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84 results for "emotions"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 16.9, 19.1-19.13, 73.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341, 739
16.9. "לָכֵן שָׂמַח לִבִּי וַיָּגֶל כְּבוֹדִי אַף־בְּשָׂרִי יִשְׁכֹּן לָבֶטַח׃", 19.1. "לַמְנַצֵּחַ מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד׃", 19.1. "יִרְאַת יְהוָה טְהוֹרָה עוֹמֶדֶת לָעַד מִשְׁפְּטֵי־יְהוָה אֱמֶת צָדְקוּ יַחְדָּו׃", 19.2. "הַשָּׁמַיִם מְסַפְּרִים כְּבוֹד־אֵל וּמַעֲשֵׂה יָדָיו מַגִּיד הָרָקִיעַ׃", 19.3. "יוֹם לְיוֹם יַבִּיעַ אֹמֶר וְלַיְלָה לְּלַיְלָה יְחַוֶּה־דָּעַת׃", 19.4. "אֵין־אֹמֶר וְאֵין דְּבָרִים בְּלִי נִשְׁמָע קוֹלָם׃", 19.5. "בְּכָל־הָאָרֶץ יָצָא קַוָּם וּבִקְצֵה תֵבֵל מִלֵּיהֶם לַשֶּׁמֶשׁ שָׂם־אֹהֶל בָּהֶם׃", 19.6. "וְהוּא כְּחָתָן יֹצֵא מֵחֻפָּתוֹ יָשִׂישׂ כְּגִבּוֹר לָרוּץ אֹרַח׃", 19.7. "מִקְצֵה הַשָּׁמַיִם מוֹצָאוֹ וּתְקוּפָתוֹ עַל־קְצוֹתָם וְאֵין נִסְתָּר מֵחַמָּתוֹ׃", 19.8. "תּוֹרַת יְהוָה תְּמִימָה מְשִׁיבַת נָפֶשׁ עֵדוּת יְהוָה נֶאֱמָנָה מַחְכִּימַת פֶּתִי׃", 19.9. "פִּקּוּדֵי יְהוָה יְשָׁרִים מְשַׂמְּחֵי־לֵב מִצְוַת יְהוָה בָּרָה מְאִירַת עֵינָיִם׃", 19.11. "הַנֶּחֱמָדִים מִזָּהָב וּמִפַּז רָב וּמְתוּקִים מִדְּבַשׁ וְנֹפֶת צוּפִים׃", 19.12. "גַּם־עַבְדְּךָ נִזְהָר בָּהֶם בְּשָׁמְרָם עֵקֶב רָב׃", 19.13. "שְׁגִיאוֹת מִי־יָבִין מִנִּסְתָּרוֹת נַקֵּנִי׃", 73.21. "כִּי יִתְחַמֵּץ לְבָבִי וְכִלְיוֹתַי אֶשְׁתּוֹנָן׃", 16.9. "Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth; my flesh also dwelleth in safety;", 19.1. "For the Leader. A Psalm of David.", 19.2. "The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament showeth His handiwork;", 19.3. "Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night revealeth knowledge;", 19.4. "There is no speech, there are no words, neither is their voice heard.", 19.5. "Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them hath He set a tent for the sun,", 19.6. "Which is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a strong man to run his course.", 19.7. "His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it; and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.", 19.8. "The law of the LORD is perfect, restoring the soul; the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple. .", 19.9. "The precepts of the LORD are right, rejoicing the heart; the commandment of the LORD is pure, enlightening the eyes.", 19.10. "The fear of the LORD is clean, enduring for ever; the ordices of the LORD are true, they are righteous altogether;", 19.11. "More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold; sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb.", 19.12. "Moreover by them is Thy servant warned; in keeping of them there is great reward.", 19.13. "Who can discern his errors? Clear Thou me from hidden faults.", 73.21. "For my heart was in a ferment, And I was pricked in my reins. .",
2. Hebrew Bible, Nahum, 2.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 136
2.10. "Take ye the spoil of silver, take the spoil of gold; For there is no end of the store, Rich with all precious vessels.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 3.4, 4.9 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
3.4. "וְאֵת שְׁתֵּי הַכְּלָיֹת וְאֶת־הַחֵלֶב אֲשֶׁר עֲלֵהֶן אֲשֶׁר עַל־הַכְּסָלִים וְאֶת־הַיֹּתֶרֶת עַל־הַכָּבֵד עַל־הַכְּלָיוֹת יְסִירֶנָּה׃", 4.9. "וְאֵת שְׁתֵּי הַכְּלָיֹת וְאֶת־הַחֵלֶב אֲשֶׁר עֲלֵיהֶן אֲשֶׁר עַל־הַכְּסָלִים וְאֶת־הַיֹּתֶרֶת עַל־הַכָּבֵד עַל־הַכְּלָיוֹת יְסִירֶנָּה׃", 3.4. "and the two kidneys, and the fat that is on them, which is by the loins, and the lobe above the liver, which he shall take away hard by the kidneys.", 4.9. "and the two kidneys, and the fat that is upon them, which is by the loins, and the lobe above the liver, which he shall take away by kidneys,",
4. Hebrew Bible, Jonah, 4.5-4.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
4.5. "וַיֵּצֵא יוֹנָה מִן־הָעִיר וַיֵּשֶׁב מִקֶּדֶם לָעִיר וַיַּעַשׂ לוֹ שָׁם סֻכָּה וַיֵּשֶׁב תַּחְתֶּיהָ בַּצֵּל עַד אֲשֶׁר יִרְאֶה מַה־יִּהְיֶה בָּעִיר׃", 4.6. "וַיְמַן יְהוָה־אֱלֹהִים קִיקָיוֹן וַיַּעַל מֵעַל לְיוֹנָה לִהְיוֹת צֵל עַל־רֹאשׁוֹ לְהַצִּיל לוֹ מֵרָעָתוֹ וַיִּשְׂמַח יוֹנָה עַל־הַקִּיקָיוֹן שִׂמְחָה גְדוֹלָה׃", 4.7. "וַיְמַן הָאֱלֹהִים תּוֹלַעַת בַּעֲלוֹת הַשַּׁחַר לַמָּחֳרָת וַתַּךְ אֶת־הַקִּיקָיוֹן וַיִּיבָשׁ׃", 4.8. "וַיְהִי כִּזְרֹחַ הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ וַיְמַן אֱלֹהִים רוּחַ קָדִים חֲרִישִׁית וַתַּךְ הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ עַל־רֹאשׁ יוֹנָה וַיִּתְעַלָּף וַיִּשְׁאַל אֶת־נַפְשׁוֹ לָמוּת וַיֹּאמֶר טוֹב מוֹתִי מֵחַיָּי׃", 4.9. "וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים אֶל־יוֹנָה הַהֵיטֵב חָרָה־לְךָ עַל־הַקִּיקָיוֹן וַיֹּאמֶר הֵיטֵב חָרָה־לִי עַד־מָוֶת׃", 4.11. "וַאֲנִי לֹא אָחוּס עַל־נִינְוֵה הָעִיר הַגְּדוֹלָה אֲשֶׁר יֶשׁ־בָּהּ הַרְבֵּה מִשְׁתֵּים־עֶשְׂרֵה רִבּוֹ אָדָם אֲשֶׁר לֹא־יָדַע בֵּין־יְמִינוֹ לִשְׂמֹאלוֹ וּבְהֵמָה רַבָּה׃", 4.5. "Then Jonah went out of the city, and sat on the east side of the city, and there made him a booth, and sat under it in the shadow, till he might see what would become of the city.", 4.6. "And the LORD God prepared a gourd, and made it to come up over Jonah, that it might be a shadow over his head, to deliver him from his evil. So Jonah was exceeding glad because of the gourd.", 4.7. "But God prepared a worm when the morning rose the next day, and it smote the gourd, that it withered.", 4.8. "And it came to pass, when the sun arose, that God prepared a vehement east wind; and the sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and requested for himself that he might die, and said: ‘It is better for me to die than to live.’", 4.9. "And God said to Jonah: ‘Art thou greatly angry for the gourd?’ And he said: ‘I am greatly angry, even unto death.’", 4.10. "And the LORD said: ‘Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow, which came up in a night, and perished in a night;", 4.11. "and should not I have pity on Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand, and also much cattle?’",
5. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.5, 23.2, 27.38, 29.11, 37.35, 45.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
4.5. "וְאֶל־קַיִן וְאֶל־מִנְחָתוֹ לֹא שָׁעָה וַיִּחַר לְקַיִן מְאֹד וַיִּפְּלוּ פָּנָיו׃", 23.2. "וַיָּקָם הַשָּׂדֶה וְהַמְּעָרָה אֲשֶׁר־בּוֹ לְאַבְרָהָם לַאֲחֻזַּת־קָבֶר מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־חֵת׃", 23.2. "וַתָּמָת שָׂרָה בְּקִרְיַת אַרְבַּע הִוא חֶבְרוֹן בְּאֶרֶץ כְּנָעַן וַיָּבֹא אַבְרָהָם לִסְפֹּד לְשָׂרָה וְלִבְכֹּתָהּ׃", 27.38. "וַיֹּאמֶר עֵשָׂו אֶל־אָבִיו הַבְרָכָה אַחַת הִוא־לְךָ אָבִי בָּרֲכֵנִי גַם־אָנִי אָבִי וַיִּשָּׂא עֵשָׂו קֹלוֹ וַיֵּבְךְּ׃", 29.11. "וַיִּשַּׁק יַעֲקֹב לְרָחֵל וַיִּשָּׂא אֶת־קֹלוֹ וַיֵּבְךְּ׃", 37.35. "וַיָּקֻמוּ כָל־בָּנָיו וְכָל־בְּנֹתָיו לְנַחֲמוֹ וַיְמָאֵן לְהִתְנַחֵם וַיֹּאמֶר כִּי־אֵרֵד אֶל־בְּנִי אָבֵל שְׁאֹלָה וַיֵּבְךְּ אֹתוֹ אָבִיו׃", 45.14. "וַיִּפֹּל עַל־צַוְּארֵי בִנְיָמִן־אָחִיו וַיֵּבְךְּ וּבִנְיָמִן בָּכָה עַל־צַוָּארָיו׃", 4.5. "but unto Cain and to his offering He had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countece fell.", 23.2. "And Sarah died in Kiriatharba—the same is Hebron—in the land of Canaan; and Abraham came to mourn for Sarah, and to weep for her.", 27.38. "And Esau said unto his father: ‘Hast thou but one blessing, my father? bless me, even me also, O my father.’ And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept.", 29.11. "And Jacob kissed Rachel, and lifted up his voice, and wept.", 37.35. "And all his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted; and he said: ‘Nay, but I will go down to the grave to my son mourning.’ And his father wept for him.", 45.14. "And he fell upon his brother Benjamin’s neck, and wept; and Benjamin wept upon his neck.",
6. Homer, Iliad, 1.243, 1.539-1.543, 1.555-1.558, 2.198-2.199, 2.299-2.329, 3.395, 5.418-5.425, 6.215-6.231, 8.368-8.370, 9.433, 9.438-9.599, 10.93-10.95, 10.374-10.377, 11.670-11.672, 13.29, 15.140-15.141, 15.627, 16.744-16.750, 17.53-17.60, 18.22-18.35, 18.51-18.64, 18.79-18.93, 18.109-18.110, 18.322, 18.600-18.601, 19.125, 19.284-19.285, 20.353, 20.381-20.382, 21.114, 21.233, 21.390, 22.405-22.436, 23.597-23.600, 24.358-24.360, 24.540-24.541, 24.629-24.633 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 49, 108, 135, 136, 137, 139, 140, 143, 145, 146, 374, 609, 662, 715
1.243. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.539. / So he sat down there upon his throne; but Hera saw, and failed not to note how silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, had taken counsel with him. Forthwith then she spoke to Zeus, son of Cronos, with mocking words:Who of the gods, crafty one, has now again taken counsel with you? 1.540. / Always is it your pleasure to hold aloof from me, and to give judgments which you have pondered in secret, nor have you ever brought yourself with a ready heart to declare to me the matter which you devise. In answer to her spoke the father of men and gods:Hera, do not hope to know all my words: 1.541. / Always is it your pleasure to hold aloof from me, and to give judgments which you have pondered in secret, nor have you ever brought yourself with a ready heart to declare to me the matter which you devise. In answer to her spoke the father of men and gods:Hera, do not hope to know all my words: 1.542. / Always is it your pleasure to hold aloof from me, and to give judgments which you have pondered in secret, nor have you ever brought yourself with a ready heart to declare to me the matter which you devise. In answer to her spoke the father of men and gods:Hera, do not hope to know all my words: 1.543. / Always is it your pleasure to hold aloof from me, and to give judgments which you have pondered in secret, nor have you ever brought yourself with a ready heart to declare to me the matter which you devise. In answer to her spoke the father of men and gods:Hera, do not hope to know all my words: 1.555. / silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, have beguiled you; for at early dawn she sat by you and clasped your knees. To her, I think, you bowed your head in sure token that you will honour Achilles, and bring many to death beside the ships of the Achaeans. Then in answer to her spoke Zeus, the cloud-gatherer: 1.556. / silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, have beguiled you; for at early dawn she sat by you and clasped your knees. To her, I think, you bowed your head in sure token that you will honour Achilles, and bring many to death beside the ships of the Achaeans. Then in answer to her spoke Zeus, the cloud-gatherer: 1.557. / silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, have beguiled you; for at early dawn she sat by you and clasped your knees. To her, I think, you bowed your head in sure token that you will honour Achilles, and bring many to death beside the ships of the Achaeans. Then in answer to her spoke Zeus, the cloud-gatherer: 1.558. / silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, have beguiled you; for at early dawn she sat by you and clasped your knees. To her, I think, you bowed your head in sure token that you will honour Achilles, and bring many to death beside the ships of the Achaeans. Then in answer to her spoke Zeus, the cloud-gatherer: 2.198. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.199. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.299. / but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.300. / whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.301. / whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.302. / whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.303. / whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.304. / whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; 2.305. / and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.306. / and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.307. / and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.308. / and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.309. / and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.310. / glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.311. / glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.312. / glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.313. / glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.314. / glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.315. / and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.316. / and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.317. / and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.318. / and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.319. / and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.320. / and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, 2.321. / and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, 2.322. / and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, 2.323. / and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, 2.324. / and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, 2.325. / late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, 2.326. / late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, 2.327. / late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, 2.328. / late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, 2.329. / late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, 3.395. / So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 5.418. / the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. 5.419. / the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. She spake, and with both her hands wiped the ichor from the arm; the arm was restored, and the grievous pains assuaged. But Athene and Hera, as they looked upon her, sought to anger Zeus, son of Cronos, with mocking words. 5.420. / And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea, 5.421. / And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea, 5.422. / And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea, 5.423. / And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea, 5.424. / And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea, 5.425. / she hath scratched upon her golden brooch her delicate hand. So spake she, but the father of men and gods smiled, and calling to him golden Aphrodite, said:Not unto thee, my child, are given works of war; nay, follow thou after the lovely works of marriage, 6.215. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet, 6.216. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet, 6.217. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet, 6.218. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet, 6.219. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet, 6.220. / and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos, 6.221. / and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos, 6.222. / and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos, 6.223. / and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos, 6.224. / and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos, 6.225. / and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.226. / and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.227. / and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.228. / and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.229. / and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.230. / and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.231. / and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 8.368. / send me forth to succour him. Had I but known all this in wisdom of my heart when Eurystheus sent him forth to the house of Hades the Warder, to bring from out of Erebus the hound of loathed Hades, then had he not escaped the sheer-falling waters of Styx. 8.369. / send me forth to succour him. Had I but known all this in wisdom of my heart when Eurystheus sent him forth to the house of Hades the Warder, to bring from out of Erebus the hound of loathed Hades, then had he not escaped the sheer-falling waters of Styx. 8.370. / Howbeit now Zeus hateth me, and hath brought to fulfillment the counsels of Thetis, that kissed his knees and with her hand clasped his chin, beseeching him to show honour to Achilles, sacker of cities. Verily the day shall come when he shall again call me his flashing-eyed darling. But now make thou ready for us twain our single-hooved horses, 9.433. / So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence, marveling at his words; for with exceeding vehemence did he deny them. But at length there spake among them the old horseman Phoenix, bursting into tears, for that greatly did he fear for the ships of the Achaeans:If verily thou layest up in thy mind, glorious Achilles, 9.438. / the purpose of returning, neither art minded at all to ward from the swift ships consuming fire, for that wrath hath fallen upon thy heart; how can I then, dear child, be left here without thee, alone? It was to thee that the old horseman Peleus sent me on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon, forth from Phthia, 9.439. / the purpose of returning, neither art minded at all to ward from the swift ships consuming fire, for that wrath hath fallen upon thy heart; how can I then, dear child, be left here without thee, alone? It was to thee that the old horseman Peleus sent me on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon, forth from Phthia, 9.440. / a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.441. / a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.442. / a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.443. / a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.444. / a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war, neither of gatherings wherein men wax preeminent. For this cause sent he me to instruct thee in all these things, to be both a speaker of words and a doer of deeds. Wherefore, dear child, I am not minded hereafter 9.445. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.446. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.447. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.448. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.449. / to be left alone without thee, nay, not though a god himself should pledge him to strip from me my old age and render me strong in youth as in the day when first I left Hellas, the home of fair women, fleeing from strife with my father Amyntor, son of Ormenus; for he waxed grievously wroth against me by reason of his fair-haired concubine, 9.450. / whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. 9.451. / whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. 9.452. / whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. 9.453. / whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. 9.454. / whom himself he ever cherished, and scorned his wife, my mother. So she besought me by my knees continually, to have dalliance with that other first myself, that the old man might be hateful in her eyes. I hearkened to her and did the deed, but my father was ware thereof forthwith and cursed me mightily, and invoked the dire Erinyes 9.455. / that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.456. / that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.457. / that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.458. / that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.459. / that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 9.460. / the voice of the people and the many revilings of men, to the end that I should not be called a father-slayer amid the Achaeans. Then might the heart in my breast in no wise be any more stayed to linger in the halls of my angered father. My fellows verily and my kinsfolk beset me about 9.461. / the voice of the people and the many revilings of men, to the end that I should not be called a father-slayer amid the Achaeans. Then might the heart in my breast in no wise be any more stayed to linger in the halls of my angered father. My fellows verily and my kinsfolk beset me about 9.462. / the voice of the people and the many revilings of men, to the end that I should not be called a father-slayer amid the Achaeans. Then might the heart in my breast in no wise be any more stayed to linger in the halls of my angered father. My fellows verily and my kinsfolk beset me about 9.463. / the voice of the people and the many revilings of men, to the end that I should not be called a father-slayer amid the Achaeans. Then might the heart in my breast in no wise be any more stayed to linger in the halls of my angered father. My fellows verily and my kinsfolk beset me about 9.464. / the voice of the people and the many revilings of men, to the end that I should not be called a father-slayer amid the Achaeans. Then might the heart in my breast in no wise be any more stayed to linger in the halls of my angered father. My fellows verily and my kinsfolk beset me about 9.465. / with many prayers and sought to stay me there in the halls, and many goodly sheep did they slaughter, and sleek kine of shambling gait, and many swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus, and wine in plenty was drunk from the jars of that old man. 9.466. / with many prayers and sought to stay me there in the halls, and many goodly sheep did they slaughter, and sleek kine of shambling gait, and many swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus, and wine in plenty was drunk from the jars of that old man. 9.467. / with many prayers and sought to stay me there in the halls, and many goodly sheep did they slaughter, and sleek kine of shambling gait, and many swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus, and wine in plenty was drunk from the jars of that old man. 9.468. / with many prayers and sought to stay me there in the halls, and many goodly sheep did they slaughter, and sleek kine of shambling gait, and many swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus, and wine in plenty was drunk from the jars of that old man. 9.469. / with many prayers and sought to stay me there in the halls, and many goodly sheep did they slaughter, and sleek kine of shambling gait, and many swine, rich with fat, were stretched to singe over the flame of Hephaestus, and wine in plenty was drunk from the jars of that old man. 9.470. / For nine nights' space about mine own body did they watch the night through; in turn kept they watch, neither were the fires quenched, one beneath the portico of the well-fenced court, and one in the porch before the door of my chamber. Howbeit when the tenth dark night was come upon me, 9.471. / For nine nights' space about mine own body did they watch the night through; in turn kept they watch, neither were the fires quenched, one beneath the portico of the well-fenced court, and one in the porch before the door of my chamber. Howbeit when the tenth dark night was come upon me, 9.472. / For nine nights' space about mine own body did they watch the night through; in turn kept they watch, neither were the fires quenched, one beneath the portico of the well-fenced court, and one in the porch before the door of my chamber. Howbeit when the tenth dark night was come upon me, 9.473. / For nine nights' space about mine own body did they watch the night through; in turn kept they watch, neither were the fires quenched, one beneath the portico of the well-fenced court, and one in the porch before the door of my chamber. Howbeit when the tenth dark night was come upon me, 9.474. / For nine nights' space about mine own body did they watch the night through; in turn kept they watch, neither were the fires quenched, one beneath the portico of the well-fenced court, and one in the porch before the door of my chamber. Howbeit when the tenth dark night was come upon me, 9.475. