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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Aelius Aristides, Orations, 48.18-48.23
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 34.4-34.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

34.4. וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֵלָיו זֹאת הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר נִשְׁבַּעְתִּי לְאַבְרָהָם לְיִצְחָק וּלְיַעֲקֹב לֵאמֹר לְזַרְעֲךָ אֶתְּנֶנָּה הֶרְאִיתִיךָ בְעֵינֶיךָ וְשָׁמָּה לֹא תַעֲבֹר׃ 34.5. וַיָּמָת שָׁם מֹשֶׁה עֶבֶד־יְהוָה בְּאֶרֶץ מוֹאָב עַל־פִּי יְהוָה׃ 34.4. And the LORD said unto him: ‘This is the land which I swore unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, saying: I will give it unto thy seed; I have caused thee to see it with thine eyes, but thou shalt not go over thither.’" 34.5. So Moses the servant of the LORD died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the LORD."
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.197-1.222, 4.279, 4.455, 10.496-10.497 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 4.279. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.455. /and far off amid the mountains the shepherd heareth the thunder thereof; even so from the joining of these in battle came shouting and toil.Antilochus was first to slay a warrior of the Trojans in full armour, a goodly man amid the foremost fighters, Echepolus, son of Thalysius. Him was he first to smite upon the horn of his helmet with crest of horse-hair 10.496. /him the thirteenth he robbed of honey-sweet life, as he breathed hard, for like to an evil dream there stood above his head that night the son of Oeneus' son, by the devise of Athene. Meanwhile steadfast Odysseus loosed the single-hooved horses and bound them together with the reins, and drave them forth from the throng
3. Homer, Odyssey, 6.13-6.41, 6.139-6.140, 6.229-6.235, 7.14-7.17, 7.19-7.79, 7.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1023-1024, 1022 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1022. οὐδὲ τὸν ὀρθοδαῆ 1022. But, did not an appointed Fate constrain
5. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 3.54-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

246d. or rightly conceived a god, imagine an immortal being which has both a soul and a body which are united for all time. Let that, however, and our words concerning it, be as is pleasing to God; we will now consider the reason why the soul loses its wings. It is something like this. The natural function of the wing is to soar upwards and carry that which is heavy up to the place where dwells the race of the gods. More than any other thing that pertains to the body
7. Plato, Statesman, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

272e. ince every soul had fulfilled all its births by falling into the earth as seed its prescribed number of times, then the helmsman of the universe dropped the tiller and withdrew to his place of outlook, and fate and innate desire made the earth turn backwards. Str. So, too, all the gods who share, each in his own sphere, the rule of the Supreme Spirit, promptly perceiving what was taking place, let go the parts of the world which were under their care.
8. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

28c. and things sensible, being apprehensible by opinion with the aid of sensation, come into existence, as we saw, and are generated. And that which has come into existence must necessarily, as we say, have come into existence by reason of some Cause. Tim. Now to discover the Maker and Father of this Universe were a task indeed; and having discovered Him, to declare Him unto all men were a thing impossible. However, let us return and inquire further concerning the Cosmos,—after which of the Models did its Architect construct it?
9. Cicero, Republic, 6.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.12. Hic tu, Africane, ostendas oportebit patriae lumen animi, ingenii consiliique tui. Sed eius temporis ancipitem video quasi fatorum viam. Nam cum aetas tua septenos octiens solis anfractus reditusque converterit, duoque ii numeri, quorum uterque plenus alter altera de causa habetur, circuitu naturali summam tibi fatalem confecerint, in te unum atque in tuum nomen se tota convertet civitas, te senatus, te omnes boni, te socii, te Latini intuebuntur, tu eris unus, in quo nitatur civitatis salus, ac, ne multa, dictator rem publicam constituas oportet, si impias propinquorum manus effugeris. Hic cum exclamasset Laelius ingemuissentque vehementius ceteri, leniter arridens Scipio: St! quaeso, inquit, ne me e somno excitetis, et parumper audite cetera.
10. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.35, 2.49-2.54, 2.70, 4.42, 5.92-5.94 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. New Testament, Acts, 16.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.9. A vision appeared to Paul in the night. There was a man of Macedonia standing, begging him, and saying, "Come over into Macedonia and help us.
12. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 39.1-39.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Aristides, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 63.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Caligula, 57.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 2.39, 37.1, 38.1-38.3, 39.1, 41.1, 42.6, 47.6-47.7, 47.9, 47.11-47.13, 47.15-47.18, 47.22-47.23, 47.26, 47.28, 47.30, 47.32, 47.40-47.43, 47.45, 47.51-47.52, 47.56, 47.58-47.59, 47.63, 47.65-47.66, 47.68, 47.71, 48.1-48.4, 48.7-48.9, 48.19-48.23, 48.27, 48.29-48.35, 48.40-48.42, 48.47, 48.50-48.51, 48.54-48.55, 48.68, 48.71, 48.74-48.75, 48.77-48.79, 48.82, 49.4, 49.7, 49.12-49.15, 49.20-49.24, 49.26-49.29, 49.37, 49.39, 49.41, 49.44-49.48, 50.1, 50.5, 50.11, 50.15-50.17, 50.19, 50.23-50.25, 50.29-50.31, 50.34, 50.38-50.45, 50.49-50.50, 50.52-50.54, 50.59, 50.61, 50.69, 50.75-50.76, 50.83, 50.89, 50.97, 50.106, 51.1, 51.8, 51.16, 51.18, 51.22, 51.24, 51.26, 51.35-51.36, 51.38, 51.44-51.45, 51.47, 51.49-51.52, 51.61, 51.65-51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims.
18. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 2.9 (2nd cent. CE

19. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 19.12.3 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19.12.3. Moreover, a slight and trivial occasion gave opportunity to extend his inquisitions indefinitely. There is a town called Abydum, situated in the remotest part of the Thebais A nome, or province, of Egypt. ; here the oracle of a god called in that place Besa in days of old revealed the future and was wont to be honoured in the ancient ceremonials of the adjacent regions.
20. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 26 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

21. Cleanthes, Hymn To Zeus, 4-5, 34



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
abydos memnonion, cult personnel Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
abydos memnonion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
aelius aristides, comments on bathing and hydrotherapy at pergamon asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
aelius aristides, sacred well Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
antioch Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
antoninus pius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
anxiety dreams and nightmares, anxiously imagined futures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
anxiety dreams and nightmares, death portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
apollo, callitecnus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, clarius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, phoebus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
apollonius, priest of sarapis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
appearance-and-sensation topic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apuleius, metam. bk Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
aretalogy Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
aristides, aristidess illness Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63, 123
artemidorus, dreams predicting lifespan Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
asclepieum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
asclepius, as saviour Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
asclepius, cult of Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
asclepius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63, 123
asklepieia, purity requirements for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
asklepieia, use of seawater for purification Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
asklepieia, uses and sources of water at asklepieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
bes and dionysos cult, and divinatory incubation at abydos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
bes and dionysos cult, and proxy incubation at abydos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
bes and dionysos cult, chthonic aspects Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
bes and dionysos cult, latin invocation for epiphany Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
bes and dionysos cult, oracle preserved in epitaph Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
bes and dionysos cult, worship beyond egypt Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
cabiri Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
corinth asklepieion, lerna complex Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
corybantes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cult, mystery cult Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cult Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
divine speech, enigmatic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 245
dream Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63, 123
dream books Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dream figures, gods, in disguise Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400
dream imagery, bizarre, surreal Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
dream imagery, death and burial Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
dream imagery, ejection from heaven Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
dreams (in egypt), predicting lifespan Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245, 493
dreams (in greek and latin literature), marinus, life of proclus Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
dreams and visions, dream figures, invisible (voice only) Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 402
dreams and visions, dream figures, statues Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 400, 404
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 245, 398, 400, 402, 404
dreams and visions, examples, epidauros and other asclepia Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 245
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 398, 400, 402, 404
dreams and visions, form criticism/classification, message dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
dreams and visions, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
dreams and visions, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 245
ex-iussu inscription Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
faustina Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
galen Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
general index, sacred oratory Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
gods Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
hydrotherapy, in cult of asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
hygieia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
inscriptions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
julian Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
lebena asklepieion, use of seawater forpurification(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
lucius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
marcus aurelius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63, 123
medicine Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
memphis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
miracle, healing miracle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
miracle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
mysteries Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
mythology Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
nausicaa Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
nemesis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
odysseus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
omens Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
oracle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
oratory Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
oriental cults, use of term, ; and christianity Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
oropos amphiareion, sacred spring (spring of amphiaraos) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
pactumeius rufinus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
pausanias Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
pergamon asklepieion, hydrotherapy Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
pergamon asklepieion, sacred well and other water sources Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 245
pergamum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63
phaeacian Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
phidias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
philostratus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
pluto Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
portents, death Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 188
ptolemy i soter Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
rhosandrus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
rome Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 123
sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice, finger Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
sacrifice Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 404
samothrace Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
sarapis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
sardinia, cult of bes' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 493
serapis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
sinope Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 334
smyrna Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63, 123
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
telesphorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
trajan Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
vision, dream vision Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
water Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63, 123
zeus, zeus asclepius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61
zeus, zeus philios Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
zeus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 61, 63