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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 50.50-50.51
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1. Homer, Iliad, 1.197-1.222 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer
2. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.2, 2.35, 2.69 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.1.10, 1.1.12-1.1.13, 1.6.3, 1.6.7, 1.12.2-1.12.3, 1.12.5, 1.14, 1.14.6, 1.14.9-1.14.10, 1.16.15-1.16.16, 1.19.11-1.19.13, 1.24.1, 2.8.1-2.8.2, 2.8.10-2.8.11, 2.14.11-2.14.13, 2.17.21-2.17.26, 2.17.29, 3.13.4, 3.13.13, 3.22.56, 3.24.60, 3.24.112-3.24.117, 4.1.103, 4.4.39, 4.8.30-4.8.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Epictetus, Fragments, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 2.39, 26.105, 38.1-38.3, 47.7-47.52, 47.54-47.56, 47.58, 47.65, 47.71, 48.1-48.5, 48.7-48.9, 48.18, 48.27, 48.29-48.33, 48.40-48.42, 48.47, 48.51, 48.63, 48.68, 49.4, 49.13, 49.20-49.24, 49.26, 49.37, 49.39, 49.43, 49.45-49.48, 50.1, 50.5, 50.11, 50.14-50.31, 50.34, 50.38-50.49, 50.51-50.62, 50.64-50.66, 50.69-50.102, 50.106, 51.16, 51.18, 51.22, 51.24, 51.31, 51.36, 51.44-51.45, 51.47, 51.49-51.52, 51.57-51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.4, 8.30, 11.5-11.6, 11.28, 11.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.5. “Behold, Lucius, I have come! Your weeping and prayers have moved me to succor you. I am she who is the natural mother of all things, mistress and governess of all the elements, the initial progeny of worlds, chief of powers divine, queen of heaven! I am the principal of the celestial gods, the light of the goddesses. At my will the planets of the heavens, the wholesome winds of the seas, and the silences of hell are disposed. My name and my divinity is adored throughout all the world in diverse manners. I am worshipped by various customs and by many names. The Phrygians call me the mother of the gods. The Athenians, Minerva. The Cyprians, Venus. The Cretans, Diana. The Sicilians, Proserpina. The Eleusians, Ceres. Some call me Juno, other Bellona, and yet others Hecate. And principally the Aethiopians who dwell in the Orient, and the Aegyptians who are excellent in all kind of ancient doctrine and by their proper ceremonies are accustomed to worship me, call me Queen Isis. Behold, I have come to take pity of your fortune and tribulation. Behold, I am present to favor and aid you. Leave off your weeping and lamentation, put away all your sorrow. For behold, the day which is ordained by my providence is at hand. Therefore be ready to attend to my command. This day which shall come after this night is dedicated to my service by an eternal religion. My priests and ministers are accustomed, after the tempests of the sea have ceased, to offer in my name a new ship as a first fruit of my navigation. I command you not to profane or despise the sacrifice in any way. 11.6. “The great priest shall carry this day, following in procession by my exhortation, a garland of roses next the rattle in his right hand. Follow my procession amongst the people and, when you come to the priest, make as though you would kiss his hand. But snatch at the roses, whereby I will put away the skin and shape of an ass. This kind of beast I have long abhorred and despised. But above all things beware that you do not doubt or fear any of those things as being hard and difficult to bring to pass. For in the same hour as I have come to you, I have commanded the priest, by a vision, of what he shall do. And all the people by my command shall be compelled to give you place and say nothing! Moreover, do not think that, amongst so fair and joyful ceremonies and in so good a company, any person shall abhor your ill-favored and deformed figure, or that any man shall be so hardy as to blame and reprove your sudden restoration to human shape. They will not conceive any sinister opinion about this deed. And know this for certain: for the rest of your life, until the hour of death, you shall be bound and subject to me! And think it not an injury to be always subject to me, since by my means and benefit you shall become a man. You shall live blessed in this world, you shall live gloriously by my guidance and protection. And when you descend to hell, you shall see me shine in that subterranean place, shining (as you see me now) in the darkness of Acheron, and reigning in the deep profundity of Styx. There you shall worship me as one who has been favorable to you. And if I perceive that you are obedient to my command, an adherent to my religion, and worthy my divine grace, know you that I will prolong your days above the time that the fates have appointed, and the celestial planets have ordained.” 11.28. Thus I was initiated into the religion, but my desire was delayed by reason of my poverty. I had spent a great part of my goods in travel and peregrination, but most of all the cost of living in the city of Rome had dwindled my resources. In the end, being often stirred forward with great trouble of mind, I was forced to sell my robe for a little money which was nevertheless sufficient for all my affairs. Then the priest spoke to me saying, “How is it that for a little pleasure you are not afraid to sell your vestments, yet when you enter into such great ceremonies you fear to fall into poverty? Prepare yourself and abstain from all animal meats, beasts and fish.” In the meantime I frequented the sacrifices of Serapis, which were done in the night. This gave me great comfort to my peregrination, and ministered to me more plentiful living since I gained some money by pleading in the courts in the Latin language.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
aelius aristides, p. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287, 371
aelius aristides, sacred tales Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
alexander of cotyaeum Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
aphrodite Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 173
apollo, callitecnus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, clarius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, phoebus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
appearance-and-sensation topic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apuleius, golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
artemidorus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287, 371; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 173, 174
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
deity, viewed by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dream, passim, esp., epiphany dream Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 173
dream Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287, 371
dream books Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dreams and visions, dream figures, statues' Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 399, 403, 404
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 399, 403, 404
emotional responses to dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, distress, terror Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, joy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emperor Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
epiktetos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
epiphany, in golden ass Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
epiphany Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
ex-iussu inscription Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
god, gods Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
god Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
henoteïsm Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 287
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
inscriptions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
johannes chortasmenos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
king Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
kyzikos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
libanios Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 173
magistrate Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
marcus aurelius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
medicine, hippocratic Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287
medicine Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287
michael psellus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
monotheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
nemesis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
oracles Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 173, 174
pergamum, sanctuary of asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287
phidias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
polytheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132
portrait, aelius aristides Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
priest Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
rhetoric Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287, 371
rhosandrus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice, finger Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sanctuary, of asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 287
sarapis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
smyrna Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
sophist Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 371
state reliefs Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286, 371
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
synesius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 286
telesphorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
viewing, of deity by human Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 299
zeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 132