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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.100-26.102
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Plato, Statesman, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

262d. one should make the division as most people in this country do; they separate the Hellenic race from all the rest as one, and to all the other races, which are countless in number and have no relation in blood or language to one another, they give the single name barbarian ; then, because of this single name, they think it is a single species. Or it was as if a man should think he was dividing number into two classes by cutting off a myriad from all the other numbers, with the notion that he was making one separate class
2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 36.29, 36.31, 48.7, 66.2 (1st cent. CE

36.29.  Yet, despite my brave words to Hieroson, I was moved and heaved a sigh, as it were, when I bethought me of Homer and Plato."Well then," said I, "the term 'city' must be taken on the understanding that our sect is not literally defining the universe as a city; for that would be in direct conflict with our doctrine of the city, which, as I have said, the Stoics define as an organization of human beings; and at the same time it would possibly not be suitable or convincing, if, after stating in the strict sense of the term that the universe is a living creature, they should then call it a city 36.31.  "This doctrine, in brief, aims to harmonize the human race with the divine, and to embrace in a single term everything endowed with reason, finding in reason the only sure and indissoluble foundation for fellowship and justice. For in keeping with that concept the term 'city' would be applied, not, of course, to an organization that has chanced to get mean or petty leaders nor to one which through tyranny or democracy or, in fact, through decarchy or oligarchy or any other similar product of imperfection, is being torn to pieces and made the victim of constant party faction. Nay, term would be applied rather to an organization that is governed by the sanest and noblest form of kingship, to one that is actually under royal goverce in accordance with law, in complete friendship and concord. 48.7.  Yes, it is a fine thing, just as it is with a well-trained chorus, for men to sing together one and the same tune, and not, like a bad musical instrument, to be discordant, emitting two kinds of notes and sounds as a result of twofold and varied natures, for in such discord, I venture to say, there is found not only contempt and misfortune but also utter impotence both among themselves and in their dealings with the proconsuls. For no one can readily hear what is being said either when choruses are discordant or when cities are at variance. Again, just as it is not possible, I fancy, for persons sailing in one ship each to obtain safety separately, but rather all together, so it is also with men who are members of one state. 66.2.  And no wonder, for among men in general each speaks well of this type of malady, deeming it advantageous for himself. Furthermore, by official act virtually all the states have devised lures of every kind for the simpletons — crowns and front seats and public proclamations. Accordingly, in some instances men who craved these things have actually been made wretched and reduced to beggary, although the states held before them nothing great or wonder­ful at all, but in some cases led their victims about with a sprig of green, as men lead cattle, or clapped upon their heads a crown or a ribbon. Therefore, while a fool like that, if he so desired, might have for the asking any number of crowns, not merely of olive or of oak, but even of ivy or of myrtle, often he sells his house and his lands and thereafter goes about hungry and clad in a shabby little cloak. Ah but, says he, his name is publicly proclaimed by his fellow citizens — just as is that of a runaway slave!
3. Musonius Rufus, Fragments, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 4.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.33.  For every nation or city is governed by the people, or by the nobility, or by individuals: a constitution selected and blended from these types is easier to commend than to create; or, if created, its tenure of life is brief. Accordingly, as in the period of alternate plebeian domice and patrician ascendancy it was imperative, in one case, to study the character of the masses and the methods of controlling them; while, in the other, those who had acquired the most exact knowledge of the temper of the senate and the aristocracy were accounted shrewd in their generation and wise; so to‑day, when the situation has been transformed and the Roman world is little else than a monarchy, the collection and the chronicling of these details may yet serve an end: for few men distinguish right and wrong, the expedient and the disastrous, by native intelligence; the majority are schooled by the experience of others. But while my themes have their utility, they offer the minimum of pleasure. Descriptions of countries, the vicissitudes of battles, commanders dying on the field of honour, such are the episodes that arrest and renew the interest of the reader: for myself, I present a series of savage mandates, of perpetual accusations, of traitorous friendships, of ruined innocents, of various causes and identical results — everywhere monotony of subject, and satiety. Again, the ancient author has few detractors, and it matters to none whether you praise the Carthaginian or the Roman arms with the livelier enthusiasm. But of many, who underwent either the legal penalty or a form of degradation in the principate of Tiberius, the descendants remain; and, assuming the actual families to be now extinct, you will still find those who, from a likeness of character, read the ill deeds of others as an innuendo against themselves. Even glory and virtue create their enemies — they arraign their opposites by too close a contrast. But I return to my subject.
6. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 1.322, 23.6, 23.16, 23.24, 23.34, 24.31, 26.7, 26.11-26.12, 26.14, 26.28, 26.31-26.32, 26.37-26.38, 26.51, 26.56, 26.59-26.66, 26.94-26.95, 26.101-26.102 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 84, 85, 87, 89, 105, 106
antoninus pius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 85, 89
aristides, p. aelius, and odyssey Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
aristides, p. aelius, and rome Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
aristides, p. aelius, orations Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
army, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 84
athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
commodus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
cynics Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 85, 105
empire, roman Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
greek/barbarian division Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89, 105, 106
hadrian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
harmonia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 84
homeland Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
homer Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105, 106
koina, greek Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
musonius rufus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
odysseus, as model Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
oikoumene' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 84, 85, 105, 106
polybius, autopsy Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233
roman empire, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 84, 85, 87, 89
severan dynasty Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
sparta Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
tertullian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 106
trajan Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 89
universal state Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 105
universe, harmony of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
xenophon, security Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 233