the people by my command shall be compelled to give you place and say nothing! Moreover, do not think that, amongst so fair and joyful ceremonies and in so good a company, any person shall abhor your ill-favored and deformed figure, or that any man shall be so hardy as to blame and reprove your sudden restoration to human shape. They will not conceive any sinister opinion about this deed. And know this for certain: for the rest of your life, until the hour of death, you shall be bound and subject to me! And think it not an injury to be always subject to me, since by my means and benefit you shall become a man. You shall live blessed in this world, you shall live gloriously by my guidance and protection. And when you descend to hell, you shall see me shine in that subterranean place, shining (as you see me now) in the darkness of Acheron, and reigning in the deep profundity of Styx. There you shall worship me as one who has been favorable to you. And if I perceive that you are obedient to my command, an adherent to my religion, and worthy my divine grace, know you that I will prolong your days above the time that the fates have appointed, and the celestial planets have ordained.” 11.28. Thus I was initiated into the religion, but my desire was delayed by reason of my poverty. I had spent a great part of my goods in travel and peregrination, but most of all the cost of living in the city of Rome had dwindled my resources. In the end, being often stirred forward with great trouble of mind, I was forced to sell my robe for a little money which was nevertheless sufficient for all my affairs. Then the priest spoke to me saying, “How is it that for a little pleasure you are not afraid to sell your vestments, yet when you enter into such great ceremonies you fear to fall into poverty? Prepare yourself and abstain from all animal meats, beasts and fish.” In the meantime I frequented the sacrifices of Serapis, which were done in the night. This gave me great comfort to my peregrination, and ministered to me more plentiful living since I gained some money by pleading in the courts in the Latin language.
5. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 43 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

43. I will now give you a conversation between Glycon and one Sacerdos of Tius[1]; the intelligence of the latter you may gauge from his questions. I read it inscribed in golden letters in Sacerdos’s house at Tius. ‘Tell me, lord Glycon,’ said he, ‘who you are.’ ‘The new Asclepius.’ ‘Another, different from the former one? Is that the meaning?’ ‘That it is not lawful for you to learn.’ ‘And how many years will you sojourn and prophesy among us?’ ‘A thousand and three.’ ‘And after that, whither will you go?’ ‘To Bactria; for the barbarians too must be blessed with my presence.’ ‘The other oracles, at Didymus and Clarus and Delphi, have they still the spirit of your grandsire Apollo, or are the answers that now come from them forgeries?’ ‘That, too, desire not to know; it is not lawful.’ ‘What shall I be after this life?’ ‘A camel; then a horse; then a wise man, no less a prophet than Alexander.’ Such was the conversation. There was added to it an oracle in verse, inspired by the fact that Sacerdos was an associate of Lepidus:Shun Lepidus; an evil fate awaits him.As I have said, Alexander was much afraid of Epicurus, and the solvent action of his logic on imposture. [1] Tius | A Greek town on the coast of Bithynia.
6. Lucian, Parliament of The Gods, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.24 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.24. And again, when it is said of Æsculapius that a great multitude both of Greeks and Barbarians acknowledge that they have frequently seen, and still see, no mere phantom, but Æsculapius himself, healing and doing good, and foretelling the future; Celsus requires us to believe this, and finds no fault with the believers in Jesus, when we express our belief in such stories, but when we give our assent to the disciples, and eye-witnesses of the miracles of Jesus, who clearly manifest the honesty of their convictions (because we see their guilelessness, as far as it is possible to see the conscience revealed in writing), we are called by him a set of silly individuals, although he cannot demonstrate that an incalculable number, as he asserts, of Greeks and Barbarians acknowledge the existence of Æsculapius; while we, if we deem this a matter of importance, can clearly show a countless multitude of Greeks and Barbarians who acknowledge the existence of Jesus. And some give evidence of their having received through this faith a marvellous power by the cures which they perform, revoking no other name over those who need their help than that of the God of all things, and of Jesus, along with a mention of His history. For by these means we too have seen many persons freed from grievous calamities, and from distractions of mind, and madness, and countless other ills, which could be cured neither by men nor devils.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, sacred tales Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
alexander of abonuteichos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
anxiety dreams and nightmares, voices Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
apuleius, golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
aristides, aelius Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
asklepios, and glykon Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios, as oracular god Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios, asklepios sōtēr Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios, father of hygieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios, provides athletic tips in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios, specific ailments cured, headaches Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
athletes Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
citizenship, greek and roman Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
deity, viewed by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
divination, incubation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
divine voices, graeco-roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
dream figures, gods, in disguise Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400, 401
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
dreams and visions, dream figures, invisible (voice only) Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
dreams and visions, dream figures, statues Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400, 404
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400, 401, 404
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400, 401, 404
dreams and visions, incubation, oracular Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
dreams and visions, participatory Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210, 401
dreams and visions, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
elite Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimony about asklepios teaching wrestling move Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
epiphany, in golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
epithets (applied to multiple divinities), σωτῆρες Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
euergetism Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
glykon, as new asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
hermokrates of phokaia (sophist), prescription from asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
hygieia, and asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
hypnos/somnus, in lucians council of the gods Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
identity, of aelius aristides Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
identity, of asian provincials Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
kos asklepieion, oracles pertaining to sanctuary improvements Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
mythological figures (excluding olympian gods and their offspring), achilles Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
oracles, reports Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 401
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
pergamon asklepieion, oracle about reincarnated citizen' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 117
portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
revelation and guidance, unexpected Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice, finger Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
second sophistic Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 49
speech in dreams, literary quotes Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
speech in dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210
viewing, of deity by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
voice portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 210