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89 results for "emotions"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 16.9, 62.1, 73.21, 131.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 340, 341
16.9. "לָכֵן שָׂמַח לִבִּי וַיָּגֶל כְּבוֹדִי אַף־בְּשָׂרִי יִשְׁכֹּן לָבֶטַח׃", 62.1. "לַמְנַצֵּחַ עַל־יְדוּתוּן מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד׃", 62.1. "אַךְ הֶבֶל בְּנֵי־אָדָם כָּזָב בְּנֵי אִישׁ בְּמֹאזְנַיִם לַעֲלוֹת הֵמָּה מֵהֶבֶל יָחַד׃", 73.21. "כִּי יִתְחַמֵּץ לְבָבִי וְכִלְיוֹתַי אֶשְׁתּוֹנָן׃", 131.2. "אִם־לֹא שִׁוִּיתִי וְדוֹמַמְתִּי נַפְשִׁי כְּגָמֻל עֲלֵי אִמּוֹ כַּגָּמֻל עָלַי נַפְשִׁי׃", 16.9. "Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth; my flesh also dwelleth in safety;", 62.1. "For the Leader; for Jeduthun. A Psalm of David.", 73.21. "For my heart was in a ferment, And I was pricked in my reins. .", 131.2. "Surely I have stilled and quieted my soul; Like a weaned child with his mother; My soul is with me like a weaned child.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Job, 32.2-32.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 340
32.2. "אֲדַבְּרָה וְיִרְוַח־לִי אֶפְתַּח שְׂפָתַי וְאֶעֱנֶה׃", 32.2. "וַיִּחַר אַף אֱלִיהוּא בֶן־בַּרַכְאֵל הַבּוּזִי מִמִּשְׁפַּחַת רָם בְּאִיּוֹב חָרָה אַפּוֹ עַל־צַדְּקוֹ נַפְשׁוֹ מֵאֱלֹהִים׃", 32.3. "וּבִשְׁלֹשֶׁת רֵעָיו חָרָה אַפּוֹ עַל אֲשֶׁר לֹא־מָצְאוּ מַעֲנֶה וַיַּרְשִׁיעוּ אֶת־אִיּוֹב׃", 32.2. "Then was kindled the wrath of Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite, of the family of Ram; against Job was his wrath kindled, because he justified himself rather than God.", 32.3. "Also against his three friends was his wrath kindled, because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.5, 23.2, 27.38, 29.11, 37.35, 45.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
4.5. "וְאֶל־קַיִן וְאֶל־מִנְחָתוֹ לֹא שָׁעָה וַיִּחַר לְקַיִן מְאֹד וַיִּפְּלוּ פָּנָיו׃", 23.2. "וַיָּקָם הַשָּׂדֶה וְהַמְּעָרָה אֲשֶׁר־בּוֹ לְאַבְרָהָם לַאֲחֻזַּת־קָבֶר מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־חֵת׃", 23.2. "וַתָּמָת שָׂרָה בְּקִרְיַת אַרְבַּע הִוא חֶבְרוֹן בְּאֶרֶץ כְּנָעַן וַיָּבֹא אַבְרָהָם לִסְפֹּד לְשָׂרָה וְלִבְכֹּתָהּ׃", 27.38. "וַיֹּאמֶר עֵשָׂו אֶל־אָבִיו הַבְרָכָה אַחַת הִוא־לְךָ אָבִי בָּרֲכֵנִי גַם־אָנִי אָבִי וַיִּשָּׂא עֵשָׂו קֹלוֹ וַיֵּבְךְּ׃", 29.11. "וַיִּשַּׁק יַעֲקֹב לְרָחֵל וַיִּשָּׂא אֶת־קֹלוֹ וַיֵּבְךְּ׃", 37.35. "וַיָּקֻמוּ כָל־בָּנָיו וְכָל־בְּנֹתָיו לְנַחֲמוֹ וַיְמָאֵן לְהִתְנַחֵם וַיֹּאמֶר כִּי־אֵרֵד אֶל־בְּנִי אָבֵל שְׁאֹלָה וַיֵּבְךְּ אֹתוֹ אָבִיו׃", 45.14. "וַיִּפֹּל עַל־צַוְּארֵי בִנְיָמִן־אָחִיו וַיֵּבְךְּ וּבִנְיָמִן בָּכָה עַל־צַוָּארָיו׃", 4.5. "but unto Cain and to his offering He had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countece fell.", 23.2. "And Sarah died in Kiriatharba—the same is Hebron—in the land of Canaan; and Abraham came to mourn for Sarah, and to weep for her.", 27.38. "And Esau said unto his father: ‘Hast thou but one blessing, my father? bless me, even me also, O my father.’ And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept.", 29.11. "And Jacob kissed Rachel, and lifted up his voice, and wept.", 37.35. "And all his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted; and he said: ‘Nay, but I will go down to the grave to my son mourning.’ And his father wept for him.", 45.14. "And he fell upon his brother Benjamin’s neck, and wept; and Benjamin wept upon his neck.",
4. Hebrew Bible, Nahum, 2.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 136
2.10. "Take ye the spoil of silver, take the spoil of gold; For there is no end of the store, Rich with all precious vessels.",
5. Hebrew Bible, Jonah, 4.5-4.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
4.5. "וַיֵּצֵא יוֹנָה מִן־הָעִיר וַיֵּשֶׁב מִקֶּדֶם לָעִיר וַיַּעַשׂ לוֹ שָׁם סֻכָּה וַיֵּשֶׁב תַּחְתֶּיהָ בַּצֵּל עַד אֲשֶׁר יִרְאֶה מַה־יִּהְיֶה בָּעִיר׃", 4.6. "וַיְמַן יְהוָה־אֱלֹהִים קִיקָיוֹן וַיַּעַל מֵעַל לְיוֹנָה לִהְיוֹת צֵל עַל־רֹאשׁוֹ לְהַצִּיל לוֹ מֵרָעָתוֹ וַיִּשְׂמַח יוֹנָה עַל־הַקִּיקָיוֹן שִׂמְחָה גְדוֹלָה׃", 4.7. "וַיְמַן הָאֱלֹהִים תּוֹלַעַת בַּעֲלוֹת הַשַּׁחַר לַמָּחֳרָת וַתַּךְ אֶת־הַקִּיקָיוֹן וַיִּיבָשׁ׃", 4.8. "וַיְהִי כִּזְרֹחַ הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ וַיְמַן אֱלֹהִים רוּחַ קָדִים חֲרִישִׁית וַתַּךְ הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ עַל־רֹאשׁ יוֹנָה וַיִּתְעַלָּף וַיִּשְׁאַל אֶת־נַפְשׁוֹ לָמוּת וַיֹּאמֶר טוֹב מוֹתִי מֵחַיָּי׃", 4.9. "וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים אֶל־יוֹנָה הַהֵיטֵב חָרָה־לְךָ עַל־הַקִּיקָיוֹן וַיֹּאמֶר הֵיטֵב חָרָה־לִי עַד־מָוֶת׃", 4.11. "וַאֲנִי לֹא אָחוּס עַל־נִינְוֵה הָעִיר הַגְּדוֹלָה אֲשֶׁר יֶשׁ־בָּהּ הַרְבֵּה מִשְׁתֵּים־עֶשְׂרֵה רִבּוֹ אָדָם אֲשֶׁר לֹא־יָדַע בֵּין־יְמִינוֹ לִשְׂמֹאלוֹ וּבְהֵמָה רַבָּה׃", 4.5. "Then Jonah went out of the city, and sat on the east side of the city, and there made him a booth, and sat under it in the shadow, till he might see what would become of the city.", 4.6. "And the LORD God prepared a gourd, and made it to come up over Jonah, that it might be a shadow over his head, to deliver him from his evil. So Jonah was exceeding glad because of the gourd.", 4.7. "But God prepared a worm when the morning rose the next day, and it smote the gourd, that it withered.", 4.8. "And it came to pass, when the sun arose, that God prepared a vehement east wind; and the sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and requested for himself that he might die, and said: ‘It is better for me to die than to live.’", 4.9. "And God said to Jonah: ‘Art thou greatly angry for the gourd?’ And he said: ‘I am greatly angry, even unto death.’", 4.10. "And the LORD said: ‘Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow, which came up in a night, and perished in a night;", 4.11. "and should not I have pity on Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand, and also much cattle?’",
6. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 3.4, 4.9 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 341
3.4. "וְאֵת שְׁתֵּי הַכְּלָיֹת וְאֶת־הַחֵלֶב אֲשֶׁר עֲלֵהֶן אֲשֶׁר עַל־הַכְּסָלִים וְאֶת־הַיֹּתֶרֶת עַל־הַכָּבֵד עַל־הַכְּלָיוֹת יְסִירֶנָּה׃", 4.9. "וְאֵת שְׁתֵּי הַכְּלָיֹת וְאֶת־הַחֵלֶב אֲשֶׁר עֲלֵיהֶן אֲשֶׁר עַל־הַכְּסָלִים וְאֶת־הַיֹּתֶרֶת עַל־הַכָּבֵד עַל־הַכְּלָיוֹת יְסִירֶנָּה׃", 3.4. "and the two kidneys, and the fat that is on them, which is by the loins, and the lobe above the liver, which he shall take away hard by the kidneys.", 4.9. "and the two kidneys, and the fat that is upon them, which is by the loins, and the lobe above the liver, which he shall take away by kidneys,",
7. Hesiod, Theogony, 120-122, 138, 154-210, 214, 221-223, 225, 270-336, 433, 438, 453-506, 521-735, 770, 820-880, 926, 941, 63 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 154
63. And rest from sorrow. For nine nights she lay
8. Homer, Iliad, 1.1-1.305, 1.528, 2.76-2.77, 2.155-2.278, 2.698-2.709, 3.39, 3.164, 3.395, 3.442-3.446, 4.30-4.54, 4.336-4.363, 5.304, 5.349, 5.406-5.415, 6.52-6.60, 6.138, 6.329-6.330, 6.492-6.493, 7.436-7.463, 9.52, 9.158-9.161, 9.186-9.191, 9.251-9.259, 9.312, 9.413, 9.433, 9.497, 9.558-9.560, 9.646-9.653, 10.93-10.95, 10.374-10.377, 11.404-11.410, 11.604, 11.656-11.658, 11.814-11.815, 12.230-12.250, 13.29, 13.769, 15.140-15.141, 15.346-15.349, 16.5, 16.17, 16.21-16.47, 16.49-16.100, 16.112-16.129, 17.645-17.647, 18.22-18.24, 18.31, 18.108-18.110, 18.203-18.229, 18.322, 19.54-19.55, 19.125, 20.293-20.317, 20.353, 20.381-20.382, 21.98, 21.114, 21.136, 21.146, 21.212, 21.233-21.271, 21.305-21.307, 21.390, 21.441-21.460, 21.595-21.607, 22.7-22.20, 22.98-22.131, 22.159-22.161, 23.490-23.491, 24.49, 24.358-24.360, 24.480-24.484, 24.503-24.504, 24.516, 24.629-24.633 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 31, 32, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 115, 116, 135, 136, 145, 146, 182, 183, 190, 214, 216, 217, 374, 473, 474, 480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 487, 488, 489, 490, 615, 637, 650, 653, 654, 655, 658, 660, 662
1.1. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 1.2. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 1.3. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 1.4. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 1.5. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 1.5. / from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, 1.6. / from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, 1.7. / from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, 1.8. / from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, 1.9. / from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, 1.10. / because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, 1.11. / because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, 1.12. / because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, 1.13. / because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, 1.14. / because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, 1.15. / but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.16. / but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.17. / but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.18. / but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.19. / but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.20. / out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.21. / out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.22. / out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.23. / out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.24. / out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.25. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, 1.26. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, 1.27. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, 1.28. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, 1.29. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, 1.30. / as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.31. / as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.32. / as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.33. / as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.34. / as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. So he spoke, and the old man was seized with fear and obeyed his word. He went forth in silence along the shore of the loud-resounding sea, and earnestly then, when he had gone apart, the old man prayed 1.35. / to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats, 1.36. / to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats, 1.37. / to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats, 1.38. / to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats, 1.39. / to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats, 1.40. / fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.41. / fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.42. / fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.43. / fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.44. / fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.45. / The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs, 1.46. / The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs, 1.47. / The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs, 1.48. / The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs, 1.49. / The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs, 1.50. / but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart, 1.51. / but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart, 1.52. / but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart, 1.53. / but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart, 1.54. / but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart, 1.55. / since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death, 1.56. / since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death, 1.57. / since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death, 1.58. / since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death, 1.59. / since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death, 1.60. / if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.61. / if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.62. / if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.63. / if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.64. / if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.65. / in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.66. / in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.67. / in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.68. / in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. / in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before, 1.70. / and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.71. / and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.72. / and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. / and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.74. / and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.75. / Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.76. / Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. / Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. / Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. / Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. / Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. / Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. / Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. / Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. / Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. / for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans, 1.86. / for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans, 1.87. / for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans, 1.88. / for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans, 1.89. / for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans, 1.90. / not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. / not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.92. / not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.93. / not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.94. / not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. Then the blameless seer took heart, and spoke:It is not then because of a vow that he finds fault, nor because of a hecatomb, but because of the priest whom Agamemnon dishonoured, and did not release his daughter nor accept the ransom. 1.95. / For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.96. / For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.97. / For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.98. / For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.99. / For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.100. / When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.101. / When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.102. / When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.103. / When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.104. / When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.105. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, 1.107. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, 1.108. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, 1.109. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, 1.110. / that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.111. / that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.112. / that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.113. / that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.114. / that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.115. / Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.116. / Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.117. / Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.118. / Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.119. / Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.120. / In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned, 1.121. / In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned, 1.122. / In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned, 1.123. / In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned, 1.124. / In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned, 1.125. / and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.126. / and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.127. / and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.128. / and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.129. / and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.130. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize, 1.131. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize, 1.132. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize, 1.133. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize, 1.134. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize, 1.135. / suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.136. / suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.137. / suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.138. / suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.139. / suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.140. / Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus, 1.141. / Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus, 1.142. / Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus, 1.143. / Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus, 1.144. / Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus, 1.145. / or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.146. / or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.147. / or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.148. / or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.149. / or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.150. / either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men, 1.151. / either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men, 1.152. / either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men, 1.153. / either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men, 1.154. / either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men, 1.155. / did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.156. / did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.157. / did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.158. / did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.159. / did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.160. / And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.161. / And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.162. / And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.163. / And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.164. / And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.165. / do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.166. / do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.167. / do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.168. / do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.169. / do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.170. / while I am here dishonoured to pile up riches and wealth for you. 1.171. / while I am here dishonoured to pile up riches and wealth for you. 1.172. / while I am here dishonoured to pile up riches and wealth for you. 1.173. / while I am here dishonoured to pile up riches and wealth for you. 1.174. / while I am here dishonoured to pile up riches and wealth for you. Then the king of men, Agamemnon, answered him:Flee then, if your heart urges you; I do not beg you to remain for my sake. With me are others who will honour me, and above all Zeus, the lord of counsel. 1.175. / Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not, 1.176. / Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not, 1.177. / Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not, 1.178. / Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not, 1.179. / Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not, 1.180. / nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.181. / nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.182. / nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.183. / nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.184. / nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.185. / how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh, 1.186. / how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh, 1.187. / how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh, 1.188. / how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh, 1.189. / how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh, 1.190. / and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth, 1.191. / and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth, 1.192. / and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth, 1.193. / and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth, 1.194. / and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth, 1.195. / for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.196. / for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.197. / for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. / for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. / for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. / Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. / Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. / Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. / Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. / Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. / With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. / With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. / With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. / With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. / With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. / the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer, 1.221. / the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer, 1.222. / the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer, 1.223. / the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer, 1.224. / the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer, 1.225. / never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.226. / never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.227. / never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.228. / never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.229. / never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.230. / People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains, 1.231. / People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains, 1.232. / People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains, 1.233. / People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains, 1.234. / People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains, 1.235. / nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.236. / nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.237. / nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.238. / nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.239. / nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.240. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.241. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.242. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.243. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.244. / one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. So spoke the son of Peleus, and down to the earth he dashed 1.245. / the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime, 1.246. / the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime, 1.247. / the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime, 1.248. / the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime, 1.249. / the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime, 1.250. / who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.251. / who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.252. / who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.253. / who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.254. / who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.255. / rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you, 1.256. / rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you, 1.257. / rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you, 1.258. / rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you, 1.259. / rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you, 1.260. / and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.261. / and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.262. / and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.263. / and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.264. / and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.265. / Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.266. / Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.267. / Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.268. / Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.269. / Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.270. / And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl, 1.271. / And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl, 1.272. / And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl, 1.273. / And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl, 1.274. / And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl, 1.275. / but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you, 1.276. / but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you, 1.277. / but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you, 1.278. / but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you, 1.279. / but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you, 1.280. / yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.281. / yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.282. / yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.283. / yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.284. / yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.285. