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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 23.78
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Livy, History, 38.50.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 178 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.188-2.192 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.188. Immediately after comes the festival of the sacred moon; in which it is the custom to play the trumpet in the temple at the same moment that the sacrifices are offered. From which practice this is called the true feast of trumpets, and there are two reasons for it, one peculiar to the nation, and the other common to all mankind. Peculiar to the nation, as being a commemoration of that most marvellous, wonderful, and miraculous event that took place when the holy oracles of the law were given; 2.189. for then the voice of a trumpet sounded from heaven, which it is natural to suppose reached to the very extremities of the universe, so that so wondrous a sound attracted all who were present, making them consider, as it is probable, that such mighty events were signs betokening some great things to be accomplished. 2.190. And what more great or more beneficial thing could come to men than laws affecting the whole race? And what was common to all mankind was this: the trumpet is the instrument of war, sounding both when commanding the charge and the retreat. ... There is also another kind of war, ordained of God, when nature is at variance with itself, its different parts attacking one another. 2.191. And by both these kinds of war the things on earth are injured. They are injured by the enemies, by the cutting down of trees, and by conflagrations; and also by natural injuries, such as droughts, heavy rains, lightning from heaven, snow and cold; the usual harmony of the seasons of the year being transformed into a want of all concord. 2.192. On this account it is that the law has given this festival the name of a warlike instrument, in order to show the proper gratitude to God as the giver of peace, who has abolished all seditions in cities, and in all parts of the universe, and has produced plenty and prosperity, not allowing a single spark that could tend to the destruction of the crops to be kindled into flame.THE NINTH FESTIVALXXXII.
4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.333-1.334 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.333. He built Patavium there, and fixed abodes 1.334. for Troy 's far-exiled sons; he gave a name
5. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 40.35 (1st cent. CE

40.35.  Do you not see in the heavens as a whole and in the divine and blessed beings that dwell therein an order and concord and self-control which is eternal, than which it is impossible to conceive of anything either more beautiful or more august? Furthermore, do you not see also the stable, righteous, everlasting concord of the elements, as they are called — air and earth and water and fire — with what reasonableness and moderation it is their nature to continue, not only to be preserved themselves, but also to preserve the entire universe?
6. New Testament, Colossians, 1.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.20. and through him to reconcile all things to himself, having made peace through the blood of his cross. Through him, I say, whether things on the earth, or things in the heavens.
7. Plutarch, On The Fortune of The Romans, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 20.3-20.4, 20.8-20.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.3. For not only was the Roman people softened and charmed by the righteousness and mildness of their king, but also the cities round about, as if some cooling breeze or salubrious wind were wafted upon them from Rome, began to experience a change of temper, and all of them were filled with longing desire to have good government, to be at peace, to till the earth, to rear their children in quiet, and to worship the gods. 20.4. Festivals and feasts, hospitalities and friendly converse between people who visited one another promiscuously and without fear,—these prevailed throughout Italy, while honour and justice flowed into all hearts from the wisdom of Numa, as from a fountain, and the calm serenity of his spirit diffused itself abroad. Thus even the hyperboles of the poets fall short of picturing the state of man in those days: 20.8. For possibly there is no need of any compulsion or menace in dealing with the multitude, but when they see with their own eyes a conspicuous and shining example of virtue in the life of their ruler, they will of their own accord walk in wisdom’s ways, and unite with him in conforming themselves to a blameless and blessed life of friendship and mutual concord, attended by righteousness and temperance. Such a life is the noblest end of all government, and he is most a king who can inculcate such a life and such a disposition in his subjects. This, then, as it appears, Numa was preeminent in discerning.
9. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.1.2, 1.3.3-1.3.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 23.3, 23.6, 23.8-23.9, 23.23-23.24, 23.76-23.77, 24.31, 26.1-26.3, 26.11-26.12, 26.33, 26.59-26.63, 26.66, 26.101 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Lucian, Apology, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62, 78
alexander iii of makedon Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
augustus Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
barbarian, barbarians Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62, 78
church Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184
colossians, letter to the Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184, 185
cosmic pacification Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184, 185
cosmos Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
culture Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
death Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
dominion v Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
economics Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
emperor Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
ephesos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
faith Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
gemma augustea Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62, 78
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
image vi Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
imperial cult Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
imperial iconography Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
life Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
lucius verus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
narrative Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184
of christ Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
order Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
pacification Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
panegyrist Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
patrimony Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
pax romana Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
philo Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78; Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
polis (greek city) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
representation Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184, 185
resurrection Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
roman empire Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 184, 185
scipio africanus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
smyrna Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
stasis (factional conflict) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
statues Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
theseus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
virgil Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83
water Robbins et al., The Art of Visual Exegesis (2017) 185
zeus' Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 83