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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



53
Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.42
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 502, 718, 501 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

501. Who grants them many fish with ease, although
2. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 448, 498, 615, 633-634, 643, 447 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

447. αὐτόματα δʼ αὐταῖς δεσμὰ διελύθη ποδῶν
4. Sophocles, Antigone, 956-965, 955 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.415, 15.322-15.328 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Strabo, Geography, 8.3.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.3.19. At the base of these mountains, on the seaboard, are two caves. One is the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades; the other is the scene of the stories of the daughters of Atlas and of the birth of Dardanus. And here, too, are the sacred precincts called the Ionaion and the Eurycydeium. Samicum is now only a fortress, though formerly there was also a city which was called Samos, perhaps because of its lofty situation; for they used to call lofty places Samoi. And perhaps Samicum was the acropolis of Arene, which the poet mentions in the Catalogue: And those who dwelt in Pylus and lovely Arene. For while they cannot with certainty discover Arene anywhere, they prefer to conjecture that this is its site; and the neighboring River Anigrus, formerly called Minyeius, gives no slight indication of the truth of the conjecture, for the poet says: And there is a River Minyeius which falls into the sea near Arene. For near the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades is a spring which makes the region that lies below it swampy and marshy. The greater part of the water is received by the Anigrus, a river so deep and so sluggish that it forms a marsh; and since the region is muddy, it emits an offensive odor for a distance of twenty stadia, and makes the fish unfit to eat. In the mythical accounts, however, this is attributed by some writers to the fact that certain of the Centaurs here washed off the poison they got from the Hydra, and by others to the fact that Melampus used these cleansing waters for the purification of the Proetides. The bathing-water from here cures leprosy, elephantiasis, and scabies. It is said, also, that the Alpheius was so named from its being a cure for leprosy. At any rate, since both the sluggishness of the Anigrus and the backwash from the sea give fixity rather than current to its waters, it was called the Minyeius in earlier times, so it is said, though some have perverted the name and made it Minteius instead. But the word has other sources of derivation, either from the people who went forth with Chloris, the mother of Nestor, from the Minyeian Orchomenus, or from the Minyans, who, being descendants of the Argonauts, were first driven out of Lemnos into Lacedemon, and thence into Triphylia, and took up their abode about Arene in the country which is now called Hypaesia, though it no longer has the settlements of the Minyans. Some of these Minyans sailed with Theras, the son of Autesion, who was a descendant of Polyneices, to the island which is situated between Cyrenaea and Crete (Calliste its earlier name, but Thera its later, as Callimachus says), and founded Thera, the mother-city of Cyrene, and designated the island by the same name as the city.
7. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 8.3.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1-3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
9. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.20.4, 2.22.1, 5.5.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos, and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus. 5.5.10. others that Pylenor, another Centaur, when shot by Heracles fled wounded to this river and washed his hurt in it, and that it was the hydra's poison which gave the Anigrus its nasty smell. Others again attribute the quality of the river to Melampus the son of Amythaon, who threw into it the means he used to purify the daughters of Proetus.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus,in colonial contexts Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
aetiologies,specific,artemis at lousoi/metapontion Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
akhaia,akhaians (s. italy) Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
alphos (skin-desease) Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
anigros (river in elis) Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
aphrodite Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
apoikia (settlement abroad,colony),gods taken to Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
apollo pythios (delphi),apollodorus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
archaic Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
argos,argive Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
artemis,s. biagio at metapontion,myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
artemis hemera (lousoi),myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
artemis hemera (lousoi),sacred herd,symbolised in womens khoroi Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
athamas Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
bacchants,bacchae,bacchai Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
binding,of statues Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
boeotia,boeotian Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
butes Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
chaeronea Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
chained images Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
choregia,mythical past and ritual present merging in Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
choreuts (dancers),real-life counterparts of mythical protagonists Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
chorus,khoros,and socialization Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
chorus,khoros,animals in myth turned into dancers in ritual Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
chorus,khoros,as religious offering Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
chorus,khoros,kathartic Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
christian,christianity Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
cult,cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
cult images,and mobility Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
dance,dancing,ecstatic,frenzied,maenadic,orgiastic Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
danger,of divine gaze Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
dionysos,dionysos eribromos Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
dionysos,dionysos xenos Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
dionysos,epiphany Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
dionysos,nurse of Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
dionysos,punishment Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
dionysos Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
dionysus Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
divinity,and mobility Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
divinity,and power of sight Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
epic Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
ethnicity,ethnic identity Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
euboea,euboean Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
eurynome Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
festival,festivity,festive Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
frenzy,frenzied Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
gaze,divine Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
great dionysia,city dionysia Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
hephaistos Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
hermes Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
hobbling,of cult images Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
hyades Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
identity,general,ethnic Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
ino Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
kadmos,kadmeian Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
lousoi Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
lycurgus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
mainads,athenian Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
mainads Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
mania,of proitids Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
maritime (ἅλιαι),proitids as Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
melampous,and proitids Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
metapontion Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
minyads,daughters of minyas [ psoloeis Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
mobility Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
mountains Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
muses Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
myth,discrete,merging in performance Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
myth,mythical Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
myth-ritual nexus,ritual moment Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
nereids Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
nymph Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
oleiai Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
orchomenos,orchomenian Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
orpheus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
pantheon Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
peloponnese,peloponnesian Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
pentheus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
perseus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
philosophy Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
pictorial formulae Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
polis Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
potnia theron,hunting a mobile cult community Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
potnia theron Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
priest,priesthood Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
procession Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
proetids,daughters of proetus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
proitids,alphos of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
proitids,and aetiology for artemis of lousoi Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
proitids,and dionysos Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
proitids,and marriage Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
proitids,bestial imagery Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278
proitids,from roaming to in woods to dancing in sacred herd Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
proitids,mania,nosos of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 278, 282
proitids,myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
psoloeis Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14
purification,in dance Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
purification,lustral Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
rite,ritual Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
sacrifice,animal substituting mythical characters Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
sacrifice,sacred herd Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
sight,power of,of divinities Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
sikyon,proitids in Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 282
sphaleotas Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
statues,binding of Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 168
theater,theatrical Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
thebes,theban Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287, 303
theomachist,theomachus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
thetis Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
tragedy,tragic Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
water Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
wine Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 287
woman' Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
woman Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14, 287
zeus Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
zoilos Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 14