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman, 1.286. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman, 1.287. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman, 1.288. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman, 1.289. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman, 1.290. / do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me, 1.291. / do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me, 1.292. / do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me, 1.293. / do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me, 1.294. / do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me, 1.295. / for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship, 1.296. / for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship, 1.297. / for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship, 1.298. / for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship, 1.299. / for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship, 1.300. / nothing will you take or carry away against my will. Come, just try, so that these too may know: forthwith will your dark blood flow forth about my spear. So when the two had made an end of contending with violent words, they rose, and broke up the gathering beside the ships of the Achaeans. 1.301. / nothing will you take or carry away against my will. Come, just try, so that these too may know: forthwith will your dark blood flow forth about my spear. So when the two had made an end of contending with violent words, they rose, and broke up the gathering beside the ships of the Achaeans. 1.302. / nothing will you take or carry away against my will. Come, just try, so that these too may know: forthwith will your dark blood flow forth about my spear. So when the two had made an end of contending with violent words, they rose, and broke up the gathering beside the ships of the Achaeans. 1.303. / nothing will you take or carry away against my will. Come, just try, so that these too may know: forthwith will your dark blood flow forth about my spear. So when the two had made an end of contending with violent words, they rose, and broke up the gathering beside the ships of the Achaeans. 1.304. / nothing will you take or carry away against my will. Come, just try, so that these too may know: forthwith will your dark blood flow forth about my spear. So when the two had made an end of contending with violent words, they rose, and broke up the gathering beside the ships of the Achaeans. 1.305. / The son of Peleus went his way to his huts and his balanced ships together with the son of Menoetius, and with his men; but the son of Atreus launched a swift ship on the sea, and chose for it twenty rowers, and drove on board a hecatomb for the god, and brought the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses and set her in the ship; 1.528. / no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 2.76. / but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. 2.77. / but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. 2.155. / Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.156. / Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.157. / Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.158. / Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.159. / Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.160. / Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, 2.161. / Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, 2.162. / Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, 2.163. / Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, 2.164. / Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, 2.165. / neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, 2.166. / neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, 2.167. / neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, 2.168. / neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, 2.169. / neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, 2.170. / as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.171. / as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.172. / as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.173. / as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.174. / as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.175. / on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.176. / on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.177. / on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.178. / on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.179. / on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.180. / and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.181. / and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.182. / and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.183. / and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.184. / and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.185. / But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 2.186. / But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 2.187. / But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 2.188. / But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 2.189. / But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. Whomsoever he met that was a chieftain or man of note, to his side would he come and with gentle words seek to restrain him, saying: 2.190. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.191. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.192. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.193. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.194. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.195. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.196. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.197. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.198. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.199. / Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, 2.200. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, 2.201. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, 2.202. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, 2.203. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, 2.204. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, 2.205. / one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.206. / one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.207. / one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.208. / one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.209. / one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.210. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.211. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.212. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.213. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.214. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.215. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.216. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.217. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.218. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.219. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.220. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. 2.221. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. 2.222. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. 2.223. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. 2.224. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. Howbeit with loud shoutings he spake and chid Agamemnon: 2.225. / Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, 2.226. / Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, 2.227. / Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, 2.228. / Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, 2.229. / Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, 2.230. / which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.231. / which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.232. / which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.233. / which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.234. / which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.235. / Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 2.236. / Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 2.237. / Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 2.238. / Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 2.239. / Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 2.240. / for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, 2.241. / for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, 2.242. / for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, 2.243. / for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, 2.244. / for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, 2.245. / and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.246. / and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.247. / and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.248. / and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.249. / and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.250. / Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, 2.251. / Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, 2.252. / Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, 2.253. / Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, 2.254. / Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, 2.255. / for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.256. / for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.257. / for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.258. / for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.259. / for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.260. / nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. / nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. / nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. / nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. / nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.265. / So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.266. / So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.267. / So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.268. / So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.269. / So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.270. / But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.271. / But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.272. / But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.273. / But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.274. / But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.275. / seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, 2.276. / seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, 2.277. / seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, 2.278. / seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, 2.698. / And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.699. / And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.700. / His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.701. / His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.702. / His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.703. / His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.704. / His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.705. / he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.706. / he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.707. / he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.708. / he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 2.709. / he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. 3.39. / and he withdraweth back again and pallor layeth hold of his cheeks; even so did godlike Alexander, seized with fear of Atreus' son, shrink back into the throng of the lordly Trojans. But Hector saw him, and chid him with words of shame:Evil Paris, most fair to look upon, thou that art mad after women, thou beguiler, 3.164. / neither be left here to be a bane to us and to our children after us. So they said, but Priam spake, and called Helen to him:Come hither, dear child, and sit before me, that thou mayest see thy former lord and thy kinsfolk and thy people—thou art nowise to blame in my eyes; it is the gods, methinks, that are to blame, 3.395. / So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.442. / but another time shall I vanquish him; on our side too there be gods. But come, let us take our joy, couched together in love; for never yet hath desire so encompassed my soul—nay, not when at the first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedaemon and sailed with thee on my seafaring ships, 3.443. / but another time shall I vanquish him; on our side too there be gods. But come, let us take our joy, couched together in love; for never yet hath desire so encompassed my soul—nay, not when at the first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedaemon and sailed with thee on my seafaring ships, 3.444. / but another time shall I vanquish him; on our side too there be gods. But come, let us take our joy, couched together in love; for never yet hath desire so encompassed my soul—nay, not when at the first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedaemon and sailed with thee on my seafaring ships, 3.445. / and on the isle of Cranae had dalliance with thee on the couch of love—as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. He spake, and led the way to the couch, and with him followed his wife.Thus the twain were couched upon the corded bed; but the son of Atreus ranged through the throng like a wild beast, 3.446. / and on the isle of Cranae had dalliance with thee on the couch of love—as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. He spake, and led the way to the couch, and with him followed his wife.Thus the twain were couched upon the corded bed; but the son of Atreus ranged through the throng like a wild beast, 4.30. / Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls, 4.31. / Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls, 4.32. / Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls, 4.33. / Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls, 4.34. / Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls, 4.35. / and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.36. / and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.37. / and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.38. / and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.39. / and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.40. / When it shall be that I, vehemently eager to lay waste a city, choose one wherein dwell men that are dear to thee, seek thou in no wise to hinder my anger, but suffer me; since I too have yielded to thee of mine own will, yet with soul unwilling. For of all cities beneath sun and starry heaven 4.41. / When it shall be that I, vehemently eager to lay waste a city, choose one wherein dwell men that are dear to thee, seek thou in no wise to hinder my anger, but suffer me; since I too have yielded to thee of mine own will, yet with soul unwilling. For of all cities beneath sun and starry heaven 4.42. / When it shall be that I, vehemently eager to lay waste a city, choose one wherein dwell men that are dear to thee, seek thou in no wise to hinder my anger, but suffer me; since I too have yielded to thee of mine own will, yet with soul unwilling. For of all cities beneath sun and starry heaven 4.43. / When it shall be that I, vehemently eager to lay waste a city, choose one wherein dwell men that are dear to thee, seek thou in no wise to hinder my anger, but suffer me; since I too have yielded to thee of mine own will, yet with soul unwilling. For of all cities beneath sun and starry heaven 4.44. / When it shall be that I, vehemently eager to lay waste a city, choose one wherein dwell men that are dear to thee, seek thou in no wise to hinder my anger, but suffer me; since I too have yielded to thee of mine own will, yet with soul unwilling. For of all cities beneath sun and starry heaven 4.45. / wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.46. / wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.47. / wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.48. / wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.49. / wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.50. / Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.51. / Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.52. / Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.53. / Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.54. / Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.336. / to set upon the Trojans, and begin the battle. At sight of these Agamemnon, king of men, chid them, and spoke, and addressed them with winged words:O son of Peteos, the king nurtured of Zeus, and thou that excellest in evil wiles, thou of crafty mind, 4.337. / to set upon the Trojans, and begin the battle. At sight of these Agamemnon, king of men, chid them, and spoke, and addressed them with winged words:O son of Peteos, the king nurtured of Zeus, and thou that excellest in evil wiles, thou of crafty mind, 4.338. / to set upon the Trojans, and begin the battle. At sight of these Agamemnon, king of men, chid them, and spoke, and addressed them with winged words:O son of Peteos, the king nurtured of Zeus, and thou that excellest in evil wiles, thou of crafty mind, 4.339. / to set upon the Trojans, and begin the battle. At sight of these Agamemnon, king of men, chid them, and spoke, and addressed them with winged words:O son of Peteos, the king nurtured of Zeus, and thou that excellest in evil wiles, thou of crafty mind, 4.340. / why stand ye apart cowering, and wait for others? For you twain were it seemly that ye take your stand amid the foremost, and confront blazing battle; for ye are the first to hear my bidding to the feast, whenso we Achaeans make ready a banquet for the elders. 4.341. / why stand ye apart cowering, and wait for others? For you twain were it seemly that ye take your stand amid the foremost, and confront blazing battle; for ye are the first to hear my bidding to the feast, whenso we Achaeans make ready a banquet for the elders. 4.342. / why stand ye apart cowering, and wait for others? For you twain were it seemly that ye take your stand amid the foremost, and confront blazing battle; for ye are the first to hear my bidding to the feast, whenso we Achaeans make ready a banquet for the elders. 4.343. / why stand ye apart cowering, and wait for others? For you twain were it seemly that ye take your stand amid the foremost, and confront blazing battle; for ye are the first to hear my bidding to the feast, whenso we Achaeans make ready a banquet for the elders. 4.344. / why stand ye apart cowering, and wait for others? For you twain were it seemly that ye take your stand amid the foremost, and confront blazing battle; for ye are the first to hear my bidding to the feast, whenso we Achaeans make ready a banquet for the elders. 4.345. / Then are ye glad to eat roast meat and drink cups of honey-sweet wine as long as ye will. But now would ye gladly behold it, aye if ten serried battalions of the Achaeans were to fight in front of you with the pitiless bronze. 4.346. / Then are ye glad to eat roast meat and drink cups of honey-sweet wine as long as ye will. But now would ye gladly behold it, aye if ten serried battalions of the Achaeans were to fight in front of you with the pitiless bronze. 4.347. / Then are ye glad to eat roast meat and drink cups of honey-sweet wine as long as ye will. But now would ye gladly behold it, aye if ten serried battalions of the Achaeans were to fight in front of you with the pitiless bronze. 4.348. / Then are ye glad to eat roast meat and drink cups of honey-sweet wine as long as ye will. But now would ye gladly behold it, aye if ten serried battalions of the Achaeans were to fight in front of you with the pitiless bronze. 4.349. / Then are ye glad to eat roast meat and drink cups of honey-sweet wine as long as ye will. But now would ye gladly behold it, aye if ten serried battalions of the Achaeans were to fight in front of you with the pitiless bronze. Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows Odysseus of many wiles addressed him: 4.350. / Son of Atreus, what a word hath escaped the barrier of thy teeth! How sayest thou that we are slack in battle, whenso we Achaeans rouse keen war against the horse-taming Trojans? Thou shalt see, if so be thou wilt and if thou carest aught therefor, the father of Telemachus mingling with the foremost fighters 4.351. / Son of Atreus, what a word hath escaped the barrier of thy teeth! How sayest thou that we are slack in battle, whenso we Achaeans rouse keen war against the horse-taming Trojans? Thou shalt see, if so be thou wilt and if thou carest aught therefor, the father of Telemachus mingling with the foremost fighters 4.352. / Son of Atreus, what a word hath escaped the barrier of thy teeth! How sayest thou that we are slack in battle, whenso we Achaeans rouse keen war against the horse-taming Trojans? Thou shalt see, if so be thou wilt and if thou carest aught therefor, the father of Telemachus mingling with the foremost fighters 4.353. / Son of Atreus, what a word hath escaped the barrier of thy teeth! How sayest thou that we are slack in battle, whenso we Achaeans rouse keen war against the horse-taming Trojans? Thou shalt see, if so be thou wilt and if thou carest aught therefor, the father of Telemachus mingling with the foremost fighters 4.354. / Son of Atreus, what a word hath escaped the barrier of thy teeth! How sayest thou that we are slack in battle, whenso we Achaeans rouse keen war against the horse-taming Trojans? Thou shalt see, if so be thou wilt and if thou carest aught therefor, the father of Telemachus mingling with the foremost fighters 4.355. / of the horse-taming Trojans. This that thou sayest is as empty wind. Then lord Agamemnon spake to him with a smile, when he knew that he was wroth, and took back his words:Zeus-born son of Laertes, Odysseus of many wiles, neither do I chide thee overmuch nor urge thee on, 4.356. / of the horse-taming Trojans. This that thou sayest is as empty wind. Then lord Agamemnon spake to him with a smile, when he knew that he was wroth, and took back his words:Zeus-born son of Laertes, Odysseus of many wiles, neither do I chide thee overmuch nor urge thee on, 4.357. / of the horse-taming Trojans. This that thou sayest is as empty wind. Then lord Agamemnon spake to him with a smile, when he knew that he was wroth, and took back his words:Zeus-born son of Laertes, Odysseus of many wiles, neither do I chide thee overmuch nor urge thee on, 4.358. / of the horse-taming Trojans. This that thou sayest is as empty wind. Then lord Agamemnon spake to him with a smile, when he knew that he was wroth, and took back his words:Zeus-born son of Laertes, Odysseus of many wiles, neither do I chide thee overmuch nor urge thee on, 4.359. / of the horse-taming Trojans. This that thou sayest is as empty wind. Then lord Agamemnon spake to him with a smile, when he knew that he was wroth, and took back his words:Zeus-born son of Laertes, Odysseus of many wiles, neither do I chide thee overmuch nor urge thee on, 4.360. / for I know that the heart in thy breast knoweth kindly thoughts, seeing thou art minded even as I am. Nay, come, these things will we make good hereafter, if any harsh word hath been spoken now; and may the gods make all to come to naught. So saying he left them there and went to others. 4.361. / for I know that the heart in thy breast knoweth kindly thoughts, seeing thou art minded even as I am. Nay, come, these things will we make good hereafter, if any harsh word hath been spoken now; and may the gods make all to come to naught. So saying he left them there and went to others. 4.362. / for I know that the heart in thy breast knoweth kindly thoughts, seeing thou art minded even as I am. Nay, come, these things will we make good hereafter, if any harsh word hath been spoken now; and may the gods make all to come to naught. So saying he left them there and went to others. 4.363. / for I know that the heart in thy breast knoweth kindly thoughts, seeing thou art minded even as I am. Nay, come, these things will we make good hereafter, if any harsh word hath been spoken now; and may the gods make all to come to naught. So saying he left them there and went to others. 5.304. / eager to slay the man whosoever should come to seize the corpse, and crying a terrible cry. But the son of Tydeus grasped in his hand a stone—a mighty deed—one that not two men could bear, such as mortals now are; yet lightly did he wield it even alone. 5.349. / and saved him in a dark cloud, lest any of the Danaans with swift horses might hurl a spear of bronze into his breast and take away his life. But over her shouted aloud Diomedes good at the war-cry:Keep thee away, daughter of Zeus, from war and fighting. Sufficeth it not that thou beguilest weakling women? 