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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



50
Aelian, Nature Of Animals, 9.33


nanThis is not the occasion for mentioning all the benefits that accrue from Wormwood, how it eases the windpipe and even cleanses the lungs. But to a troublesome creature it is certainly an enemy: it destroys intestinal worm. This creature grows and grows and becomes a monster bred in the intestines, and is reckoned among the diseases of mankind, and what is more, among those which are hardest to cure and which will not yield to any mortal treatment. Hippys is sufficient witness to this. The account given by the historian of Rhegium is as follows. A woman suffered from an intestinal worm, and the cleverest doctors despaired of curing her. Accordingly she went to Epidaurus and prayed the god that she might be rid of the complaint that was lodged in her. The god was not at hand. The attendants of the temple however made her lie down in the place where the god was in the habit of healing his petitioners. And the woman lay quiet as she was bid; and the ministers of the god addressed themselves to her cure: they severed her head from the neck, and one of them inserted his hand and drew out the worm, which was a monstrous creature. But to adjust the head and to restore it to its former setting, this they always failed to do. Well, the god arrived and was enraged with the ministers for undertaking a task beyond their skill, and himself with the irresistible power of a god restored the head to the body and raised the stranger up again. For my part, O King Asclepius, of all gods the kindliest to man, I do not set Wormwood against your skill (heaven forbid I should be so insensate!), but in considering Wormwood I was reminded of your beneficent action and of your astounding powers of healing. And there is no need to doubt that this herb also is a gift from you.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 621, 662, 411 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

411. ἐγώ, κατακλίνειν αὐτὸν εἰς ̓Ασκληπιοῦ
2. Aristophanes, Wasps, 123 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

