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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 50.53
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 27.2, 37.1, 38.1, 40.22, 41.1, 42.11, 47.6-47.8, 47.11, 47.13, 47.15-47.17, 47.21-47.22, 47.24-47.26, 47.28, 47.30-47.33, 47.35-47.52, 47.54, 47.58, 47.63, 47.65-47.66, 47.71, 48.7, 48.9, 48.18, 48.27, 48.30-48.35, 48.40-48.42, 49.4, 49.12-49.15, 49.20, 49.23-49.24, 49.39, 49.45-49.46, 49.48, 50.1, 50.5, 50.11, 50.14-50.31, 50.34, 50.38-50.52, 50.54-50.62, 50.64-50.66, 50.69-50.102, 50.106, 51.8, 51.16, 51.18, 51.22, 51.44-51.45, 51.47, 51.49-51.52, 51.57-51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.4, 8.30, 11.5-11.6, 11.28, 11.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.5. “Behold, Lucius, I have come! Your weeping and prayers have moved me to succor you. I am she who is the natural mother of all things, mistress and governess of all the elements, the initial progeny of worlds, chief of powers divine, queen of heaven! I am the principal of the celestial gods, the light of the goddesses. At my will the planets of the heavens, the wholesome winds of the seas, and the silences of hell are disposed. My name and my divinity is adored throughout all the world in diverse manners. I am worshipped by various customs and by many names. The Phrygians call me the mother of the gods. The Athenians, Minerva. The Cyprians, Venus. The Cretans, Diana. The Sicilians, Proserpina. The Eleusians, Ceres. Some call me Juno, other Bellona, and yet others Hecate. And principally the Aethiopians who dwell in the Orient, and the Aegyptians who are excellent in all kind of ancient doctrine and by their proper ceremonies are accustomed to worship me, call me Queen Isis. Behold, I have come to take pity of your fortune and tribulation. Behold, I am present to favor and aid you. Leave off your weeping and lamentation, put away all your sorrow. For behold, the day which is ordained by my providence is at hand. Therefore be ready to attend to my command. This day which shall come after this night is dedicated to my service by an eternal religion. My priests and ministers are accustomed, after the tempests of the sea have ceased, to offer in my name a new ship as a first fruit of my navigation. I command you not to profane or despise the sacrifice in any way. 11.6. “The great priest shall carry this day, following in procession by my exhortation, a garland of roses next the rattle in his right hand. Follow my procession amongst the people and, when you come to the priest, make as though you would kiss his hand. But snatch at the roses, whereby I will put away the skin and shape of an ass. This kind of beast I have long abhorred and despised. But above all things beware that you do not doubt or fear any of those things as being hard and difficult to bring to pass. For in the same hour as I have come to you, I have commanded the priest, by a vision, of what he shall do. And all the people by my command shall be compelled to give you place and say nothing! Moreover, do not think that, amongst so fair and joyful ceremonies and in so good a company, any person shall abhor your ill-favored and deformed figure, or that any man shall be so hardy as to blame and reprove your sudden restoration to human shape. They will not conceive any sinister opinion about this deed. And know this for certain: for the rest of your life, until the hour of death, you shall be bound and subject to me! And think it not an injury to be always subject to me, since by my means and benefit you shall become a man. You shall live blessed in this world, you shall live gloriously by my guidance and protection. And when you descend to hell, you shall see me shine in that subterranean place, shining (as you see me now) in the darkness of Acheron, and reigning in the deep profundity of Styx. There you shall worship me as one who has been favorable to you. And if I perceive that you are obedient to my command, an adherent to my religion, and worthy my divine grace, know you that I will prolong your days above the time that the fates have appointed, and the celestial planets have ordained.” 11.28. Thus I was initiated into the religion, but my desire was delayed by reason of my poverty. I had spent a great part of my goods in travel and peregrination, but most of all the cost of living in the city of Rome had dwindled my resources. In the end, being often stirred forward with great trouble of mind, I was forced to sell my robe for a little money which was nevertheless sufficient for all my affairs. Then the priest spoke to me saying, “How is it that for a little pleasure you are not afraid to sell your vestments, yet when you enter into such great ceremonies you fear to fall into poverty? Prepare yourself and abstain from all animal meats, beasts and fish.” In the meantime I frequented the sacrifices of Serapis, which were done in the night. This gave me great comfort to my peregrination, and ministered to me more plentiful living since I gained some money by pleading in the courts in the Latin language.
3. Galen, On The Powers of Simple Remedies, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.11 (2nd cent. CE

4.11. Having purged the Ephesians of the plague, and having had enough of the people of Ionia, he started for Hellas. Having made his way then to Pergamum, and being pleased with the sanctuary of Asclepius, he gave hints to the supplicants of the god, what to do in order to obtain favorable dreams; and having healed many of them he came to the land of Ilium. And when his mind was glutted with all the traditions of their past, he went to visit the tombs of the Achaeans, and he delivered himself of many speeches over them, and he offered many sacrifices of a bloodless and pure kind; and then he bade his companions go on board ship, for he himself, he said, must spend a night on the mound of Achilles. Now his companions tried to deter him — for in fact the Dioscoridae and the Phaedimi, and a whole company of such already followed in the train of Apollonius — alleging that Achilles was still dreadful as a phantom; for such was the conviction about him of the inhabitants of Ilium. Nevertheless, said Apollonius, I know Achilles well and that he thoroughly delights in company; for he heartily welcomed Nestor when he came from Pylos, because he always had something useful to tell him; and he used to honor Phoenix with the title of foster-father and companion and so forth, because Phoenix entertained him with his talk; and he looked most mildly upon Priam also, although he was his bitterest enemy, so soon as he heard him talk; and when in the course of a quarrel he had an interview with Odysseus, he made himself so gracious that Odysseus thought him more handsome than terrible.For, I think that his shield and his plumes that wave so terribly, as they say, are a menace to the Trojans, because he can never forget what he suffered at their hands, when they played him false over the marriage. But I have nothing in common with Ilium, and I shall talk to him more pleasantly than his former companions; and if he slays me, as you say he will, why then I shall repose with Memnon and Cycnus, and perhaps Troy will bury me in a hollow sepulcher as they did Hector. Such were his words to his companions, half playful and half serious, as he went up alone to the barrow; but they went on board ship, for it was already evening.
5. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 1.25, 2.9 (2nd cent. CE

6. Oribasius, Liber Incertus (Collectiones Medicae Libri Incerti), 45.30.10-45.30.14 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, sacred tales Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
antoninus pius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
apuleius, golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
asclepius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
asia minor Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
asklepieia, anatomical dedications Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, dedications of ears or eyes Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, specific ailments cured, hearing problems Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios, surgery prompted by asklepios dream Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
commodus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), κατ ἐπιταγήν Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), κατ ὄνειρον Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dedicatory objects, reliefs representing ears Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
deity, viewed by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
divination Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
dreams (in greek and latin literature), galen, on treatment by venesection Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 398, 403
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 398, 403
emotional responses to dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, distress, terror Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, joy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
epiphany, in golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
galen, and medical/prescriptive dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
hadrian Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
incubation Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
lucius verus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
marcus aurelius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
mysticism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
pergamon asklepieion, anatomical relief Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamon asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding aristides)' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 199
pergamum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
prophecy, foretelling the future Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 176
smyrna Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 3
viewing, of deity by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299