5.406. / And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.407. / And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.408. / And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.409. / And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.410. / Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she, 5.411. / Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she, 5.412. / Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she, 5.413. / Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she, 5.414. / Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she, 5.415. / the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. 6.52. / should he hear that I am alive at the ships of the Achaeans. So spake he, and sought to persuade the other's heart in his breast, and lo, Menelaus was about to give him to his squire to lead to the swift ships of the Achaeans, but Agamemnon came running to meet him, and spake a word of reproof, saying: 6.53. / should he hear that I am alive at the ships of the Achaeans. So spake he, and sought to persuade the other's heart in his breast, and lo, Menelaus was about to give him to his squire to lead to the swift ships of the Achaeans, but Agamemnon came running to meet him, and spake a word of reproof, saying: 6.54. / should he hear that I am alive at the ships of the Achaeans. So spake he, and sought to persuade the other's heart in his breast, and lo, Menelaus was about to give him to his squire to lead to the swift ships of the Achaeans, but Agamemnon came running to meet him, and spake a word of reproof, saying: 6.55. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape, 6.56. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape, 6.57. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape, 6.58. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape, 6.59. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape, 6.60. / but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.138. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.329. / And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other, 6.330. / whomso thou shouldest haply see shrinking from hateful war. Nay, then, rouse thee, lest soon the city blaze with consuming fire. 6.492. / Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.493. / Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 7.436. / and they made about it a single barrow, rearing it from the plain for all alike; and thereby they built a wall and a lofty rampart, a defence for their ships and for themselves. And therein they made gates, close-fastening, that through them might be a way for the driving of chariots. 7.437. / and they made about it a single barrow, rearing it from the plain for all alike; and thereby they built a wall and a lofty rampart, a defence for their ships and for themselves. And therein they made gates, close-fastening, that through them might be a way for the driving of chariots. 7.438. / and they made about it a single barrow, rearing it from the plain for all alike; and thereby they built a wall and a lofty rampart, a defence for their ships and for themselves. And therein they made gates, close-fastening, that through them might be a way for the driving of chariots. 7.439. / and they made about it a single barrow, rearing it from the plain for all alike; and thereby they built a wall and a lofty rampart, a defence for their ships and for themselves. And therein they made gates, close-fastening, that through them might be a way for the driving of chariots. 7.440. / And without they dug a deep ditch hard by, wide and great, and therein they planted stakes. 7.441. / And without they dug a deep ditch hard by, wide and great, and therein they planted stakes. 7.442. / And without they dug a deep ditch hard by, wide and great, and therein they planted stakes. 7.443. / And without they dug a deep ditch hard by, wide and great, and therein they planted stakes. 7.444. / And without they dug a deep ditch hard by, wide and great, and therein they planted stakes. Thus were they toiling, the long-haired Achaeans; and the gods, as they sat by the side of Zeus, the lord of the lightning, marvelled at the great work of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 7.445. / And among them Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, was first to speak:Father Zeus, is there now anyone of mortals on the face of the boundless earth, that will any more declare to the immortals his mind and counsel? Seest thou not that now again the long-haired Achaeans have builded them a wall to defend their ships, and about it have drawn a trench, 7.446. / And among them Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, was first to speak:Father Zeus, is there now anyone of mortals on the face of the boundless earth, that will any more declare to the immortals his mind and counsel? Seest thou not that now again the long-haired Achaeans have builded them a wall to defend their ships, and about it have drawn a trench, 7.447. / And among them Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, was first to speak:Father Zeus, is there now anyone of mortals on the face of the boundless earth, that will any more declare to the immortals his mind and counsel? Seest thou not that now again the long-haired Achaeans have builded them a wall to defend their ships, and about it have drawn a trench, 7.448. / And among them Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, was first to speak:Father Zeus, is there now anyone of mortals on the face of the boundless earth, that will any more declare to the immortals his mind and counsel? Seest thou not that now again the long-haired Achaeans have builded them a wall to defend their ships, and about it have drawn a trench, 7.449. / And among them Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, was first to speak:Father Zeus, is there now anyone of mortals on the face of the boundless earth, that will any more declare to the immortals his mind and counsel? Seest thou not that now again the long-haired Achaeans have builded them a wall to defend their ships, and about it have drawn a trench, 7.450. / but gave not glorious hecatombs to the gods? of a surety shall the fame thereof reach as far as the dawn spreadeth, and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with toil for the warrior Laomedon. Then greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spake to him: 7.451. / but gave not glorious hecatombs to the gods? of a surety shall the fame thereof reach as far as the dawn spreadeth, and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with toil for the warrior Laomedon. Then greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spake to him: 7.452. / but gave not glorious hecatombs to the gods? of a surety shall the fame thereof reach as far as the dawn spreadeth, and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with toil for the warrior Laomedon. Then greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spake to him: 7.453. / but gave not glorious hecatombs to the gods? of a surety shall the fame thereof reach as far as the dawn spreadeth, and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with toil for the warrior Laomedon. Then greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spake to him: 7.454. / but gave not glorious hecatombs to the gods? of a surety shall the fame thereof reach as far as the dawn spreadeth, and men will forget the wall that I and Phoebus Apollo built with toil for the warrior Laomedon. Then greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spake to him: 7.455. / Ah me, thou Shaker of Earth, wide of sway, what a thing thou hast said! Another of the gods might haply fear this device, whoso was feebler far than thou in hand and might; whereas thy fame shall of a surety reach as far as the dawn spreadeth. Go to now, when once the long-haired Achaeans have gone with their ships to their dear native land, 7.456. / Ah me, thou Shaker of Earth, wide of sway, what a thing thou hast said! Another of the gods might haply fear this device, whoso was feebler far than thou in hand and might; whereas thy fame shall of a surety reach as far as the dawn spreadeth. Go to now, when once the long-haired Achaeans have gone with their ships to their dear native land, 7.457. / Ah me, thou Shaker of Earth, wide of sway, what a thing thou hast said! Another of the gods might haply fear this device, whoso was feebler far than thou in hand and might; whereas thy fame shall of a surety reach as far as the dawn spreadeth. Go to now, when once the long-haired Achaeans have gone with their ships to their dear native land, 7.458. / Ah me, thou Shaker of Earth, wide of sway, what a thing thou hast said! Another of the gods might haply fear this device, whoso was feebler far than thou in hand and might; whereas thy fame shall of a surety reach as far as the dawn spreadeth. Go to now, when once the long-haired Achaeans have gone with their ships to their dear native land, 7.459. / Ah me, thou Shaker of Earth, wide of sway, what a thing thou hast said! Another of the gods might haply fear this device, whoso was feebler far than thou in hand and might; whereas thy fame shall of a surety reach as far as the dawn spreadeth. Go to now, when once the long-haired Achaeans have gone with their ships to their dear native land, 7.460. / then do thou burst apart the wall and sweep it all into the sea, and cover the great beach again with sand, that so the great wall of the Achaeans may be brought to naught of thee. On this wise spake they, one to the other, 7.461. / then do thou burst apart the wall and sweep it all into the sea, and cover the great beach again with sand, that so the great wall of the Achaeans may be brought to naught of thee. On this wise spake they, one to the other, 7.462. / then do thou burst apart the wall and sweep it all into the sea, and cover the great beach again with sand, that so the great wall of the Achaeans may be brought to naught of thee. On this wise spake they, one to the other, 7.463. / then do thou burst apart the wall and sweep it all into the sea, and cover the great beach again with sand, that so the great wall of the Achaeans may be brought to naught of thee. On this wise spake they, one to the other, 9.52. / So spake he, and all the sons of the Achaeans shouted aloud, applauding the word of Diomedes, tamer of horses. Then uprose and spake among them the horseman Nestor:Son of Tydeus, above all men art thou mighty in battle, 9.158. / men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.159. / men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.160. / And let him submit himself unto me, seeing I am more kingly, and avow me his elder in years. 9.161. / And let him submit himself unto me, seeing I am more kingly, and avow me his elder in years. 9.186. / And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.187. / And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.188. / And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.189. / And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.190. / and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 9.191. / and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 9.251. / be found for ill once wrought—nay, rather, ere it be too late bethink thee how thou mayest ward from the Danaans the day of evil. Good friend, surely it was to thee that thy father Peleus gave command on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon forth from Phthia: ‘My son, strength shall Athene and Hera 9.252. / be found for ill once wrought—nay, rather, ere it be too late bethink thee how thou mayest ward from the Danaans the day of evil. Good friend, surely it was to thee that thy father Peleus gave command on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon forth from Phthia: ‘My son, strength shall Athene and Hera 9.253. / be found for ill once wrought—nay, rather, ere it be too late bethink thee how thou mayest ward from the Danaans the day of evil. Good friend, surely it was to thee that thy father Peleus gave command on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon forth from Phthia: ‘My son, strength shall Athene and Hera 9.254. / be found for ill once wrought—nay, rather, ere it be too late bethink thee how thou mayest ward from the Danaans the day of evil. Good friend, surely it was to thee that thy father Peleus gave command on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon forth from Phthia: ‘My son, strength shall Athene and Hera 9.255. / give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now, 9.256. / give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now, 9.257. / give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now, 9.258. / give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now, 9.259. / give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now, 9.312. / and as it shall be brought to pass, that ye sit not by me here on this side and on that and prate endlessly. For hateful in my eyes, even as the gates of Hades, is that man that hideth one thing in his mind and sayeth another. Nay, I will speak what seemeth to me to be best. 9.413. / For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land, 9.433. / So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence, marveling at his words; for with exceeding vehemence did he deny them. But at length there spake among them the old horseman Phoenix, bursting into tears, for that greatly did he fear for the ships of the Achaeans:If verily thou layest up in thy mind, glorious Achilles, 9.497. / to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 9.558. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.559. / he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.560. / Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.646. / all this thou seemest to speak almost after mine own mind; but my heart swelleth with wrath whenso I think of this, how the son of Atreus hath wrought indignity upon me amid the Argives, as though I were some alien that had no rights. Howbeit do ye go and declare my message, 9.647. / all this thou seemest to speak almost after mine own mind; but my heart swelleth with wrath whenso I think of this, how the son of Atreus hath wrought indignity upon me amid the Argives, as though I were some alien that had no rights. Howbeit do ye go and declare my message, 9.648. / all this thou seemest to speak almost after mine own mind; but my heart swelleth with wrath whenso I think of this, how the son of Atreus hath wrought indignity upon me amid the Argives, as though I were some alien that had no rights. Howbeit do ye go and declare my message, 9.649. / all this thou seemest to speak almost after mine own mind; but my heart swelleth with wrath whenso I think of this, how the son of Atreus hath wrought indignity upon me amid the Argives, as though I were some alien that had no rights. Howbeit do ye go and declare my message, 9.650. / for I will not sooner bethink me of bloody war until wise-hearted Priam's son, even goodly Hector, be come to the huts and ships of the Myrmidons, as he slays the Argives, and have smirched the ships with fire. But about my hut and my black ship 9.651. / for I will not sooner bethink me of bloody war until wise-hearted Priam's son, even goodly Hector, be come to the huts and ships of the Myrmidons, as he slays the Argives, and have smirched the ships with fire. But about my hut and my black ship 9.652. / for I will not sooner bethink me of bloody war until wise-hearted Priam's son, even goodly Hector, be come to the huts and ships of the Myrmidons, as he slays the Argives, and have smirched the ships with fire. But about my hut and my black ship 9.653. / for I will not sooner bethink me of bloody war until wise-hearted Priam's son, even goodly Hector, be come to the huts and ships of the Myrmidons, as he slays the Argives, and have smirched the ships with fire. But about my hut and my black ship 10.93. / so long as the breath abideth in my breast and my knees are quick. I wander thus, because sweet sleep settleth not upon mine eyes, but war is a trouble to me and the woes of the Achaeans. Wondrously do I fear for the Danaans, nor is my mind firm, but I am tossed to and fro, and my heart 10.94. / so long as the breath abideth in my breast and my knees are quick. I wander thus, because sweet sleep settleth not upon mine eyes, but war is a trouble to me and the woes of the Achaeans. Wondrously do I fear for the Danaans, nor is my mind firm, but I am tossed to and fro, and my heart 10.95. / leapeth forth from out my breast, and my glorious limbs tremble beneath me. But if thou wouldest do aught, seeing on thee too sleep cometh not, come, let us go to the sentinels, that we may look to them, lest fordone with toil and drowsiness they be slumbering, and have wholly forgot their watch. 10.374. / Stand, or I shall reach thee with the spear, and I deem thou shalt not long escape sheer destruction at my hand. He spake, and hurled his spear, but of purpose he missed the man, and over his right shoulder passed the point of the polished spear, and fixed itself in the ground; and Dolon stood still, seized with terror, 10.375. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 10.376. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 10.377. / stammering and pale with fear, and the teeth clattered in his mouth; and the twain panting for breath came upon him, and seized his hands; and he with a burst of tears spake to them, saying:Take me alive, and I will ransom myself; for at home have I store of bronze and gold and iron, wrought with toil; 11.404. / drive to the hollow ships, for he was sore pained at heart.Now Odysseus famed for his spear, was left alone, nor did anyone of the Argives abide by him, for that fear had laid hold of them all. Then mightily moved he spake unto his own great-hearted spirit:Woe is me; what is to befall me? Great evil were it if I flee, 11.405. / seized with fear of the throng;, yet this were a worse thing, if I be taken all alone, for the rest of the Danaans hath the son of Cronos scattered in flight. But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? For I know that they are cowards that depart from battle, whereas whoso is pre-eminent in fight, him verily it behoveth 11.406. / seized with fear of the throng;, yet this were a worse thing, if I be taken all alone, for the rest of the Danaans hath the son of Cronos scattered in flight. But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? For I know that they are cowards that depart from battle, whereas whoso is pre-eminent in fight, him verily it behoveth 11.407. / seized with fear of the throng;, yet this were a worse thing, if I be taken all alone, for the rest of the Danaans hath the son of Cronos scattered in flight. But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? For I know that they are cowards that depart from battle, whereas whoso is pre-eminent in fight, him verily it behoveth 11.408. / seized with fear of the throng;, yet this were a worse thing, if I be taken all alone, for the rest of the Danaans hath the son of Cronos scattered in flight. But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? For I know that they are cowards that depart from battle, whereas whoso is pre-eminent in fight, him verily it behoveth 11.409. / seized with fear of the throng;, yet this were a worse thing, if I be taken all alone, for the rest of the Danaans hath the son of Cronos scattered in flight. But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? For I know that they are cowards that depart from battle, whereas whoso is pre-eminent in fight, him verily it behoveth 11.410. / to hold his ground boldly, whether he be smitten, or smite another. 11.604. / for Achilles was standing by the stern of his ship, huge of hull, gazing upon the utter toil of battle and the tearful rout. And forthwith he spake to his comrade Patroclus, calling to him from beside the ship; and he heard, and came forth from the hut like unto Ares; and this to him was the beginning of evil. 11.656. / Then made answer the horseman Nestor of Gerenia:Wherefore now doth Achilles thus have pity for the sons of the Achaeans, as many as have been smitten with missiles? Nor knoweth he at all what grief hath arisen throughout the camp; for the best men lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 11.657. / Then made answer the horseman Nestor of Gerenia:Wherefore now doth Achilles thus have pity for the sons of the Achaeans, as many as have been smitten with missiles? Nor knoweth he at all what grief hath arisen throughout the camp; for the best men lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 11.658. / Then made answer the horseman Nestor of Gerenia:Wherefore now doth Achilles thus have pity for the sons of the Achaeans, as many as have been smitten with missiles? Nor knoweth he at all what grief hath arisen throughout the camp; for the best men lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 11.814. / the Zeus-born son of Euaemon, smitten in the thigh with an arrow, limping from out the battle. And in streams down from his head and shoulders flowed the sweat, and from his grievous wound the black blood was gushing, yet was his spirit unshaken. At sight of him the valiant son of Menoetius had pity on him, 11.815. / and with wailing spake to him winged words:Ah ye wretched men, leaders and lords of the Danaans, thus then were ye destined, far from your friends and your native land, to glut with your white fat the swift dogs in Troy. But come, tell me this, Eurypylus, warrior fostered of Zeus, 12.230. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.231. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.232. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.233. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.234. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.235. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.236. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.237. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.238. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.239. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.240. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.241. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.242. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.243. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.244. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.245. / For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war, 12.246. / For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war, 12.247. / For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war, 12.248. / For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war, 12.249. / For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war, 12.250. / forthwith smitten by my spear shalt thou lose thy life. So spake he and led the way; and they followed after with a wondrous din; and thereat Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, roused from the mountains of Ida a blast of wind, that bare the dust straight against the ships and he bewildered the mind of the Achaeans, but vouchsafed glory to the Trojans and to Hector. Trusting therefore in his portents and in their might they sought to break the great wall of the Achaeans. The pinnets of the fortifications they dragged down and overthrew the battlements, and pried out the supporting beams that the Achaeans had set 13.29. / and with gold he clad himself about his body, and grasped the well-wrought whip of gold, and stepped upon his car, and set out to drive over the waves. Then gambolled the sea-beasts beneath him on every side from out the deeps, for well they knew their lord, and in gladness the sea parted before him; 13.769. / But one he presently found on the left of the tearful battle, even goodly Alexander, the lord of fair-tressed Helen, heartening his comrades and urging them on to fight; and he drew near and spake to him with words of shame:Evil Paris, most fair to look upon, thou that art mad after women, thou beguiler, 15.140. / or will yet be slain; and a hard thing it is to preserve the lineage and offspring of men. She spake she, and made furious Ares to sit down upon his throne. But Hera called Apollo forth from out the hall, and Iris, that is the messenger of the immortal gods; 15.141. / or will yet be slain; and a hard thing it is to preserve the lineage and offspring of men. She spake she, and made furious Ares to sit down upon his throne. But Hera called Apollo forth from out the hall, and Iris, that is the messenger of the immortal gods; 15.346. / fleeing this way and that, and were getting them within their wall perforce. And Hector shouted aloud, and called to the Trojans:Speed ye against the ships, and let be the blood-stained spoils. Whomsoever I shall mark holding aloof from the ships on the further side, on the very spot shall I devise his death, nor shall his 15.347. / fleeing this way and that, and were getting them within their wall perforce. And Hector shouted aloud, and called to the Trojans:Speed ye against the ships, and let be the blood-stained spoils. Whomsoever I shall mark holding aloof from the ships on the further side, on the very spot shall I devise his death, nor shall his 15.348. / fleeing this way and that, and were getting them within their wall perforce. And Hector shouted aloud, and called to the Trojans:Speed ye against the ships, and let be the blood-stained spoils. Whomsoever I shall mark holding aloof from the ships on the further side, on the very spot shall I devise his death, nor shall his 15.349. / fleeing this way and that, and were getting them within their wall perforce. And Hector shouted aloud, and called to the Trojans:Speed ye against the ships, and let be the blood-stained spoils. Whomsoever I shall mark holding aloof from the ships on the further side, on the very spot shall I devise his death, nor shall his 16.5. / Thus then they were warring around the well-benched ship, but Patroclus drew nigh to Achilles, shepherd of the host, shedding hot tears, even as a fountain of dark water that down over the face of a beetling cliff poureth its dusky stream; 16.5. / and swift-footed goodly Achilles had pity when he saw him, and spake and addressed him with winged words:Why, Patroclus, art thou bathed in tears, like a girl, a mere babe, that runneth by her mother's side and biddeth her take her up, and clutcheth at her gown, and hindereth her in her going, 16.17. / and still lives Peleus. son of Aeacus, amid the Myrmidons, for which twain would we grieve right sore, were they dead. Or art thou sorrowing for the Argives, how they are being slain beside the hollow ships by reason of their own presumptuous act? Speak out; hide it not in thy mind;that we both may know. 16.21. / Then with a heavy groan, didst thou make answer, O knight Patroclus:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, be not wroth; so great a sorrow hath overmastered the Achaeans. For verily all they that aforetime were bravest, lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 16.22. / Then with a heavy groan, didst thou make answer, O knight Patroclus:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, be not wroth; so great a sorrow hath overmastered the Achaeans. For verily all they that aforetime were bravest, lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 16.23. / Then with a heavy groan, didst thou make answer, O knight Patroclus:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, be not wroth; so great a sorrow hath overmastered the Achaeans. For verily all they that aforetime were bravest, lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 16.24. / Then with a heavy groan, didst thou make answer, O knight Patroclus:O Achilles, son of Peleus, far the mightiest of the Achaeans, be not wroth; so great a sorrow hath overmastered the Achaeans. For verily all they that aforetime were bravest, lie among the ships smitten by darts or wounded with spear-thrusts. 