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 9.476. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 9.477. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 9.478. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 9.479. / then verily I burst the cunningly fitted doors of my chamber and leapt the fence of the court full easily, unseen of the watchmen and the slave women. Thereafter I fled afar through spacious Hellas, and came to deep-soiled Phthia, mother of flocks, 9.480. / unto king Peleus; and he received me with a ready heart, and cherished me as a father cherisheth his only son and well-beloved, that is heir to great possessions; and he made me rich and gave much people to me, and I dwelt on the furthermost border of Phthia, ruling over the Dolopians. 9.481. / unto king Peleus; and he received me with a ready heart, and cherished me as a father cherisheth his only son and well-beloved, that is heir to great possessions; and he made me rich and gave much people to me, and I dwelt on the furthermost border of Phthia, ruling over the Dolopians. 9.482. / unto king Peleus; and he received me with a ready heart, and cherished me as a father cherisheth his only son and well-beloved, that is heir to great possessions; and he made me rich and gave much people to me, and I dwelt on the furthermost border of Phthia, ruling over the Dolopians. 9.483. / unto king Peleus; and he received me with a ready heart, and cherished me as a father cherisheth his only son and well-beloved, that is heir to great possessions; and he made me rich and gave much people to me, and I dwelt on the furthermost border of Phthia, ruling over the Dolopians. 9.484. / unto king Peleus; and he received me with a ready heart, and cherished me as a father cherisheth his only son and well-beloved, that is heir to great possessions; and he made me rich and gave much people to me, and I dwelt on the furthermost border of Phthia, ruling over the Dolopians. 9.485. / And I reared thee to be such as thou art, O godlike Achilles, loving thee from may heart; for with none other wouldest thou go to the feast neither take meat in the hall, till I had set thee on my knees and given thee thy fill of the savoury morsel cut first for thee, and had put the wine cup to thy lips. 9.486. / And I reared thee to be such as thou art, O godlike Achilles, loving thee from may heart; for with none other wouldest thou go to the feast neither take meat in the hall, till I had set thee on my knees and given thee thy fill of the savoury morsel cut first for thee, and had put the wine cup to thy lips. 9.487. / And I reared thee to be such as thou art, O godlike Achilles, loving thee from may heart; for with none other wouldest thou go to the feast neither take meat in the hall, till I had set thee on my knees and given thee thy fill of the savoury morsel cut first for thee, and had put the wine cup to thy lips. 9.488. / And I reared thee to be such as thou art, O godlike Achilles, loving thee from may heart; for with none other wouldest thou go to the feast neither take meat in the hall, till I had set thee on my knees and given thee thy fill of the savoury morsel cut first for thee, and had put the wine cup to thy lips. 9.489. / And I reared thee to be such as thou art, O godlike Achilles, loving thee from may heart; for with none other wouldest thou go to the feast neither take meat in the hall, till I had set thee on my knees and given thee thy fill of the savoury morsel cut first for thee, and had put the wine cup to thy lips. 9.490. / Full often hast thou wetted the tunic upon my breast, sputtering forth the wine in thy sorry helplessness. 9.491. / Full often hast thou wetted the tunic upon my breast, sputtering forth the wine in thy sorry helplessness. 9.492. / Full often hast thou wetted the tunic upon my breast, sputtering forth the wine in thy sorry helplessness. 9.493. / Full often hast thou wetted the tunic upon my breast, sputtering forth the wine in thy sorry helplessness. 9.494. / Full often hast thou wetted the tunic upon my breast, sputtering forth the wine in thy sorry helplessness. So have I suffered much for thee and toiled much, ever mindful of this that the gods would in no wise vouchsafe me a son born of mine own body. Nay. it was thou that I sought to make my son, O godlike Achilles, 9.495. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.496. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.497. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.498. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.499. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.500. / and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.501. / and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.502. / and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.503. / and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.504. / and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.505. / Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.506. / Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.507. / Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.508. / Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.509. / Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.510. / but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.511. / but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.512. / but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.513. / but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.514. / but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.515. / For if the son of Atreus were not offering thee gifts and telling of yet others hereafter, but were ever furiously wroth, I of a surety should not bid thee cast aside thine anger and bear aid to the Argives even in their sore need. But now he offereth thee many gifts forthwith, and promiseth thee more hereafter, 9.516. / For if the son of Atreus were not offering thee gifts and telling of yet others hereafter, but were ever furiously wroth, I of a surety should not bid thee cast aside thine anger and bear aid to the Argives even in their sore need. But now he offereth thee many gifts forthwith, and promiseth thee more hereafter, 9.517. / For if the son of Atreus were not offering thee gifts and telling of yet others hereafter, but were ever furiously wroth, I of a surety should not bid thee cast aside thine anger and bear aid to the Argives even in their sore need. But now he offereth thee many gifts forthwith, and promiseth thee more hereafter, 9.518. / For if the son of Atreus were not offering thee gifts and telling of yet others hereafter, but were ever furiously wroth, I of a surety should not bid thee cast aside thine anger and bear aid to the Argives even in their sore need. But now he offereth thee many gifts forthwith, and promiseth thee more hereafter, 9.519. / For if the son of Atreus were not offering thee gifts and telling of yet others hereafter, but were ever furiously wroth, I of a surety should not bid thee cast aside thine anger and bear aid to the Argives even in their sore need. But now he offereth thee many gifts forthwith, and promiseth thee more hereafter, 9.520. / and hath sent forth warriors to beseech thee, choosing them that are best throughout the host of the Achaeans, and that to thine own self are dearest of the Argives; have not thou scorn of their words, neither of their coming hither; though till then no man could blame thee that thou wast wroth. Even in this manner have we heard the fame of men of old 9.521. / and hath sent forth warriors to beseech thee, choosing them that are best throughout the host of the Achaeans, and that to thine own self are dearest of the Argives; have not thou scorn of their words, neither of their coming hither; though till then no man could blame thee that thou wast wroth. Even in this manner have we heard the fame of men of old 9.522. / and hath sent forth warriors to beseech thee, choosing them that are best throughout the host of the Achaeans, and that to thine own self are dearest of the Argives; have not thou scorn of their words, neither of their coming hither; though till then no man could blame thee that thou wast wroth. Even in this manner have we heard the fame of men of old 9.523. / and hath sent forth warriors to beseech thee, choosing them that are best throughout the host of the Achaeans, and that to thine own self are dearest of the Argives; have not thou scorn of their words, neither of their coming hither; though till then no man could blame thee that thou wast wroth. Even in this manner have we heard the fame of men of old 9.524. / and hath sent forth warriors to beseech thee, choosing them that are best throughout the host of the Achaeans, and that to thine own self are dearest of the Argives; have not thou scorn of their words, neither of their coming hither; though till then no man could blame thee that thou wast wroth. Even in this manner have we heard the fame of men of old 9.525. / that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.526. / that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.527. / that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.528. / that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.529. / that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.530. / around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.531. / around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.532. / around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.533. / around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.534. / around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.535. / whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.536. / whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.537. / whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.538. / whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.539. / whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. Thereat the Archer-goddess, the child of Zeus, waxed wroth and sent against him a fierce wild boar, white of tusk, 9.540. / that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.541. / that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.542. / that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.543. / that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.544. / that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.545. / and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.546. / and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.547. / and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.548. / and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.549. / and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.550. / Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise, 9.551. / Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise, 9.552. / Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise, 9.553. / Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise, 9.554. / Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise, 9.555. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.556. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.557. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.558. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.559. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.560. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.561. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.562. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.563. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.564. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.565. / By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone, 9.566. / By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone, 9.567. / By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone, 9.568. / By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone, 9.569. / By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone, 9.570. / the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.571. / the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.572. / the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.573. / the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.574. / the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.575. / of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland, 9.576. / of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland, 9.577. / of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland, 9.578. / of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland, 9.579. / of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland, 9.580. / and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.581. / and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.582. / and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.583. / and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.584. / and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. And earnestly the old horseman Oeneus besought him, standing upon the threshold of his high-roofed chamber, and shaking the jointed doors, in prayer to his son, and earnestly too did his sisters and his honoured mother beseech him 9.585. / —but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.586. / —but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.587. / —but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.588. / —but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.589. / —but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.590. / Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.591. / Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.592. / Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.593. / Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.594. / Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.595. / Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.596. / Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.597. / Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.598. / Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.599. / Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 10.93. / so long as the breath abideth in my breast and my knees are quick. I wander thus, because sweet sleep settleth not upon mine eyes, but war is a trouble to me and the woes of the Achaeans. Wondrously do I fear for the Danaans, nor is my mind firm, but I am tossed to and fro, and my heart 10.94. / so long as the breath abideth in my breast and my knees are quick. I wander thus, because sweet sleep settleth not upon mine eyes, but war is a trouble to me and the woes of the Achaeans. Wondrously do I fear for the Danaans, nor is my mind firm, but I am tossed to and fro, and my heart 10.95. / leapeth forth from out my breast, and my glorious limbs tremble beneath me. But if thou wouldest do aught, seeing on thee too sleep cometh not, come, let us go to the sentinels, that we may look to them, lest fordone with toil and drowsiness they be slumbering, and have wholly forgot their watch. 10.374. / Stand, or I shall reach thee with the spear, and I deem thou shalt not long escape sheer destruction at my hand. He spake, and hurled his spear, but of purpose he missed the man, and over his right shoulder passed the point of the polished spear, and fixed itself in the ground; and Dolon stood still, seized with terror, 10.375. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 10.376. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 10.377. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 11.670. / Would that I were young and my strength were as when strife was set afoot between the Eleans and our folk about the lifting of kine, what time I slew Itymoneus, the valiant son of Hypeirochus, a man that dwelt in Elis, when I was driving off what we had seized in reprisal; and he while fighting for the kine 11.671. / Would that I were young and my strength were as when strife was set afoot between the Eleans and our folk about the lifting of kine, what time I slew Itymoneus, the valiant son of Hypeirochus, a man that dwelt in Elis, when I was driving off what we had seized in reprisal; and he while fighting for the kine 11.672. / Would that I were young and my strength were as when strife was set afoot between the Eleans and our folk about the lifting of kine, what time I slew Itymoneus, the valiant son of Hypeirochus, a man that dwelt in Elis, when I was driving off what we had seized in reprisal; and he while fighting for the kine 13.29. / and with gold he clad himself about his body, and grasped the well-wrought whip of gold, and stepped upon his car, and set out to drive over the waves. Then gambolled the sea-beasts beneath him on every side from out the deeps, for well they knew their lord, and in gladness the sea parted before him; 15.140. / or will yet be slain; and a hard thing it is to preserve the lineage and offspring of men. She spake she, and made furious Ares to sit down upon his throne. But Hera called Apollo forth from out the hall, and Iris, that is the messenger of the immortal gods; 15.141. / or will yet be slain; and a hard thing it is to preserve the lineage and offspring of men. She spake she, and made furious Ares to sit down upon his throne. But Hera called Apollo forth from out the hall, and Iris, that is the messenger of the immortal gods; 15.627. / swollen by the winds, falleth upon a swift ship, and she is all hidden by the foam thereof, and the dread blast of the wind roareth against the sail, and the hearts of the sailors shudder in their fear, for that by little are they borne forth from death; even so were the hearts of the Achaeans rent within their breasts. 16.744. / And both his brows did the stone dash together, and the bone held not, but the eyes fell to the ground in the dust even there, before his feet. And like a diver he fell from the well-wrought car, and his spirit left his bones. Then with mocking words didst thou speak to him, knight Patroclus: 16.745. / Hah, look you, verily nimble is the man; how lightly he diveth! In sooth if he were on the teeming deep, this man would satisfy many by seeking for oysters, leaping from his ship were the sea never so stormy, seeing that now on the plain he diveth lightly from his car. Verily among the Trojans too there be men that dive. 16.746. / Hah, look you, verily nimble is the man; how lightly he diveth! In sooth if he were on the teeming deep, this man would satisfy many by seeking for oysters, leaping from his ship were the sea never so stormy, seeing that now on the plain he diveth lightly from his car. Verily among the Trojans too there be men that dive. 16.747. / Hah, look you, verily nimble is the man; how lightly he diveth! In sooth if he were on the teeming deep, this man would satisfy many by seeking for oysters, leaping from his ship were the sea never so stormy, seeing that now on the plain he diveth lightly from his car. Verily among the Trojans too there be men that dive. 16.748. / Hah, look you, verily nimble is the man; how lightly he diveth! In sooth if he were on the teeming deep, this man would satisfy many by seeking for oysters, leaping from his ship were the sea never so stormy, seeing that now on the plain he diveth lightly from his car. Verily among the Trojans too there be men that dive. 16.749. / Hah, look you, verily nimble is the man; how lightly he diveth! In sooth if he were on the teeming deep, this man would satisfy many by seeking for oysters, leaping from his ship were the sea never so stormy, seeing that now on the plain he diveth lightly from his car. Verily among the Trojans too there be men that dive. 16.750. / So saying he made for the warrior Cebriones with the rush of a lion that, while he wasteth the farm-stead, hath been smitten on the breast, and his own valour bringeth him to ruin; even so upon Cebriones, O Patroclus, didst thou leap furiously. 17.53. / And he fell with a thud, and upon him his armour clanged. In blood was his hair drenched, that was like the hair of the Graces, and his tresses that were braided with gold and silver. And as a man reareth a lusty sapling of an olive in a lonely place, where water welleth up abundantly— 17.54. / And he fell with a thud, and upon him his armour clanged. In blood was his hair drenched, that was like the hair of the Graces, and his tresses that were braided with gold and silver. And as a man reareth a lusty sapling of an olive in a lonely place, where water welleth up abundantly— 17.55. / a goodly sapling and a fair-growing; and the blasts of all the winds make it to quiver, and it burgeoneth out with white blossoms; but suddenly cometh the wind with a mighty tempest, and teareth it out of its trench, and layeth it low upon the earth; even in such wise did 17.56. / a goodly sapling and a fair-growing; and the blasts of all the winds make it to quiver, and it burgeoneth out with white blossoms; but suddenly cometh the wind with a mighty tempest, and teareth it out of its trench, and layeth it low upon the earth; even in such wise did 17.57. / a goodly sapling and a fair-growing; and the blasts of all the winds make it to quiver, and it burgeoneth out with white blossoms; but suddenly cometh the wind with a mighty tempest, and teareth it out of its trench, and layeth it low upon the earth; even in such wise did 17.58. / a goodly sapling and a fair-growing; and the blasts of all the winds make it to quiver, and it burgeoneth out with white blossoms; but suddenly cometh the wind with a mighty tempest, and teareth it out of its trench, and layeth it low upon the earth; even in such wise did 17.59. / a goodly sapling and a fair-growing; and the blasts of all the winds make it to quiver, and it burgeoneth out with white blossoms; but suddenly cometh the wind with a mighty tempest, and teareth it out of its trench, and layeth it low upon the earth; even in such wise did 17.60. / Menelaus, son of Atreus, slay Panthous' son, Euphorbus of the good ashen spear, and set him to spoil him of his armour. And as when a mountain-nurtured lion, trusting in his might, hath seized from amid a grazing herd the heifer that is goodliest: her neck he seizeth first in his strong jaws, and breaketh it, and thereafter devoureth the blood and all the inward parts in his fury; 18.22. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. 18.23. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. 18.24. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. So spake he, and a black cloud of grief enwrapped Achilles, and with both his hands he took the dark dust 18.25. / and strewed it over his head and defiled his fair face, and on his fragrant tunic the black ashes fell. And himself in the dust lay outstretched, mighty in his mightiness, and with his own hands he tore and marred his hair. And the handmaidens, that Achilles and Patroclus had got them as booty, shrieked aloud in anguish of heart, 18.26. / and strewed it over his head and defiled his fair face, and on his fragrant tunic the black ashes fell. And himself in the dust lay outstretched, mighty in his mightiness, and with his own hands he tore and marred his hair. And the handmaidens, that Achilles and Patroclus had got them as booty, shrieked aloud in anguish of heart, 18.27. / and strewed it over his head and defiled his fair face, and on his fragrant tunic the black ashes fell. And himself in the dust lay outstretched, mighty in his mightiness, and with his own hands he tore and marred his hair. And the handmaidens, that Achilles and Patroclus had got them as booty, shrieked aloud in anguish of heart, 18.28. / and strewed it over his head and defiled his fair face, and on his fragrant tunic the black ashes fell. And himself in the dust lay outstretched, mighty in his mightiness, and with his own hands he tore and marred his hair. And the handmaidens, that Achilles and Patroclus had got them as booty, shrieked aloud in anguish of heart, 18.29. / and strewed it over his head and defiled his fair face, and on his fragrant tunic the black ashes fell. And himself in the dust lay outstretched, mighty in his mightiness, and with his own hands he tore and marred his hair. And the handmaidens, that Achilles and Patroclus had got them as booty, shrieked aloud in anguish of heart, 18.30. