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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.41-48.43
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.197-1.222 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer
2. Ovid, Amores, 3.1.1-3.1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 10.5.8 (1st cent. BCE

4. Tibullus, Elegies, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.35, 5.89 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
7. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 5.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 2.39, 37.18-37.22, 43.25, 43.29, 47.6-47.7, 47.11-47.13, 47.15, 47.17-47.18, 47.26, 47.28, 47.32, 47.43, 47.45, 47.51-47.52, 47.58, 47.63, 47.66, 47.71, 48.1-48.4, 48.7, 48.9, 48.18, 48.27, 48.30-48.35, 48.40, 48.42-48.44, 48.69-48.71, 49.12-49.15, 49.20-49.24, 49.29, 49.37, 49.44-49.48, 50.1, 50.5, 50.14, 50.19-50.20, 50.23, 50.31, 50.39-50.47, 50.49-50.50, 50.53-50.54, 50.57, 50.59, 50.75, 50.89, 50.97, 50.106, 51.1, 51.8, 51.18, 51.22, 51.24, 51.44-51.45, 51.47, 51.49-51.52, 51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.28 (2nd cent. CE

4.28. And looking at the statue set up at Olympia, he said: Hail, O thou good Zeus, for thou art so good that thou dost impart thine own nature unto mankind. And he also gave them an account of the brazen statue of Milo and explained the attitude of this figure. For this Milo is seen standing on a disk with his two feet close together, and in his left hand he grasps a pomegranate, whole of his right hand the fingers are extended and pressed together as if to pass through a chink. Now among the people of Olympia and Arcadia the story told about this athlete is, that he was so inflexible that he could never be induced to leave the spot on which he stood; and they infer the grip of the clenched fingers from the way he grasps the pomegranate, and that they could never be separated from another, however much you struggled with any one of them, because the intervals between the extended fingers are very close; and they say that the fillet with which his head is bound is a symbol of temperance and sobriety. Apollonius while admitting that this account was wisely conceived, said that the truth was still wiser. In order that you may know, said he, the meaning of the statue of Milo, the people of Croton made this athlete a priest of Hera. As to the meaning then of this mitre, I need not explain it further than by reminding you that the hero was a priest. But the pomegranate is the only fruit which is grown in honor of Hera; and the disk beneath his feet means that the priest is standing on a small shield to offer his prayer to Hera; and this is also indicated by his right hand. As for the artist's rendering the fingers and feet, between which he has left no interval, that you may ascribe to the antique style of the sculpture.
10. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11. Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 277, 276

12. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 127



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius, leucippe and clitophon Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 31
aelius aristides, and sarapis Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides, inspired by asklepios to compose sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides, p. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
aelius aristides, sacred tales Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 31
aelius aristides, unsolicited dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
aelius aristides Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164; Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15, 201
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
alexander of cotyaeum Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
alexander the great Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
apollo, callitecnus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, clarius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, phoebus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollonius of tyana Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
appearance-and-sensation topic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
architecture and art, roman appreciation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
art Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164
art and architecture, roman appreciation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
artemidorus, and prescriptive dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
artemidorus, dreams of asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285; Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
asklepios, in artemidorus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
astrology Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
athena Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285; Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119; Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 31; Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
athene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
athens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
baal Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119
brindisium Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
countryside, ancestral homes in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
divinities (greek and roman), zeus olympios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
dream Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
dream books Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dream figures, gods, in disguise Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dreams (general), providing inspiration for literary undertaking Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
dreams and visions, dream figures, statues Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 398, 400
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 398, 400
dyrrhachium Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
egeria Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
ekphrasis, of painting Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 31
epicureans Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
epiphanies Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164
epiphany Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
ex-iussu inscription Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
falerii Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
festivals Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
god, gods Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
god Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164
gods Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164
greek religion and mythology Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
healing, miraculous Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 31
heliopolis Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
herodes atticus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
iconography Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119
image Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119
incubation, extended incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation, ritual incubation vs. private dream-divination Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation, terms for incubation structures (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
incubation (greek), public nature Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
inscriptions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
juno Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
magic, invocations for dreams in magical papyri Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 15
marcus aurelius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
medicine, hippocratic Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
medicine Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
military commander Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
monotheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
nemesis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
numinousness, imagined in earlier times Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
numinousness, in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
numinousness, of nature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
olympian zeus, statue of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
orator Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
orthodoxy Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119
paulus, aemilius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
phidias Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
plato Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
polytheism Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
religions, roman, festivals Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
rhetoric Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
rhosandrus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
rule, rome, city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
sacred reality Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
sanctuary, of asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
sarapis, and aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
sarapis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
smyrna, and aelius aristides Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 201
smyrna Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
statue Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119; Harkins and Maier, Experiencing the Shepherd of Hermas (2022) 164
statues, of olympian zeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
telesphorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
witchcraft Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 285
zeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 131
zeus of olympia, statue of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 240
ælius aristides' Bricault and Bonnet, Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire (2013) 119