16.25. / Smitten is the son of Tydeus, mighty Diomedes, wounded with spear-thrust is Odysseus, famed for his spear, and Agamemnon, and smitten, too, is Eurypylus with an arrow in the thigh. About these the leeches, skilled in many simples, are busied, seeking to heal their wounds; but with thee may no man deal, Achilles. 16.26. / Smitten is the son of Tydeus, mighty Diomedes, wounded with spear-thrust is Odysseus, famed for his spear, and Agamemnon, and smitten, too, is Eurypylus with an arrow in the thigh. About these the leeches, skilled in many simples, are busied, seeking to heal their wounds; but with thee may no man deal, Achilles. 16.27. / Smitten is the son of Tydeus, mighty Diomedes, wounded with spear-thrust is Odysseus, famed for his spear, and Agamemnon, and smitten, too, is Eurypylus with an arrow in the thigh. About these the leeches, skilled in many simples, are busied, seeking to heal their wounds; but with thee may no man deal, Achilles. 16.28. / Smitten is the son of Tydeus, mighty Diomedes, wounded with spear-thrust is Odysseus, famed for his spear, and Agamemnon, and smitten, too, is Eurypylus with an arrow in the thigh. About these the leeches, skilled in many simples, are busied, seeking to heal their wounds; but with thee may no man deal, Achilles. 16.29. / Smitten is the son of Tydeus, mighty Diomedes, wounded with spear-thrust is Odysseus, famed for his spear, and Agamemnon, and smitten, too, is Eurypylus with an arrow in the thigh. About these the leeches, skilled in many simples, are busied, seeking to heal their wounds; but with thee may no man deal, Achilles. 16.30. / Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee, 16.31. / Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee, 16.32. / Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee, 16.33. / Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee, 16.34. / Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee, 16.35. / and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.36. / and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.37. / and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.38. / and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.39. / and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.40. / And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of thine, in hope that the Trojans may take me for thee, and so desist from war, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in battle. And lightly might we that are unwearied 16.41. / And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of thine, in hope that the Trojans may take me for thee, and so desist from war, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in battle. And lightly might we that are unwearied 16.42. / And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of thine, in hope that the Trojans may take me for thee, and so desist from war, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in battle. And lightly might we that are unwearied 16.43. / And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of thine, in hope that the Trojans may take me for thee, and so desist from war, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in battle. And lightly might we that are unwearied 16.44. / And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of thine, in hope that the Trojans may take me for thee, and so desist from war, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in battle. And lightly might we that are unwearied 16.45. / drive men that are wearied with the battle back to the city from the ships and the huts. 16.46. / drive men that are wearied with the battle back to the city from the ships and the huts. 16.47. / drive men that are wearied with the battle back to the city from the ships and the huts. 16.49. / drive men that are wearied with the battle back to the city from the ships and the huts. So spake he in prayer, fool that he was, for in sooth it was to be his own evil death and fate for which he prayed. Then, his heart deeply stirred, spake to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, Zeus-born Patroclus, what a thing hast thou said! 16.50. / Neither reck I of any oracle, that I wot of, nor has my queenly mother declared to me aught from Zeus; but herein dread grief cometh upon heart and soul, whenso a man is minded to rob one that is his equal, and take from him his prize, for that he surpasseth him in power. 16.51. / Neither reck I of any oracle, that I wot of, nor has my queenly mother declared to me aught from Zeus; but herein dread grief cometh upon heart and soul, whenso a man is minded to rob one that is his equal, and take from him his prize, for that he surpasseth him in power. 16.52. / Neither reck I of any oracle, that I wot of, nor has my queenly mother declared to me aught from Zeus; but herein dread grief cometh upon heart and soul, whenso a man is minded to rob one that is his equal, and take from him his prize, for that he surpasseth him in power. 16.53. / Neither reck I of any oracle, that I wot of, nor has my queenly mother declared to me aught from Zeus; but herein dread grief cometh upon heart and soul, whenso a man is minded to rob one that is his equal, and take from him his prize, for that he surpasseth him in power. 16.54. / Neither reck I of any oracle, that I wot of, nor has my queenly mother declared to me aught from Zeus; but herein dread grief cometh upon heart and soul, whenso a man is minded to rob one that is his equal, and take from him his prize, for that he surpasseth him in power. 16.55. / Dread grief is this to me, seeing I have suffered woes at heart. The girl that the sons of the Achaeans chose out for me as a prize, and that I won with my spear, when I had laid waste a well-walled city, her hath lord Agamemnon taken back from my arms, this son of Atreus, as though I were some alien that had no rights. 16.56. / Dread grief is this to me, seeing I have suffered woes at heart. The girl that the sons of the Achaeans chose out for me as a prize, and that I won with my spear, when I had laid waste a well-walled city, her hath lord Agamemnon taken back from my arms, this son of Atreus, as though I were some alien that had no rights. 16.57. / Dread grief is this to me, seeing I have suffered woes at heart. The girl that the sons of the Achaeans chose out for me as a prize, and that I won with my spear, when I had laid waste a well-walled city, her hath lord Agamemnon taken back from my arms, this son of Atreus, as though I were some alien that had no rights. 16.58. / Dread grief is this to me, seeing I have suffered woes at heart. The girl that the sons of the Achaeans chose out for me as a prize, and that I won with my spear, when I had laid waste a well-walled city, her hath lord Agamemnon taken back from my arms, this son of Atreus, as though I were some alien that had no rights. 16.59. / Dread grief is this to me, seeing I have suffered woes at heart. The girl that the sons of the Achaeans chose out for me as a prize, and that I won with my spear, when I had laid waste a well-walled city, her hath lord Agamemnon taken back from my arms, this son of Atreus, as though I were some alien that had no rights. 16.60. / Howbeit these things will we let be, as past and done. In no wise, meseems, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet verily I deemed that I should not make an end of mine anger, until the hour when unto mine own ships should come the war-cry and the battle. But come, do thou put upon thy shoulders my glorious armour, 16.61. / Howbeit these things will we let be, as past and done. In no wise, meseems, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet verily I deemed that I should not make an end of mine anger, until the hour when unto mine own ships should come the war-cry and the battle. But come, do thou put upon thy shoulders my glorious armour, 16.62. / Howbeit these things will we let be, as past and done. In no wise, meseems, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet verily I deemed that I should not make an end of mine anger, until the hour when unto mine own ships should come the war-cry and the battle. But come, do thou put upon thy shoulders my glorious armour, 16.63. / Howbeit these things will we let be, as past and done. In no wise, meseems, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet verily I deemed that I should not make an end of mine anger, until the hour when unto mine own ships should come the war-cry and the battle. But come, do thou put upon thy shoulders my glorious armour, 16.64. / Howbeit these things will we let be, as past and done. In no wise, meseems, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet verily I deemed that I should not make an end of mine anger, until the hour when unto mine own ships should come the war-cry and the battle. But come, do thou put upon thy shoulders my glorious armour, 16.65. / and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if in good sooth the dark cloud of the Trojans lieth encompassed the ships mightily, and those others abide with naught to support them but the shore of the sea, having but scant space of land still left them, even the Argives; while the whole city of the Trojans hath come forth against them 16.66. / and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if in good sooth the dark cloud of the Trojans lieth encompassed the ships mightily, and those others abide with naught to support them but the shore of the sea, having but scant space of land still left them, even the Argives; while the whole city of the Trojans hath come forth against them 16.67. / and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if in good sooth the dark cloud of the Trojans lieth encompassed the ships mightily, and those others abide with naught to support them but the shore of the sea, having but scant space of land still left them, even the Argives; while the whole city of the Trojans hath come forth against them 16.68. / and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if in good sooth the dark cloud of the Trojans lieth encompassed the ships mightily, and those others abide with naught to support them but the shore of the sea, having but scant space of land still left them, even the Argives; while the whole city of the Trojans hath come forth against them 16.69. / and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if in good sooth the dark cloud of the Trojans lieth encompassed the ships mightily, and those others abide with naught to support them but the shore of the sea, having but scant space of land still left them, even the Argives; while the whole city of the Trojans hath come forth against them 16.70. / fearlessly, for they see not the front of my helm shining hard at hand; full soon in their flight would they fill the water-courses with their dead, were but lord Agamemnon of kindly mind toward me, whereas now they are warring around the camp. 16.71. / fearlessly, for they see not the front of my helm shining hard at hand; full soon in their flight would they fill the water-courses with their dead, were but lord Agamemnon of kindly mind toward me, whereas now they are warring around the camp. 16.72. / fearlessly, for they see not the front of my helm shining hard at hand; full soon in their flight would they fill the water-courses with their dead, were but lord Agamemnon of kindly mind toward me, whereas now they are warring around the camp. 16.73. / fearlessly, for they see not the front of my helm shining hard at hand; full soon in their flight would they fill the water-courses with their dead, were but lord Agamemnon of kindly mind toward me, whereas now they are warring around the camp. 16.74. / fearlessly, for they see not the front of my helm shining hard at hand; full soon in their flight would they fill the water-courses with their dead, were but lord Agamemnon of kindly mind toward me, whereas now they are warring around the camp. For not in the hands of Diomedes, son of Tydeus, 16.75. / doth the spear rage, to ward off ruin from the Danaans, neither as yet have I heard the voice of the son of Atreus, shouting from his hated head; nay, it is the voice of man-slaying Hector that breaketh about me, as he calleth to the Trojans, and they with their din possess all the plain, and vanquish the Achaeans in battle. 16.76. / doth the spear rage, to ward off ruin from the Danaans, neither as yet have I heard the voice of the son of Atreus, shouting from his hated head; nay, it is the voice of man-slaying Hector that breaketh about me, as he calleth to the Trojans, and they with their din possess all the plain, and vanquish the Achaeans in battle. 16.77. / doth the spear rage, to ward off ruin from the Danaans, neither as yet have I heard the voice of the son of Atreus, shouting from his hated head; nay, it is the voice of man-slaying Hector that breaketh about me, as he calleth to the Trojans, and they with their din possess all the plain, and vanquish the Achaeans in battle. 16.78. / doth the spear rage, to ward off ruin from the Danaans, neither as yet have I heard the voice of the son of Atreus, shouting from his hated head; nay, it is the voice of man-slaying Hector that breaketh about me, as he calleth to the Trojans, and they with their din possess all the plain, and vanquish the Achaeans in battle. 16.79. / doth the spear rage, to ward off ruin from the Danaans, neither as yet have I heard the voice of the son of Atreus, shouting from his hated head; nay, it is the voice of man-slaying Hector that breaketh about me, as he calleth to the Trojans, and they with their din possess all the plain, and vanquish the Achaeans in battle. 16.80. / Yet even so, Patroclus, in warding destruction from the ships fall thou upon them mightily, lest verily they burn the ships with blazing fire and rob the Greeks of their desired return. Howbeit do thou hearken, that I may put in thy mind the sum of my counsel, to the end that thou mayest win me great recompense and glory 16.81. / Yet even so, Patroclus, in warding destruction from the ships fall thou upon them mightily, lest verily they burn the ships with blazing fire and rob the Greeks of their desired return. Howbeit do thou hearken, that I may put in thy mind the sum of my counsel, to the end that thou mayest win me great recompense and glory 16.82. / Yet even so, Patroclus, in warding destruction from the ships fall thou upon them mightily, lest verily they burn the ships with blazing fire and rob the Greeks of their desired return. Howbeit do thou hearken, that I may put in thy mind the sum of my counsel, to the end that thou mayest win me great recompense and glory 16.83. / Yet even so, Patroclus, in warding destruction from the ships fall thou upon them mightily, lest verily they burn the ships with blazing fire and rob the Greeks of their desired return. Howbeit do thou hearken, that I may put in thy mind the sum of my counsel, to the end that thou mayest win me great recompense and glory 16.84. / Yet even so, Patroclus, in warding destruction from the ships fall thou upon them mightily, lest verily they burn the ships with blazing fire and rob the Greeks of their desired return. Howbeit do thou hearken, that I may put in thy mind the sum of my counsel, to the end that thou mayest win me great recompense and glory 16.85. / at the hands of all the Danaans, and that they send back that beauteous girl, and therewithal give glorious gifts. When thou hast driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud-thundering lord of Hera grant thee to win glory, be not thou fain apart from me to war 16.86. / at the hands of all the Danaans, and that they send back that beauteous girl, and therewithal give glorious gifts. When thou hast driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud-thundering lord of Hera grant thee to win glory, be not thou fain apart from me to war 16.87. / at the hands of all the Danaans, and that they send back that beauteous girl, and therewithal give glorious gifts. When thou hast driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud-thundering lord of Hera grant thee to win glory, be not thou fain apart from me to war 16.88. / at the hands of all the Danaans, and that they send back that beauteous girl, and therewithal give glorious gifts. When thou hast driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud-thundering lord of Hera grant thee to win glory, be not thou fain apart from me to war 16.89. / at the hands of all the Danaans, and that they send back that beauteous girl, and therewithal give glorious gifts. When thou hast driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud-thundering lord of Hera grant thee to win glory, be not thou fain apart from me to war 16.90. / against the war-loving Trojans: thou wilt lessen mine honour. Nor yet do thou, as thou exultest in war and conflict, and slayest the Trojans, lead on unto Ilios, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray; right dearly doth Apollo, that worketh afar, love them. 16.91. / against the war-loving Trojans: thou wilt lessen mine honour. Nor yet do thou, as thou exultest in war and conflict, and slayest the Trojans, lead on unto Ilios, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray; right dearly doth Apollo, that worketh afar, love them. 16.92. / against the war-loving Trojans: thou wilt lessen mine honour. Nor yet do thou, as thou exultest in war and conflict, and slayest the Trojans, lead on unto Ilios, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray; right dearly doth Apollo, that worketh afar, love them. 16.93. / against the war-loving Trojans: thou wilt lessen mine honour. Nor yet do thou, as thou exultest in war and conflict, and slayest the Trojans, lead on unto Ilios, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray; right dearly doth Apollo, that worketh afar, love them. 16.94. / against the war-loving Trojans: thou wilt lessen mine honour. Nor yet do thou, as thou exultest in war and conflict, and slayest the Trojans, lead on unto Ilios, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray; right dearly doth Apollo, that worketh afar, love them. 16.95. / Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction, 16.96. / Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction, 16.97. / Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction, 16.98. / Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction, 16.99. / Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction, 16.100. / that alone we might loose the sacred diadem of Troy. On this wise spake they one to the other, but Aias no longer abode, for he was sore beset with darts; the will of Zeus was overmastering him, and the lordly Trojans with their missiles; and terribly did the bright helm about his temples 16.112. / and down from his limbs on every side abundant sweat kept streaming, nor had he any wise respite to get his breath withal, but every way evil was heaped upon evil. 16.113. / and down from his limbs on every side abundant sweat kept streaming, nor had he any wise respite to get his breath withal, but every way evil was heaped upon evil. 16.114. / and down from his limbs on every side abundant sweat kept streaming, nor had he any wise respite to get his breath withal, but every way evil was heaped upon evil. Tell me now, ye Muses, that have dwellings on Olympus, how fire was first flung upon the ships of the Achaeans.It was Hector that drew nigh to Aias 16.115. / and smote his ashen spear with his great sword hard by the socket, at the base ot the point, and shore it clean away, so that Telamonian Aias brandished all vainly a pointless spear, and far from him the head of bronze fell ringing to the ground. And Aias knew in his noble heart, and shuddered 16.116. / and smote his ashen spear with his great sword hard by the socket, at the base ot the point, and shore it clean away, so that Telamonian Aias brandished all vainly a pointless spear, and far from him the head of bronze fell ringing to the ground. And Aias knew in his noble heart, and shuddered 16.117. / and smote his ashen spear with his great sword hard by the socket, at the base ot the point, and shore it clean away, so that Telamonian Aias brandished all vainly a pointless spear, and far from him the head of bronze fell ringing to the ground. And Aias knew in his noble heart, and shuddered 16.118. / and smote his ashen spear with his great sword hard by the socket, at the base ot the point, and shore it clean away, so that Telamonian Aias brandished all vainly a pointless spear, and far from him the head of bronze fell ringing to the ground. And Aias knew in his noble heart, and shuddered 16.119. / and smote his ashen spear with his great sword hard by the socket, at the base ot the point, and shore it clean away, so that Telamonian Aias brandished all vainly a pointless spear, and far from him the head of bronze fell ringing to the ground. And Aias knew in his noble heart, and shuddered 16.120. / at the deeds of the gods, how that Zeus, who thundereth on high, brought utterly to naught the counsels of his battle, and would have victory for the Trojans. Then he gave ground from out the darts; and the Trojans cast upon the swift ship unwearied fire, and over her forthwith streamed a flame that might not be quenched.So then was the ship's stern wreathed about with fire, but Achilles 16.121. / at the deeds of the gods, how that Zeus, who thundereth on high, brought utterly to naught the counsels of his battle, and would have victory for the Trojans. Then he gave ground from out the darts; and the Trojans cast upon the swift ship unwearied fire, and over her forthwith streamed a flame that might not be quenched.So then was the ship's stern wreathed about with fire, but Achilles 16.122. / at the deeds of the gods, how that Zeus, who thundereth on high, brought utterly to naught the counsels of his battle, and would have victory for the Trojans. Then he gave ground from out the darts; and the Trojans cast upon the swift ship unwearied fire, and over her forthwith streamed a flame that might not be quenched.So then was the ship's stern wreathed about with fire, but Achilles 16.123. / at the deeds of the gods, how that Zeus, who thundereth on high, brought utterly to naught the counsels of his battle, and would have victory for the Trojans. Then he gave ground from out the darts; and the Trojans cast upon the swift ship unwearied fire, and over her forthwith streamed a flame that might not be quenched.So then was the ship's stern wreathed about with fire, but Achilles 16.124. / at the deeds of the gods, how that Zeus, who thundereth on high, brought utterly to naught the counsels of his battle, and would have victory for the Trojans. Then he gave ground from out the darts; and the Trojans cast upon the swift ship unwearied fire, and over her forthwith streamed a flame that might not be quenched.So then was the ship's stern wreathed about with fire, but Achilles 16.125. / smote both his thighs and spake to Patroclus:Up now, Zeus-born Patroclus, master of horsemen. Lo, I see by the ships the rush of consuming fire. Let it not be that they take the ships and there be no more escaping! Do on my armour with all haste, and I will gather the host. 16.126. / smote both his thighs and spake to Patroclus:Up now, Zeus-born Patroclus, master of horsemen. Lo, I see by the ships the rush of consuming fire. Let it not be that they take the ships and there be no more escaping! Do on my armour with all haste, and I will gather the host. 16.127. / smote both his thighs and spake to Patroclus:Up now, Zeus-born Patroclus, master of horsemen. Lo, I see by the ships the rush of consuming fire. Let it not be that they take the ships and there be no more escaping! Do on my armour with all haste, and I will gather the host. 16.128. / smote both his thighs and spake to Patroclus:Up now, Zeus-born Patroclus, master of horsemen. Lo, I see by the ships the rush of consuming fire. Let it not be that they take the ships and there be no more escaping! Do on my armour with all haste, and I will gather the host. 16.129. / smote both his thighs and spake to Patroclus:Up now, Zeus-born Patroclus, master of horsemen. Lo, I see by the ships the rush of consuming fire. Let it not be that they take the ships and there be no more escaping! Do on my armour with all haste, and I will gather the host. 17.645. / Father Zeus, deliver thou from the darkness the sons of the Achaeans, and make clear sky, and grant us to see with our eyes. In the light do thou e'en slay us, seeing such is thy good pleasure. So spake he, and the Father had pity on him as he wept, and forthwith scattered the darkness and drave away the mist, 17.646. / Father Zeus, deliver thou from the darkness the sons of the Achaeans, and make clear sky, and grant us to see with our eyes. In the light do thou e'en slay us, seeing such is thy good pleasure. So spake he, and the Father had pity on him as he wept, and forthwith scattered the darkness and drave away the mist, 17.647. / Father Zeus, deliver thou from the darkness the sons of the Achaeans, and make clear sky, and grant us to see with our eyes. In the light do thou e'en slay us, seeing such is thy good pleasure. So spake he, and the Father had pity on him as he wept, and forthwith scattered the darkness and drave away the mist, 18.22. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. 18.23. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. 18.24. / Low lies Patroclus, and around his corpse are they fighting—his naked corpse; but his armour is held by Hector of the flashing helm. So spake he, and a black cloud of grief enwrapped Achilles, and with both his hands he took the dark dust 18.31. / and ran forth around wise-hearted Achilles, and all beat their breasts with their hands, and the knees of each one were loosed be-neath her. And over against them Antilochus wailed and shed tears, holding the hands of Achilles, that in his noble heart was moaning mightily; for he feared lest he should cut his throat asunder with the knife. 18.108. / I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.109. / I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.110. / waxeth like smoke in the breasts of men; even as but now the king of men, Agamemnon, moved me to wrath. Howbeit these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts, because we must. But now will I go forth that I may light on the slayer of the man I loved, 18.203. / the Trojans may desist from battle, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in war. When she had thus spoken swift-footed Iris departed; but Achilles, dear to Zeus, roused him, and round about his mighty shoulders Athene flung her tasselled aegis, 18.204. / the Trojans may desist from battle, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans may take breath, wearied as they are; for scant is the breathing-space in war. When she had thus spoken swift-footed Iris departed; but Achilles, dear to Zeus, roused him, and round about his mighty shoulders Athene flung her tasselled aegis, 18.205. / and around his head the fair goddess set thick a golden cloud, and forth from the man made blaze a gleaming fire. And as when a smoke goeth up from a city and reacheth to heaven from afar, from an island that foes beleaguer, and the men thereof contend the whole day through in hateful war 18.206. / and around his head the fair goddess set thick a golden cloud, and forth from the man made blaze a gleaming fire. And as when a smoke goeth up from a city and reacheth to heaven from afar, from an island that foes beleaguer, and the men thereof contend the whole day through in hateful war 18.207. / and around his head the fair goddess set thick a golden cloud, and forth from the man made blaze a gleaming fire. And as when a smoke goeth up from a city and reacheth to heaven from afar, from an island that foes beleaguer, and the men thereof contend the whole day through in hateful war 18.208. / and around his head the fair goddess set thick a golden cloud, and forth from the man made blaze a gleaming fire. And as when a smoke goeth up from a city and reacheth to heaven from afar, from an island that foes beleaguer, and the men thereof contend the whole day through in hateful war 18.209. / and around his head the fair goddess set thick a golden cloud, and forth from the man made blaze a gleaming fire. And as when a smoke goeth up from a city and reacheth to heaven from afar, from an island that foes beleaguer, and the men thereof contend the whole day through in hateful war 18.210. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 18.211. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 18.212. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 18.213. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 18.214. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 18.215. / Then strode he from the wall to the trench, and there took his stand, yet joined him not to the company of the Achaeans, for he had regard to his mother's wise behest. There stood he and shouted, and from afar Pallas Athene uttered her voice; but amid the Trojans he roused confusion unspeakable. 18.216. / Then strode he from the wall to the trench, and there took his stand, yet joined him not to the company of the Achaeans, for he had regard to his mother's wise behest. There stood he and shouted, and from afar Pallas Athene uttered her voice; but amid the Trojans he roused confusion unspeakable. 18.217. / Then strode he from the wall to the trench, and there took his stand, yet joined him not to the company of the Achaeans, for he had regard to his mother's wise behest. There stood he and shouted, and from afar Pallas Athene uttered her voice; but amid the Trojans he roused confusion unspeakable. 18.218. / Then strode he from the wall to the trench, and there took his stand, yet joined him not to the company of the Achaeans, for he had regard to his mother's wise behest. There stood he and shouted, and from afar Pallas Athene uttered her voice; but amid the Trojans he roused confusion unspeakable. 18.219. / Then strode he from the wall to the trench, and there took his stand, yet joined him not to the company of the Achaeans, for he had regard to his mother's wise behest. There stood he and shouted, and from afar Pallas Athene uttered her voice; but amid the Trojans he roused confusion unspeakable. Clear as the trumpet's voice when it soundeth aloud 18.220. / beneath the press of murderous foemen that beleaguer a city, so clear was then the voice of the son of Aeacus. And when they heard the brazen voice of the son of Aeacus the hearts of all were dismayed; and the fair-maned horses 18.221. / beneath the press of murderous foemen that beleaguer a city, so clear was then the voice of the son of Aeacus. And when they heard the brazen voice of the son of Aeacus the hearts of all were dismayed; and the fair-maned horses 18.222. / beneath the press of murderous foemen that beleaguer a city, so clear was then the voice of the son of Aeacus. And when they heard the brazen voice of the son of Aeacus the hearts of all were dismayed; and the fair-maned horses 18.223. / beneath the press of murderous foemen that beleaguer a city, so clear was then the voice of the son of Aeacus. And when they heard the brazen voice of the son of Aeacus the hearts of all were dismayed; and the fair-maned horses 18.224. / beneath the press of murderous foemen that beleaguer a city, so clear was then the voice of the son of Aeacus. And when they heard the brazen voice of the son of Aeacus the hearts of all were dismayed; and the fair-maned horses 18.225. / turned their cars backward, for their spirits boded bane. And the charioteers were stricken with terror when they beheld the unwearied fire blaze in fearsome wise above the head of the great-souled son of Peleus; for the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, made it blaze. Thrice over the trench shouted mightily the goodly Achilles, and thrice the Trojans and their famed allies were confounded. 18.226. / turned their cars backward, for their spirits boded bane. And the charioteers were stricken with terror when they beheld the unwearied fire blaze in fearsome wise above the head of the great-souled son of Peleus; for the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, made it blaze. Thrice over the trench shouted mightily the goodly Achilles, and thrice the Trojans and their famed allies were confounded. 18.227. / turned their cars backward, for their spirits boded bane. And the charioteers were stricken with terror when they beheld the unwearied fire blaze in fearsome wise above the head of the great-souled son of Peleus; for the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, made it blaze. Thrice over the trench shouted mightily the goodly Achilles, and thrice the Trojans and their famed allies were confounded. 18.228. / turned their cars backward, for their spirits boded bane. And the charioteers were stricken with terror when they beheld the unwearied fire blaze in fearsome wise above the head of the great-souled son of Peleus; for the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, made it blaze. Thrice over the trench shouted mightily the goodly Achilles, and thrice the Trojans and their famed allies were confounded. 18.229. / turned their cars backward, for their spirits boded bane. And the charioteers were stricken with terror when they beheld the unwearied fire blaze in fearsome wise above the head of the great-souled son of Peleus; for the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, made it blaze. Thrice over the trench shouted mightily the goodly Achilles, and thrice the Trojans and their famed allies were confounded. 18.322. / from out the thick wood; and the lion coming back thereafter grieveth sore, and through many a glen he rangeth on the track of the footsteps of the man, if so be he may anywhere find him; for anger exceeding grim layeth hold of him. Even so with heavy groaning spake Achilles among the Myrmidons: 19.54. / and they went and sat them down in the front of the gathering. And last of all came the king of men, Agamemnon, burdened with his wound; for him too in the fierce conflict had Coon, Antenor's son, wounded with a thrust of his bronze-shod spear. But when all the Achaeans were gathered together, 19.55. / Achilles, swift of foot, arose among them and said:Son of Atreus, was this then the better for us twain, for thee and for me, what time with grief at heart we raged in soul-devouring strife for the sake of a girl? Would that amid the ships Artemis had slain her with an arrow 19.125. / So spake she, and sharp pain smote him in the deep of his heart, and forthwith he seized Ate by her bright-tressed head, wroth in his soul, and sware a mighty oath that never again unto Olympus and the starry heaven should Ate come, she that blindeth all. 20.293. / and the son of Peleus in close combat would with his sword have robbed Aeneas of life, had not Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, been quick to see. And forthwith he spake among the immortal gods, saying:Now look you, verily have I grief for great-hearted Aeneas, who anon shall go down to the house of Hades, 20.294. / and the son of Peleus in close combat would with his sword have robbed Aeneas of life, had not Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, been quick to see. And forthwith he spake among the immortal gods, saying:Now look you, verily have I grief for great-hearted Aeneas, who anon shall go down to the house of Hades, 20.295. / slain by the son of Peleus, for that he listened to the bidding of Apollo that smiteth afar—fool that he was! nor will the god in any wise ward from him woeful destruction. But wherefore should he, a guiltless man, suffer woes vainly by reason of sorrows that are not his own?—whereas he ever giveth acceptable gifts to the gods that hold broad heaven. 20.296. / slain by the son of Peleus, for that he listened to the bidding of Apollo that smiteth afar—fool that he was! nor will the god in any wise ward from him woeful destruction. But wherefore should he, a guiltless man, suffer woes vainly by reason of sorrows that are not his own?—whereas he ever giveth acceptable gifts to the gods that hold broad heaven. 20.297. / slain by the son of Peleus, for that he listened to the bidding of Apollo that smiteth afar—fool that he was! nor will the god in any wise ward from him woeful destruction. But wherefore should he, a guiltless man, suffer woes vainly by reason of sorrows that are not his own?—whereas he ever giveth acceptable gifts to the gods that hold broad heaven. 20.298. / slain by the son of Peleus, for that he listened to the bidding of Apollo that smiteth afar—fool that he was! nor will the god in any wise ward from him woeful destruction. But wherefore should he, a guiltless man, suffer woes vainly by reason of sorrows that are not his own?—whereas he ever giveth acceptable gifts to the gods that hold broad heaven. 20.299. / slain by the son of Peleus, for that he listened to the bidding of Apollo that smiteth afar—fool that he was! nor will the god in any wise ward from him woeful destruction. But wherefore should he, a guiltless man, suffer woes vainly by reason of sorrows that are not his own?—whereas he ever giveth acceptable gifts to the gods that hold broad heaven. 20.300. / Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.301. / Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.302. / Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.303. / Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.304. / Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.305. / from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.306. / from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.307. / from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.308. / from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.309. / from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. Then made answer to him the ox-eyed, queenly Hera: 20.310. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I, 20.311. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I, 20.312. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I, 20.313. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I, 20.314. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I, 20.315. / have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears, 20.316. / have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears, 20.317. / have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears, 20.353. / seeing that now he is glad to have escaped from death. But come, I will call to the war-loving Danaans and go forth against the other Trojans to make trial of them. He spake, and leapt along the ranks, and called to each man:No longer now stand ye afar from the Trojans, ye goodly Achaeans, 20.381. / seized with fear, when he heard the voice of the god as he spoke.But Achilles leapt among the Trojans, his heart clothed about in might, crying a terrible cry, and first he slew Iphition, the valiant son of Otrynteus, the leader of a great host, whom a Naiad nymph bare to Otrynteus, sacker of cities, 20.382. / seized with fear, when he heard the voice of the god as he spoke.But Achilles leapt among the Trojans, his heart clothed about in might, crying a terrible cry, and first he slew Iphition, the valiant son of Otrynteus, the leader of a great host, whom a Naiad nymph bare to Otrynteus, sacker of cities, 21.98. / slay me not; since I am not sprung from the same womb as Hector, who slew thy comrade the kindly and valiant. 21.114. / There shall come a dawn or eve or mid-day, when my life too shall some man take in battle, whether he smite me with cast of the spear, or with an arrow from the string. So spake he, and the other's knees were loosened where he was and his heart was melted. 21.136. / whom by the swift ships ye slew while I tarried afar. 21.146. / stood forth from the river to face him, holding two spears; and courage was set in his heart by Xanthus, being wroth because of the youths slain in battle, of whom Achilles was making havoc along the stream and had no pity. But when they were come near, as they advanced one against the other, then finst unto Asteropaeus spake swift-footed, goodly Achilles: 21.212. / and Mnesus and Thrasius and Aenius and Ophelestes; and yet more of the Paeonians would swift Achilles have slain, had not the deep-eddying River waxed wroth and called to him in the semblance of a man, sending forth a voice from out the deep eddy:O Achilles, beyond men art thou in might, and beyond men doest deeds of evil; 21.233. / of the son of Cronos, who straitly charged thee to stand by the side of the Trojans and to succour them, until the late-setting star of even shall have come forth and darkened the deep-soiled earth. 21.234. / of the son of Cronos, who straitly charged thee to stand by the side of the Trojans and to succour them, until the late-setting star of even shall have come forth and darkened the deep-soiled earth. He spake, and Achilles, famed for his spear, sprang from the bank and leapt into his midst; but the River rushed upon him with surging flood, and roused all his streams tumultuously, and swept along the many dead 21.235. / that lay thick within his bed, slain by Achilles; these lie cast forth to the land, bellowing the while like a bull, and the living he saved under his fair streams, hiding them in eddies deep and wide. 21.236. / that lay thick within his bed, slain by Achilles; these lie cast forth to the land, bellowing the while like a bull, and the living he saved under his fair streams, hiding them in eddies deep and wide. 21.237. / that lay thick within his bed, slain by Achilles; these lie cast forth to the land, bellowing the while like a bull, and the living he saved under his fair streams, hiding them in eddies deep and wide. 21.238. / that lay thick within his bed, slain by Achilles; these lie cast forth to the land, bellowing the while like a bull, and the living he saved under his fair streams, hiding them in eddies deep and wide. 21.239. / that lay thick within his bed, slain by Achilles; these lie cast forth to the land, bellowing the while like a bull, and the living he saved under his fair streams, hiding them in eddies deep and wide. 21.240. / In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 21.241. / In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 21.242. / In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 21.243. / In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 21.244. / In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 21.245. / with its thick branches, and dammed the River himself, falling all within him; but Achilles, springing forth from the eddy hasted to fly with swift feet over the plain, for he was seized with fear. Howbeit the great god ceased not, but rushed upon him with dark-crested wave, that he might stay 21.246. / with its thick branches, and dammed the River himself, falling all within him; but Achilles, springing forth from the eddy hasted to fly with swift feet over the plain, for he was seized with fear. Howbeit the great god ceased not, but rushed upon him with dark-crested wave, that he might stay 21.247. / with its thick branches, and dammed the River himself, falling all within him; but Achilles, springing forth from the eddy hasted to fly with swift feet over the plain, for he was seized with fear. Howbeit the great god ceased not, but rushed upon him with dark-crested wave, that he might stay 21.248. / with its thick branches, and dammed the River himself, falling all within him; but Achilles, springing forth from the eddy hasted to fly with swift feet over the plain, for he was seized with fear. Howbeit the great god ceased not, but rushed upon him with dark-crested wave, that he might stay 21.249. / with its thick branches, and dammed the River himself, falling all within him; but Achilles, springing forth from the eddy hasted to fly with swift feet over the plain, for he was seized with fear. Howbeit the great god ceased not, but rushed upon him with dark-crested wave, that he might stay 21.250. / goodly Achilles from his labour, and ward off ruin from the Trojans. But the son of Peleus rushed back as far as a spear-cast with the swoop of a black eagle, the mighty hunter, that is alike the strongest and swiftest of winged things; like him he darted, and upon his breast 21.251. / goodly Achilles from his labour, and ward off ruin from the Trojans. But the son of Peleus rushed back as far as a spear-cast with the swoop of a black eagle, the mighty hunter, that is alike the strongest and swiftest of winged things; like him he darted, and upon his breast 21.252. / goodly Achilles from his labour, and ward off ruin from the Trojans. But the son of Peleus rushed back as far as a spear-cast with the swoop of a black eagle, the mighty hunter, that is alike the strongest and swiftest of winged things; like him he darted, and upon his breast 21.253. / goodly Achilles from his labour, and ward off ruin from the Trojans. But the son of Peleus rushed back as far as a spear-cast with the swoop of a black eagle, the mighty hunter, that is alike the strongest and swiftest of winged things; like him he darted, and upon his breast 21.254. / goodly Achilles from his labour, and ward off ruin from the Trojans. But the son of Peleus rushed back as far as a spear-cast with the swoop of a black eagle, the mighty hunter, that is alike the strongest and swiftest of winged things; like him he darted, and upon his breast 21.255. / the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.256. / the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.257. / the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.258. / the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.259. / the bronze rang terribly, while he swerved from beneath the flood and fled ever onward, and the River followed after, flowing with a mighty roar. As when a man that guideth its flow leadeth from a dusky spring a stream of water amid his plants and garden-lots a mattock in his hands and cleareth away the dams from the channel— 21.260. / and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.261. / and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.262. / and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.263. / and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.264. / and as it floweth all the pebbles beneath are swept along therewith, and it glideth swiftly onward with murmuring sound down a sloping place and outstrippeth even him that guideth it;—even thus did the flood of the River 21.265. / ever overtake Achilles for all he was fleet of foot; for the gods are mightier than men. And oft as swift-footed, goodly Achilles strove to make stand against him and to learn if all the immortals that hold broad heaven were driving him in rout, so often would the great flood of the heaven-fed River beat upon his shoulders from above; and he would spring on high with his feet 21.266. / ever overtake Achilles for all he was fleet of foot; for the gods are mightier than men. And oft as swift-footed, goodly Achilles strove to make stand against him and to learn if all the immortals that hold broad heaven were driving him in rout, so often would the great flood of the heaven-fed River beat upon his shoulders from above; and he would spring on high with his feet 21.267. / ever overtake Achilles for all he was fleet of foot; for the gods are mightier than men. And oft as swift-footed, goodly Achilles strove to make stand against him and to learn if all the immortals that hold broad heaven were driving him in rout, so often would the great flood of the heaven-fed River beat upon his shoulders from above; and he would spring on high with his feet 21.268. / ever overtake Achilles for all he was fleet of foot; for the gods are mightier than men. And oft as swift-footed, goodly Achilles strove to make stand against him and to learn if all the immortals that hold broad heaven were driving him in rout, so often would the great flood of the heaven-fed River beat upon his shoulders from above; and he would spring on high with his feet 21.269. / ever overtake Achilles for all he was fleet of foot; for the gods are mightier than men. And oft as swift-footed, goodly Achilles strove to make stand against him and to learn if all the immortals that hold broad heaven were driving him in rout, so often would the great flood of the heaven-fed River beat upon his shoulders from above; and he would spring on high with his feet 21.270. / in vexation of spirit, and the River was ever tiring his knees with its violent flow beneath, and was snatching away the ground from under his feet. 21.271. / in vexation of spirit, and the River was ever tiring his knees with its violent flow beneath, and was snatching away the ground from under his feet. 21.305. / Nor yet would Scamander abate his fury, but was even more wroth against the son of Peleus, and raising himself on high he made the surge of his flood into a crest, and he called with a shout to Simois:Dear brother, the might of this man let us stay, though it need the two of us, seeing presently he will lay waste the great city of king Priam, 21.306. / Nor yet would Scamander abate his fury, but was even more wroth against the son of Peleus, and raising himself on high he made the surge of his flood into a crest, and he called with a shout to Simois:Dear brother, the might of this man let us stay, though it need the two of us, seeing presently he will lay waste the great city of king Priam, 21.307. / Nor yet would Scamander abate his fury, but was even more wroth against the son of Peleus, and raising himself on high he made the surge of his flood into a crest, and he called with a shout to Simois:Dear brother, the might of this man let us stay, though it need the two of us, seeing presently he will lay waste the great city of king Priam, 21.390. / in joy as he beheld the gods joining in strife. Then no more held they long aloof, for Ares, piercer of shields, began the fray, and first leapt upon Athene, brazen spear in hand, and spake a word of reviling:Wherefore now again, thou dog-fly, 21.441. / it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.442. / it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.443. / it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.444. / it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.445. / at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.446. / at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.447. / at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.448. / at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.449. / at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.450. / But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.451. / But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.452. / But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.453. / But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.454. / But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.455. / Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.456. / Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.457. / Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.458. / Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.459. / Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.460. / in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.595. / And the son of Peleus in his turn set upon godlike Agenor; howbeit Apollo suffered him not to win glory, but snatched away Agenor, and shrouded him in thick mist, and sent him forth from the war to go his way in peace. 