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.31. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.32. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.33. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.34. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.35. / Then terribly did Achilles groan aloud, and his queenly mother heard him as she sat in the depths of the sea beside the old man her father. Thereat she uttered a shrill cry, and the goddesses thronged about her, even all the daughters of Nereus that were in the deep of the sea. There were Glauce and Thaleia and Cymodoce, 18.51. / With these the bright cave was filled, and they all alike beat their breasts, and Thetis was leader in their lamenting:Listen, sister Nereids, that one and all ye may hear and know all the sorrows that are in my heart. Ah, woe is me unhappy, woe is me that bare to my sorrow the best of men, 18.52. / With these the bright cave was filled, and they all alike beat their breasts, and Thetis was leader in their lamenting:Listen, sister Nereids, that one and all ye may hear and know all the sorrows that are in my heart. Ah, woe is me unhappy, woe is me that bare to my sorrow the best of men, 18.53. / With these the bright cave was filled, and they all alike beat their breasts, and Thetis was leader in their lamenting:Listen, sister Nereids, that one and all ye may hear and know all the sorrows that are in my heart. Ah, woe is me unhappy, woe is me that bare to my sorrow the best of men, 18.54. / With these the bright cave was filled, and they all alike beat their breasts, and Thetis was leader in their lamenting:Listen, sister Nereids, that one and all ye may hear and know all the sorrows that are in my heart. Ah, woe is me unhappy, woe is me that bare to my sorrow the best of men, 18.55. / for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.56. / for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.57. / for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.58. / for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.59. / for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.60. / back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.61. / back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.62. / back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.63. / back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.64. / back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.79. / by Zeus, as aforetime thou didst pray, stretching forth thy hands, even that one and all the sons of the Achaeans should be huddled at the sterns of the ships in sore need of thee, and should suffer cruel things. Then groaning heavily swift-footed Achilles answered her:My mother, these prayers verily hath the Olympian brought to pass for me, 18.80. / but what pleasure have I therein, seeing my dear comrade is dead, even Patroclus, whom I honoured above all my comrades, even as mine own self? Him have I lost, and his armour Hector that slew him hath stripped from him, that fair armour, huge of size, a wonder to behold, that the gods gave as a glorious gift to Peleus 18.81. / but what pleasure have I therein, seeing my dear comrade is dead, even Patroclus, whom I honoured above all my comrades, even as mine own self? Him have I lost, and his armour Hector that slew him hath stripped from him, that fair armour, huge of size, a wonder to behold, that the gods gave as a glorious gift to Peleus 18.82. / but what pleasure have I therein, seeing my dear comrade is dead, even Patroclus, whom I honoured above all my comrades, even as mine own self? Him have I lost, and his armour Hector that slew him hath stripped from him, that fair armour, huge of size, a wonder to behold, that the gods gave as a glorious gift to Peleus 18.83. / but what pleasure have I therein, seeing my dear comrade is dead, even Patroclus, whom I honoured above all my comrades, even as mine own self? Him have I lost, and his armour Hector that slew him hath stripped from him, that fair armour, huge of size, a wonder to behold, that the gods gave as a glorious gift to Peleus 18.84. / but what pleasure have I therein, seeing my dear comrade is dead, even Patroclus, whom I honoured above all my comrades, even as mine own self? Him have I lost, and his armour Hector that slew him hath stripped from him, that fair armour, huge of size, a wonder to behold, that the gods gave as a glorious gift to Peleus 18.85. / on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome 18.86. / on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome 18.87. / on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome 18.88. / on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome 18.89. / on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome 18.90. / to his home; for neither doth my own heart bid me live on and abide among men, unless Hector first, smitten by my spear, shall lose his life, and pay back the price for that he made spoil of Patroclus, son of Menoetius. Then Thetis again spake unto him, shedding tears the while: 18.91. / to his home; for neither doth my own heart bid me live on and abide among men, unless Hector first, smitten by my spear, shall lose his life, and pay back the price for that he made spoil of Patroclus, son of Menoetius. Then Thetis again spake unto him, shedding tears the while: 18.92. / to his home; for neither doth my own heart bid me live on and abide among men, unless Hector first, smitten by my spear, shall lose his life, and pay back the price for that he made spoil of Patroclus, son of Menoetius. Then Thetis again spake unto him, shedding tears the while: 18.93. / to his home; for neither doth my own heart bid me live on and abide among men, unless Hector first, smitten by my spear, shall lose his life, and pay back the price for that he made spoil of Patroclus, son of Menoetius. Then Thetis again spake unto him, shedding tears the while: 18.109. / I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.110. / waxeth like smoke in the breasts of men; even as but now the king of men, Agamemnon, moved me to wrath. Howbeit these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts, because we must. But now will I go forth that I may light on the slayer of the man I loved, 18.322. / from out the thick wood; and the lion coming back thereafter grieveth sore, and through many a glen he rangeth on the track of the footsteps of the man, if so be he may anywhere find him; for anger exceeding grim layeth hold of him. Even so with heavy groaning spake Achilles among the Myrmidons: 18.600. / exceeding lightly, as when a potter sitteth by his wheel that is fitted between his hands and maketh trial of it whether it will run; and now again would they run in rows toward each other. And a great company stood around the lovely dance, taking joy therein; 18.601. / exceeding lightly, as when a potter sitteth by his wheel that is fitted between his hands and maketh trial of it whether it will run; and now again would they run in rows toward each other. And a great company stood around the lovely dance, taking joy therein; 19.125. / So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 19.284. / And they bestowed them in the huts, and set the women there, and the horses proud squires drave off to the herd.But Briseis, that was like unto golden Aphrodite, when she had sight of Patroclus mangled with the sharp bronze, flung herself about him and shrieked aloud, 19.285. / and with her hands she tore her breast and tender neck and beautiful face. And amid her wailing spake the woman like unto the goddesses:Patroclus, dearest to my hapless heart, alive I left thee when I went from the hut, and now I find thee dead, thou leader of hosts, 20.353. / seeing that now he is glad to have escaped from death. But come, I will call to the war-loving Danaans and go forth against the other Trojans to make trial of them. He spake, and leapt along the ranks, and called to each man:No longer now stand ye afar from the Trojans, ye goodly Achaeans, 20.381. / seized with fear, when he heard the voice of the god as he spoke.But Achilles leapt among the Trojans, his heart clothed about in might, crying a terrible cry, and first he slew Iphition, the valiant son of Otrynteus, the leader of a great host, whom a Naiad nymph bare to Otrynteus, sacker of cities, 20.382. / seized with fear, when he heard the voice of the god as he spoke.But Achilles leapt among the Trojans, his heart clothed about in might, crying a terrible cry, and first he slew Iphition, the valiant son of Otrynteus, the leader of a great host, whom a Naiad nymph bare to Otrynteus, sacker of cities, 21.114. / There shall come a dawn or eve or mid-day, when my life too shall some man take in battle, whether he smite me with cast of the spear, or with an arrow from the string. So spake he, and the other's knees were loosened where he was and his heart was melted. 21.233. / of the son of Cronos, who straitly charged thee to stand by the side of the Trojans and to succour them, until the late-setting star of even shall have come forth and darkened the deep-soiled earth. 21.390. / in joy as he beheld the gods joining in strife. Then no more held they long aloof, for Ares, piercer of shields, began the fray, and first leapt upon Athene, brazen spear in hand, and spake a word of reviling:Wherefore now again, thou dog-fly, 22.405. / So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.406. / So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.407. / So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.408. / So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.409. / So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.410. / Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth, 22.411. / Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth, 22.412. / Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth, 22.413. / Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth, 22.414. / Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth, 22.415. / and calling on each man by name:Withhold, my friends, and suffer me for all your love to go forth from the city alone, and hie me to the ships of the Achaeans. I will make prayer to yon ruthless man, yon worker of violence, if so be he may have shame before his fellows and have pity on my old age. 22.416. / and calling on each man by name:Withhold, my friends, and suffer me for all your love to go forth from the city alone, and hie me to the ships of the Achaeans. I will make prayer to yon ruthless man, yon worker of violence, if so be he may have shame before his fellows and have pity on my old age. 22.417. / and calling on each man by name:Withhold, my friends, and suffer me for all your love to go forth from the city alone, and hie me to the ships of the Achaeans. I will make prayer to yon ruthless man, yon worker of violence, if so be he may have shame before his fellows and have pity on my old age. 22.418. / and calling on each man by name:Withhold, my friends, and suffer me for all your love to go forth from the city alone, and hie me to the ships of the Achaeans. I will make prayer to yon ruthless man, yon worker of violence, if so be he may have shame before his fellows and have pity on my old age. 22.419. / and calling on each man by name:Withhold, my friends, and suffer me for all your love to go forth from the city alone, and hie me to the ships of the Achaeans. I will make prayer to yon ruthless man, yon worker of violence, if so be he may have shame before his fellows and have pity on my old age. 22.420. / He too, I ween, hath a father such as I am, even Peleus, that begat him and reared him to be a bane to Trojans; but above all others hath he brought woe upon me, so many sons of mine hath he slain in their prime. Yet for them all I mourn not so much, despite my grief, 22.421. / He too, I ween, hath a father such as I am, even Peleus, that begat him and reared him to be a bane to Trojans; but above all others hath he brought woe upon me, so many sons of mine hath he slain in their prime. Yet for them all I mourn not so much, despite my grief, 22.422. / He too, I ween, hath a father such as I am, even Peleus, that begat him and reared him to be a bane to Trojans; but above all others hath he brought woe upon me, so many sons of mine hath he slain in their prime. Yet for them all I mourn not so much, despite my grief, 22.423. / He too, I ween, hath a father such as I am, even Peleus, that begat him and reared him to be a bane to Trojans; but above all others hath he brought woe upon me, so many sons of mine hath he slain in their prime. Yet for them all I mourn not so much, despite my grief, 22.424. / He too, I ween, hath a father such as I am, even Peleus, that begat him and reared him to be a bane to Trojans; but above all others hath he brought woe upon me, so many sons of mine hath he slain in their prime. Yet for them all I mourn not so much, despite my grief, 22.425. / as for one only, sharp grief for whom will bring me down to the house of Hades—even for Hector. Ah, would he had died in my arms; then had we taken our fill of weeping and wailing, the mother that bare him to her sorrow, and myself. So spake he weeping, and thereto the townsfolk added their laments. 22.426. / as for one only, sharp grief for whom will bring me down to the house of Hades—even for Hector. Ah, would he had died in my arms; then had we taken our fill of weeping and wailing, the mother that bare him to her sorrow, and myself. So spake he weeping, and thereto the townsfolk added their laments. 22.427. / as for one only, sharp grief for whom will bring me down to the house of Hades—even for Hector. Ah, would he had died in my arms; then had we taken our fill of weeping and wailing, the mother that bare him to her sorrow, and myself. So spake he weeping, and thereto the townsfolk added their laments. 22.428. / as for one only, sharp grief for whom will bring me down to the house of Hades—even for Hector. Ah, would he had died in my arms; then had we taken our fill of weeping and wailing, the mother that bare him to her sorrow, and myself. So spake he weeping, and thereto the townsfolk added their laments. 22.429. / as for one only, sharp grief for whom will bring me down to the house of Hades—even for Hector. Ah, would he had died in my arms; then had we taken our fill of weeping and wailing, the mother that bare him to her sorrow, and myself. So spake he weeping, and thereto the townsfolk added their laments. 22.430. / And among the women of Troy Hecabe led the vehement lamentation:My child, ah woe is me! How shall I live in my sore anguish, now thou art dead?—thou that wast my boast night and day in the city, and a blessing to all, both to the men and women of Troy throughout the town, who ever greeted thee as a god; 22.431. / And among the women of Troy Hecabe led the vehement lamentation:My child, ah woe is me! How shall I live in my sore anguish, now thou art dead?—thou that wast my boast night and day in the city, and a blessing to all, both to the men and women of Troy throughout the town, who ever greeted thee as a god; 22.432. / And among the women of Troy Hecabe led the vehement lamentation:My child, ah woe is me! How shall I live in my sore anguish, now thou art dead?—thou that wast my boast night and day in the city, and a blessing to all, both to the men and women of Troy throughout the town, who ever greeted thee as a god; 22.433. / And among the women of Troy Hecabe led the vehement lamentation:My child, ah woe is me! How shall I live in my sore anguish, now thou art dead?—thou that wast my boast night and day in the city, and a blessing to all, both to the men and women of Troy throughout the town, who ever greeted thee as a god; 22.434. / And among the women of Troy Hecabe led the vehement lamentation:My child, ah woe is me! How shall I live in my sore anguish, now thou art dead?—thou that wast my boast night and day in the city, and a blessing to all, both to the men and women of Troy throughout the town, who ever greeted thee as a god; 22.435. / for verily thou wast to them a glory exceeding great, while yet thou livedst; but now death and fate are come upon thee. 22.436. / for verily thou wast to them a glory exceeding great, while yet thou livedst; but now death and fate are come upon thee. 23.597. / and be a sinner in the eyes of the gods. So spake the son of great-souled Nestor, and led up the mare, and gave her into the hands of Menelaus. And his heart was gladdened even as the corn when with the dew upon the ears it waxeth ripe, what time the fields are bristling. 23.598. / and be a sinner in the eyes of the gods. So spake the son of great-souled Nestor, and led up the mare, and gave her into the hands of Menelaus. And his heart was gladdened even as the corn when with the dew upon the ears it waxeth ripe, what time the fields are bristling. 23.599. / and be a sinner in the eyes of the gods. So spake the son of great-souled Nestor, and led up the mare, and gave her into the hands of Menelaus. And his heart was gladdened even as the corn when with the dew upon the ears it waxeth ripe, what time the fields are bristling. 23.600. / In such wise, Menelaus, was thy heart gladdened in thy breast. Then he spake winged words unto Antilochos, saying:Antilochus, lo now, I of myself cease from mine anger against thee, since nowise flighty or light of wit wast thou of old, albeit now hath thy youth got the better of thy reason. 24.358. / here is somewhat that calls for prudent thought. I see a man, and anon methinks shall we be cut to pieces. Come, let us flee in thie chariot, or at least clasp his knees and entreat him, if so be he will have pity. So spake he, and the old man's mind was confounded and he was sore afraid, and up stood the hair on his pliant limbs, 24.359. / here is somewhat that calls for prudent thought. I see a man, and anon methinks shall we be cut to pieces. Come, let us flee in thie chariot, or at least clasp his knees and entreat him, if so be he will have pity. So spake he, and the old man's mind was confounded and he was sore afraid, and up stood the hair on his pliant limbs, 24.360. / and he stood in a daze. But of himself the Helper drew nigh, and took the ohd man's hand, and made question of him, saying:Whither, Father, dost thou thus guide horses and mules through the immortal night when other mortals are sleeping? Art thou untouched by fear of the fury-breathing Achaeans, 24.540. / Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth, 24.541. / Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth, 24.629. / And Automedon took bread and dealt it forth on the table in fair baskets, while Achilles dealt the meat. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, then verily Priam, son of Dardanus, marvelled at Achilles, how tall he was and how comely; 24.630. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.631. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.632. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.633. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying:
7. Hesiod, Works And Days, 202-208, 210-212, 209 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 156
209. Fair flesh veiled by white robes, shall Probity
8. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 9.18 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 342
9.18. "כִּי קוֹל נְהִי נִשְׁמַע מִצִּיּוֹן אֵיךְ שֻׁדָּדְנוּ בֹּשְׁנוּ מְאֹד כִּי־עָזַבְנוּ אָרֶץ כִּי הִשְׁלִיכוּ מִשְׁכְּנוֹתֵינוּ׃", 9.18. "For a voice of wailing is heard out of Zion: ‘How are we undone! We are greatly confounded, because we have forsaken the land, because our dwellings have cast us out.’",
9. Homer, Odyssey, 1.48, 1.74-1.75, 1.81, 1.161-1.172, 1.179, 1.187, 1.191-1.192, 1.245-1.247, 1.362-1.364, 3.352-3.355, 4.102-4.103, 4.499-4.510, 4.703-4.721, 4.840, 5.149-5.227, 5.233-5.262, 5.394-5.398, 5.463, 6.56, 6.160-6.169, 8.304, 9.64-9.66, 9.256, 9.467, 10.201, 10.209, 10.241, 10.246-10.248, 10.398-10.399, 10.409, 10.454, 10.497-10.499, 10.576-10.578, 11.5, 11.187-11.203, 11.540, 12.234, 12.251-12.255, 12.309-12.311, 13.125-13.164, 13.320, 13.326, 14.175, 14.199-14.206, 15.196-15.197, 15.353-15.360, 16.140-16.145, 17.150, 18.35, 18.84-18.87, 18.100, 18.212, 18.341-18.342, 18.349-18.355, 19.136, 19.172-19.184, 19.204-19.208, 19.263-19.264, 19.603-19.604, 20.8, 20.10, 20.13-20.16, 20.345-20.349, 20.358, 20.374, 20.382-20.383, 20.390, 21.357-21.358, 21.375, 21.377, 22.42, 23.73-23.77, 23.108-23.110, 23.166-23.204, 23.225-23.227, 23.233-23.240, 24.206-24.207, 24.211-24.360, 24.364-24.369, 24.371, 24.374, 24.378, 24.384-24.386, 24.389-24.390, 24.395-24.396, 24.412 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 108, 128, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 143, 144, 145, 146, 715
10. Hesiod, Theogony, 138, 154-210, 467, 489, 558, 868, 874, 605 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 140
605. The better of Lord Zeus – before the rest
11. Sappho, Fragments, 31 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 609, 739
12. Sappho, Fragments, 31 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 609, 739
13. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 32.18 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 342
32.18. "בֶּן־אָדָם נְהֵה עַל־הֲמוֹן מִצְרַיִם וְהוֹרִדֵהוּ אוֹתָהּ וּבְנוֹת גּוֹיִם אַדִּרִם אֶל־אֶרֶץ תַּחְתִּיּוֹת אֶת־יוֹרְדֵי בוֹר׃", 32.18. "’Son of man, wail for the multitude of Egypt, and cast them down, even her, with the daughters of the mighty nations, unto the nether parts of the earth, with them that go down into the pit.",
14. Aeschylus, Persians, 169-171, 168 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 317
168. ἔστι γὰρ πλοῦτός γʼ ἀμεμφής, ἀμφὶ δʼ ὀφθαλμῷ φόβος·
15. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 4.120-4.123 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 138
16. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 1008-1009, 1007 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 317
1007. αἰαῖ αἰαῖ μελέων ἔργων· 1007. Alas! Alas! Sorrowful work! You were done in by a wretched death. Alas! Alas! And for the survivor also suffering blossoms. Orestes
17. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 437
18. Euripides, Medea, 347, 491, 346 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
19. Euripides, Orestes, 98-99 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
20. Euripides, Trojan Women, 100-103, 105-137, 19, 98-99, 104 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 331
21. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.41.1, 2.44, 2.51.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 374, 375
2.41.1. ‘ξυνελών τε λέγω τήν τε πᾶσαν πόλιν τῆς Ἑλλάδος παίδευσιν εἶναι καὶ καθ’ ἕκαστον δοκεῖν ἄν μοι τὸν αὐτὸν ἄνδρα παρ’ ἡμῶν ἐπὶ πλεῖστ᾽ ἂν εἴδη καὶ μετὰ χαρίτων μάλιστ’ ἂν εὐτραπέλως τὸ σῶμα αὔταρκες παρέχεσθαι. 2.51.3. σῶμά τε αὔταρκες ὂν οὐδὲν διεφάνη πρὸς αὐτὸ ἰσχύος πέρι ἢ ἀσθενείας, ἀλλὰ πάντα ξυνῄρει καὶ τὰ πάσῃ διαίτῃ θεραπευόμενα. 2.41.1. In short, I say that as a city we are the school of Hellas ; while I doubt if the world can produce a man, who where he has only himself to depend upon, is equal to so many emergencies, and graced by so happy a versatility as the Athenian. 2.51.3. Strong and weak constitutions proved equally incapable of resistance, all alike being swept away, although dieted with the utmost precaution.
22. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 437
23. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 630 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
24. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 1231 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
25. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1177-1181, 58, 62-64, 747-749, 746 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 317
26. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1236, 91-92, 1237 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
27. Sophocles, Electra, 1027, 45-46, 1028 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
28. Sophocles, Ajax, 983, 583 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
29. Herodotus, Histories, 1.1.4, 1.4, 1.5.2, 1.8.1, 1.8.3, 1.26-1.29, 1.27.5, 1.30.4-1.30.5, 1.31, 1.32.1, 1.32.8, 1.33, 1.34.3, 1.44.1-1.44.2, 1.45.2, 1.46.1, 1.54.1, 1.56.1, 1.85.3, 1.86.3, 1.87.2, 1.87.4, 1.88.1, 1.90.3, 1.112.1, 1.119, 1.123.1, 1.156.2, 1.193.4, 1.196-1.197, 1.199, 1.213, 2.64, 3.11, 3.14, 3.29.1, 3.33, 3.38.4, 3.39.1, 3.53.3, 3.64.3, 3.80.1, 3.81.2, 3.119.7, 3.140.2, 4.36.2, 4.42, 5.12, 5.97.2, 6.43, 6.94.1, 7.5, 7.8, 7.11, 7.45, 7.103.1, 7.105, 7.190, 7.205.2, 7.221, 7.226, 8.62.1, 8.69.2, 8.106.3, 8.112, 9.16.4, 9.108 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 370
1.90.3. Croesus repeated to him the story of all his own aspirations, and the answers of the oracles, and more particularly his offerings, and how the oracle had encouraged him to attack the Persians; and so saying he once more insistently pled that he be allowed to reproach the god for this. At this Cyrus smiled, and replied, “This I will grant you, Croesus, and whatever other favor you may ever ask me.”
30. Isocrates, Orations, 12.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 715
31. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 10-12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
12. εἶναι πανοῦργοι— καὶ γάρ ἐσμεν νὴ Δία.
32. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 292
33. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 338-340 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
340. ἐμοὶ πέπονθας. καὶ γὰρ ᾗ ξύνειμ' ἐγὼ
34. Aristophanes, Birds, 1547-1548 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
1548. νὴ τὸν Δί' ἀεὶ δῆτα θεομισὴς ἔφυς.
35. Plato, Minos, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 437
36. Sophocles, Antigone, 1113 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
37. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 16-20 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 319
38. Lycophron, Alexandra, 931-950, 930 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 188
930. ὁ δʼ ἱπποτέκτων Λαγαρίας ἐν ἀγκάλαις,
39. Timocles Comicus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 292
40. Timocles Comicus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 292
41. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 330
42. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 292
43. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 291
44. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 5.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 136
5.6. "אֱדַיִן מַלְכָּא זִיוֺהִי שְׁנוֹהִי וְרַעיֹנֹהִי יְבַהֲלוּנֵּהּ וְקִטְרֵי חַרְצֵהּ מִשְׁתָּרַיִן וְאַרְכֻבָּתֵהּ דָּא לְדָא נָקְשָׁן׃", 5.6. "Then the king’s countece was changed in him, and his thoughts affrighted him; and the joints of his loins were loosed, and his knees smote one against another.",
45. Cicero, On Old Age, 52-58, 51 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 139
46. Cicero, De Oratore, 3.155 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 137
3.155. Tertius ille modus transferendi verbi late patet, quem necessitas genuit inopia coacta et angustiis, post autem iucunditas delectatioque celebravit. Nam ut vestis frigoris depellendi causa reperta primo, post adhiberi coepta est ad ornatum etiam corporis et dignitatem, sic verbi translatio instituta est inopiae causa, frequentata delectationis. Nam gemmare vitis, luxuriem esse in herbis, laetas segetes etiam rustici dicunt. Quod enim declarari vix verbo proprio potest, id translato cum est dictum, inlustrat id, quod intellegi volumus, eius rei, quam alieno verbo posuimus, similitudo.
47. Ovid, Fasti, 4.393-4.618 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
4.393. Hinc Cereris ludi. non est opus indice causae; 4.394. sponte deae munus promeritumque patet. 4.395. panis erat primis virides mortalibus herbae, 4.396. quas tellus nullo sollicitante dabat; 4.397. et modo carpebant vivax e cespite gramen, 4.398. nunc epulae tenera fronde cacumen erant, 4.399. postmodo glans nata est: bene erat iam glande reperta, 4.400. duraque magnificas quercus habebat opes. 4.401. prima Ceres homine ad meliora alimenta vocato 4.402. mutavit glandes utiliore cibo. 4.403. illa iugo tauros collum praebere coegit: 4.404. tunc primum soles eruta vidit humus. 4.405. aes erat in pretio, chalybeia massa latebat: 4.406. eheu! perpetuo debuit illa tegi. 4.407. pace Ceres laeta est; et vos orate, coloni, 4.408. perpetuam pacem pacificumque ducem, 4.409. farra deae micaeque licet salientis honorem 4.410. detis et in veteres turea grana focos, 4.411. et, si tura aberunt, unctas accendite taedas: 4.412. parva bonae Cereri, sint modo casta, placent, 4.413. a bove succincti cultros removete ministri: 4.414. bos aret; ignavam sacrificate suem. 4.415. apta iugo cervix non est ferienda securi: 4.416. vivat et in dura saepe laboret humo. 4.417. Exigit ipse locus, raptus ut virginis edam: 4.418. plura recognosces, pauca docendus eris. 4.419. terra tribus scopulis vastum procurrit in aequor 4.420. Trinacris, a positu nomen adepta loci, 4.421. grata domus Cereri, multas ea possidet urbes, 4.422. in quibus est culto fertilis Henna solo. 4.423. frigida caelestum matres Arethusa vocarat: 4.424. venerat ad sacras et dea flava dapes. 4.425. filia, consuetis ut erat comitata puellis, 4.426. errabat nudo per sua prata pede. 4.427. valle sub umbrosa locus est aspergine multa 4.428. uvidus ex alto desilientis aquae. 4.429. tot fuerant illic, quot habet natura, colores, 4.430. pictaque dissimili flore nitebat humus. 4.431. quam simul aspexit, comites, accedite dixit 4.432. et mecum plenos flore referte sinus. 4.433. praeda puellares animos prolectat iis, 4.434. et non sentitur sedulitate labor. 4.435. haec implet lento calathos e vimine nexos, 4.436. haec gremium, laxos degravat illa sinus: 4.437. illa legit calthas, huic sunt violaria curae, 4.438. illa papavereas subsecat ungue comas: 4.439. has, hyacinthe, tenes; illas, amarante, moraris: 4.440. pars thyma, pars rorem, pars meliloton amat. 4.441. plurima lecta rosa est, sunt et sine nomine flores; 4.442. ipsa crocos tenues liliaque alba legit, 4.443. carpendi studio paulatim longius itur, 4.444. et dominam casu nulla secuta comes. 4.445. hanc videt et visam patruus velociter aufert 4.446. regnaque caeruleis in sua portat equis, 4.447. illa quidem clamabat ‘io, carissima mater, 4.448. auferor!’ ipsa suos abscideratque sinus: 4.449. panditur interea Diti via, namque diurnum 4.450. lumen inadsueti vix patiuntur equi. 4.451. at chorus aequalis, cumulatis flore canistris, 4.452. Persephone, clamant ad tua dona veni! 4.453. ut clamata silet, montes ululatibus implent 4.454. et feriunt maesta pectora nuda manu. 4.455. attonita est plangore Ceres (modo venerat Hennam) 4.456. nec mora, me miseram! filia, dixit ubi es? 4.457. mentis inops rapitur, quales audire solemus 4.458. Threicias fusis maenadas ire comis, 4.459. ut vitulo mugit sua mater ab ubere rapto 4.460. et quaerit fetus per nemus omne suos: 4.461. sic dea nec retinet gemitus et concita cursu 4.462. fertur et a campis incipit, Henna, tuis. 4.463. inde puellaris nacta est vestigia plantae 4.464. et pressam noto pondere vidit humum; 4.465. forsitan illa dies erroris summa fuisset, 4.466. si non turbassent signa reperta sues. 4.467. iamque Leontinos Ameaque flumina cursu 4.468. praeterit et ripas, herbifer Aci, tuas; 4.469. praeterit et Cyanen et fontes lenis Anapi 4.470. et te, verticibus non adeunde Gela. 4.471. liquerat Ortygien Megareaque Pantagienque, 4.472. quaque Symaetheas accipit aequor aquas, 4.473. antraque Cyclopum positis exusta caminis, 4.474. quique locus curvae nomina falcis habet, 4.475. Himeraque et Didymen Acragantaque Tauromenumque 4.476. sacrarumque Melan pascua laeta boum. 4.477. hinc Cameri adit Thapsonque et Heloria Tempe. 4.478. quaque iacet Zephyro semper apertus Eryx. 4.479. iamque Peloriadem Lilybaeaque, iamque Pachynon 4.480. lustrarat, terrae cornua trina suae. 4.481. quacumque ingreditur, miseris loca cuncta querellis 4.482. implet, ut amissum cum gemit ales Ityn, 4.483. perque vices modo Persephone! modo filia! clamat, 4.484. clamat et alternis nomen utrumque ciet. 4.485. sed neque Persephone Cererem nec filia matrem 4.486. audit, et alternis nomen utrumque perit; 4.487. unaque, pastorem vidisset an arva colentem, 4.488. vox erat hac gressus ecqua puella tufit? 4.489. iam color unus inest rebus, tenebrisque teguntur 4.490. omnia, iam vigiles conticuere canes: 4.491. alta iacet vasti super ora Typhoeos Aetne, 4.492. cuius anhelatis ignibus ardet humus; 4.493. illic accendit geminas pro lampade pinus: 4.494. hinc Cereris sacris nunc quoque taeda datur. 4.495. est specus exesi structura pumicis asper, 4.496. non homini regio, non adeunda ferae: 4.497. quo simul ac venit, frenatos curribus angues 4.498. iungit et aequoreas sicca pererrat aquas, 4.499. effugit et Syrtes et te, Zanclaea Charybdis, 4.500. et vos, Nisaei, naufraga monstra, canes, 4.501. Hadriacumque patens late bimaremque Corinthum: 4.502. sic venit ad portus, Attica terra, tuos. 4.503. hic primum sedit gelido maestissima saxo: 4.504. illud Cecropidae nunc quoque triste vocant. 4.505. sub Iove duravit multis inmota diebus, 4.506. et lunae patiens et pluvialis aquae, 4.507. fors sua cuique loco est: quod nunc Cerialis Eleusin 4.508. dicitur, hoc Celei rura fuere senis. 4.509. ille domum glandes excussaque mora rubetis 4.510. portat et arsuris arida ligna focis. 4.511. filia parva duas redigebat monte capellas, 4.512. et tener in cunis filius aeger erat. 4.513. mater! ait virgo (mota est dea nomine matris) 4.514. quid facis in solis incomitata locis? 4.515. restitit et senior, quamvis onus urget, et orat, 4.516. tecta suae subeat quantulacumque casae. 4.517. illa negat, simularat anum mitraque capillos 4.518. presserat. instanti talia dicta refert: 4.519. ‘sospes eas semperque parens! mihi filia rapta est. 4.520. heu, melior quanto sors tua sorte mea est!’ 4.521. dixit, et ut lacrimae (neque enim lacrimare deorum est) 4.522. decidit in tepidos lucida gutta sinus, 4.523. flent pariter molles animis virgoque senexque; 4.524. e quibus haec iusti verba fuere senis: 4.525. ‘sic tibi, quam raptam quaeris, sit filia sospes, 4.526. surge nec exiguae despice tecta casae.’ 4.527. cui dea duc! inquit scisti, qua cogere posses, 4.528. seque levat saxo subsequiturque senem, 4.529. dux comiti narrat, quam sit sibi filius aeger 4.530. nec capiat somnos invigiletque malis. 4.531. illa soporiferum, parvos initura penates, 4.532. colligit agresti lene papaver humo; 4.533. dum legit, oblito fertur gustasse palato 4.534. longamque imprudens exsoluisse famem. 4.535. quae quia principio posuit ieiunia noctis, 4.536. tempus habent mystae sidera visa cibi. 4.537. limen ut intravit, luctus videt omnia plena: 4.538. iam spes in puero nulla salutis erat. 4.539. matre salutata (mater Metanira vocatur) 4.540. iungere dignata est os puerile suo. 4.541. pallor abit, subitasque vident in corpore vires: 4.542. tantus caelesti venit ab ore vigor. 4.543. tota domus laeta est, hoc est materque paterque 4.544. nataque: tres illi tota fuere domus. 4.545. mox epulas ponunt, liquefacta coagula lacte 4.546. pomaque et in ceris aurea mella suis. 4.547. abstinet alma Ceres somnique papavera causas 4.548. dat tibi cum tepido lacte bibenda, puer. 4.549. noctis erat medium placidique silentia somni: 4.550. Triptolemum gremio sustulit illa suo 4.551. terque manu permulsit eum, tria carmina dixit, 4.552. carmina mortali non referenda sono, 4.553. inque foco corpus pueri vivente favilla 4.554. obruit, humanum purget ut ignis onus. 4.555. excutitur somno stulte pia mater et amens 4.556. quid facis? exclamat membraque ab igne rapit. 4.557. cui dea dum non es dixit ‘scelerata, fuisti: 4.558. inrita materno sunt mea dona metu. 4.559. iste quidem mortalis erit, sed primus arabit 4.560. et seret et culta praemia tollet humo.’ 4.561. dixit et egrediens nubem trahit inque dracones 4.562. transit et alifero tollitur axe Ceres. 4.563. Sunion expositum Piraeaque tuta recessu 4.564. linquit et in dextrum quae iacet ora latus. 4.565. hinc init Aegaeum, quo Cycladas aspicit omnes, 4.566. Ioniumque rapax Icariumque legit, 4.567. perque urbes Asiae longum petit Hellespontum, 4.568. diversumque locis alta pererrat iter. 4.569. nam modo turilegos Arabas, modo despicit Indos, 4.570. hinc Libys, hinc Meroe siccaque terra subest; 4.571. nunc adit Hesperios Rhenum Rhodanumque Padumque 4.572. teque, future parens, Thybri, potentis aquae, 4.573. quo feror? inmensum est erratas dicere terras: 4.574. praeteritus Cereri nullus in orbe locus. 4.575. errat et in caelo liquidique inmunia ponti 4.576. adloquitur gelido proxima signa polo: 4.577. ‘Parrhasides stellae (namque omnia nosse potestis, 4.578. aequoreas numquam cum subeatis aquas), 4.579. Persephonen natam miserae monstrate parenti!’ 4.580. dixerat, huic Helice talia verba refert: 4.581. ‘crimine nox vacua est; Solem de virgine rapta 4.582. consule, qui late facta diurna videt.’ 4.583. Sol aditus quam quaeris, ait ‘ne vana labores, 4.584. nupta Iovis fratri tertia regna tenet.’ 4.585. questa diu secum, sic est adfata Totem, 4.586. maximaque in voltu signa dolentis erant: 4.587. ‘si memor es, de quo mihi sit Proserpina nata, 4.588. dimidium curae debet habere tuae. 4.589. orbe pererrato sola est iniuria facti 4.590. cognita: commissi praemia raptor habet. 4.591. at neque Persephone digna est praedone marito, 4.592. nec gener hoc nobis more parandus erat. 4.593. quid gravius victore Gyge captiva tulissem, 4.594. quam nunc te caeli sceptra tenente tuli? 4.595. verum impune ferat, nos haec patiemur inultae; 4.596. reddat et emendet facta priora novis.’ 