123. νύκτωρ κατέκλινεν αὐτὸν εἰς ̓Ασκληπιοῦ
3. Herodotus, Histories, 4.172, 8.134 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.172. Next west of these Auschisae is the populous country of the Nasamones, who in summer leave their flocks by the sea and go up to the land called Augila to gather dates from the palm-trees that grow there in great abundance and all bear fruit. They hunt locusts, which they dry in the sun, and after grinding sprinkle them into milk and drink it. ,It is their custom for every man to have many wives; their intercourse with women is promiscuous, as among the Massagetae; a staff is placed before the dwelling, and then they have intercourse. When a man of the Nasamones weds, on the first night the bride must by custom lie with each of the whole company in turn; and each man after intercourse gives her whatever gift he has brought from his house. ,As for their manner of swearing and divination, they lay their hands on the graves of the men reputed to have been the most just and good among them, and by these men they swear; their practice of divination is to go to the tombs of their ancestors, where after making prayers they lie down to sleep, and take for oracles whatever dreams come to them. ,They give and receive pledges by each drinking from the hand of the other party; and if they have nothing liquid, they take the dust of the earth and lick it up. 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place.
4. Hippocrates, Letters, 15 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Herodas, Mimes, 4.79-4.84 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, On Divination, 2.13, 2.34, 2.143 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.13. Sed animadverti, Quinte, te caute et ab iis coniecturis, quae haberent artem atque prudentiam, et ab iis rebus, quae sensibus aut artificiis perciperentur, abducere divinationem eamque ita definire: divinationem esse earum rerum praedictionem et praesensionem, quae essent fortuitae. Primum eodem revolveris. Nam et medici et gubernatoris et imperatoris praesensio est rerum fortuitarum. Num igitur aut haruspex aut augur aut vates quis aut somnians melius coniecerit aut e morbo evasurum aegrotum aut e periculo navem aut ex insidiis exercitum quam medicus, quam gubernator, quam imperator? 2.34. Quid de fretis aut de marinis aestibus plura dicam? quorum accessus et recessus lunae motu gubertur. Sescenta licet eiusdem modi proferri, ut distantium rerum cognatio naturalis appareat)—demus hoc; nihil enim huic disputationi adversatur; num etiam, si fissum cuiusdam modi fuerit in iecore, lucrum ostenditur? qua ex coniunctione naturae et quasi concentu atque consensu, quam sumpa/qeian Graeci appellant, convenire potest aut fissum iecoris cum lucello meo aut meus quaesticulus cum caelo, terra rerumque natura? Concedam hoc ipsum, si vis, etsi magnam iacturam causae fecero, si ullam esse convenientiam naturae cum extis concessero; 2.143. Dicitur quidam, cum in somnis complexu Venerio iungeretur, calculos eiecisse. Video sympathian; visum est enim tale obiectum dormienti, ut id, quod evenit, naturae vis, non opinio erroris effecerit. Quae igitur natura obtulit illam speciem Simonidi, a qua vetaretur navigare? aut quid naturae copulatum habuit Alcibiadis quod scribitur somnium? qui paulo ante interitum visus est in somnis amicae esse amictus amiculo. Is cum esset proiectus inhumatus ab omnibusque desertus iaceret, amica corpus eius texit suo pallio. Ergo hoc inerat in rebus futuris et causas naturalis habebat, an, et ut videretur et ut eveniret, casus effecit? 2.13. But I observed, Quintus, that you prudently withdrew divination from conjectures based upon skill and experience in public affairs, from those drawn from the use of the senses and from those made by persons in their own callings. I observed, also, that you defined divination to be the foreknowledge and foretelling of things which happen by chance. In the first place, that is a contradiction of what you have admitted. For the foreknowledge possessed by a physician, a pilot, and a general is of things which happen by chance. Then can any soothsayer, augur, prophet, or dreamer conjecture better than a physician, a pilot, or a general that an invalid will come safely out of his sickness, or that a ship will escape from danger, or that an army will avoid an ambuscade? 2.13. Chrysippus, indeed, defines divination in these words: The power to see, understand, and explain premonitory signs given to men by the gods. Its duty, he goes on to say, is to know in advance the disposition of the gods towards men, the manner in which that disposition is shown and by what means the gods may be propitiated and their threatened ills averted. And this same philosopher defines the interpretation of dreams thus: It is the power to understand and explain the visions sent by the gods to men in sleep. Then, if that be true, will just ordinary shrewdness meet these requirements, or rather is there not need of surpassing intelligence and absolutely perfect learning? But I have never seen such a man. [64] 2.34. There is no need to go on and mention the seas and straits with their tides, whose ebb and flow are governed by the motion of the moon. Innumerable instances of the same kind may be given to prove that some natural connexion does exist between objects apparently unrelated. Concede that it does exist; it does not contravene the point I make, that no sort of a cleft in a liver is prophetic of ficial gain. What natural tie, or what symphony, so to speak, or association, or what sympathy, as the Greeks term it, can there be between a cleft in a liver and a petty addition to my purse? Or what relationship between my miserable money-getting, on the one hand, and heaven, earth, and the laws of nature on the other?[15] However, I will concede even this if you wish, though it will greatly weaken my case to admit that there is any connexion between nature and the condition of the entrails; 2.143. A person, it is said, while dreaming of coition, ejected gravel. In this case I can see a relation between the dream and the result; for the vision presented to the sleeper was such as to make it clear that what happened was due to natural causes and not to the delusion. But by what law of nature did Simonides receive that vision which forbade him to sail? or what was the connexion between the laws of nature and the dream of Alcibiades in which according to history, shortly before his death, he seemed to be enveloped in the cloak of his mistress? Later, when his body had been cast out and was lying unburied and universally neglected, his mistress covered it with her mantle. Then do you say that this dream was united by some natural tie with the fate that befell Alcibiades, or did chance cause both the apparition and the subsequent event? [70]
7. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.6.15. Epidaurus used to be called Epicarus, for Aristotle says that Carians took possession of it, as also of Hermione, but that after the return of the Heracleidae the Ionians who had accompanied the Heracleidae from the Attic Tetrapolis to Argos took up their abode with these Carians. Epidaurus, too, is an important city, and particularly because of the fame of Asclepius, who is believed to cure diseases of every kind and always has his sanctuary full of the sick, and also of the votive tablets on which the treatments are recorded, just as at Cos and Tricce. The city lies in the recess of the Saronic Gulf, has a circular coast of fifteen stadia, and faces the summer risings of the sun. It is enclosed by high mountains which reach as far as the sea, so that on all sides it is naturally fitted for a stronghold. Between Troezen and Epidaurus there was a stronghold called Methana, and also a peninsula of the same name. In some copies of Thucydides the name is spelled Methone, the same as the Macedonian city in which Philip, in the siege, had his eye knocked out. And it is on this account, in the opinion of Demetrius of Scepsis, that some writers, being deceived, suppose that it was the Methone in the territory of Troezen against which the men sent by Agamemnon to collect sailors are said to have uttered the imprecation that its citizens might never cease from their wall-building, since, in his opinion, it was not these citizens that refused, but those of the Macedonian city, as Theopompus says; and it is not likely, he adds, that these citizens who were near to Agamemnon disobeyed him.
8. Aelian, Fragments, 101 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 47.57, 48.34-48.35 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 4.8.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 24, 22 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. So oracles and divine utterances were the order of the day, and much shrewdness he displayed, eking out mechanical ingenuity with obscurity, his answers to some being crabbed and ambiguous, and to others absolutely unintelligible. He did, however, distribute warning and encouragement according to his lights, and recommend treatments and diets; for he had, as I originally stated, a wide and serviceable acquaintance with drugs; he was particularly given to prescribing ‘cytmides,’ which were a salve prepared from goat’s fat, the name being of his own invention. For the realization of ambitions, advancement, or successions, he took care never to assign early dates; the formula was, ‘All this shall come to pass when it is my will, and when my prophet Alexander shall make prayer and entreaty on your behalf.’
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.27.1-2.27.3, 2.27.5-2.27.6, 10.38.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.27.1. The sacred grove of Asclepius is surrounded on all sides by boundary marks. No death or birth takes place within the enclosure the same custom prevails also in the island of Delos . All the offerings, whether the offerer be one of the Epidaurians themselves or a stranger, are entirely consumed within the bounds. At Titane too, I know, there is the same rule. 2.27.2. The image of Asclepius is, in size, half as big as the Olympian Zeus at Athens, and is made of ivory and gold. An inscription tells us that the artist was Thrasymedes, a Parian, son of Arignotus. The god is sitting on a seat grasping a staff; the other hand he is holding above the head of the serpent; there is also a figure of a dog lying by his side. On the seat are wrought in relief the exploits of Argive heroes, that of Bellerophontes against the Chimaera, and Perseus, who has cut off the head of Medusa. Over against the temple is the place where the suppliants of the god sleep. 2.27.3. Near has been built a circular building of white marble, called Tholos (Round House), which is worth seeing. In it is a picture by Pausias 1. A famous painter of Sicyon . representing Love, who has cast aside his bow and arrows, and is carrying instead of them a lyre that he has taken up. Here there is also another work of Pausias, Drunkenness drinking out of a crystal cup. You can see even in the painting a crystal cup and a woman's face through it. Within the enclosure stood slabs; in my time six remained, but of old there were more. On them are inscribed the names of both the men and the women who have been healed by Asclepius, the disease also from which each suffered, and the means of cure. The dialect is Doric. 2.27.5. The Epidaurians have a theater within the sanctuary, in my opinion very well worth seeing. For while the Roman theaters are far superior to those anywhere else in their splendor, and the Arcadian theater at Megalopolis is unequalled for size, what architect could seriously rival Polycleitus in symmetry and beauty? For it was Polycleitus Probably the younger artist of that name. who built both this theater and the circular building. Within the grove are a temple of Artemis, an image of Epione, a sanctuary of Aphrodite and Themis, a race-course consisting, like most Greek race-courses, of a bank of earth, and a fountain worth seeing for its roof and general splendour. 2.27.6. A Roman senator, Antoninus, made in our own day a bath of Asclepius and a sanctuary of the gods they call Bountiful. 138 or 161 A.D. He made also a temple to Health, Asclepius, and Apollo, the last two surnamed Egyptian. He moreover restored the portico that was named the Portico of Cotys, which, as the brick of which it was made had been unburnt, had fallen into utter ruin after it had lost its roof. As the Epidaurians about the sanctuary were in great distress, because their women had no shelter in which to be delivered and the sick breathed their last in the open, he provided a dwelling, so that these grievances also were redressed. Here at last was a place in which without sin a human being could die and a woman be delivered. 10.38.13. The sanctuary of Asclepius I found in ruins, but it was originally built by a private person called Phalysius. For he had a complaint of the eyes, and when he was almost blind the god at Epidaurus sent to him the poetess Anyte, who brought with her a sealed tablet. The woman thought that the god's appearance was a dream, but it proved at once to be a waking vision. For she found in her own hands a sealed tablet; so sailing to Naupactus she bade Phalysius take away the seal and read what was written. He did not think it possible to read the writing with his eyes in such a condition, but hoping to get some benefit from Asclepius he took away the seal. When he had looked at the wax he recovered his sight, and gave to Anyte what was written on the tablet, two thousand staters of gold.
13. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 31, 30 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Oribasius, Liber Incertus (Collectiones Medicae Libri Incerti), 45.30.10-45.30.14 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

15. Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 277, 276

16. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, 122-124, 255, 121

17. Papyri, P.Cair.Zen., 1.59034

18. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 6.330



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius aristides, and neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228
aelius aristides, and physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
aeschines (athenian orator), length of stay at epidauros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
alexander of abonuteichos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
amphiaraos, consulted by mys Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
aristophaness plutus incubation scene, terminology for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
asclepius Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
asklepieia, incubation in temple pronaos area Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
asklepieia, pig/piglet sacrifice Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
asklepieia, prescriptive dreams and autosuggestion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
asklepieia, presence of physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
asklepieia, problem of stoas (and other structures) as evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
asklepieia, role for neokoroi/zakoroi in incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228, 229
asklepieia, role for priests or physicians in incubation(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228
asklepieia, structural evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
asklepieia, written evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
asklepieia and lesser cult sites, delos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
asklepieia and lesser cult sites, paros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228, 229
asklepieion (or asklepieion-sarapieion?), temple of hera burned down Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
asklepios, and chronic ailments Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
asklepios, and rational medicine Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
asklepios, as alternative to physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
asklepios, as physician or surgeon in dreams Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228, 229
asklepios, epigraphical terms for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
asklepios, prescriptions attributed to asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
asklepios, question of evolution in healing modus operandi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
asklepios, specific ailments cured, kidney stones Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
asklepios, specific ailments cured, parasitic worm Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124, 227, 228
asklepios, worshipers instructed in dreams to visit asklepieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124, 168, 172, 227, 228, 229
athens asklepieion, doric east stoa and incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
athens asklepieion, presence of zakoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
cicero, possible allusion to epidaurian testimony Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
cicero Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
cult personnel (greek), neokoros/nakoros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228, 229
cult personnel (greek), zakoros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228, 229
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), speculatively associated with incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
dedicatory formulas (greek and latin), κατ ὄνειρον Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
dedicatory objects, medical instruments Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
delos, asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
delos sarapieia, presence of neokoroi(?) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
divination Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
divinities (greek and roman), apollo maleatas Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
divinities (greek and roman), hera Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
dreams, dream divination Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelian, fragments Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelian, on the nature of animals Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
dreams (in greek and latin literature), aelius aristides, sacred tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228
dreams (in greek and latin literature), cicero, on divination Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 393
epicureanism Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
epidaurian miracle inscriptions Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
epidauros asklepieion, abaton/incubation stoa Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
epidauros asklepieion, apollo maleatas cult and sanctuary Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
epidauros asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
epidauros asklepieion, lex sacra for preliminary offerings and sacrifices Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
epidauros asklepieion, literary sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
epidauros asklepieion, presence of zakoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228, 229
epidauros asklepieion, story of sons botching operation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11, 124, 168, 172, 227, 228, 229
epidauros asklepieion, written sources for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
epidauros asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, date Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, display Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, focus on miraculous cures Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
epidauros miracle inscriptions, reference to apollo maleatas Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, seen by pausanias Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168, 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, sources and composition Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, terms employed for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimonies echoed in literary sources Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124, 168, 172
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimonies with asklepios using medicine Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
epidauros miracle inscriptions, testimonies with cautionary tales Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 172
glykon, and healing Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
incubation, at tombs Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
incubation, outdoors incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
incubation, terms for incubation (greek) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
incubation (other peoples), augilae/nasamones (libyan tribe) Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
kos asklepieion, epigraphical evidence forphysicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
kos asklepieion, inscribed records of cures Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 229
lebena asklepieion, inscribed foundation narrative Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 168
lebena asklepieion, presence of neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
lebena asklepieion, unusual terminology for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
menander, possible fragment pertaining to asklepios Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 11
neoplatonism Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
oropos amphiareion, incubation stoa Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
oropos amphiareion, presence of neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 228
pergamon asklepieion, presence of nakoroi/neokoroi Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227, 228
physicians, at asklepieia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 227
physicians, gods viewed as alternatives to physicians Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
plotinus Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
posidonius Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
proclus Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
stoicism Russell and Nesselrath, On Prophecy, Dreams and Human Imagination: Synesius, De insomniis (2014) 79
troizen asklepieion, lack of structural evidence for incubation Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124
troizen asklepieion, testimony about worshiper urged to incubate at epidauros' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 124