21.596. / And the son of Peleus in his turn set upon godlike Agenor; howbeit Apollo suffered him not to win glory, but snatched away Agenor, and shrouded him in thick mist, and sent him forth from the war to go his way in peace. 21.597. / And the son of Peleus in his turn set upon godlike Agenor; howbeit Apollo suffered him not to win glory, but snatched away Agenor, and shrouded him in thick mist, and sent him forth from the war to go his way in peace. 21.598. / And the son of Peleus in his turn set upon godlike Agenor; howbeit Apollo suffered him not to win glory, but snatched away Agenor, and shrouded him in thick mist, and sent him forth from the war to go his way in peace. 21.599. / And the son of Peleus in his turn set upon godlike Agenor; howbeit Apollo suffered him not to win glory, but snatched away Agenor, and shrouded him in thick mist, and sent him forth from the war to go his way in peace. 21.600. / But Apollo by craft kept the son of Peleus away from the folk, for likened in all things to Agenor's self the god that worketh afar took his stand before his feet; and Achilles rushed upon him swiftly to pursue him. And while he pursued him over the wheat-bearing plain, turning him toward the river, deep-eddying Scamander, as he by but little outran him—for by craft did Apollo beguile him, 21.601. / But Apollo by craft kept the son of Peleus away from the folk, for likened in all things to Agenor's self the god that worketh afar took his stand before his feet; and Achilles rushed upon him swiftly to pursue him. And while he pursued him over the wheat-bearing plain, turning him toward the river, deep-eddying Scamander, as he by but little outran him—for by craft did Apollo beguile him, 21.602. / But Apollo by craft kept the son of Peleus away from the folk, for likened in all things to Agenor's self the god that worketh afar took his stand before his feet; and Achilles rushed upon him swiftly to pursue him. And while he pursued him over the wheat-bearing plain, turning him toward the river, deep-eddying Scamander, as he by but little outran him—for by craft did Apollo beguile him, 21.603. / But Apollo by craft kept the son of Peleus away from the folk, for likened in all things to Agenor's self the god that worketh afar took his stand before his feet; and Achilles rushed upon him swiftly to pursue him. And while he pursued him over the wheat-bearing plain, turning him toward the river, deep-eddying Scamander, as he by but little outran him—for by craft did Apollo beguile him, 21.604. / But Apollo by craft kept the son of Peleus away from the folk, for likened in all things to Agenor's self the god that worketh afar took his stand before his feet; and Achilles rushed upon him swiftly to pursue him. And while he pursued him over the wheat-bearing plain, turning him toward the river, deep-eddying Scamander, as he by but little outran him—for by craft did Apollo beguile him, 21.605. / that he ever hoped to overtake him in his running—meanwhile the rest of the Trojans that were fleeing in rout came crowding gladly toward the city, and the town was filled with the throng of them. Neither dared they longer to await one another outside the city and wall, and to know who perchance was escaped and 21.606. / that he ever hoped to overtake him in his running—meanwhile the rest of the Trojans that were fleeing in rout came crowding gladly toward the city, and the town was filled with the throng of them. Neither dared they longer to await one another outside the city and wall, and to know who perchance was escaped and 21.607. / that he ever hoped to overtake him in his running—meanwhile the rest of the Trojans that were fleeing in rout came crowding gladly toward the city, and the town was filled with the throng of them. Neither dared they longer to await one another outside the city and wall, and to know who perchance was escaped and 22.7. / But Hector did deadly fate ensnare to abide there where he was in front of Ilios and the Scaean gates. Then unto the son of Peleus spake Phoebus Apollo:Wherefore, son of Peleus, dost thou pursue me with swift feet, thyself a mortal, while I am an immortal god? 22.8. / But Hector did deadly fate ensnare to abide there where he was in front of Ilios and the Scaean gates. Then unto the son of Peleus spake Phoebus Apollo:Wherefore, son of Peleus, dost thou pursue me with swift feet, thyself a mortal, while I am an immortal god? 22.9. / But Hector did deadly fate ensnare to abide there where he was in front of Ilios and the Scaean gates. Then unto the son of Peleus spake Phoebus Apollo:Wherefore, son of Peleus, dost thou pursue me with swift feet, thyself a mortal, while I am an immortal god? 22.10. / Not even yet hast thou known me that I am a god, but thou ragest incessantly! Hast thou in good sooth no care for thy toil regarding the Trojans whom thou dravest in rout, who now are gathered into the city, while thou hast turned thee aside hitherward? Thou shalt never slay me, for lo, I am not one that is appointed to die. Then with a mighty burst of anger spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 22.11. / Not even yet hast thou known me that I am a god, but thou ragest incessantly! Hast thou in good sooth no care for thy toil regarding the Trojans whom thou dravest in rout, who now are gathered into the city, while thou hast turned thee aside hitherward? Thou shalt never slay me, for lo, I am not one that is appointed to die. Then with a mighty burst of anger spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 22.12. / Not even yet hast thou known me that I am a god, but thou ragest incessantly! Hast thou in good sooth no care for thy toil regarding the Trojans whom thou dravest in rout, who now are gathered into the city, while thou hast turned thee aside hitherward? Thou shalt never slay me, for lo, I am not one that is appointed to die. Then with a mighty burst of anger spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 22.13. / Not even yet hast thou known me that I am a god, but thou ragest incessantly! Hast thou in good sooth no care for thy toil regarding the Trojans whom thou dravest in rout, who now are gathered into the city, while thou hast turned thee aside hitherward? Thou shalt never slay me, for lo, I am not one that is appointed to die. Then with a mighty burst of anger spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 22.14. / Not even yet hast thou known me that I am a god, but thou ragest incessantly! Hast thou in good sooth no care for thy toil regarding the Trojans whom thou dravest in rout, who now are gathered into the city, while thou hast turned thee aside hitherward? Thou shalt never slay me, for lo, I am not one that is appointed to die. Then with a mighty burst of anger spake to him swift-footed Achilles: 22.15. / Thou hast foiled me, thou god that workest afar, most cruel of all gods in that thou hast now turned me hither from the wall; else had many a man yet bitten the ground or ever they came into Ilios. Now hast thou robbed me of great glory, aud them hast thou saved full easily, seeing thou hadst no fear of vengeance in the aftertime. 22.16. / Thou hast foiled me, thou god that workest afar, most cruel of all gods in that thou hast now turned me hither from the wall; else had many a man yet bitten the ground or ever they came into Ilios. Now hast thou robbed me of great glory, aud them hast thou saved full easily, seeing thou hadst no fear of vengeance in the aftertime. 22.17. / Thou hast foiled me, thou god that workest afar, most cruel of all gods in that thou hast now turned me hither from the wall; else had many a man yet bitten the ground or ever they came into Ilios. Now hast thou robbed me of great glory, aud them hast thou saved full easily, seeing thou hadst no fear of vengeance in the aftertime. 22.18. / Thou hast foiled me, thou god that workest afar, most cruel of all gods in that thou hast now turned me hither from the wall; else had many a man yet bitten the ground or ever they came into Ilios. Now hast thou robbed me of great glory, aud them hast thou saved full easily, seeing thou hadst no fear of vengeance in the aftertime. 22.19. / Thou hast foiled me, thou god that workest afar, most cruel of all gods in that thou hast now turned me hither from the wall; else had many a man yet bitten the ground or ever they came into Ilios. Now hast thou robbed me of great glory, aud them hast thou saved full easily, seeing thou hadst no fear of vengeance in the aftertime. 22.20. / Verily I would avenge me on thee, had I but the power. So spake he, and was gone toward the city in pride of heart, speeding as speedeth with a chariot a horse that is winner of prizes, one that lightly courseth at full speed over the plain; even so swiftly plied Achilles his feet and knees. 22.98. / and terribly he glareth as he coileth him about within his lair; even so Hector in his courage unquenchable would not give ground, leaning his bright shield against the jutting wall. Then, mightily moved, he spake unto his own great-hearted spirit:Ah, woe is me, if I go within the gates and the walls 22.99. / and terribly he glareth as he coileth him about within his lair; even so Hector in his courage unquenchable would not give ground, leaning his bright shield against the jutting wall. Then, mightily moved, he spake unto his own great-hearted spirit:Ah, woe is me, if I go within the gates and the walls 22.100. / Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly, 22.101. / Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly, 22.102. / Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly, 22.103. / Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly, 22.104. / Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly, 22.105. / I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home, 22.106. / I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home, 22.107. / I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home, 22.108. / I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home, 22.109. / I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home, 22.110. / or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.111. / or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.112. / or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.113. / or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.114. / or myself perish gloriously before the city. Or what if I lay down my bossed shield and my heavy helm, and leaning my spear against the wall, go myself to meet peerless Achilles, and promise him that Helen, 22.115. / and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.116. / and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.117. / and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.118. / and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.119. / and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.120. / that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed, 22.121. / that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed, 22.122. / that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed, 22.123. / that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed, 22.124. / that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed, 22.125. / as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.126. / as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.127. / as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.128. / as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.129. / as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.130. / let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.131. / let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.159. / where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.160. / that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.161. / that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 23.490. / and yet furthur would the strife between the twain have gone, had not Achilles himself stood up, and spoken, saying:No longer now, O Aias and Idomeneus, answer ye one another with angry words, with evil words, for that were unseemly. Ye have indignation with another, whoso should act thus. 23.491. / and yet furthur would the strife between the twain have gone, had not Achilles himself stood up, and spoken, saying:No longer now, O Aias and Idomeneus, answer ye one another with angry words, with evil words, for that were unseemly. Ye have indignation with another, whoso should act thus. 24.49. / the which harmeth men greatly and profiteth them withal. Lo, it may be that a man hath lost one dearer even than was this—a brother, that the selfsame mother bare, or haply a son; yet verily when he hath wept and wailed for him he maketh an end; for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men. 24.358. / here is somewhat that calls for prudent thought. I see a man, and anon methinks shall we be cut to pieces. Come, let us flee in thie chariot, or at least clasp his knees and entreat him, if so be he will have pity. So spake he, and the old man's mind was confounded and he was sore afraid, and up stood the hair on his pliant limbs, 24.359. / here is somewhat that calls for prudent thought. I see a man, and anon methinks shall we be cut to pieces. Come, let us flee in thie chariot, or at least clasp his knees and entreat him, if so be he will have pity. So spake he, and the old man's mind was confounded and he was sore afraid, and up stood the hair on his pliant limbs, 24.360. / and he stood in a daze. But of himself the Helper drew nigh, and took the ohd man's hand, and made question of him, saying:Whither, Father, dost thou thus guide horses and mules through the immortal night when other mortals are sleeping? Art thou untouched by fear of the fury-breathing Achaeans, 24.480. / And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.481. / And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.482. / And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.483. / And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.484. / And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.503. / him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he, 24.504. / him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he, 24.516. / forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans, 24.629. / And Automedon took bread and dealt it forth on the table in fair baskets, while Achilles dealt the meat. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, then verily Priam, son of Dardanus, marvelled at Achilles, how tall he was and how comely; 24.630. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.631. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.632. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying: 24.633. / for he was like the gods to look upon. And a son of Dardanus, did Achilles marvel, beholding his goodly aspect and hearkening to his words. But when they had had their fill of gazing one upon the other, then the old man, godlike Priam, was first to speak, saying:
9. Homer, Odyssey, 1.10, 1.19, 1.20, 1.21, 1.74, 1.75, 1.81, 1.161, 1.162, 1.163, 1.164, 1.165, 1.166, 1.167, 1.168, 1.169, 1.170, 1.171, 1.172, 1.173, 1.174, 1.175, 1.362, 1.363, 1.364, 2.146, 2.147, 2.148, 2.149, 2.150, 2.151, 2.152, 2.153, 2.154, 2.155, 2.156, 2.157, 2.158, 2.159, 2.160, 2.161, 2.162, 2.163, 2.164, 2.165, 2.166, 2.167, 2.168, 2.169, 2.170, 2.171, 2.172, 2.173, 2.174, 2.175, 2.176, 2.177, 2.178, 2.179, 2.180, 2.181, 2.182, 2.183, 2.184, 2.185, 2.186, 2.187, 2.188, 2.189, 2.190, 2.191, 2.192, 2.193, 2.194, 2.195, 2.196, 2.197, 2.198, 2.199, 2.200, 2.201, 2.202, 2.203, 2.204, 2.205, 2.206, 2.207, 3.147, 3.180, 3.181, 3.182, 4.271, 4.272, 4.273, 4.274, 4.275, 4.276, 4.277, 4.278, 4.279, 4.280, 4.281, 4.282, 4.283, 4.284, 4.285, 4.286, 4.287, 4.288, 4.289, 4.499, 4.500, 4.501, 4.502, 4.503, 4.504, 4.505, 4.506, 4.507, 4.508, 4.509, 4.510, 4.703, 4.704, 4.705, 4.706, 4.707, 4.708, 4.709, 4.710, 4.711, 4.712, 4.713, 4.714, 4.715, 4.716, 4.717, 4.718, 4.719, 4.720, 4.721, 4.805, 5.38, 5.39, 5.40, 5.122, 5.394, 5.395, 5.396, 5.397, 5.398, 5.463, 8.304, 8.565, 8.566, 8.567, 8.568, 8.569, 9.64, 9.65, 9.66, 9.467, 9.531, 9.534, 9.536, 10.64, 10.72, 10.73, 10.74, 10.75, 10.121, 10.122, 10.123, 10.124, 10.125, 10.126, 10.127, 10.128, 10.129, 10.130, 10.131, 10.132, 10.135-12.142, 10.201, 10.209, 10.241, 10.246, 10.247, 10.248, 10.398, 10.399, 10.409, 10.454, 10.497, 10.498, 10.499, 10.576, 10.577, 10.578, 11.5, 11.100, 11.101, 11.102, 11.103, 11.104, 11.105, 11.106, 11.107, 11.108, 11.109, 11.110, 11.111, 11.112, 11.113, 11.114, 11.115, 11.307, 11.308, 11.309, 11.310, 11.311, 11.312, 11.313, 11.314, 11.315, 11.316, 11.317, 11.318, 11.319, 11.320, 11.475, 11.476, 11.477, 11.478, 11.479, 11.480, 11.481, 11.482, 11.483, 11.484, 11.485, 11.486, 11.487, 11.488, 11.489, 11.490, 11.491, 11.540, 11.563, 11.564, 11.565, 12.137, 12.138, 12.139, 12.140, 12.141, 12.169, 12.234, 12.286, 12.287, 12.288, 12.289, 12.290, 12.295, 12.309, 12.310, 12.311, 12.312, 12.313, 12.314, 12.315, 12.325, 12.326, 12.338, 12.370, 12.371, 12.372, 12.374, 12.375, 12.376, 12.377, 12.378, 12.379, 12.380, 12.381, 12.382, 12.383, 12.384, 12.385, 12.386, 12.387, 12.388, 12.389, 12.390, 12.403, 12.404, 12.405, 12.406, 12.407, 12.408, 12.409, 12.410, 12.411, 12.412, 12.413, 12.414, 12.415, 12.416, 12.417, 12.418, 12.419, 13.2, 13.125, 13.126, 13.127, 13.128, 13.129, 13.130, 13.131, 13.132, 13.133, 13.134, 13.135, 13.136, 13.137, 13.138, 13.139, 13.140, 13.141, 13.142, 13.143, 13.144, 13.145, 13.146, 13.147, 13.148, 13.149, 13.150, 13.151, 13.152, 13.153, 13.154, 13.155, 13.156, 13.157, 13.158, 13.159, 13.160, 13.161, 13.162, 13.163, 13.164, 13.165, 13.166, 13.167, 13.168, 13.169, 13.170, 13.171, 13.172, 13.173, 13.174, 13.175, 13.176, 13.177, 13.178, 13.179, 13.180, 13.181, 13.182, 13.183, 13.184, 13.185, 13.186, 13.187, 17.150, 18.35, 18.100, 18.155, 18.156, 18.212, 18.341, 18.342, 18.350, 19.136, 19.204, 19.205, 19.206, 19.207, 19.208, 19.263, 19.264, 19.603, 19.604, 20.8, 20.10, 20.13, 20.14, 20.15, 20.16, 20.18, 20.19, 20.20, 20.284, 20.285, 20.286, 20.345, 20.346, 20.347, 20.348, 20.349, 20.358, 20.374, 20.390, 21.357, 21.358, 21.375, 21.377, 22.42, 23.73, 23.74, 23.75, 23.76, 23.77, 23.108, 23.109, 23.110, 23.166, 23.167, 23.168, 23.169, 23.170, 23.171, 23.172, 23.173, 23.174, 23.175, 23.176, 23.177, 23.178, 23.179, 23.180, 23.181, 23.182, 23.183, 23.184, 23.185, 23.186, 23.187, 23.188, 23.189, 23.190, 23.191, 23.192, 23.193, 23.194, 23.195, 23.196, 23.197, 23.198, 23.199, 23.200, 23.201, 23.202, 23.203, 23.204, 23.225, 23.226, 23.227, 23.233, 23.234, 23.235, 23.236, 23.237, 23.238, 23.239, 23.240, 24.213, 24.214, 24.215, 24.216, 24.217, 24.218, 24.219, 24.220, 24.221, 24.222, 24.223, 24.224, 24.225, 24.226, 24.227, 24.228, 24.229, 24.230, 24.231, 24.232, 24.233, 24.234, 24.235, 24.236, 24.237, 24.238, 24.239, 24.240, 24.241, 24.242, 24.243, 24.244, 24.245, 24.246, 24.247, 24.248, 24.249, 24.250, 24.251, 24.252, 24.253, 24.254, 24.255, 24.256, 24.257, 24.258, 24.259, 24.260, 24.261, 24.262, 24.263, 24.264, 24.265, 24.266, 24.267, 24.268, 24.269, 24.270, 24.271, 24.272, 24.273, 24.274, 24.275, 24.276, 24.277, 24.278, 24.279, 24.280, 24.281, 24.282, 24.283, 24.284, 24.285, 24.286, 24.287, 24.288, 24.289, 24.290, 24.291, 24.292, 24.293, 24.294, 24.295, 24.296, 24.297, 24.298, 24.299, 24.300, 24.301, 24.302, 24.303, 24.304, 24.305, 24.306, 24.307, 24.308, 24.309, 24.310, 24.311, 24.312, 24.313, 24.314, 24.315, 24.316, 24.317, 24.318, 24.319, 24.320, 24.321, 24.322, 24.323, 24.324, 24.325, 24.326, 24.327, 24.328, 24.329, 24.330, 24.331, 24.332, 24.333, 24.334, 24.335, 24.336, 24.337, 24.338, 24.339, 24.340, 24.341, 24.342, 24.343, 24.344, 24.345, 24.346, 24.347, 24.348, 24.349, 24.350, 24.351, 24.352, 24.353, 24.354, 24.355, 24.356, 24.357, 24.358, 24.359, 24.360 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 113
10. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 6.16, 21.5 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 340
6.16. "כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה עִמְדוּ עַל־דְּרָכִים וּרְאוּ וְשַׁאֲלוּ לִנְתִבוֹת עוֹלָם אֵי־זֶה דֶרֶךְ הַטּוֹב וּלְכוּ־בָהּ וּמִצְאוּ מַרְגּוֹעַ לְנַפְשְׁכֶם וַיֹּאמְרוּ לֹא נֵלֵךְ׃", 21.5. "וְנִלְחַמְתִּי אֲנִי אִתְּכֶם בְּיָד נְטוּיָה וּבִזְרוֹעַ חֲזָקָה וּבְאַף וּבְחֵמָה וּבְקֶצֶף גָּדוֹל׃", 6.16. "Thus saith the LORD: Stand ye in the ways and see, And ask for the old paths, Where is the good way, and walk therein, And ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said: ‘We will not walk therein.’", 21.5. "And I myself will fight against you with an outstretched hand and with a strong arm, even in anger, and in fury, and in great wrath.",
11. Hesiod, Works And Days, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-212, 22, 228, 23-27, 274-275, 28, 286-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 60, 600-609, 61, 610-616, 62-97, 99, 98 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 153, 155
98. Before this time men lived quite separately,
12. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 10.69-10.71 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 482
13. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 220
34d. ὀργῆς τὴν ψῆφον. εἰ δή τις ὑμῶν οὕτως ἔχει—οὐκ ἀξιῶ μὲν γὰρ ἔγωγε, εἰ δʼ οὖν—ἐπιεικῆ ἄν μοι δοκῶ πρὸς τοῦτον λέγειν λέγων ὅτι ἐμοί, ὦ ἄριστε, εἰσὶν μέν πού τινες καὶ οἰκεῖοι· καὶ γὰρ τοῦτο αὐτὸ τὸ τοῦ Ὁμήρου, οὐδʼ ἐγὼ ἀπὸ δρυὸς οὐδʼ ἀπὸ πέτρης πέφυκα ἀλλʼ ἐξ ἀνθρώπων, ὥστε καὶ οἰκεῖοί μοί εἰσι καὶ ὑεῖς γε, ὦ ἄνδρες Ἀθηναῖοι, τρεῖς, εἷς μὲν μειράκιον ἤδη, δύο δὲ παιδία· ἀλλʼ ὅμως οὐδένα αὐτῶν δεῦρο ἀναβιβασάμενος δεήσομαι ὑμῶν ἀποψηφίσασθαι. τί δὴ οὖν οὐδὲν τούτων ποιήσω; οὐκ αὐθαδιζόμενος, ὦ ἄνδρες 34d. —I do not believe there is such a person—but if there should be, I think I should be speaking fairly if I said to him, My friend, I too have relatives, for I am, as Homer has it, not born of an oak or a rock, but of human parents, so that I have relatives and, men of Athens , I have three sons, one nearly grown up, and two still children; but nevertheless I shall not bring any of them here and beg you to acquit me. And why shall I not do so? Not because I am stubborn, Athenians,
14. Plato, Charmides, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
15. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
333e. Soc. Do you mean, Protagoras, I asked,
16. Plato, Euthydemus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
17. Euripides, Medea, 1078-1079 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 625
18. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1000-1001, 914-922, 924-966, 983-999, 923 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218
19. Herodotus, Histories, a b c d\n0 7.212 7.212 7 212\n1 8.15 8.15 8 15 \n2 8.86 8.86 8 86 \n3 8.97 8.97 8 97 \n4 8.103 8.103 8 103\n.. ... ... .. ...\n129 8.87 8.87 8 87 \n130 6.84.3 6.84.3 6 84 \n131 5.105 5.105 5 105\n132 3.66.3 3.66.3 3 66 \n133 1.155 1.155 1 155\n\n[134 rows x 4 columns] (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 356
7.212. It is said that during these assaults in the battle the king, as he watched, jumped up three times from the throne in fear for his army. This, then, is how the fighting progressed, and on the next day the barbarians fought no better. They joined battle supposing that their enemies, being so few, were now disabled by wounds and could no longer resist. ,The Hellenes, however, stood ordered in ranks by nation, and each of them fought in turn, except the Phocians, who were posted on the mountain to guard the path. When the Persians found nothing different from what they saw the day before, they withdrew.