4.597. Iuppiter hanc lenit factumque excusat amore, 4.598. nec gener est nobis ille pudendus ait. 4.599. ‘non ego nobilior: posita est mihi regia caelo, 4.600. possidet alter aquas, alter ie chaos, 4.601. sed si forte tibi non est mutabile pectus, 4.602. statque semel iuncti rumpere vincla tori, 4.603. hoc quoque temptemus, siquidem ieiuna remansit; 4.604. si minus, inferni coniugis uxor erit.’ 4.605. Tartara iussus adit sumptis Caducifer alis 4.606. speque redit citius visaque certa refert: 4.607. rapta tribus dixit ‘solvit ieiunia granis, 4.608. Punica quae lento cortice poma tegunt.’ 4.609. non secus indoluit, quam si modo rapta fuisset, 4.610. maesta parens, longa vixque refecta mora est, 4.611. atque ita nec nobis caelum est habitabile dixit; 4.612. Taenaria recipi me quoque valle iube. 4.613. et factura fuit, pactus nisi Iuppiter esset, 4.614. bis tribus ut caelo mensibus illa foret. 4.615. tum demum voltumque Ceres animumque recepit 4.616. imposuitque suae spicea serta comae; 4.617. largaque provenit cessatis messis in arvis, 4.618. et vix congestas area cepit opes. 4.393. Next, the Games of Ceres, there’s no need to say why: 4.394. Obvious: the bounteous promise and gifts of the goddess. 4.395. The bread of primitive humans was made of plants, 4.396. That the earth produced without being asked: 4.397. They sometimes plucked wild grasses from the turf, 4.398. Sometimes tender leaves from the treetops made a meal. 4.399. Later the acorn was known: its discovery was fine, 4.400. Since the sturdy oak offered a rich horde. 4.401. Ceres was first to summon men to a better diet, 4.402. Replacing their acorns with more nourishing food. 4.403. She forced bulls to bow their necks to the yoke: 4.404. So the deep-ploughed soil first saw the light. 4.405. Copper was prized then, iron was still hidden: 4.406. Ah! If only it could have been hidden forever. 4.407. Ceres delights in peace: pray, you farmers, 4.408. Pray for endless peace and a peace-loving leader. 4.409. Honour the goddess with wheat, and dancing salt grains, 4.410. And grains of incense offered on the ancient hearths, 4.411. And if there’s no incense, burn your resinous torches: 4.412. Ceres is pleased with little, if it’s pure in kind. 4.413. You girded attendants lift those knives from the ox: 4.414. Let the ox plough, while you sacrifice the lazy sow, 4.415. It’s not fitting for an axe to strike a neck that’s yoked: 4.416. Let the ox live, and toil through the stubborn soil. 4.417. Now, this part requires me to tell of a virgin’s rape: 4.418. You’ll recognise much you know, but part is new. 4.419. The Trinacrian land took its name from its shape: 4.420. It runs out in three rocky capes to the vast ocean. 4.421. It’s a place dear to Ceres. She owns, there, many cities, 4.422. Among them fertile Enna, with its well-ploughed soul. 4.423. Cool Arethusa gathered together the mothers of the gods: 4.424. And the yellow-haired goddess came to the sacred feast. 4.425. Her daughter, Persephone, attended by girls, as ever, 4.426. Wandered barefoot through Enna’s meadows. 4.427. In a shadow-filled valley there’s a place, 4.428. Wet by the copious spray from a high fall. 4.429. All the colours of nature were displayed there, 4.430. And the earth was bright with hues of various flowers. 4.431. On seeing it she cried: ‘Come here to me, my friends, 4.432. And each carry back, with me, a lapful of flowers.’ 4.433. The foolish prize enticed their girlish spirits, 4.434. And they were too busy to feel weary. 4.435. One filled baskets woven from supple willow, 4.436. Another her lap, the next loose folds of her robe: 4.437. One picked marigolds: another loved violets, 4.438. And one nipped the poppy-heads with her nails: 4.439. Some you tempt, hyacinth: others, amaranth, you delay: 4.440. Others desire thyme, cornflowers or clover. 4.441. Many a rose was taken, and flowers without name: 4.442. Proserpine herself plucked fragile crocuses and white lilies. 4.443. Intent on gathering them, she gradually strayed, 4.444. And none of her friends chanced to follow their lady. 4.445. Dis, her uncle saw her, and swiftly carried her off, 4.446. And bore her on shadowy horses to his realm. 4.447. She called out: ‘Oh, dearest Mother, I’m being 4.448. Carried away!’ and tore at the breast of her robe: 4.449. Meanwhile a path opened for Dis, since his horse 4.450. Can scarcely endure the unaccustomed daylight. 4.451. When her crowd of friends had gathered their flowers, 4.452. They shouted: ‘Persephone, come for your gifts!’ 4.453. But silence met their call: they filled the hills with their cries, 4.454. And sadly beat their naked breasts with their hands. 4.455. Ceres was startled by their grief (she’d just now come from Enna), 4.456. And cried instantly ‘Ah me! Daughter, where are you?’ 4.457. She rushed about, distracted, as we’ve heard 4.458. The Thracian Maenads run with flowing hair. 4.459. As a cow bellows, when her calf’s torn from her udder, 4.460. And goes searching for her child, through the woods, 4.461. So the goddess groaned freely, and ran quickly, 4.462. As she made her way, Enna, from your plains. 4.463. There she found marks of the girlish feet, and saw 4.464. Where her familiar form had printed the ground: 4.465. Perhaps her wandering would have ended that day, 4.466. If wild pigs hadn’t muddied the trail she found. 4.467. She’d already passed Leontini, the river Ameas, 4.468. And your grassy banks, Acis, on her way: 4.469. She’d passed Cyane, the founts of slow Anapus, 4.470. And you, Gelas, with whirlpools to be shunned. 4.471. She’d left Ortygia, Megara and the Pantagias, 4.472. And the place where the sea receives Symaethus’ waves, 4.473. And the caves of Cyclopes, scorched by their forges, 4.474. And the place who’s name’s derived from a curving sickle, 4.475. And Himera, Didyme, Acragas and Tauromenium, 4.476. And the Mylae, that rich pasture for sacred cattle. 4.477. Next she reached Camerina, Thapsus, and Helorus’ Tempe, 4.478. And where Eryx stands, ever open to the Western winds. 4.479. She’d crossed Pelorias, Lilybaeum and Pachynum, 4.480. Those three projecting horns of her land. 4.481. Wherever she set foot, she filled the place with sad cries, 4.482. Like the bird mourning for her lost Itys. 4.483. Alternately she cried: ‘Persephone!’ and ‘My daughter’, 4.484. Calling and shouting both the names in turn, 4.485. But Persephone heard not Ceres, nor the daughter 4.486. Her mother, and both names by turns died away: 4.487. If she spied a shepherd or farmer at work, 4.488. Her cry was: ‘Has a girl passed this way?’ 4.489. Now the colours faded, and the darkness hid 4.490. Everything. Now the wakeful dogs fell silent. 4.491. High Etna stands above vast Typhoeus’ mouth, 4.492. Who scorches the earth with his fiery breath: 4.493. There the goddess lit twin pine branches as torches: 4.494. And since then there are torches handed out at her rites. 4.495. There’s a cave, its interior carved from sharp pumice, 4.496. A place not to be approached by man or beast: 4.497. Reaching it she yoked serpents to her chariot, 4.498. And roamed the ocean waves above the spray. 4.499. She shunned the Syrtes and Zanclaean Charybdis, 4.500. And you, hounds of Scylla, wrecking monsters, 4.501. Shunned the wide Adriatic, and Corinth between two seas: 4.502. And so came to your harbour, country of Attica. 4.503. Here she sat for the first time, mournfully, on cold stone: 4.504. That stone the Athenians named the Sorrowful. 4.505. She lingered many days under the open sky, 4.506. Enduring both the moonlight and the rain. 4.507. Every place has its destiny: What’s now called 4.508. Ceres’ Eleusis was then old Celeus’ farm. 4.509. He was bringing acorns home, and berries he’d picked 4.510. From the briars, and dry wood for the blazing hearth. 4.511. His little daughter was driving two she-goats from the hill, 4.512. While confined in his cradle was a sickly son. 4.513. ‘Mother!’ the girl said (the goddess was moved 4.514. By that word mother) ‘Why are you alone in the wilderness?’ 4.515. The old man stopped too, despite his heavy load, 4.516. And begged her to shelter under his insignificant roof. 4.517. She refused. She was disguised as an old woman, her hair 4.518. Covered with a cap. When he urged her she replied: 4.519. ‘Be happy, and always a father! My daughter’s been 4.520. Stolen from me. Ah, how much better your fate than mine!’ 4.521. She spoke, and a crystal drop (though goddesses cannot weep), 4.522. Like a tear, fell on her warm breast. Those tender hearts, 4.523. The old man and the virgin girl, wept with her: 4.524. And these were the righteous old man’s words: 4.525. ‘Rise, and don’t scorn the shelter of my humble hut, 4.526. And may the lost daughter you mourn be safe and sound.’ 4.527. The goddess said: ‘Lead on! You’ve found what could persuade me’ 4.528. And she rose from the stone and followed the old man. 4.529. Leading, he told his follower, how his son was sick 4.530. Lying there sleepless, kept awake by his illness. 4.531. About to enter the humble house, she plucked 4.532. A tender, sleep-inducing, poppy from the bare ground: 4.533. And as she picked it, they say, unthinkingly, she tasted it, 4.534. And so, unwittingly, eased her long starvation. 4.535. And because she first broke her fast at nightfall, 4.536. Her priests of the Mysteries eat once the stars appear. 4.537. When she crossed the threshold, she saw all were grieving: 4.538. Since they’d lost hope of the child’s recovery. 4.539. Greeting the mother (who was called Metanira) 4.540. The goddess deigned to join her lips to the child’s. 4.541. His pallor fled, his body suddenly seemed healthier: 4.542. Such power flowed out of the goddess’ mouth. 4.543. There was joy in the house, in the father, mother 4.544. And daughter: those three were the whole house. 4.545. They soon set out a meal, curds in whey, 4.546. Apples, and golden honey on the comb. 4.547. Kind Ceres abstained, and gave to the boy 4.548. Poppy seeds in warm milk to make him sleep. 4.549. It was midnight: silent in peaceful slumber, 4.550. The goddess took Triptolemus on her lap, 4.551. Caressed him with her hand three times, and spoke 4.552. Three spells, not to be sounded by mortal tongue, 4.553. And she covered the boy’s body with live ember 4.554. On the hearth, so the fire would purge his mortal burden. 4.555. His good, fond, foolish mother, waking from sleep, 4.556. Crying: ‘What are you doing?’ snatched him from the coals, 4.557. To her the goddess said: ‘Though sinless, you’ve sinned: 4.558. My gift’s been thwarted by a mother’s fear. 4.559. He will still be mortal, but first to plough, 4.560. And sow, and reap a harvest from the soil.’ 4.561. Ceres spoke, and left the house, trailing mist, and crossed 4.562. To her dragons, and was carried away in her winged chariot. 4.563. She left Sunium’s exposed cape behind, and Piraeus’ safe harbour, 4.564. And all that coast that lies towards the west. 4.565. From there she crossed the Aegean, saw all the Cyclades, 4.566. Skimmed the wild Ionian, and the Icarian Sea, 4.567. And, passing through Asia’s cities, sought the long Hellespont, 4.568. And wandered her course, on high, among diverse regions. 4.569. Now she gazed at incense-gathering Arabs, now Ethiopians, 4.570. Beneath her Libya now, now Meroe and the desert lands: 4.571. Then she saw the western rivers, Rhine, Rhone, Po, 4.572. And you, Tiber, parent of a stream full of future power. 4.573. Where, now? Too long to tell of the lands she wandered: 4.574. No place on earth remained unvisited by Ceres. 4.575. She wandered the sky too, and spoke to the constellation 4.576. Those near the chilly pole, free of the ocean waves: 4.577. ‘You Arcadian stars (since you can see all things, 4.578. Never plunging beneath the watery wastes) 4.579. Show this wretched mother, her daughter, Proserpine!’ 4.580. She spoke, and Helice answered her in this way: 4.581. ‘Night’s free of blame: Ask the Light about your 4.582. Stolen daughter: the Sun views, widely, things done by day.’ 4.583. The Sun, asked, said: ‘To save you grief, she whom you seek 4.584. Is married to Jupiter’s brother, and rules the third realm.’ 4.585. After grieving a while, she addressed the Thunderer: 4.586. And there were deep marks of sorrow in her face: 4.587. ‘If you remember by whom I conceived Persephone, 4.588. Half of the care she ought to be shown is yours. 4.589. Wandering the world I’ve learnt only of her wrong: 4.590. While her ravisher is rewarded for his crime. 4.591. But Persephone didn’t deserve a thief as husband: 4.592. It’s not right to have found a son-in-law this way. 4.593. How could I have suffered more, as captive to a conquering 4.594. Gyges, than now, while you hold the sceptre of the heavens? 4.595. Well, let him escape unpunished, I’ll suffer it, un-avenged, 4.596. If he returns her, amending his old actions by the new.’ 4.597. Jupiter soothed her, excusing it as an act of love, 4.598. ‘He’s not a son-in-law who’ll shames us,’ he said, 4.599. ‘I’m no nobler than him: my kingdom’s in the sky, 4.600. Another owns the waters, another the empty void. 4.601. But if your mind is really so set against alteration, 4.602. And you’re determined to break firm marriage bonds, 4.603. Let’s make the attempt, but only if she’s kept her fast: 4.604. If not, she’ll remain the wife of her infernal spouse.’ 4.605. The Messenger God had his orders, and took flight for Tartarus, 4.606. And, back sooner than expected, told what he’d clearly seen: 4.607. ‘The ravished girl,’ he said ‘broke her fast with three seed 4.608. Concealed in the tough rind of a pomegranate.’ 4.609. Her gloomy mother grieved, no less than if her daughter 4.610. Had just been taken, and was a long time recovering even a little. 4.611. Then she said: ‘Heaven’s no place for me to be, either: 4.612. Order that I too may be received by the Taenarian vale.’ 4.613. And so it would have been, if Jupiter hadn’t promised, 4.614. That Persephone should spend six months each year in heaven. 4.615. Then, at last, Ceres recovered her countece and spirits, 4.616. And set garlands, woven from ears of corn, on her hair: 4.617. And the tardy fields delivered a copious harvest, 4.618. And the threshing-floor barely held the heaped sheaves.
48. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.2-5.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
5.2. 2.  Its circumference is some four thousand three hundred and sixty stades; for of its three sides, that extending from Pelorias to Lilybaeum is one thousand seven hundred stades, that from Lilybaeum to Pachynus in the territory of Syracuse is a thousand five hundred, and the remaining side is one thousand one hundred and forty stades.,3.  The Siceliotae who dwell in the island have received the tradition from their ancestors, the report having ever been handed down successively from earliest time by one generation to the next, that the island is sacred to Demeter and Corê; although there are certain poets who recount the myth that at the marriage of Pluton and Persephonê Zeus gave this island as a wedding present to the bride.,4.  That the ancient inhabitants of Sicily, the Sicani, were indigenous, is stated by the best authorities among historians, also that the goddesses we have mentioned first made their appearance on this island, and that it was the first, because of the fertility of the soil, to bring forth the fruit of the corn, facts to which the most renowned of the poets also bears witness when he writes: But all these things grow there for them unsown And e'en untilled, both wheat and barley, yea, And vines, which yield such wine as fine grapes give, And rain of Zeus gives increase unto them. Indeed, in the plain of Leontini, we are told, and throughout many other parts of Sicily the wheat men call "wild" grows even to this day.,5.  And, speaking generally, before the corn was discovered, if one were to raise the question, what manner of land it was of the inhabited earth where the fruits we have mentioned appeared for the first time, the meed of honour may reasonably be accorded to the richest land; and in keeping with what we have stated, it is also to be observed that the goddesses who made this discovery are those who receive the highest honours among the Siceliotae. 5.3. 1.  Again, the fact that the Rape of Corê took place in Sicily is, men say, proof most evident that the goddesses made this island their favourite retreat because it was cherished by them before all others.,2.  And the Rape of Corê, the myth relates, took place in the meadows in the territory of Enna. The spot lies near the city, a place of striking beauty for its violets and every other kind of flower and worthy of the goddess. And the story is told that, because of the sweet odour of the flowers growing there, trained hunting dogs are unable to hold the trail, because their natural sense of smell is balked. And the meadow we have mentioned is level in the centre and well watered throughout, but on its periphery it rises high and falls off with precipitous cliffs on every side. And it is conceived of as lying in the very centre of the island, which is the reason why certain writers call it the navel of Sicily.,3.  Near to it also are sacred groves, surrounded by marshy flats, and a huge grotto which contains a chasm which leads down into the earth and opens to the north, and through it, the myth relates, Pluton, coming out with his chariot, effected the Rape of Corê. And the violets, we are told, and the rest of the flowers which supply the sweet odour continue to bloom, to one's amazement, throughout the entire year, and so the whole aspect of the place is one of flowers and delight.,4.  And both Athena and Artemis, the myth goes on to say, who had made the same choice of maidenhood as had Corê and were reared together with her, joined with her in gathering the flowers, and all of them together wove the robe for their father Zeus. And because of the time they had spent together and their intimacy they all loved this island above any other, and each one of them received for her portion a territory, Athena receiving hers in the region of Himera, where the Nymphs, to please Athena, caused the springs of warm water to gush forth on the occasion of the visit of Heracles to the island, and the natives consecrated a city to her and a plot of ground which to this day is called Athena's.,5.  And Artemis received from the gods the island at Syracuse which was named after her, by both the oracles and men, Ortygia. On this island likewise these Nymphs, to please Artemis, caused a great fountain to gush forth to which was given the name Arethusa.,6.  And not only in ancient times did this fountain contain large fish in great numbers, but also in our own day we find these fish still there, considered to be holy and not to be touched by men; and on many occasions, when certain men have eaten them amid stress of war, the deity has shown a striking sign, and has visited with great sufferings such as dared to take them for food. of these matters we shall give an exact account in connection with the appropriate period of time. 5.4. 1.  Like the two goddesses whom we have mentioned Corê, we are told, received as her portion the meadows round about Enna; but a great fountain was made sacred to her in the territory of Syracuse and given the name Cyanê or "Azure Fount.",2.  For the myth relates that it was near Syracuse that Pluton effected the Rape of Corê and took her away in his chariot, and that after cleaving the earth asunder he himself descended into Hades, taking along with him the bride whom he had seized, and that he caused the fountain named Cyanê to gush forth, near which the Syracusans each year hold a notable festive gathering; and private individuals offer the lesser victims, but when the ceremony is on behalf of the community, bulls are plunged in the pool, this manner of sacrifice having been commanded by Heracles on the occasion when he made the circuit of all Sicily, while driving off the cattle of Geryones.,3.  After the Rape of Corê, the myth does on to recount, Demeter, being unable to find her daughter, kindled torches in the craters of Mt. Aetna and visited many parts of the inhabited world, and upon the men who received her with the greatest favour she conferred briefs, rewarding them with the gift of the fruit of the wheat.,4.  And since a more kindly welcome was extended the goddess by the Athenians than by any other people, they were the first after the Siceliotae to be given the fruit of the wheat; and in return for this gift the citizens of that city in assembly honoured the goddess above all others with the establishment both of most notable sacrifices and of the mysteries of Eleusis, which, by reason of their very great antiquity and sanctity, have come to be famous among all mankind. From the Athenians many peoples received a portion of the gracious gift of the corn, and they in turn, sharing the gift of the seed with their neighbours, in this way caused all the inhabited world to abound with it.,5.  And the inhabitants of Sicily, since by reason of the intimate relationship of Demeter and Corê with them they were the first to share in the corn after its discovery, instituted to each one of the goddesses sacrifices and festive gatherings, which they named after them, and by the time chosen for these made acknowledgement of the gifts which had been conferred upon them.,6.  In the case of Corê, for instance, they established the celebration of her return at about the time when the fruit of the corn was found to come to maturity, and they celebrate this sacrifice and festive gathering with such strictness of observance and such zeal as we should reasonably expect those men to show who are returning thanks for having been selected before all mankind for the greatest possible gift;,7.  but in the case of Demeter they preferred that time for the sacrifice when the sowing of the corn is first begun, and for a period of ten days they hold a festive gathering which bears the name of this goddess and is most magnificent by reason of the brilliance of their preparation for it, while in the observance of it they imitate the ancient manner of life. And it is their custom during these days to indulge in coarse language as they associate one with another, the reason being that by such coarseness the goddess, grieved though she was at the Rape of Corê, burst into laughter. 5.5. 1.  That the Rape of Corê took place in the manner we have described is attested by many ancient historians and poets. Carcinus the tragic poet, for instance, who often visited in Syracuse and witnessed the zeal which the inhabitants displayed in the sacrifices and festive gatherings for both Demeter and Corê, has the following verses in his writings: Demeter's daughter, her whom none may name, By secret schemings Pluton, men say, stole, And then he dropped into earth's depths, whose light Is darkness. Longing for the vanished girl Her mother searched and visited all lands In turn. And Sicily's land by Aetna's crags Was filled with streams of fire which no man could Approach, and groaned throughout its length; in grief Over the maiden now the folk, beloved of Zeus, was perishing without the corn. Hence honour they these goddesses e'en now. ,2.  But we should not omit to mention the very great benefaction which Demeter conferred upon mankind; for beside the fact that she was the discoverer of corn, she also taught mankind how to prepare it for food and introduced laws by obedience to which men became accustomed to the practice of justice, this being the reason, we are told, why she has been given the epithet Thesmophoros or Lawgiver.,3.  Surely a benefaction greater than these discoveries of hers one could not find; for they embrace both living and living honourably. However, as for the myths which are current among the Siceliotae, we shall be satisfied with what has been said.
49. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.341-5.661 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
5.341. “Prima Ceres unco glaebam dimovit aratro, 5.342. prima dedit fruges alimentaque mitia terris, 5.343. prima dedit leges: Cereris sunt omnia munus. 5.344. Illa canenda mihi est. Utinam modo dicere possem 5.345. carmina digna dea: certe dea carmine digna est. 5.346. Vasta giganteis ingesta est insula membris 5.347. Trinacris et magnis subiectum molibus urget 5.348. aetherias ausum sperare Typhoea sedes. 5.349. Nititur ille quidem pugnatque resurgere saepe, 5.350. dextra sed Ausonio manus est subiecta Peloro, 5.351. laeva, Pachyne, tibi, Lilybaeo crura premuntur, 5.352. degravat Aetna caput: sub qua resupinus harenas 5.353. eiectat flammamque ferox vomit ore Typhoeus. 5.354. Saepe remoliri luctatur pondera terrae 5.355. oppidaque et magnos devolvere corpore montes. 5.356. Inde tremit tellus, et rex pavet ipse silentum, 5.357. ne pateat latoque solum retegatur hiatu 5.358. inmissusque dies trepidantes terreat umbras. 5.359. Hanc metuens cladem tenebrosa sede tyrannus 5.360. exierat, curruque atrorum vectus equorum 5.361. ambibat Siculae cautus fundamina terrae. 5.362. Postquam exploratum satis est loca nulla labare, 5.363. depositoque metu, videt hunc Erycina vagantem 5.364. monte suo residens, natumque amplexa volucrem 5.365. “arma manusque meae, mea, nate, potentia”, dixit, 5.366. “illa, quibus superas omnes, cape tela, Cupido, 5.367. inque dei pectus celeres molire sagittas, 5.368. cui triplicis cessit fortuna novissima regni. 5.369. Tu superos ipsumque Iovem tu numina ponti 5.370. victa domas ipsumque, regit qui numina ponti. 5.371. Tartara quid cessant? cur non matrisque tuumque 5.372. imperium profers? agitur pars tertia mundi. 5.373. Et tamen in caelo, quae iam patientia nostra est, 5.374. spernimur, ac mecum vires minuuntur Amoris. 5.375. Pallada nonne vides iaculatricemque Dianam 5.376. abscessisse mihi? Cereris quoque filia virgo, 5.377. si patiemur, erit: nam spes adfectat easdem. 5.378. At tu, pro socio, siqua est ea gratia, regno 5.379. iunge deam patruo.” Dixit Venus. Ille pharetram 5.380. solvit et arbitrio matris de mille sagittis 5.381. unam seposuit, sed qua nec acutior ulla 5.382. nec minus incerta est nec quae magis audiat arcus, 5.383. oppositoque genu curvavit flexile cornum 5.384. inque cor hamata percussit harundine Ditem. 5.385. Haud procul Hennaeis lacus est a moenibus altae, 5.386. nomine Pergus, aquae. Non illo plura Caystros 5.387. carmina cycnorum labentibus audit in undis. 5.388. Silva coronat aquas cingens latus omne, suisque 5.389. frondibus ut velo Phoebeos submovet ictus. 5.390. Frigora dant rami, tyrios humus umida flores: 5.391. perpetuum ver est. Quo dum Proserpina luco 5.392. ludit et aut violas aut candida lilia carpit, 5.393. dumque puellari studio calathosque sinumque 5.394. implet et aequales certat superare legendo, 5.395. paene simul visa est dilectaque raptaque Diti: 5.396. usque adeo est properatus amor. Dea territa maesto 5.397. et matrem et comites, sed matrem saepius, ore 5.398. clamat; et, ut summa vestem laniarat ab ora, 5.399. conlecti flores tunicis cecidere remissis. 5.400. Tantaque simplicitas puerilibus adfuit annis, 5.401. haec quoque virgineum movit iactura dolorem. 5.402. Raptor agit currus et nomine quemque vocando 5.403. exhortatur equos, quorum per colla iubasque 5.404. excutit obscura tinctas ferrugine habenas, 5.405. perque lacus altos et olentia sulphure fertur 5.406. stagna Palicorum, rupta fervenu terra, 5.407. et qua Bacchiadae, bimari gens orta Corintho, 5.408. inter inaequales posuerunt moenia portus. 5.409. Est medium Cyanes et Pisaeae Arethusae, 5.410. quod coit angustis inclusum cornibus aequor. 5.411. Hic fuit, a cuius stagnum quoque nomine dictum est, 5.412. inter Sicelidas Cyane celeberrima nymphas. 5.413. Gurgite quae medio summa tenus exstitit alvo 5.414. agnovitque deam. “Nec longius ibitis!” inquit, 5.415. “non potes invitae Cereris gener esse: roganda, 5.416. non rapienda fuit. Quodsi componere magnis 5.417. parva mihi fas est, et me dilexit Anapis: 5.418. exorata tamen, nec, ut haec, exterrita nupsi.” 5.419. Dixit et in partes diversas bracchia tendens 5.420. obstitit. Haud ultra tenuit Saturnius iram, 5.421. terribilesque hortatus equos in gurgitis ima 5.422. contortum valido sceptrum regale lacerto 5.423. condidit. Icta viam tellus in Tartara fecit 5.424. et pronos currus medio cratere recepit. 5.425. At Cyane, raptamque deam contemptaque fontis 5.426. iura sui maerens, inconsolabile vulnus 5.427. mente gerit tacita lacrimisque absumitur omnis, 5.428. et quarum fuerat magnum modo numen, in illas 5.429. ossa pati flexus, ungues posuisse rigorem; 5.430. extenuatur aquas. Molliri membra videres, 5.431. primaque de tota tenuissima quaeque liquescunt, 5.432. caerulei crines digitique et crura pedesque: 5.433. nam brevis in gelidas membris exilibus undas 5.434. transitus est: post haec umeri tergusque latusque 5.435. pectoraque in tenues abeunt evanida rivos. 5.436. Denique pro vivo vitiatas sanguine venas 5.437. lympha subit, restatque nihil, quod prendere possis. 5.438. Interea pavidae nequiquam filia matri 5.439. omnibus est terris, omni quaesita profundo. 5.440. Illam non udis veniens Aurora capillis 5.441. cessantem vidit, non Hesperus. Illa duabus 5.442. flammiferas pinus manibus succendit ab Aetna 5.443. perque pruinosas tulit inrequieta tenebras. 5.444. Rursus ubi alma dies hebetarat sidera, natam 5.445. solis ab occasu solis quaerebat ad ortus. 5.446. Fessa labore sitim conlegerat oraque nulli 5.447. colluerant fontes; cum tectam stramine vidit 5.448. forte casam parvasque fores pulsavit: at inde 5.449. prodit anus divamque videt, lymphamque roganti 5.450. dulce dedit, tosta quod texerat ante polenta. 5.451. Dum bibit illa datum, duri puer oris et audax 5.452. constitit ante deam risitque avidamque vocavit. 5.453. offensa est neque adhuc epota parte loquentem 5.454. cum liquido mixta perfudit diva polenta. 5.455. Combibit os maculas, et quae modo bracchia gessit, 5.456. crura gerit; cauda est mutatis addita membris; 5.457. inque brevem formam, ne sit vis magna nocendi, 5.458. contrahitur, parvaque minor mensura lacerta est. 5.459. Mirantem flentemque et tangere monstra parantem 5.460. fugit anum latebramque petit; aptumque colori 5.461. nomen habet, variis stellatus corpora guttis. 5.462. Quas dea per terras et quas erraverit undas, 5.463. dicere longa mora est: quaerenti defuit orbis. 5.464. Sicaniam repetit; dumque omnia lustrat eundo, 5.465. venit et ad Cyanen. Ea ni mutata fuisset, 5.466. omnia narrasset: sed et os et lingua volenti 5.467. dicere non aderant, nec quo loqueretur habebat. 5.468. Signa tamen manifesta dedit notamque parenti, 5.469. illo forte loco delapsam in gurgite sacro, 5.470. Persephones zonam summis ostendit in undis. 5.471. Quam simul agnovit, tamquam tunc denique raptam 5.472. scisset, inornatos laniavit diva capillos 5.473. et repetita suis percussit pectora palmis. 5.474. Nescit adhuc, ubi sit: terras tamen increpat omnes 5.475. ingratasque vocat nec frugum munere dignas, 5.476. Trinacriam ante alias, in qua vestigia damni 5.477. repperit. Ergo illic saeva vertentia glaebas 5.478. fregit aratra manu, parilique irata colonos 5.479. ruricolasque boves leto dedit arvaque iussit 5.480. fallere depositum vitiataque semina fecit. 5.481. Fertilitas terrae latum vulgata per orbem 5.482. falsa iacet: primis segetes moriuntur in herbis, 5.483. et modo sol nimius, nimius modo corripit imber 5.484. sideraque ventique nocent, avidaeque volucres 5.485. semina iacta legunt; lolium tribulique fatigant 5.486. triticeas messes et inexpugnabile gramen. 