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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.11-26.13
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13 results
1. Cicero, Republic, 2.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.34. Sed hoc loco primum videtur insitiva quadam disciplina doctior facta esse civitas. Influxit enim non tenuis quidam e Graecia rivulus in hanc urbem, sed abundantissimus amnis illarum disciplinarum et artium. Fuisse enim quendam ferunt Demaratum Corinthium et honore et auctoritate et fortunis facile civitatis suae principem; qui cum Corinthiorum tyrannum Cypselum ferre non potuisset, fugisse cum magna pecunia dicitur ac se contulisse Tarquinios, in urbem Etruriae florentissimam. Cumque audiret dominationem Cypseli confirmari, defugit patriam vir liber ac fortis et adscitus est civis a Tarquiniensibus atque in ea civitate domicilium et sedes collocavit. Ubi cum de matre familias Tarquiniensi duo filios procreavisset, omnibus eos artibus ad Graecorum disciplinam eru diit
2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.3.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3.3.  But Rome rules every country that is not inaccessible or uninhabited, and she is mistress of every sea, not only of that which lies inside the Pillars of Hercules but also of the Ocean, except that part of it which is not navigable; she is the first and the only State recorded in all time that ever made the risings and the settings of the sun the boundaries of her dominion. Nor has her supremacy been of short duration, but more lasting than that of any other commonwealth or kingdom.
3. Livy, History, 38.50.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.473 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.473. two strongholds with dismantled walls, which now
5. Vergil, Georgics, 1.498-1.499, 2.146-2.148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill.
6. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.18, 1.23, 3.6-3.7, 31.149, 32.35-32.36, 32.47, 36.29, 36.31, 48.7, 62.1, 66.2 (1st cent. CE

31.149.  You remember the notorious Acratus, who visited practically the whole inhabited world in this quest and passed by no village even — you recall how he came here likewise, and when you were, quite naturally, distressed, he said he had come to see the sights, for he had no authority to touch anything here. Therefore, apart from the beautiful sight which all the world may enjoy, the great number of your statues brings you a renown of another sort! For these things are manifestly a proof of your friendship for your rulers and of their respect for you. 32.35.  But to take just that topic which I mentioned in the beginning, see how important it is. For how you dine in private, how you sleep, how you manage your household, these are matters in which as individuals you are not at all conspicuous; on the other hand, how you behave as spectators and what you are like in the theatre are matters of common knowledge among Greeks and barbarians alike. For your city is vastly superior in point of size and situation, and it is admittedly ranked second among all cities beneath the sun. 32.36.  For not only does the mighty nation, Egypt, constitute the framework of your city — or more accurately its ')" onMouseOut="nd();"appendage — but the peculiar nature of the river, when compared with all others, defies description with regard to both its marvellous habits and its usefulness; and furthermore, not only have you a monopoly of the shipping of the entire Mediterranean by reason of the beauty of your harbours, the magnitude of your fleet, and the abundance and the marketing of the products of every land, but also the outer waters that lie beyond are in your grasp, both the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, whose name was rarely heard in former days. The result is that the trade, not merely of islands, ports, a few straits and isthmuses, but of practically the whole world is yours. For Alexandria is situated, as it were, at the cross-roads of the whole world, of even the most remote nations thereof, as if it were a market serving a single city, a market which brings together into one place all manner of men, displaying them to one another and, as far as possible, making them a kindred people. 36.29.  Yet, despite my brave words to Hieroson, I was moved and heaved a sigh, as it were, when I bethought me of Homer and Plato."Well then," said I, "the term 'city' must be taken on the understanding that our sect is not literally defining the universe as a city; for that would be in direct conflict with our doctrine of the city, which, as I have said, the Stoics define as an organization of human beings; and at the same time it would possibly not be suitable or convincing, if, after stating in the strict sense of the term that the universe is a living creature, they should then call it a city 36.31.  "This doctrine, in brief, aims to harmonize the human race with the divine, and to embrace in a single term everything endowed with reason, finding in reason the only sure and indissoluble foundation for fellowship and justice. For in keeping with that concept the term 'city' would be applied, not, of course, to an organization that has chanced to get mean or petty leaders nor to one which through tyranny or democracy or, in fact, through decarchy or oligarchy or any other similar product of imperfection, is being torn to pieces and made the victim of constant party faction. Nay, term would be applied rather to an organization that is governed by the sanest and noblest form of kingship, to one that is actually under royal goverce in accordance with law, in complete friendship and concord. 48.7.  Yes, it is a fine thing, just as it is with a well-trained chorus, for men to sing together one and the same tune, and not, like a bad musical instrument, to be discordant, emitting two kinds of notes and sounds as a result of twofold and varied natures, for in such discord, I venture to say, there is found not only contempt and misfortune but also utter impotence both among themselves and in their dealings with the proconsuls. For no one can readily hear what is being said either when choruses are discordant or when cities are at variance. Again, just as it is not possible, I fancy, for persons sailing in one ship each to obtain safety separately, but rather all together, so it is also with men who are members of one state. 62.1. And indeed, if a person is not competent to govern a single man, and that too a man who is very close to him, in fact his constant companion, and if, again, he cannot guide a single soul, and that his own, how could he be king, as you are, over unnumbered thousands scattered everywhere, many even dwelling at the ends of the earth, most of whom he has not even seen and never could see, and whose speech he will not understand? Why, it is as if one were to say of the man with vision so impaired that he cannot see even what lies at his feet but needs some one to lead him by the hand, that he can reach with his eyes the most distant objects, like those who at sea behold from afar both the mountains and the islands; or as if one were to say of the man who cannot make himself heard even by those who stand beside him, that he is able to speak so as to be heard by whole communities and armies. 66.2.  And no wonder, for among men in general each speaks well of this type of malady, deeming it advantageous for himself. Furthermore, by official act virtually all the states have devised lures of every kind for the simpletons — crowns and front seats and public proclamations. Accordingly, in some instances men who craved these things have actually been made wretched and reduced to beggary, although the states held before them nothing great or wonder­ful at all, but in some cases led their victims about with a sprig of green, as men lead cattle, or clapped upon their heads a crown or a ribbon. Therefore, while a fool like that, if he so desired, might have for the asking any number of crowns, not merely of olive or of oak, but even of ivy or of myrtle, often he sells his house and his lands and thereafter goes about hungry and clad in a shabby little cloak. Ah but, says he, his name is publicly proclaimed by his fellow citizens — just as is that of a runaway slave!
