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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Aelius Aristides, Orations, 47.11-47.52
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.197-1.222, 9.223 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 9.223. /and Patroclus cast burnt-offering into the fire. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, Aias nodded to Phoenix; and goodly Odysseus was ware thereof, and filling a cup with wine he pledged Achilles:
2. Cicero, Republic, 6.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.10. Post autem apparatu regio accepti sermonem in multam noctem produximus, cum senex nihil nisi de Africano loqueretur omniaque eius non facta solum, sed etiam dicta meminisset. Deinde, ut cubitum discessimus, me et de via fessum, et qui ad multam noctem vigilassem, artior quam solebat somnus complexus est. Hic mihi (credo equidem ex hoc, quod eramus locuti; fit enim fere, ut cogitationes sermonesque nostri pariant aliquid in somno tale, quale de Homero scribit Ennius, de quo videlicet saepissime vigilans solebat cogitare et loqui) Africanus se ostendit ea forma, quae mihi ex imagine eius quam ex ipso erat notior; quem ubi agnovi, equidem cohorrui, sed ille: Ades, inquit, animo et omitte timorem, Scipio, et, quae dicam, trade memoriae.
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.700-5.703 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.700. he only, pierced the bird in upper air. 5.701. Next gift was his whose arrow cut the cord; 5.703. Father Aeneas now, not making end
4. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.35 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. New Testament, Acts, 10.9-10.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.9. Now on the next day as they were on their journey, and got close to the city, Peter went up on the housetop to pray at about noon. 10.10. He became hungry and desired to eat, but while they were preparing, he fell into a trance. 10.11. He saw heaven opened and a certain container descending to him, like a great sheet let down by four corners on the earth 10.12. in which were all kinds of four-footed animals of the earth, wild animals, reptiles, and birds of the sky. 10.13. A voice came to him, "Rise, Peter, kill and eat! 10.14. But Peter said, "Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common or unclean. 10.15. A voice came to him again the second time, "What God has cleansed, you must not make unholy. 10.16. This was done three times, and immediately the vessel was received up into heaven.
6. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 2.39, 47.6-47.10, 47.12-47.52, 47.54-47.58, 47.65, 47.71, 48.7, 48.9, 48.18, 48.30-48.33, 48.40-48.41, 49.4, 49.13, 49.20-49.24, 49.37, 49.39, 49.43, 49.46-49.48, 50.1, 50.11, 50.14-50.15, 50.19, 50.21, 50.25-50.26, 50.28-50.30, 50.38-50.42, 50.48-50.50, 50.52-50.58, 50.60-50.62, 50.64-50.66, 50.69, 50.81, 50.83, 50.89-50.93, 50.106, 51.22, 51.24, 51.26, 51.31, 51.42-51.47, 51.49-51.52, 51.57-51.66 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
aelius aristides, and asclepius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
aelius aristides, denying nomination to priesthood Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
aelius aristides, p. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
aelius aristides, relationship with priests of asclepius at pergamum Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
aelius aristides, residence at the temple of asclepius Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
aelius aristides Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
apollo, callitecnus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, clarius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo, phoebus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
appearance-and-sensation topic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
archaeology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
asclepieion in pergamum, keys of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
asclepieion in pergamum, lighting of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
asclepieion in pergamum Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
asclepius, priests of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
asclepius, representation of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369; Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
behr, c. Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
cult, of asclepius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dream Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
dream books Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
dreams, in a temple Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
dreams, including priests Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
dreams, statues in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
dreams and visions, examples, aelius aristides Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 135, 399, 403
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 135, 399, 403
dreams and visions, form criticism/classification, symbolic dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 135
dreams and visions, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 135
emotional responses to dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, distress, terror Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams, joy Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 403
emotional responses within dreams Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 135
emperor Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
ex-iussu inscription Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
inscriptions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
keys of temples Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
kyzikos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
marcus aurelius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
natural dreaming, prescience and cognition Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 172
natural dreaming, theoretical discussion in literary settings Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 172
natural dreaming Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 172
nemesis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
odysseus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
pergamon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
pergamum Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
phidias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
priesthood as inferior to informal communication with the divine, evasion of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
priesthood as inferior to informal communication with the divine, hereditary Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
priesthood as inferior to informal communication with the divine, nomination to Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55
priests adolescent, in aristides' sacred tales" Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
priests adolescent, in dreams Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
rhetoric Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
rhosandrus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
sacrifice Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
sarapis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
smyrna Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55, 60
sophist Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 369
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
telesphorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
temple warden (neokoros) Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
temples autonomy of, liturgical routine in' Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 60
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 174
zeus, olympian z. at adriani, priesthood of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa, Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians (2013) 55