5.487. Tum caput Eleis Alpheias extulit undis 5.488. rorantesque comas a fronte removit ad aures 5.489. atque ait: “O toto quaesitae virginis orbe 5.490. et frugum genetrix, inmensos siste labores 5.491. neve tibi fidae violenta irascere terrae. 5.492. Terra nihil meruit patuitque invita rapinae. 5.493. Nec sum pro patria supplex: huc hospita veni; 5.494. Pisa mihi patria est et ab Elide ducimus ortus; 5.495. Sicaniam peregrina colo, sed gratior omni 5.496. haec mihi terra solo est: hos nunc Arethusa penates, 5.497. hanc habeo sedem: quam tu, mitissima, serva. 5.498. Mota loco cur sim tantique per aequoris undas 5.499. advehar Ortygiam, veniet narratibus hora 5.500. tempestiva meis, cum tu curaque levata 5.501. et vultus melioris eris. Mihi pervia tellus 5.502. praebet iter, subterque imas ablata cavernas 5.503. hic caput attollo desuetaque sidera cerno. 5.504. Ergo dum Stygio sub terris gurgite labor, 5.505. visa tua est oculis illic Proserpina nostris: 5.506. illa quidem tristis neque adhuc interrita vultu, 5.507. sed regina tamen, sed opaci maxima mundi, 5.508. sed tamen inferni pollens matrona tyranni.” 5.509. Mater ad auditas stupuit ceu saxea voces 5.510. attonitaeque diu similis fuit. Utque dolore 5.511. pulsa gravi gravis est amentia, curribus oras 5.512. exit in aetherias. Ibi toto nubila vultu 5.513. ante Iovem passis stetit invidiosa capillis 5.514. “pro” que “meo veni supplex tibi, Iuppiter” inquit, 5.515. “sanguine proque tuo. Si nulla est gratia matris, 5.516. nata patrem moveat, neu sit tibi cura, precamur, 5.517. vilior illius, quod nostro est edita partu. 5.518. En quaesita diu tandem mihi nata reperta est, 5.519. si reperire vocas amittere certius, aut si 5.520. scire, ubi sit, reperire vocas. Quod rapta, feremus, 5.521. dummodo reddat eam: neque enim praedone marito 5.522. filia digna tua est, si iam mea filia non est.” 5.523. Iuppiter excepit: “Commune est pignus onusque 5.524. nata mihi tecum. Sed si modo nomina rebus 5.525. addere vera placet, non hoc iniuria factum, 5.526. verum amor est; neque erit nobis gener ille pudori, 5.527. tu modo, diva, velis. Ut desint cetera, quantum est 5.528. esse Iovis fratrem! — Quid quod non cetera desunt 5.529. nec cedit nisi sorte mihi? sed tanta cupido 5.530. si tibi discidii est, repetet Proserpina caelum, 5.531. lege tamen certa, si nullos contigit illic 5.532. ore cibos; nam sic Parcarum foedere cautum est.” 5.533. Dixerat. At Cereri certum est educere natam. 5.534. Non ita fata sinunt, quoniam ieiunia virgo 5.535. solverat et, cultis dum simplex errat in hortis, 5.536. Poeniceum curva decerpserat arbore pomum 5.537. sumptaque pallenti septem de cortice grana 5.538. presserat ore suo. Solusque ex omnibus illud 5.539. Ascalaphus vidit, quem quondam dicitur Orphne, 5.540. inter Avernales haud ignotissima nymphas, 5.541. ex Acheronte suo silvis peperisse sub atris: 5.542. vidit et indicio reditum crudelis ademit. 5.543. Ingemuit regina Erebi testemque profanam 5.544. fecit avem, sparsumque caput Phlegethontide lympha 5.545. in rostrum et plumas et grandia lumina vertit. 5.546. Ille sibi ablatus fulvis amicitur in alis, 5.547. inque caput crescit, longosque reflectitur ungues 5.548. vixque movet natas per inertia bracchia pennas: 5.549. foedaque fit volucris, venturi nuntia luctus, 5.550. ignavus bubo, dirum mortalibus omen. 5.551. Hic tamen indicio poenam linguaque videri 5.552. commeruisse potest: vobis, Acheloides, unde 5.553. pluma pedesque avium, cum virginis ora geratis? 5.554. an quia, cum legeret vernos Proserpina flores, 5.555. in comitum numero, doctae Sirenes, eratis? 5.556. Quam postquam toto frustra quaesistis in orbe, 5.557. protinus, ut vestram sentirent aequora curam, 5.558. posse super fluctus alarum insistere remis 5.559. optastis, facilesque deos habuistis et artus 5.560. vidistis vestros subitis flavescere pennis. 5.561. Ne tamen ille canor mulcendas natus ad aures 5.562. tantaque dos oris linguae deperderet usum, 5.563. virginei vultus et vox humana remansit. 5.564. At medius fratrisque sui maestaeque sororis 5.565. Iuppiter ex aequo volventem dividit annum. 5.566. Nunc dea, regnorum numen commune duorum, 5.567. cum matre est totidem, totidem cum coniuge menses. 5.568. Vertitur extemplo facies et mentis et oris: 5.569. nam modo quae poterat Diti quoque maesta videri, 5.570. laeta deae frons est, ut sol, qui tectus aquosis 5.571. nubibus ante fuit, victis e nubibus exit. 5.572. Exigit alma Ceres, nata secura recepta, 5.573. quae tibi causa fugae, cur sis, Arethusa, sacer fons. 5.574. Conticuere undae: quarum dea sustulit alto 5.575. fonte caput viridesque manu siccata capillos 5.576. fluminis Elei veteres narravit amores. 5.577. “Pars ego nympharum quae sunt in Achaide” dixit, 5.578. “una fui, nec me studiosius altera saltus 5.579. legit nec posuit studiosius altera casses. 5.580. Sed quamvis formae numquam mihi fama petita est, 5.581. quamvis fortis eram, formosae nomen habebam. 5.582. Nec mea me facies nimium laudata iuvabat, 5.583. quaque aliae gaudere solent, ego rustica dote 5.584. corporis erubui, crimenque placere putavi. 5.585. Lassa revertebar (memini) Stymphalide silva: 5.586. aestus erat, magnumque labor geminaverat aestum. 5.587. Invenio sine vertice aquas, sine murmure euntes, 5.588. perspicuas ad humum, per quas numerabilis alte 5.589. calculus omnis erat, quas tu vix ire putares. 5.590. Cana salicta dabant nutritaque populus unda 5.591. sponte sua natas ripis declivibus umbras. 5.592. Accessi primumque pedis vestigia tinxi, 5.593. poplite deinde tenus: neque eo contenta, recingor 5.594. molliaque impono salici velamina curvae 5.595. nudaque mergor aquis. Quas dum ferioque trahoque 5.596. mille modis labens excussaque bracchia iacto, 5.597. nescio quod medio sensi sub gurgite murmur 5.598. territaque insisto propioris margine ripae. 5.599. “Quo properas, Arethusa?” suis Alpheus ab undis, 5.600. “quo properas?” iterum rauco mihi dixerat ore. 5.601. Sicut eram, fugio sine vestibus: altera vestes 5.602. ripa meas habuit. Tanto magis instat et ardet, 5.603. et quia nuda fui, sum visa paratior illi. 5.604. Sic ego currebam, sic me ferus ille premebat, 5.605. ut fugere accipitrem penna trepidante columbae, 5.606. ut solet accipiter trepidas urgere columbas. 5.607. Usque sub Orchomenon Psophidaque Cyllenenque 5.608. Maenaliosque sinus gelidumque Erymanthon et Elin 5.609. currere sustinui; nec me velocior ille. 5.610. Sed tolerare diu cursus ego, viribus impar, 5.611. non poteram: longi patiens erat ille laboris. 5.612. Per tamen et campos, per opertos arbore montes, 5.613. saxa quoque et rupes et qua via nulla, cucurri. 5.614. Sol erat a tergo: vidi praecedere longam 5.615. ante pedes umbram, nisi si timor illa videbat; 5.616. sed certe sonitusque pedum terrebat et ingens 5.617. crinales vittas adflabat anhelitus oris. 5.618. Fessa labore fugae “fer opem, deprendimur” inquam, 5.619. “armigerae, Diana, tuae, cui saepe dedisti 5.620. ferre tuos arcus inclusaque tela pharetra.” 5.621. Mota dea est spissisque ferens e nubibus unam 5.622. me super iniecit. Lustrat caligine tectam 5.623. amnis et ignarus circum cava nubila quaerit. 5.624. Bisque locum, quo me dea texerat inscius ambit 5.625. et bis “io Arethusa io Arethusa!” vocavit. 5.626. Quid mihi tunc animi miserae fuit? anne quod agnae est, 5.627. siqua lupos audit circum stabula alta frementes, 5.628. aut lepori, qui vepre latens hostilia cernit 5.629. ora canum nullosque audet dare corpore motus? 5.630. Non tamen abscedit: neque enim vestigia cernit 5.631. longius ulla pedum: servat nubemque locumque. 5.632. Occupat obsessos sudor mihi frigidus artus, 5.633. caeruleaeque cadunt toto de corpore guttae, 5.634. quaque pedem movi, manat lacus, eque capillis 5.635. ros cadit, et citius, quam nunc tibi facta renarro, 5.636. in latices mutor. Sed enim cognoscit amatas 5.637. amnis aquas, positoque viri, quod sumpserat, ore 5.638. vertitur in proprias, ut se mihi misceat, undas. 5.639. Delia rupit humum; caecisque ego mersa cavernis 5.640. advehor Ortygiam, quae me cognomine divae 5.641. grata meae superas eduxit prima sub auras.” 5.642. Hac Arethusa tenus. Geminos dea fertilis angues 5.643. curribus admovit frenisque coercuit ora 5.644. et medium caeli terraeque per aera vecta est 5.645. atque levem currum Tritonida misit in urbem 5.646. Triptolemo; partimque rudi data semina iussit 5.647. spargere humo, partim post tempora longa recultae. 5.648. Iam super Europen sublimis et Asida terram 5.649. vectus erat iuvenis; Scythicas advertitur oras. 5.650. Rex ibi Lyncus erat: regis subit ille penates. 5.651. Qua veniat, causamque viae nomenque rogatus 5.652. et patriam, “patria est clarae mihi” dixit “Athenae, 5.653. Triptolemus nomen. Veni nec puppe per undas, 5.654. nec pede per terras: patuit mihi pervius aether. 5.655. Dona fero Cereris latos quae sparsa per agros 5.656. frugiferas messes alimentaque mitia reddant.” 5.657. Barbarus invidit; tantique ut muneris auctor 5.658. ipse sit, hospitio recipit somnoque gravatum 5.659. adgreditur ferro. Cotem figere pectus 5.660. lynca Ceres fecit rursusque per aera iussit 5.661. Mopsopium iuvenem sacros agitare iugales.”
50. Catullus, Poems, 51.1-51.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 739
51. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.134, 4.169, 4.194, 4.198-4.394, 4.408-4.412, 4.439-4.450, 6.77-6.80, 12.64-12.69 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 565, 669, 672
4.134. daughter of Saturn, unto Venus turned 4.169. in sylvan shades unhappy Dido gives 4.194. At last, with numerous escort, forth she shines: 4.198. meet in a golden clasp. To greet her come 4.199. the noble Phrygian guests; among them smiles 4.200. the boy Iulus; and in fair array 4.201. Aeneas, goodliest of all his train. 4.202. In such a guise Apollo (when he leaves 4.203. cold Lycian hills and Xanthus ' frosty stream 4.204. to visit Delos to Latona dear) 4.205. ordains the song, while round his altars cry 4.206. the choirs of many islands, with the pied, 4.207. fantastic Agathyrsi; soon the god 4.208. moves o'er the Cynthian steep; his flowing hair 4.209. he binds with laurel garland and bright gold; 4.210. upon his shining shoulder as he goes 4.211. the arrows ring:—not less uplifted mien 4.212. aeneas wore; from his illustrious brow 4.213. uch beauty shone. Soon to the mountains tall 4.214. the cavalcade comes nigh, to pathless haunts 4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen, 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 4.218. are routed deer, that scour the spreading plain, 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight, 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills, 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy , 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line, 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may, 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven, 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn, 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell, 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues, 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud, 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers, 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong, 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears, 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come, 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way, 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease, 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 4.279. the filthy goddess spread; and soon she hied 4.280. to King Iarbas, where her hateful song 4.282. Him the god Ammon got by forced embrace 4.283. upon a Libyan nymph; his kingdoms wide 4.284. possessed a hundred ample shrines to Jove, 4.285. a hundred altars whence ascended ever 4.286. the fires of sacrifice, perpetual seats 4.287. for a great god's abode, where flowing blood 4.288. enriched the ground, and on the portals hung 4.289. garlands of every flower. The angered King, 4.290. half-maddened by maligt Rumor's voice, 4.291. unto his favored altars came, and there, 4.292. urrounded by the effluence divine, 4.293. upraised in prayer to Jove his suppliant hands. 4.294. “Almighty Jupiter, to whom each day, 4.295. at banquet on the painted couch reclined, 4.296. Numidia pours libation! Do thine eyes 4.297. behold us? Or when out of yonder heaven, 4.298. o sire, thou launchest the swift thunderbolt, 4.299. is it for naught we fear thee? Do the clouds 4.300. hoot forth blind fire to terrify the soul 4.301. with wild, unmeaning roar? O, Iook upon 4.302. that woman, who was homeless in our realm, 4.303. and bargained where to build her paltry town, 4.304. receiving fertile coastland for her farms, 4.305. by hospitable grant! She dares disdain 4.306. our proffered nuptial vow. She has proclaimed 4.307. Aeneas partner of her bed and throne. 4.308. And now that Paris, with his eunuch crew, 4.309. beneath his chin and fragrant, oozy hair 4.310. ties the soft Lydian bonnet, boasting well 4.311. his stolen prize. But we to all these fanes, 4.312. though they be thine, a fruitless offering bring, 4.314. As thus he prayed and to the altars clung, 4.315. th' Omnipotent gave ear, and turned his gaze 4.316. upon the royal dwelling, where for love 4.317. the amorous pair forgot their place and name. 4.318. Then thus to Mercury he gave command: 4.319. “Haste thee, my son, upon the Zephyrs call, 4.320. and take thy winged way! My mandate bear 4.321. unto that prince of Troy who tarries now 4.322. in Tyrian Carthage, heedless utterly 4.323. of empire Heaven-bestowed. On winged winds 4.324. hasten with my decrees. Not such the man 4.325. his beauteous mother promised; not for this 4.326. twice did she shield him from the Greeks in arms: 4.327. but that he might rule Italy , a land 4.328. pregt with thrones and echoing with war; 4.329. that he of Teucer's seed a race should sire, 4.330. and bring beneath its law the whole wide world. 4.331. If such a glory and event supreme 4.332. enkindle not his bosom; if such task 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap 4.337. of enemies, considering no more 4.338. the land Lavinian and Ausonia's sons. 4.339. Let him to sea! Be this our final word: 4.341. He spoke. The god a prompt obedience gave 4.342. to his great sire's command. He fastened first 4.343. those sandals of bright gold, which carry him 4.344. aloft o'er land or sea, with airy wings 4.345. that race the fleeting wind; then lifted he 4.346. his wand, wherewith he summons from the grave 4.347. pale-featured ghosts, or, if he will, consigns 4.348. to doleful Tartarus; or by its power 4.349. gives slumber or dispels; or quite unseals 4.350. the eyelids of the dead: on this relying, 4.351. he routs the winds or cleaves th' obscurity 4.352. of stormful clouds. Soon from his flight he spied 4.353. the summit and the sides precipitous 4.354. of stubborn Atlas, whose star-pointing peak 4.355. props heaven; of Atlas, whose pine-wreathed brow 4.356. is girdled evermore with misty gloom 4.357. and lashed of wind and rain; a cloak of snow 4.358. melts on his shoulder; from his aged chin 4.359. drop rivers, and ensheathed in stiffening ice 4.360. glitters his great grim beard. Here first was stayed 4.361. the speed of Mercury's well-poising wing; 4.362. here making pause, from hence he headlong flung 4.363. his body to the sea; in motion like 4.364. ome sea-bird's, which along the levelled shore 4.365. or round tall crags where rove the swarming fish, 4.366. flies Iow along the waves: o'er-hovering so 4.367. between the earth and skies, Cyllene's god 4.368. flew downward from his mother's mountain-sire, 4.369. parted the winds and skimmed the sandy merge 4.370. of Libya . When first his winged feet 4.371. came nigh the clay-built Punic huts, he saw 4.372. Aeneas building at a citadel, 4.373. and founding walls and towers; at his side 4.374. was girt a blade with yellow jaspers starred, 4.375. his mantle with the stain of Tyrian shell 4.376. flowed purple from his shoulder, broidered fair 4.377. by opulent Dido with fine threads of gold, 4.378. her gift of love; straightway the god began: 4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall, 4.381. build her proud city? Hast thou, shameful loss! 4.382. Forgot thy kingdom and thy task sublime? 4.383. From bright Olympus , I. He who commands 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.392. Iulus in his bloom, thy hope and heir 4.393. Ascanius. It is his rightful due 4.394. in Italy o'er Roman lands to reign.” 4.408. at this resolve: he summoned to his side 4.409. Mnestheus, Sergestus, and Serestus bold, 4.410. and bade them fit the fleet, all silently 4.411. gathering the sailors and collecting gear, 4.412. but carefully dissembling what emprise 4.439. If Troy still stood, and if thou wert not bound 4.440. for alien shore unknown, wouldst steer for Troy 4.441. through yonder waste of waves? Is it from me 4.442. thou takest flight? O, by these flowing tears, 4.443. by thine own plighted word (for nothing more 4.444. my weakness left to miserable me), 4.445. by our poor marriage of imperfect vow, 4.446. if aught to me thou owest, if aught in me 4.447. ever have pleased thee—O, be merciful 4.448. to my low-fallen fortunes! I implore, 4.449. if place be left for prayer, thy purpose change! 4.450. Because of thee yon Libyan savages 6.77. On great Achilles! Thou hast guided me 6.78. Through many an unknown water, where the seas 6.79. Break upon kingdoms vast, and to the tribes 6.80. of the remote Massyli, whose wild land 12.64. who even now thy absence daily mourns 12.65. in Ardea , his native land and thine.” 12.66. But to this pleading Turnus' frenzied soul 12.67. yields not at all, but rather blazes forth 12.68. more wildly, and his fever fiercer burns 12.69. beneath the healer's hand. In answer he,