7. Musonius Rufus, Fragments, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.97 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 20.3-20.4, 20.8-20.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.3. For not only was the Roman people softened and charmed by the righteousness and mildness of their king, but also the cities round about, as if some cooling breeze or salubrious wind were wafted upon them from Rome, began to experience a change of temper, and all of them were filled with longing desire to have good government, to be at peace, to till the earth, to rear their children in quiet, and to worship the gods. 20.4. Festivals and feasts, hospitalities and friendly converse between people who visited one another promiscuously and without fear,—these prevailed throughout Italy, while honour and justice flowed into all hearts from the wisdom of Numa, as from a fountain, and the calm serenity of his spirit diffused itself abroad. Thus even the hyperboles of the poets fall short of picturing the state of man in those days: 20.8. For possibly there is no need of any compulsion or menace in dealing with the multitude, but when they see with their own eyes a conspicuous and shining example of virtue in the life of their ruler, they will of their own accord walk in wisdom’s ways, and unite with him in conforming themselves to a blameless and blessed life of friendship and mutual concord, attended by righteousness and temperance. Such a life is the noblest end of all government, and he is most a king who can inculcate such a life and such a disposition in his subjects. This, then, as it appears, Numa was preeminent in discerning.
10. Tacitus, Annals, 15.45.1-15.45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.45.1.  Meanwhile, Italy had been laid waste for contributions of money; the provinces, the federate communities, and the so‑called free states, were ruined. The gods themselves formed part of the plunder, as the ravaged temples of the capital were drained of the gold dedicated in the triumphs or the vows, the prosperity or the fears, of the Roman nation at every epoch. But in Asia and Achaia, not offerings alone but the images of deity were being swept away, since Acratus and Carrinas Secundus had been despatched into the two provinces. The former was a freedman prepared for any enormity; the latter, as far as words went, was a master of Greek philosophy, but his character remained untinctured by the virtues. Seneca, it was rumoured, to divert the odium of sacrilege from himself, had asked leave to retire to a distant estate in the country, and, when it was not accorded, had feigned illness — a neuralgic affection, he said — and declined to leave his bedroom. Some have put it on record that, by the orders of Nero, poison had been prepared for him by one of his freedmen, Cleonicus by name; and that, owing either to the man's revelations or to his own alarms, it was avoided by Seneca, who supported life upon an extremely simple diet of field fruits and, if thirst was insistent, spring water.
11. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 1.322, 23.3, 23.6, 23.16, 23.24, 23.34, 23.78, 24.31, 26.7-26.8, 26.12-26.14, 26.28, 26.31-26.33, 26.51, 26.56, 26.59-26.63, 26.65-26.66, 26.94-26.95, 26.100-26.102 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Lucian, Apology, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Augustine, The City of God, 18.22 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

18.22. To be brief, the city of Rome was founded, like another Babylon, and as it were the daughter of the former Babylon, by which God was pleased to conquer the whole world, and subdue it far and wide by bringing it into one fellowship of government and laws. For there were already powerful and brave peoples and nations trained to arms, who did not easily yield, and whose subjugation necessarily involved great danger and destruction as well as great and horrible labor. For when the Assyrian kingdom subdued almost all Asia, although this was done by fighting, yet the wars could not be very fierce or difficult, because the nations were as yet untrained to resist, and neither so many nor so great as afterward; forasmuch as, after that greatest and indeed universal flood, when only eight men escaped in Noah's ark, not much more than a thousand years had passed when Ninus subdued all Asia with the exception of India. But Rome did not with the same quickness and facility wholly subdue all those nations of the east and west which we see brought under the Roman empire, because, in its gradual increase, in whatever direction it was extended, it found them strong and warlike. At the time when Rome was founded, then, the people of Israel had been in the land of promise seven hundred and eighteen years. of these years twenty-seven belong to Joshua the Son of Nun, and after that three hundred and twenty-nine to the period of the judges. But from the time when the kings began to reign there, three hundred and sixty-two years had passed. And at that time there was a king in Judah called Ahaz, or, as others compute, Hezekiah his successor, the best and most pious king, who it is admitted reigned in the times of Romulus. And in that part of the Hebrew nation called Israel, Hoshea had begun to reign.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acratus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
aelius aristides Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 54
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 78, 87, 89, 105
alexander iii of makedon Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
alexandria (egypt) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
antoninus pius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
apameia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
arpinum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
augustine Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 54
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 78
cattle in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
clitumnus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
commodus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
countryside, ancestral homes in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
crowds Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
cynics Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 78, 105
evanders rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
flow Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
galba Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
greek/barbarian division Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89, 105
hadrian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
homer Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78, 87
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 78, 105
immigration Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
italy, roman perception of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
koina, greek Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
musonius rufus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
nero Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76, 78, 89, 105
plutarch Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 54; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
pompeius magnus, cn. Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
roman empire, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87, 89
scipio africanus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
severan dynasty Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
size of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
sparta Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
tiber Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 166
trajan Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
travel' Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 54
universal state Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
universe, harmony of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
vergil Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 54