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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 49.47
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.197-1.222 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer
2. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 7.26.2 (1st cent. CE

7.26.2. λέγουσι δὲ αἱ ἐφημερίδες αἱ βασίλειοι ἐν τοῦ Σαράπιδος τῷ ἱερῷ Πείθωνά τε ἐγκοιμηθέντα καὶ Ἄτταλον καὶ Δημοφῶντα καὶ Πευκέσταν, πρὸς δὲ Κλεομένην τε καὶ Μενίδαν καὶ Σέλευκον, ἐπερωτᾶν τὸν θεὸν εἰ λῷον καὶ ἄμεινον Ἀλεξάνδρῳ εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν τοῦ θεοῦ κομισθέντα καὶ ἱκετεύσαντα θεραπεύεσθαι πρὸς τοῦ θεοῦ· καὶ γενέσθαι φήμην τινὰ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ μὴ κομίζεσθαι εἰς τὸ ἱερόν, ἀλλὰ αὐτοῦ μένοντι ἔσεσθαι ἄμεινον.
3. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.35, 2.39, 5.26, 5.92-5.93 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 2.39, 38.23, 47.11-47.13, 47.18, 47.71, 48.1-48.4, 48.7, 48.9, 48.18, 48.41-48.43, 48.69-48.70, 49.13, 49.20-49.23, 49.43-49.46, 49.48, 50.1, 50.14, 50.19, 50.31, 50.39-50.47, 50.50, 51.22, 51.24, 51.49-51.52 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.32.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.32.13. About forty stades distant from Asclepius is a precinct and shrine sacred to Isis, the holiest of all those made by the Greeks for the Egyptian goddess. For the Tithoreans think it wrong to dwell round about it, and no one may enter the shrine except those whom Isis herself has honored by inviting them in dreams. The same rule is observed in the cities above the Maeander by the gods of the lower world; for to all whom they wish to enter their shrines they send visions seen in dreams.
6. Epigraphy, Ig Xi,4, 1299

7. Epigraphy, Ricis, 202/0101, 113/0536



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, and asclepius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
aelius aristides, and sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides, inspired by asklepios to compose sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides, relationship with priests of asclepius at pergamum Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
aelius aristides, unsolicited dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67; Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
alexander the great, sarapis consulted regarding final illness Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
apellas Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
apollo, callitecnus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, clarius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, phoebus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollonios (delian priest of sarapis) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
appearance-and-sensation topic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
artemidorus, dreams of egyptian gods Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
artemidorus, dreams of sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
asclepieion in pergamum, sacrifices at Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
asclepieion in pergamum, structures of authority at Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
asclepius, priests of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
asclepius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
behr, c. Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
cerberus, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
cerberus, in reliefs Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
choral performances Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
delos sarapieia, dream interpreters Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
delos sarapieia, sarapieion a Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
divinities (greek and roman), zeus olympios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
dream books Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dream interpreters/interpretation (greece and rome), at sanctuaries of isis and sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
dreams (general), providing inspiration for literary undertaking Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201, 390
dreams (in greek and latin literature), pausanias, description of greece Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
ex-iussu inscription Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
inscriptions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
isis, at tithorea Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
isis, in worshipers dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
miracles Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
nemesis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
oracles, and miracles Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
oracles, and philosophy Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
pergamum Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
phidias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
philosophy and altruism, and oracles Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
podalirius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
priesthood as inferior to informal communication with the divine Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
priests adolescent, in aristides' sacred tales" Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
quadratus, c. antius aulus iulius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
rhosandrus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
sacrifice' Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 67
sarapis, and aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
sarapis, and cerberus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, dream interpreters at sarapieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, incubation in cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, introduction to delos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis, introduction to opous Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
sarapis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
smyrna, and aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
telesphorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
thessalonika egyptian sanctuary, possibility of incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
thessalonika egyptian sanctuary, role in spread of sarapis cult to opous Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
tithorea, isieion and dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 390
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174