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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



111
Aelius Aristides, Orations, 23.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.17.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.17.4. From a mob like this you need not look for either uimity in counsel or concert in action; but they will probably one by one come in as they get a fair offer, especially if they are torn by civil strife as we are told.
2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 38.34-38.38, 38.41-38.45 (1st cent. CE

38.34.  And I should like the Nicaeans also to pursue the same course, and they will do so if you come to terms with them, and the power of each will become greater through union. For by joining forces you will control all the cities, and, what is more, the provincial governors will feel greater reluctance and fear with regard to you, in case they wish to commit a wrong. But as things are now, the other cities are elated by the quarrel between you; for you seem to have need of their assistance, and in fact you do have need of it because of your struggle with each other, and you are in the predicament of two men, both equally distinguished, when they become rivals over politics — of necessity they court the favour of everybody, even of those who are ever so far beneath them. 38.35.  And so while you are fighting for primacy, the chances are that the primacy really is in the hands of those who are courted by you. For it is impossible that people should not be thought to possess that which you expect to obtain from these same people. And so it is going to be absolutely necessary that the cities should resume their proper status, and, as is reasonable and right, that they should stand in need of you, not you of them. And applying this principle I shall expect you to behave toward them, not like tyrants, but with kindness and moderation, just as I suggested a little while ago, to the end that your position as leaders may not be obnoxious to them, but that it may be not only leadership but a welcome thing as well. 38.36.  Again, what need is there to discuss the present situation of your governors in the presence of you who are informed? Or is it possible you are not aware of the tyrannical power your own strife offers those who govern you? For at once whoever wishes to mistreat your people comes armed with the knowledge of what he must do to escape the penalty. For either he allies himself with the Nicaean party and has their group for his support, or else by choosing the party of Nicomedia he is protected by you. Moreover, while he has no love for either side, he appears to love one of the two; yet all the while he is wronging them all. Still, despite the wrongs he commits, he is protected by those who believe they alone are loved by him. 38.37.  Yet by their public acts they have branded you as a pack of fools, yes, they treat you just like children, for we often offer children the most trivial things in place of things of greatest worth; moreover, those children, in their ignorance of what is truly valuable and in their pleasure over what is of least account, delight in what is a mere nothing. So also in your case, in place of justice, in place of the freedom of the cities from spoliation or from the seizure of the private possessions of their inhabitants, in place of their refraining from insulting you, in place of their refraining from drunken violence, your governors hand you titles, and call you "first" either by word of mouth or in writing; that done, they may thenceforth with impunity treat you as being the very last! 38.38.  In truth such marks of distinction, on which you plume yourselves, not only are objects of utter contempt in the eyes of all persons of discernment, but especially in Rome they excite laughter and, what is still more humiliating, are called "Greek failings!" And failings they are indeed, men of Nicomedia, though not Greek, unless some one will claim that in this special particular they are Greek, namely, that those Greeks of old, both Athenians and Spartans, once laid counterclaims to glory. However, I may have said already that their doings were not mere vain conceit but a struggle for real empire — though nowadays you may fancy somehow that they were making a valiant struggle for the right to lead the procession, like persons in some mystic celebration putting up a sham battle over something not really theirs. 38.41.  Well, here is another outcome of concord for you to take into account. At present you two cities have each your own men; but if you come to terms, you will each have the other's too; and as for honours — for a city needs these too — set them down as doubled, and likewise the services. Some one in your city is gifted as a speaker; he will aid the Nicaeans too. There is a rich man in Nicaea: he will defray public expenses in your city too. And in general, neither will any man who is unworthy of first place in a city achieve fame with you by assailing the Nicaeans, or with the Nicaeans by assailing you; nor, in case a man is found to be a low fellow and deserving of punishment, will he escape his just deserts by migrating from Nicomedia to Nicaea or from Nicaea to Nicomedia. 38.42.  Yet as things are now, you two cities, as it were, are lying in wait for each other at your moorings, and men who have wronged the one can find refuge with the other. But once concord is achieved, persons must be men of honour and justice or else get out of Bithynia. You are proud of your superiority in population; you will be still more populous. You think you have sufficient territory; you will have more than sufficient. In fine, when all resources have been united — crops, money, official dignities for men, and military forces — the resources of both cities are doubled. 38.43.  Furthermore, that which is the aim of all human action, pleasure, becomes greater than tongue can tell. For to achieve, on the one hand, the elimination of the things which cause you pain — envy and rivalry and the strife which is their outcome, your plotting against one another, your gloating over the misfortunes of your neighbours, your vexation at their good fortune — and, on the other hand, the introduction into your cities of their opposites — sharing in things which are good, unity of heart and mind, rejoicing of both peoples in the same things — does not all this resemble a public festival? 38.44.  But figure it this way. If some god, men of Nicomedia, had given you the option of having not merely your own city, but also that of the Nicaeans, would not that have seemed to you a boon of incredible magnitude, and would you not have made all sorts of vows in the hope of obtaining it? Well, this thing which seems incredible can take place at once — Nicaea can be yours and your possessions theirs. 38.45.  Or, since we admire those brothers who share completely a common estate and have not because of stinginess divided their patrimony; whose wealth, moreover, is even more admired, since it is greater for the very reason that it has not been divided and half of everything is thought to belong to both; and whom, furthermore, all men regard as good and just and really brothers — since this is true, if this spirit of brotherhood is achieved in your cities, will it not be an even greater blessing, more beautiful and richer?
3. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 23.1, 23.3, 23.8-23.9, 23.16, 23.23-23.24, 23.76-23.78, 24.31, 26.7, 26.11, 26.32, 26.51, 26.56, 26.59-26.63, 26.65, 26.100, 26.102 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.33-10.34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.33. To Trajan. While I was visiting a distant part of the province a most desolating fire broke out at Nicomedia and destroyed a number of private houses and two public buildings, the almshouse * and temple of Isis, although a road ran between them. The fire was allowed to spread farther than it need have done, first, owing to the violence of the wind, and, secondly, to the laziness of the inhabitants, it being generally agreed that they stood idly by without moving and merely watched the catastrophe. Moreover, there is not a single public fire-engine ** or bucket in the place, and not one solitary appliance for mastering an outbreak of fire. However, these will be provided in accordance with the orders I have already given. But, Sir, I would have you consider whether you think a guild of firemen, of about 150 men, should be instituted. I will take care that no one who is not a genuine fireman should be admitted, and that the guild should not misapply the charter granted to it, and there would be no difficulty in keeping an eye on so small a body. 0 10.34. Trajan to Pliny. You have conceived the idea that a guild of firemen might be formed in Nicomedia on the model of various others already existing. But it is to be remembered that your province of Bithynia, and especially city states like Nicomedia, are the prey of factions. Whatever name we may give to those who form an association, and whatever the reason of the association may be, they will soon degenerate into secret societies. It is better policy to provide appliances for mastering conflagrations and encourage property owners to make use of them, and, if occasion demands, press the crowd which collects into the same service.
5. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.33-10.34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.33. To Trajan. While I was visiting a distant part of the province a most desolating fire broke out at Nicomedia and destroyed a number of private houses and two public buildings, the almshouse * and temple of Isis, although a road ran between them. The fire was allowed to spread farther than it need have done, first, owing to the violence of the wind, and, secondly, to the laziness of the inhabitants, it being generally agreed that they stood idly by without moving and merely watched the catastrophe. Moreover, there is not a single public fire-engine ** or bucket in the place, and not one solitary appliance for mastering an outbreak of fire. However, these will be provided in accordance with the orders I have already given. But, Sir, I would have you consider whether you think a guild of firemen, of about 150 men, should be instituted. I will take care that no one who is not a genuine fireman should be admitted, and that the guild should not misapply the charter granted to it, and there would be no difficulty in keeping an eye on so small a body. 0 10.34. Trajan to Pliny. You have conceived the idea that a guild of firemen might be formed in Nicomedia on the model of various others already existing. But it is to be remembered that your province of Bithynia, and especially city states like Nicomedia, are the prey of factions. Whatever name we may give to those who form an association, and whatever the reason of the association may be, they will soon degenerate into secret societies. It is better policy to provide appliances for mastering conflagrations and encourage property owners to make use of them, and, if occasion demands, press the crowd which collects into the same service.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaia Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 62, 87, 241
aiolians Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
arcadians Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48, 77
archiereus, of asia Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
archiereus, of the ionian koinon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
aristides, aelius Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
asia, province Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 62
autochthony Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48, 77
basileus, of the ionian koinon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
bithynia (roman province) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
citizenship, roman Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
cult, for rulers Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 241
empire, roman Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
ephesos Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 62, 241
eris (strife) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
hadrianoi Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
harmonia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
homer Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87, 241
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 62, 87, 241
identity, of aelius aristides Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
identity, of asian provincials Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
imperial cult Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
ionian koinon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
ionianness Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
kimon of athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
koina, greek Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
kyzikos Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
lucius verus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
marcus aurelius Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
officials, of the ionian koinon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
pergamon, asklepieion Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
pergamon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 241
perikles of athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
philia, philoi Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
philonikia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
plato Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
polis (greek city) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
priest, of the ionian koinon Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 77
rhodes Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
rivalries, between cities, in asia Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48
roman empire, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87
roman government Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
smyrna Hallmannsecker, Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor (2022) 48; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 62, 241
stasis (factional conflict)' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
stasis (factional conflict) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49, 241
stoic thought Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 241
themistokles of athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 49
theseus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 62
universe, harmony of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 87