52. Vergil, Georgics, 1.75, 2.363-2.364 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 137
1.75. aut tenuis fetus viciae tristisque lupini 2.363. parcendum teneris, et dum se laetus ad auras 2.364. palmes agit laxis per purum inmissus habenis,
53. Propertius, Elegies, 12, 15, 1 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 738
54. Longinus, On The Sublime, 1.4, 3.5, 7.2, 8.2-8.4, 9.8, 10.3, 10.5, 13.2, 15.1, 15.3, 16.2, 20.2, 32.7, 39.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 604, 609
55. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 6.3.82 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, including fearful emotions of pity and grief Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 291
56. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 6.3.82 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, including fearful emotions of pity and grief Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 291
57. Statius, Thebais, 8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 668
58. Plutarch, Solon, 21.4-21.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 376
21.4. ἐπέστησε δὲ καὶ ταῖς ἐξόδοις τῶν γυναικῶν καὶ τοῖς πένθεσι καὶ ταῖς ἑορταῖς νόμον ἀπείργοντα τὸ ἄτακτον καὶ ἀκόλαστον· ἐξιέναι μὲν ἱματίων τριῶν μὴ πλέον ἔχουσαν κελεύσας, μηδὲ βρωτὸν ἢ ποτὸν πλείονος ἢ ὀβολοῦ φερομένην, μηδὲ κάνητα πηχυαίου μείζονα, μηδὲ νύκτωρ πορεύεσθαι πλὴν ἁμάξῃ κομιζομένην λύχνου προφαίνοντος. ἀμυχὰς δὲ κοπτομένων καὶ τὸ θρηνεῖν πεποιημένα καὶ τὸ κωκύειν ἄλλον ἐν ταφαῖς ἑτέρων ἀφεῖλεν. 21.5. ἐναγίζειν δὲ βοῦν οὐκ εἴασεν, οὐδὲ συντιθέναι πλέον ἱματίων τριῶν, οὐδʼ ἐπʼ ἀλλότρια μνήματα βαδίζειν χωρὶς ἐκκομιδῆς. ὧν τὰ πλεῖστα καὶ τοῖς ἡμετέροις νόμοις ἀπηγόρευται· πρόσκειται δὲ τοῖς ἡμετέροις ζημιοῦσθαι τοὺς τὰ τοιαῦτα ποιοῦντας ὑπὸ τῶν γυναικονόμων, ὡς ἀνάνδροις καὶ γυναικώδεσι τοῖς περὶ τὰ πένθη πάθεσι καὶ ἁμαρτήμασιν ἐνεχομένους. 21.4. He also subjected the public appearances of the women, their mourning and their festivals, to a law which did away with disorder and licence. When they went out, they were not to wear more than three garments, they were not to carry more than an obol’s worth of food or drink, nor a pannier more than a cubit high, and they were not to travel about by night unless they rode in a wagon with a lamp to light their way. Laceration of the flesh by mourners, and the use of set lamentations, and the bewailing of any one at the funeral ceremonies of another, he forbade. 21.5. The sacrifice of an ox at the grave was not permitted, nor the burial with the dead of more than three changes of raiment, nor the visiting of other tombs than those of their own family, except at the time of interment. Most of these practices are also forbidden by our laws, but ours contain the additional proviso that such offenders shall be punished by the board of censors for women, because they indulge in unmanly and effeminate extravagances of sorrow when they mourn
59. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.19 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, including fearful emotions of pity and grief Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 291
60. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.16 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 656
4.16. δεομένων δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων τοῦ λόγου τούτου καὶ φιληκόως ἐχόντων αὐτοῦ “ἀλλ' οὐχὶ βόθρον” εἶπεν “̓Οδυσσέως ὀρυξάμενος, οὐδὲ ἀρνῶν αἵματι ψυχαγωγήσας ἐς διάλεξιν τοῦ ̓Αχιλλέως ἦλθον, ἀλλ' εὐξάμενος, ὁπόσα τοῖς ἥρωσιν ̓Ινδοί φασιν εὔχεσθαι, “ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ,” ἔφην “τεθνάναι σε οἱ πολλοὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων φασίν, ἐγὼ δὲ οὐ ξυγχωρῶ τῷ λόγῳ, οὐδὲ Πυθαγόρας σοφίας ἐμῆς πρόγονος. εἰ δὴ ἀληθεύομεν, δεῖξον ἡμῖν τὸ σεαυτοῦ εἶδος, καὶ γὰρ ἂν ὄναιο ἄγαν τῶν ἐμῶν ὀφθαλμῶν, εἰ μάρτυσιν αὐτοῖς τοῦ εἶναι χρήσαιο.” ἐπὶ τούτοις σεισμὸς μὲν περὶ τὸν κολωνὸν βραχὺς ἐγένετο, πεντάπηχυς δὲ νεανίας ἀνεδόθη Θετταλικὸς τὴν χλαμύδα, τὸ δὲ εἶδος οὐκ ἀλαζών τις ἐφαίνετο, ὡς ἐνίοις ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς δοκεῖ, δεινός τε ὁρώμενος οὐκ ἐξήλλαττε τοῦ φαιδροῦ, τὸ δὲ κάλλος οὔπω μοι δοκεῖ ἐπαινέτου ἀξίου ἐπειλῆφθαι καίτοι ̔Ομήρου πολλὰ ἐπ' αὐτῷ εἰπόντος, ἀλλὰ ἄρρητον εἶναι καὶ καταλύεσθαι μᾶλλον ὑπὸ τοῦ ὑμνοῦντος ἢ παραπλησίως ἑαυτῷ ᾅδεσθαι. ὁρώμενος δέ, ὁπόσον εἶπον, μείζων ἐγίγνετο καὶ διπλάσιος καὶ ὑπὲρ τοῦτο, δωδεκάπηχυς γοῦν ἐφάνη μοι, ὅτε δὴ τελεώτατος ἑαυτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ τὸ κάλλος ἀεὶ ξυνεπεδίδου τῷ μήκει. τὴν μὲν δὴ κόμην οὐδὲ κείρασθαί ποτε ἔλεγεν, ἀλλὰ ἄσυλον φυλάξαι τῷ Σπερχειῷ, ποταμῶν γὰρ πρώτῳ Σπερχειῷ χρήσασθαι, τὰ γένεια δ' αὐτῷ πρώτας ἐκβολὰς εἶχε. προσειπὼν δέ με “ἀσμένως” εἶπεν “ἐντετύχηκά σοι, πάλαι δεόμενος ἀνδρὸς τοιῦδε: Θετταλοὶ γὰρ τὰ ἐναγίσματα χρόνον ἤδη πολὺν ἐκλελοίπασί μοι, καὶ μηνίειν μὲν οὔπω ἀξιῶ, μηνίσαντος γὰρ ἀπολοῦνται μᾶλλον ἢ οἱ ἐνταῦθά ποτε ̔́Ελληνες, ξυμβουλίᾳ δὲ ἐπιεικεῖ χρῶμαι, μὴ ὑβρίζειν σφᾶς ἐς τὰ νόμιμα, μηδὲ κακίους ἐλέγχεσθαι τουτωνὶ τῶν Τρώων, οἳ τοσούσδε ἄνδρας ὑπ' ἐμοῦ ἀφαιρεθέντες δημοσίᾳ τε θύουσί μοι καὶ ὡραίων ἀπάρχονται καὶ ἱκετηρίαν τιθέμενοι σπονδὰς αἰτοῦσιν, ἃς ἐγὼ οὐ δώσω: τὰ γὰρ ἐπιορκηθέντα τούτοις ἐπ' ἐμὲ οὐκ ἐάσει τὸ ̓́Ιλιόν ποτε τὸ ἀρχαῖον ἀναλαβεῖν εἶδος, οὐδὲ τυχεῖν ἀκμῆς, ὁπόση περὶ πολλὰς τῶν καθῃρημένων ἐγένετο, ἀλλ' οἰκήσουσιν αὐτὸ βελτίους οὐδὲν ἢ εἰ χθὲς ἥλωσαν. ἵν' οὖν μὴ καὶ τὰ Θετταλῶν ἀποφαίνω ὅμοια, πρέσβευε παρὰ τὸ κοινὸν αὐτῶν ὑπὲρ ὧν εἶπον.” “πρεσβεύσω”, ἔφην “ὁ γὰρ νοῦς τῆς πρεσβείας ἦν μὴ ἀπολέσθαι αὐτούς. ἀλλ' ἐγώ τί σου, ̓Αχιλλεῦ, δέομαι.” “ξυνίημι”, ἔφη “δῆλος γὰρ εἶ περὶ τῶν Τρωικῶν ̔ἐρωτήσων': ἐρώτα δὲ λόγους πέντε, οὓς αὐτός τε βούλει καὶ Μοῖραι ξυγχωροῦσιν.” ἠρόμην οὖν πρῶτον, εἰ κατὰ τὸν τῶν ποιητῶν λόγον ἔτυχε τάφου. “κεῖμαι μέν,” εἶπεν “ὡς ἔμοιγε ἥδιστον καὶ Πατρόκλῳ ἐγένετο, ξυνέβημεν γὰρ δὴ κομιδῇ νέοι, ξυνέχει δὲ ἄμφω χρυσοῦς ἀμφορεὺς κειμένους, ὡς ἕνα. Μουσῶν δὲ θρῆνοι καὶ Νηρηίδων, οὓς ἐπ' ἐμοὶ γενέσθαι φασί, Μοῦσαι μὲν οὐδ' ἀφίκοντό ποτε ἐνταῦθα, Νηρηίδες δὲ ἔτι φοιτῶσι.” μετὰ ταῦτα δὲ ἠρόμην, εἰ ἡ Πολυξένη ἐπισφαγείη αὐτῷ, ὁ δὲ ἀληθὲς μὲν ἔφη τοῦτο εἶναι, σφαγῆναι δὲ αὐτὴν οὐχ ὑπὸ τῶν ̓Αχαιῶν, ἀλλ' ἑκοῦσαν ἐπὶ τὸ σῆμα ἐλθοῦσαν καὶ τὸν ἑαυτῆς τε κἀκείνου ἔρωτα μεγάλων ἀξιῶσαι προσπεσοῦσαν ξίφει ὀρθῷ. τρίτον ἠρόμην: ἡ ̔Ελένη, ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ, ἐς Τροίαν ἦλθεν ἢ ̔Ομήρῳ ἔδοξεν ὑποθέσθαι ταῦτα;” “πολὺν” ἔφη “χρόνον ἐξηπατώμεθα πρεσβευόμενοί τε παρὰ τοὺς Τρῶας καὶ ποιούμενοι τὰς ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς μάχας, ὡς ἐν τῷ ̓Ιλίῳ οὔσης, ἡ δ' Αἴγυπτὸν τε ᾤκει καὶ τὸν Πρωτέως οἶκον ἁρπασθεῖσα ὑπὸ τοῦ Πάριδος. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐπιστεύθη τοῦτο, ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς τῆς Τροίας λοιπὸν ἐμαχόμεθα, ὡς μὴ αἰσχρῶς ἀπέλθοιμεν.” ἡψάμην καὶ τετάρτης ἐρωτήσεως καὶ θαυμάζειν ἔφην, εἰ τοσούσδε ὁμοῦ καὶ τοιούσδε ἄνδρας ἡ ̔Ελλὰς ἤνεγκεν, ὁπόσους ̔́Ομηρος ἐπὶ τὴν Τροίαν ξυντάττει. ὁ δὲ ̓Αχιλλεὺς “οὐδὲ οἱ βάρβαροι” ἔφη “πολὺ ἡμῶν ἐλείποντο, οὕτως ἡ γῆ πᾶσα ἀρετῆς ἤνθησε.” πέμπτον δ' ἠρόμην: τί παθὼν ̔́Ομηρος τὸν Παλαμήδην οὐκ οἶδεν, ἢ οἶδε μέν, ἐξαιρεῖ δὲ τοῦ περὶ ὑμῶν λόγου; “εἰ Παλαμήδης” εἶπεν “ἐς Τροίαν οὐκ ἦλθεν, οὐδὲ Τροία ἐγένετο: ἐπεὶ δὲ ἀνὴρ σοφώτατός τε καὶ μαχιμώτατος ἀπέθανεν, ὡς ̓Οδυσσεῖ ἔδοξεν, οὐκ ἐσάγεται αὐτὸν ἐς τὰ ποιήματα ̔́Ομηρος, ὡς μὴ τὰ ὀνείδη τοῦ ̓Οδυσσέως ᾅδοι.” καὶ ἐπολοφυράμενος αὐτῷ ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς ὡς μεγίστῳ τε καὶ καλλίστῳ νεωτάτῳ τε καὶ πολεμικωτάτῳ σωφροσύνῃ τε ὑπερβαλομένῳ πάντας καὶ πολλὰ ξυμβαλομένῳ ταῖς Μούσαις “ἀλλὰ σύ,” ἔφη “̓Απολλώνιε, σοφοῖς γὰρ πρὸς σοφοὺς ἐπιτήδεια, τοῦ τε τάφου ἐπιμελήθητι καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα τοῦ Παλαμήδους ἀνάλαβε φαύλως ἐρριμμένον: κεῖται δὲ ἐν τῇ Αἰολίδι κατὰ Μήθυμναν τὴν ἐν Λέσβῳ.” ταῦτα εἰπὼν καὶ ἐπὶ πᾶσι τὰ περὶ τὸν νεανίαν τὸν ἐκ Πάρου ἀπῆλθε ξὺν ἀστραπῇ μετρίᾳ, καὶ γὰρ δὴ καὶ ἀλεκτρυόνες ἤδη ᾠδῆς ἥπτοντο. 4.16. Therest of the company also besought him to tell them all about it, and as they were in a mood to listen to him, he said: Well, it was not by digging a ditch like Odysseus, nor by tempting souls with the blood of sheep, that I obtained a conversation with Achilles; but I offered up the prayer which the Indians say they use in approaching their heroes. “O Achilles,' I said, “most of mankind declare that you are dead, but I cannot agree with them, nor can Pythagoras, my spiritual ancestor. If then we hold the truth, show to us your own form; for you would profit not a little by showing yourself to my eyes, if you should be able to use them to attest your existence.” Thereupon a slight earthquake shook the neighborhood of the barrow, and a youth issued forth five cubits high, wearing a cloak ofThessalian fashion; but in appearance he was by no means the braggart figure which some imagine Achilles to have been. Though he was stern to look upon, he had never lost his bright look; and it seems to me that his beauty has never received its meed of praise, even though Homer dwelt at length upon it; for it was really beyond the power of words, and it is easier for the singer to ruin his fame in this respect than to praise him as he deserved. At first sight he was of the size which I have mentioned, but he grew bigger, till he was twice as large and even more than that; at any rate he appeared to me to be twelve cubits high just at that moment when he reached his complete stature, and his beauty grew apace with his length. He told me then that he had never at any time shorn off his hair, bit preserved it to inviolate for the river Spercheus, for this was the river of his first intimacy; but on his cheeks you saw the first down.And he addressed me and said: “I am pleased to have met you, since I have long wanted a man like yourself. For the Thessalians for a long time past have failed to present their offerings to my tomb, and I do not yet wish to show my wrath against them; for if I did so, they would perish more thoroughly than ever the Hellenes did on this spot; accordingly I resort to gentle advice, and would warn them not to violate ancient custom, nor to prove themselves worse men than the Trojans here, who though they were robbed of so many of their heroes by myself, yet sacrifice publicly to me, and also give me the tithes of their fruits of season, and olive branch in hand ask for a truce from my hostility. But this I will not grant, for the perjuries which they committed against me will not suffer Ilium ever to resume its pristine beauty, nor to regain the prosperity which yet has favored many a city that was destroyed of old; nay, if they rebuild it, things shall go as hard with them as if their city had been captured only yesterday. In order then to save me from bringing the Thessalian polity then to the same condition, you must go as my envoy to their council in behalf of the object I have mentioned.” “I will be your envoy,” I replied, “for the object of my embassy were to save them from ruin. But, O Achilles, I would ask something of you.” “I understand,” said he, “for it is plain you are going to ask about the Trojan war. So ask me five questions about whatever you like, and that the Fates approve of.” I accordingly asked him firstly, if he had obtained burial in accordance with the story of the poets. “I lie here,” he answered, “as was most delightful to myself and Patroclus; for you know we met in mere youth, and a single golden jar holds the remains of both of us, as if we were one. But as for the dirges of the Muses and Nereids, which they say are sung over me, the Muses, I may tell you, never once came here at all, though the Nereids still resort to the spot.” Next I asked him, if Polyxena was really slaughtered over his tomb; and he replied that this was true, but that she was not slain by the Achaeans, but that she came of her own free will to the sepulcher, and that so high was the value she set on her passion for him and she for her, that she threw herself upon an upright sword. The third questions was this: “Did Helen, O Achilles, really come to Troy or was it Homer that was pleased to make up the story?' “For a long time,” he replied, “we were deceived and tricked into sending envoys to the Trojans and fighting battles in her behalf, in the belief that she was in Ilium, whereas she really was living in Egypt and in the house of Proteus, whither she had been snatched away by Paris. But when we became convinced thereof, we continued to fight to win Troy itself, so as not to disgrace ourselves by retreat.” The fourth question which I ventured upon was this: “I wonder,” I said, “that Greece ever produced at any one time so many and such distinguished heroes as Homer says were gathered against Troy.' But Achilles answered: “Why even the barbarians did not fall far short of us, so abundantly then did excellence flourish all over the earth.” And my fifth question was this: “Why was it that Homer knew nothing about Palamedes, or if he knew him, then kept him out of your story?' “If Palamedes,' he answered, “never came to Troy, then Troy never existed either. But since this wisest and most warlike hero fell in obedience to Odysseus' whim, Homer does not introduce him into his poems, lest he should have to record the shame of Odysseus in his song.” And withal Achilles raised a wail over him as over one who was the greatest and most beautiful of men, the youngest and also the most warlike, one who in sobriety surpassed all others, and had often foregathered with the Muses. “But you,” he added, “O Apollonius, since sages have a tender regard for one another, you must care for his tomb and restore the image of Palamedes that has been so contemptuously cast aside; and it lies in Aeolis close to Methymna in Lesbos.' Wit these words and with the closing remarks concerning the youth from Paros, Achilles vanished with a flash of summer lightning, for indeed the cocks were already beginning their chant.
61. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 33.36, 45.6-45.8, 46.2, 48.6, 48.8-48.9, 48.11, 48.18-48.19, 48.21-48.22, 51.3-51.4, 56.11, 57.15, 57.17 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 656, 662
62. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 1.11 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, including fearful emotions of pity and grief Found in books: Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 291
63. Philostratus, Pictures, 2.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 709
64. Nilus of Ancyra, Narrationes Septem De Monachis In Sina, 1.3, 2.2, 2.6, 4.7, 4.9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 689
65. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 5.565-5.621, 6.1-6.168 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 668
66. Claudianus, De Raptu Prosperine, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 670
67. Epigraphy, Ig, 12.5.593  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 376
68. Bacchylides, Odes, 5.86-5.88  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 139
69. Various, Anthologia Latina, 5.78  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 738
70. Epigraphy, Ig I , None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 377
71. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
72. Hugo Grotius, Erotopaegnia, 10-11, 3, 5, 8-9, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 732
73. Hebrew Bible, '1 Sam., 18.1-18.3, 18.20, 19.1  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 346
74. Hebrew Bible, '2 Sam., 1.26, 13.1, 18.33-19.8, 22.5, 22.6, 22.7, 22.17, 22.20  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 346
75. Hebrew Bible, '1 Kings, 19.4-19.9  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
76. Hermogenes, On Forms, 1.12.7-1.12.8, 1.12.11-1.12.39  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 715
77. Epigraphy, Cid I, 9.19  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 376
78. Procopius of Gaza, Ekphrasis Eikonos, 36  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 709
79. Eustathios, On The Odyssey, 4.102-4.103, 12.251-12.255, 18.37  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 714, 715
80. Eustathios, On The Iliad, 2.198-2.199, 6.399, 8.368-8.370, 11.627, 15.634-15.636, 18.474-18.482, 23.153-23.154  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 714, 715
81. Anon., Cypria (Fragmenta), 1  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, grief Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 184
82. Anon., Scholia In Homeri Iliadem, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 714
83. Orphic Hymns., Argonautica, 1186-1187, 1189-1196, 17-31, 1188  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667