20. Sophocles, Ajax, 500-505, 510-513 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218
21. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 457
458a. ΣΩ. ἐγὼ οὖν, εἰ μὲν καὶ σὺ εἶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὧνπερ καὶ ἐγώ, ἡδέως ἄν σε διερωτῴην· εἰ δὲ μή, ἐῴην ἄν. ἐγὼ δὲ τίνων εἰμί; τῶν ἡδέως μὲν ἂν ἐλεγχθέντων εἴ τι μὴ ἀληθὲς λέγω, ἡδέως δʼ ἂν ἐλεγξάντων εἴ τίς τι μὴ ἀληθὲς λέγοι, οὐκ ἀηδέστερον μεντἂν ἐλεγχθέντων ἢ ἐλεγξάντων· μεῖζον γὰρ αὐτὸ ἀγαθὸν ἡγοῦμαι, ὅσῳπερ μεῖζον ἀγαθόν ἐστιν αὐτὸν ἀπαλλαγῆναι κακοῦ τοῦ μεγίστου ἢ ἄλλον ἀπαλλάξαι. οὐδὲν γὰρ οἶμαι τοσοῦτον κακὸν εἶναι ἀνθρώπῳ, ὅσον δόξα 458a. Soc. I therefore, if you are a person of the same sort as myself, should be glad to continue questioning you: if not, I can let it drop. of what sort am I? One of those who would be glad to be refuted if I say anything untrue, and glad to refute anyone else who might speak untruly; but just as glad, mind you, to be refuted as to refute, since I regard the former as the greater benefit, in proportion as it is a greater benefit for oneself to be delivered from the greatest evil than to deliver some one else. For I consider that a man cannot suffer any evil so great as a false opinion on the subjects of our actual argument.
22. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 401
23. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1014-1016 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 638
1016. οὕτω σφόδρα ζηλότυπος ὁ νεανίσκος ἦν.
24. Isocrates, Orations, 1.42 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 401
25. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 4.5.9, 7.5.37 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 419
4.5.9. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἡμέρα ἐγένετο, καὶ ἐπὶ θύρας οὐδεὶς ἧκε πλὴν οἵπερ καὶ συνεδείπνουν, καὶ τὸ στρατόπεδον ἤκουε κενὸν εἶναι τῶν Μήδων καὶ τῶν ἱππέων, καὶ ἑώρα, ἐπειδὴ ἐξῆλθεν, οὕτως ἔχοντα, ἐνταῦθα δὴ ἐβριμοῦτό τε τῷ Κύρῳ καὶ τοῖς Μήδοις τῷ καταλιπόντας αὐτὸν ἔρημον οἴχεσθαι, καὶ εὐθύς, ὥσπερ λέγεται ὠμὸς εἶναι καὶ ἀγνώμων, τῶν παρόντων κελεύει τινὰ λαβόντα τοὺς ἑαυτοῦ ἱππέας πορεύεσθαι ὡς τάχιστα ἐπὶ τὸ ἀμφὶ Κῦρον στράτευμα καὶ λέγειν τάδε. 7.5.37. ἐκ δὲ τούτου ἐπιθυμῶν ὁ Κῦρος ἤδη κατασκευάσασθαι καὶ αὐτὸς ὡς βασιλεῖ ἡγεῖτο πρέπειν, ἔδοξεν αὐτῷ τοῦτο σὺν τῇ τῶν φίλων γνώμῃ ποιῆσαι, ὡς ὅτι ἥκιστα ἂν ἐπιφθόνως σπάνιός τε καὶ σεμνὸς φανείη. ὧδε οὖν ἐμηχανᾶτο τοῦτο. ἅμα τῇ ἡμέρᾳ στὰς ὅπου ἐδόκει ἐπιτήδειον εἶναι προσεδέχετο τὸν βουλόμενον λέγειν τι καὶ ἀποκρινάμενος ἀπέπεμπεν. 4.5.9. 7.5.37. After this, Cyrus conceived a desire to establish Cyrus holds court himself as he thought became a king, but he decided to do it with the approval of his friends, in such a way that his public appearances should be rare and solemn and yet excite as little jealousy as possible. So he adopted the following plan: at day-break he would take his station in a place that seemed to him to be adapted to the purpose and there receive all who had any matter to bring before him, give them an answer, and send them away.
26. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.1.27-1.1.31, 1.2.14, 1.3.13, 1.6.26-1.6.27, 1.6.29-1.6.31, 1.6.33-1.6.35, 1.7, 1.7.4-1.7.6, 1.7.9-1.7.15, 1.7.17-1.7.23, 1.7.25-1.7.35, 2.3.24-2.3.56 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 401
27. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 3.3.12-3.3.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 221
3.3.12. ἀκούσας δὲ Ξενοφῶν ἔλεγεν ὅτι ὀρθῶς αἰτιῷντο καὶ αὐτὸ τὸ ἔργον αὐτοῖς μαρτυροίη. ἀλλʼ ἐγώ, ἔφη, ἠναγκάσθην διώκειν, ἐπειδὴ ἑώρων ἡμᾶς ἐν τῷ μένειν κακῶς μὲν πάσχοντας, ἀντιποιεῖν δὲ οὐ δυναμένους. 3.3.13. ἐπειδὴ δὲ ἐδιώκομεν, ἀληθῆ, ἔφη, ὑμεῖς λέγετε· κακῶς μὲν γὰρ ποιεῖν οὐδὲν μᾶλλον ἐδυνάμεθα τοὺς πολεμίους, ἀνεχωροῦμεν δὲ παγχαλέπως. 3.3.14. τοῖς οὖν θεοῖς χάρις ὅτι οὐ σὺν πολλῇ ῥώμῃ ἀλλὰ σὺν ὀλίγοις ἦλθον, ὥστε βλάψαι μὲν μὴ μεγάλα, δηλῶσαι δὲ ὧν δεόμεθα. 3.3.15. νῦν γὰρ οἱ πολέμιοι τοξεύουσι καὶ σφενδονῶσιν ὅσον οὔτε οἱ Κρῆτες ἀντιτοξεύειν δύνανται οὔτε οἱ ἐκ χειρὸς βάλλοντες ἐξικνεῖσθαι· ὅταν δὲ αὐτοὺς διώκωμεν, πολὺ μὲν οὐχ οἷόν τε χωρίον ἀπὸ τοῦ στρατεύματος διώκειν, ἐν ὀλίγῳ δὲ οὐδʼ εἰ ταχὺς εἴη πεζὸς πεζὸν ἂν διώκων καταλαμβάνοι ἐκ τόξου ῥύματος. 3.3.16. ἡμεῖς οὖν εἰ μέλλοιμεν τούτους εἴργειν ὥστε μὴ δύνασθαι βλάπτειν ἡμᾶς πορευομένους, σφενδονητῶν τὴν ταχίστην δεῖ καὶ ἱππέων. ἀκούω δʼ εἶναι ἐν τῷ στρατεύματι ἡμῶν Ῥοδίους, ὧν τοὺς πολλούς φασιν ἐπίστασθαι σφενδονᾶν, καὶ τὸ βέλος αὐτῶν καὶ διπλάσιον φέρεσθαι τῶν Περσικῶν σφενδονῶν. 3.3.17. ἐκεῖναι γὰρ διὰ τὸ χειροπληθέσι τοῖς λίθοις σφενδονᾶν ἐπὶ βραχὺ ἐξικνοῦνται, οἱ δὲ Ῥόδιοι καὶ ταῖς μολυβδίσιν ἐπίστανται χρῆσθαι. 3.3.18. ἢν οὖν αὐτῶν ἐπισκεψώμεθα τίνες πέπανται σφενδόνας, καὶ τούτῳ μὲν δῶμεν αὐτῶν ἀργύριον, τῷ δὲ ἄλλας πλέκειν ἐθέλοντι ἄλλο ἀργύριον τελῶμεν, καὶ τῷ σφενδονᾶν ἐν τῷ τεταγμένῳ ἐθέλοντι ἄλλην τινὰ ἀτέλειαν εὑρίσκωμεν, ἴσως τινὲς φανοῦνται ἱκανοὶ ἡμᾶς ὠφελεῖν. 3.3.19. ὁρῶ δὲ ἵππους ὄντας ἐν τῷ στρατεύματι, τοὺς μέν τινας παρʼ ἐμοί, τοὺς δὲ τῶν Κλεάρχου καταλελειμμένους, πολλοὺς δὲ καὶ ἄλλους αἰχμαλώτους σκευοφοροῦντας. ἂν οὖν τούτους πάντας ἐκλέξαντες σκευοφόρα μὲν ἀντιδῶμεν, τοὺς δὲ ἵππους εἰς ἱππέας κατασκευάσωμεν, ἴσως καὶ οὗτοί τι τοὺς φεύγοντας ἀνιάσουσιν. 3.3.20. ἔδοξε καὶ ταῦτα. καὶ ταύτης τῆς νυκτὸς σφενδονῆται μὲν εἰς διακοσίους ἐγένοντο, ἵπποι δὲ καὶ ἱππεῖς ἐδοκιμάσθησαν τῇ ὑστεραίᾳ εἰς πεντήκοντα, καὶ σπολάδες καὶ θώρακες αὐτοῖς ἐπορίσθησαν, καὶ ἵππαρχος ἐπεστάθη Λύκιος ὁ Πολυστράτου Ἀθηναῖος. 3.3.12. When Xenophon heard their words, he replied that they were right in finding fault with him, and that the outcome bore witness of itself for their view. But, he continued, I was compelled to pursue when I saw that by keeping our places we were suffering severely and were still unable to strike a blow ourselves. 3.3.13. As to what happened, however, when we did pursue, you are quite right: we were no better able to inflict harm upon the enemy, and it was only with the utmost difficulty that we effected our own withdrawal. 3.3.14. Let us thank the gods, therefore, that they came, not with a large force, but with a handful, so that without doing us any great damage they have revealed our needs. 3.3.15. For at present the enemy can shoot arrows and sling stones so far that neither our Cretan bowmen nor our javelin-men can reach them in reply; and when we pursue them, a long chase, away from our main body, is out of the question, and in a short chase no foot-soldier, even if he is swift, can overtake another foot-soldier who has a bow-shot the start of him. 3.3.16. Hence, if we should propose to put an end to the possibility of their harming us on our march, we need slingers ourselves at once, and horsemen also. Now I am told that there are Rhodians Rhodian slingers were hardly less famous than Cretan bowmen. in our army, that most of them understand the use of the sling, and that their missile carries no less than twice as far as those from the Persian slings. 3.3.17. For the latter have only a short range because the stones that are used in them are as large as the hand can hold; the Rhodians, however, are versed also in the art of slinging leaden bullets. 3.3.18. If, therefore, we should ascertain who among them possess slings, and should not only pay these people for their slings, but likewise pay anyone who is willing to plait new ones, and if, furthermore, we should devise some sort of exemption for the man who will volunteer to serve as a slinger at his appointed post, it may be that men will come forward who will be capable of helping us. 3.3.19. Again, I observe that there are horses in the army—a few at my own quarters, others that made part of Clearchus’ troop and were left behind, i.e. when Clearchus’ troopers deserted to the King ( Xen. Anab. 2.2.7 ). and many others that have been taken from the enemy and are used as pack-animals. If, then, we should pick out all these horses, replacing them with mules, and should equip them for cavalry, it may be that this cavalry also will cause some annoyance to the enemy when they are in flight. 3.3.20. These proposals also were adopted, and in the course of that night a company of two hundred slingers was organized, while on the following day horses and horsemen to the number of fifty were examined and accepted, and jerkins and cuirasses were provided for them; and Lycius, the son of Polystratus, an Athenian, was put in command of the troop.
28. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
29. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
30. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.140.1, 2.22.1, 2.41.1, 2.44, 2.51.3, 2.59-2.65, 2.59.3, 2.60.1, 2.61.2, 2.63.2-2.63.3, 2.65.8, 3.34-3.50, 3.36.4-3.36.6, 3.37.2, 3.38.1, 3.40.1, 3.40.4, 3.42.1, 3.43.2, 3.43.5, 3.49.4, 7.69-7.72, 7.87, 8.1.1, 8.27.2-8.27.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 215, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 374, 375, 401
1.140.1. ‘τῆς μὲν γνώμης, ὦ Ἀθηναῖοι, αἰεὶ τῆς αὐτῆς ἔχομαι, μὴ εἴκειν Πελοποννησίοις, καίπερ εἰδὼς τοὺς ἀνθρώπους οὐ τῇ αὐτῇ ὀργῇ ἀναπειθομένους τε πολεμεῖν καὶ ἐν τῷ ἔργῳ πράσσοντας, πρὸς δὲ τὰς ξυμφορὰς καὶ τὰς γνώμας τρεπομένους. ὁρῶ δὲ καὶ νῦν ὁμοῖα καὶ παραπλήσια ξυμβουλευτέα μοι ὄντα, καὶ τοὺς ἀναπειθομένους ὑμῶν δικαιῶ τοῖς κοινῇ δόξασιν, ἢν ἄρα τι καὶ σφαλλώμεθα, βοηθεῖν, ἢ μηδὲ κατορθοῦντας τῆς ξυνέσεως μεταποιεῖσθαι. ἐνδέχεται γὰρ τὰς ξυμφορὰς τῶν πραγμάτων οὐχ ἧσσον ἀμαθῶς χωρῆσαι ἢ καὶ τὰς διανοίας τοῦ ἀνθρώπου: δι’ ὅπερ καὶ τὴν τύχην, ὅσα ἂν παρὰ λόγον ξυμβῇ, εἰώθαμεν αἰτιᾶσθαι. 2.22.1. Περικλῆς δὲ ὁρῶν μὲν αὐτοὺς πρὸς τὸ παρὸν χαλεπαίνοντας καὶ οὐ τὰ ἄριστα φρονοῦντας, πιστεύων δὲ ὀρθῶς γιγνώσκειν περὶ τοῦ μὴ ἐπεξιέναι, ἐκκλησίαν τε οὐκ ἐποίει αὐτῶν οὐδὲ ξύλλογον οὐδένα, τοῦ μὴ ὀργῇ τι μᾶλλον ἢ γνώμῃ ξυνελθόντας ἐξαμαρτεῖν, τήν τε πόλιν ἐφύλασσε καὶ δι’ ἡσυχίας μάλιστα ὅσον ἐδύνατο εἶχεν. 2.41.1. ‘ξυνελών τε λέγω τήν τε πᾶσαν πόλιν τῆς Ἑλλάδος παίδευσιν εἶναι καὶ καθ’ ἕκαστον δοκεῖν ἄν μοι τὸν αὐτὸν ἄνδρα παρ’ ἡμῶν ἐπὶ πλεῖστ᾽ ἂν εἴδη καὶ μετὰ χαρίτων μάλιστ’ ἂν εὐτραπέλως τὸ σῶμα αὔταρκες παρέχεσθαι. 2.51.3. σῶμά τε αὔταρκες ὂν οὐδὲν διεφάνη πρὸς αὐτὸ ἰσχύος πέρι ἢ ἀσθενείας, ἀλλὰ πάντα ξυνῄρει καὶ τὰ πάσῃ διαίτῃ θεραπευόμενα. 2.59.3. ὁ δὲ ὁρῶν αὐτοὺς πρὸς τὰ παρόντα χαλεπαίνοντας καὶ πάντα ποιοῦντας ἅπερ αὐτὸς ἤλπιζε, ξύλλογον ποιήσας ʽἔτι δ’ ἐστρατήγεἰ ἐβούλετο θαρσῦναί τε καὶ ἀπαγαγὼν τὸ ὀργιζόμενον τῆς γνώμης πρὸς τὸ ἠπιώτερον καὶ ἀδεέστερον καταστῆσαι: παρελθὼν δὲ ἔλεξε τοιάδε. 2.60.1. ‘καὶ προσδεχομένῳ μοι τὰ τῆς ὀργῆς ὑμῶν ἔς με γεγένηται (αἰσθάνομαι γὰρ τὰς αἰτίας) καὶ ἐκκλησίαν τούτου ἕνεκα ξυνήγαγον, ὅπως ὑπομνήσω καὶ μέμψωμαι εἴ τι μὴ ὀρθῶς ἢ ἐμοὶ χαλεπαίνετε ἢ ταῖς ξυμφοραῖς εἴκετε. 2.61.2. καὶ ἐγὼ μὲν ὁ αὐτός εἰμι καὶ οὐκ ἐξίσταμαι: ὑμεῖς δὲ μεταβάλλετε, ἐπειδὴ ξυνέβη ὑμῖν πεισθῆναι μὲν ἀκεραίοις, μεταμέλειν δὲ κακουμένοις, καὶ τὸν ἐμὸν λόγον ἐν τῷ ὑμετέρῳ ἀσθενεῖ τῆς γνώμης μὴ ὀρθὸν φαίνεσθαι, διότι τὸ μὲν λυποῦν ἔχει ἤδη τὴν αἴσθησιν ἑκάστῳ, τῆς δὲ ὠφελίας ἄπεστιν ἔτι ἡ δήλωσις ἅπασι, καὶ μεταβολῆς μεγάλης, καὶ ταύτης ἐξ ὀλίγου, ἐμπεσούσης ταπεινὴ ὑμῶν ἡ διάνοια ἐγκαρτερεῖν ἃ ἔγνωτε. 2.63.2. ἧς οὐδ’ ἐκστῆναι ἔτι ὑμῖν ἔστιν, εἴ τις καὶ τόδε ἐν τῷ παρόντι δεδιὼς ἀπραγμοσύνῃ ἀνδραγαθίζεται: ὡς τυραννίδα γὰρ ἤδη ἔχετε αὐτήν, ἣν λαβεῖν μὲν ἄδικον δοκεῖ εἶναι, ἀφεῖναι δὲ ἐπικίνδυνον. 2.63.3. τάχιστ’ ἄν τε πόλιν οἱ τοιοῦτοι ἑτέρους τε πείσαντες ἀπολέσειαν καὶ εἴ που ἐπὶ σφῶν αὐτῶν αὐτόνομοι οἰκήσειαν: τὸ γὰρ ἄπραγμον οὐ σῴζεται μὴ μετὰ τοῦ δραστηρίου τεταγμένον, οὐδὲ ἐν ἀρχούσῃ πόλει ξυμφέρει, ἀλλ’ ἐν ὑπηκόῳ, ἀσφαλῶς δουλεύειν. 2.65.8. αἴτιον δ’ ἦν ὅτι ἐκεῖνος μὲν δυνατὸς ὢν τῷ τε ἀξιώματι καὶ τῇ γνώμῃ χρημάτων τε διαφανῶς ἀδωρότατος γενόμενος κατεῖχε τὸ πλῆθος ἐλευθέρως, καὶ οὐκ ἤγετο μᾶλλον ὑπ᾽ αὐτοῦ ἢ αὐτὸς ἦγε, διὰ τὸ μὴ κτώμενος ἐξ οὐ προσηκόντων τὴν δύναμιν πρὸς ἡδονήν τι λέγειν, ἀλλ’ ἔχων ἐπ’ ἀξιώσει καὶ πρὸς ὀργήν τι ἀντειπεῖν. 3.36.4. καὶ τῇ ὑστεραίᾳ μετάνοιά τις εὐθὺς ἦν αὐτοῖς καὶ ἀναλογισμὸς ὠμὸν τὸ βούλευμα καὶ μέγα ἐγνῶσθαι, πόλιν ὅλην διαφθεῖραι μᾶλλον ἢ οὐ τοὺς αἰτίους. 3.36.5. ὡς δ’ ᾔσθοντο τοῦτο τῶν Μυτιληναίων οἱ παρόντες πρέσβεις καὶ οἱ αὐτοῖς τῶν Ἀθηναίων ξυμπράσσοντες, παρεσκεύασαν τοὺς ἐν τέλει ὥστε αὖθις γνώμας προθεῖναι: καὶ ἔπεισαν ῥᾷον, διότι καὶ ἐκείνοις ἔνδηλον ἦν βουλόμενον τὸ πλέον τῶν πολιτῶν αὖθίς τινας σφίσιν ἀποδοῦναι βουλεύσασθαι. 3.36.6. καταστάσης δ’ εὐθὺς ἐκκλησίας ἄλλαι τε γνῶμαι ἀφ’ ἑκάστων ἐλέγοντο καὶ Κλέων ὁ Κλεαινέτου, ὅσπερ καὶ τὴν προτέραν ἐνενικήκει ὥστε ἀποκτεῖναι, ὢν καὶ ἐς τὰ ἄλλα βιαιότατος τῶν πολιτῶν τῷ τε δήμῳ παρὰ πολὺ ἐν τῷ τότε πιθανώτατος, παρελθὼν αὖθις ἔλεγε τοιάδε. 3.37.2. διὰ γὰρ τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν ἀδεὲς καὶ ἀνεπιβούλευτον πρὸς ἀλλήλους καὶ ἐς τοὺς ξυμμάχους τὸ αὐτὸ ἔχετε, καὶ ὅτι ἂν ἢ λόγῳ πεισθέντες ὑπ’ αὐτῶν ἁμάρτητε ἢ οἴκτῳ ἐνδῶτε, οὐκ ἐπικινδύνως ἡγεῖσθε ἐς ὑμᾶς καὶ οὐκ ἐς τὴν τῶν ξυμμάχων χάριν μαλακίζεσθαι, οὐ σκοποῦντες ὅτι τυραννίδα ἔχετε τὴν ἀρχὴν καὶ πρὸς ἐπιβουλεύοντας αὐτοὺς καὶ ἄκοντας ἀρχομένους, οἳ οὐκ ἐξ ὧν ἂν χαρίζησθε βλαπτόμενοι αὐτοὶ ἀκροῶνται ὑμῶν, ἀλλ’ ἐξ ὧν ἂν ἰσχύι μᾶλλον ἢ τῇ ἐκείνων εὐνοίᾳ περιγένησθε. 3.38.1. ‘ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν ὁ αὐτός εἰμι τῇ γνώμῃ καὶ θαυμάζω μὲν τῶν προθέντων αὖθις περὶ Μυτιληναίων λέγειν καὶ χρόνου διατριβὴν ἐμποιησάντων, ὅ ἐστι πρὸς τῶν ἠδικηκότων μᾶλλον ʽὁ γὰρ παθὼν τῷ δράσαντι ἀμβλυτέρᾳ τῇ ὀργῇ ἐπεξέρχεται, ἀμύνεσθαι δὲ τῷ παθεῖν ὅτι ἐγγυτάτω κείμενον ἀντίπαλον ὂν μάλιστα τὴν τιμωρίαν ἀναλαμβάνεἰ, θαυμάζω δὲ καὶ ὅστις ἔσται ὁ ἀντερῶν καὶ ἀξιώσων ἀποφαίνειν τὰς μὲν Μυτιληναίων ἀδικίας ἡμῖν ὠφελίμους οὔσας, τὰς δ’ ἡμετέρας ξυμφορὰς τοῖς ξυμμάχοις βλάβας καθισταμένας. 3.40.1. ‘οὔκουν δεῖ προθεῖναι ἐλπίδα οὔτε λόγῳ πιστὴν οὔτε χρήμασιν ὠνητήν, ὡς ξυγγνώμην ἁμαρτεῖν ἀνθρωπίνως λήψονται. ἄκοντες μὲν γὰρ οὐκ ἔβλαψαν, εἰδότες δὲ ἐπεβούλευσαν: ξύγγνωμον δ’ ἐστὶ τὸ ἀκούσιον. 3.40.4. ἕν τε ξυνελὼν λέγω: πειθόμενοι μὲν ἐμοὶ τά τε δίκαια ἐς Μυτιληναίους καὶ τὰ ξύμφορα ἅμα ποιήσετε, ἄλλως δὲ γνόντες τοῖς μὲν οὐ χαριεῖσθε, ὑμᾶς δὲ αὐτοὺς μᾶλλον δικαιώσεσθε. εἰ γὰρ οὗτοι ὀρθῶς ἀπέστησαν, ὑμεῖς ἂν οὐ χρεὼν ἄρχοιτε. εἰ δὲ δὴ καὶ οὐ προσῆκον ὅμως ἀξιοῦτε τοῦτο δρᾶν, παρὰ τὸ εἰκός τοι καὶ τούσδε ξυμφόρως δεῖ κολάζεσθαι, ἢ παύεσθαι τῆς ἀρχῆς καὶ ἐκ τοῦ ἀκινδύνου ἀνδραγαθίζεσθαι. 3.42.1. ‘οὔτε τοὺς προθέντας τὴν διαγνώμην αὖθις περὶ Μυτιληναίων αἰτιῶμαι, οὔτε τοὺς μεμφομένους μὴ πολλάκις περὶ τῶν μεγίστων βουλεύεσθαι ἐπαινῶ, νομίζω δὲ δύο τὰ ἐναντιώτατα εὐβουλίᾳ εἶναι, τάχος τε καὶ ὀργήν, ὧν τὸ μὲν μετὰ ἀνοίας φιλεῖ γίγνεσθαι, τὸ δὲ μετὰ ἀπαιδευσίας καὶ βραχύτητος γνώμης. 3.43.2. καθέστηκε δὲ τἀγαθὰ ἀπὸ τοῦ εὐθέος λεγόμενα μηδὲν ἀνυποπτότερα εἶναι τῶν κακῶν, ὥστε δεῖν ὁμοίως τόν τε τὰ δεινότατα βουλόμενον πεῖσαι ἀπάτῃ προσάγεσθαι τὸ πλῆθος καὶ τὸν τὰ ἀμείνω λέγοντα ψευσάμενον πιστὸν γενέσθαι. 3.43.5. εἰ γὰρ ὅ τε πείσας καὶ ὁ ἐπισπόμενος ὁμοίως ἐβλάπτοντο, σωφρονέστερον ἂν ἐκρίνετε: νῦν δὲ πρὸς ὀργὴν ἥντινα τύχητε ἔστιν ὅτε σφαλέντες τὴν τοῦ πείσαντος μίαν γνώμην ζημιοῦτε καὶ οὐ τὰς ὑμετέρας αὐτῶν, εἰ πολλαὶ οὖσαι ξυνεξήμαρτον. 3.49.4. κατὰ τύχην δὲ πνεύματος οὐδενὸς ἐναντιωθέντος καὶ τῆς μὲν προτέρας νεὼς οὐ σπουδῇ πλεούσης ἐπὶ πρᾶγμα ἀλλόκοτον, ταύτης δὲ τοιούτῳ τρόπῳ ἐπειγομένης, ἡ μὲν ἔφθασε τοσοῦτον ὅσον Πάχητα ἀνεγνωκέναι τὸ ψήφισμα καὶ μέλλειν δράσειν τὰ δεδογμένα, ἡ δ᾽ ὑστέρα αὐτῆς ἐπικατάγεται καὶ διεκώλυσε μὴ διαφθεῖραι. παρὰ τοσοῦτον μὲν ἡ Μυτιλήνη ἦλθε κινδύνου. 8.1.1. ἐς δὲ τὰς Ἀθήνας ἐπειδὴ ἠγγέλθη, ἐπὶ πολὺ μὲν ἠπίστουν καὶ τοῖς πάνυ τῶν στρατιωτῶν ἐξ αὐτοῦ τοῦ ἔργου διαπεφευγόσι καὶ σαφῶς ἀγγέλλουσι, μὴ οὕτω γε ἄγαν πανσυδὶ διεφθάρθαι: ἐπειδὴ δὲ ἔγνωσαν, χαλεποὶ μὲν ἦσαν τοῖς ξυμπροθυμηθεῖσι τῶν ῥητόρων τὸν ἔκπλουν, ὥσπερ οὐκ αὐτοὶ ψηφισάμενοι, ὠργίζοντο δὲ καὶ τοῖς χρησμολόγοις τε καὶ μάντεσι καὶ ὁπόσοι τι τότε αὐτοὺς θειάσαντες ἐπήλπισαν ὡς λήψονται Σικελίαν. 8.27.2. ὅπου γὰρ [ἔξεστιν] ἐν ὑστέρῳ σαφῶς εἰδότας πρὸς ὁπόσας τε ναῦς πολεμίας καὶ ὅσαις πρὸς αὐτὰς ταῖς σφετέραις ἱκανῶς καὶ καθ’ ἡσυχίαν παρασκευασαμένοις ἔσται ἀγωνίσασθαι, οὐδέποτε τῷ αἰσχρῷ ὀνείδει εἴξας ἀλόγως διακινδυνεύσειν. 8.27.3. οὐ γὰρ αἰσχρὸν εἶναι Ἀθηναίους ναυτικῷ μετὰ καιροῦ ὑποχωρῆσαι, ἀλλὰ καὶ μετὰ ὁτουοῦν τρόπου αἴσχιον ξυμβήσεσθαι ἢν ἡσσηθῶσιν: καὶ τὴν πόλιν οὐ μόνον τῷ αἰσχρῷ, ἀλλὰ καὶ τῷ μεγίστῳ κινδύνῳ περιπίπτειν, ᾗ μόλις ἐπὶ ταῖς γεγενημέναις ξυμφοραῖς ἐνδέχεσθαι μετὰ βεβαίου παρασκευῆς καθ’ ἑκουσίαν, ἢ πάνυ γε ἀνάγκῃ, προτέρᾳ ποι ἐπιχειρεῖν, ἦ που δὴ μὴ βιαζομένῃ γε πρὸς αὐθαιρέτους κινδύνους ἰέναι. 1.140.1. ‘There is one principle, Athenians, which I hold to through everything, and that is the principle of no concession to the Peloponnesians. I know that the spirit which inspires men while they are being persuaded to make war, is not always retained in action; that as circumstances change, resolutions change. Yet I see that now as before the same, almost literally the same, counsel is demanded of me; and I put it to those of you, who are allowing yourselves to be persuaded, to support the national resolves even in the case of reverses, or to forfeit all credit for their wisdom in the event of success. For sometimes the course of things is as arbitrary as the plans of man; indeed this is why we usually blame chance for whatever does not happen as we expected. 2.22.1. He, meanwhile, seeing anger and infatuation just now in the ascendant, and confident of his wisdom in refusing a sally, would not call either assembly or meeting of the people, fearing the fatal results of a debate inspired by passion and not by prudence. Accordingly, he addressed himself to the defence of the city, and kept it as quiet as possible, 2.41.1. In short, I say that as a city we are the school of Hellas ; while I doubt if the world can produce a man, who where he has only himself to depend upon, is equal to so many emergencies, and graced by so happy a versatility as the Athenian. 2.51.3. Strong and weak constitutions proved equally incapable of resistance, all alike being swept away, although dieted with the utmost precaution. 2.59.3. When he saw them exasperated at the present turn of affairs and acting exactly as he had anticipated, he called an assembly, being (it must be remembered) still general, with the double object of restoring confidence and of leading them from these angry feelings to a calmer and more hopeful state of mind. He accordingly came forward and spoke as follows: 2.60.1. ‘I was not unprepared for the indignation of which I have been the object, as I know its causes; and I have called an assembly for the purpose of reminding you upon certain points, and of protesting against your being unreasonably irritated with me, or cowed by your sufferings. 2.61.2. I am the same man and do not alter, it is you who change, since in fact you took my advice while unhurt, and waited for misfortune to repent of it; and the apparent error of my policy lies in the infirmity of your resolution, since the suffering that it entails is being felt by every one among you, while its advantage is still remote and obscure to all, and a great and sudden reverse having befallen you, your mind is too much depressed to persevere in your resolves. 2.63.2. Besides, to recede is no longer possible, if indeed any of you in the alarm of the moment has become enamored of the honesty of such an unambitious part. For what you hold is, to speak somewhat plainly, a tyranny; to take it perhaps was wrong, but to let it go is unsafe. 2.63.3. And men of these retiring views, making converts of others, would quickly ruin a state; indeed the result would be the same if they could live independent by themselves; for the retiring and unambitious are never secure without vigorous protectors at their side; in fine, such qualities are useless to an imperial city, though they may help a dependency to an unmolested servitude. 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 3.36.4. The morrow brought repentance with it and reflection on the horrid cruelty of a decree, which condemned a whole city to the fate merited only by the guilty. 3.36.5. This was no sooner perceived by the Mitylenian ambassadors at Athens and their Athenian supporters, than they moved the authorities to put the question again to the vote; which they the more easily consented to do, as they themselves plainly saw that most of the citizens wished some one to give them an opportunity for reconsidering the matter. 3.36.6. An assembly was therefore at once called, and after much expression of opinion upon both sides, Cleon, son of Cleaenetus, the same who had carried the former motion of putting the Mitylenians to death, the most violent man at Athens , and at that time by far the most powerful with the commons, came forward again and spoke as follows:— 3.37.2. Fears or plots being unknown to you in your daily relations with each other, you feel just the same with regard to your allies, and never reflect that the mistakes into which you may be led by listening to their appeals, or by giving way to your own compassion, are full of danger to yourselves, and bring you no thanks for your weakness from your allies; entirely forgetting that your empire is a despotism and your subjects disaffected conspirators, whose obedience is insured not by your suicidal concessions, but by the superiority given you by your own strength and not their loyalty. 3.38.1. For myself, I adhere to my former opinion, and wonder at those who have proposed to reopen the case of the Mitylenians, and who are thus causing a delay which is all in favour of the guilty, by making the sufferer proceed against the offender with the edge of his anger blunted; although where vengeance follows most closely upon the wrong, it best equals it and most amply requites it. I wonder also who will be the man who will maintain the contrary, and will pretend to show that the crimes of the Mitylenians are of service to us, and our misfortunes injurious to the allies. 3.40.1. No hope, therefore, that rhetoric may instil or money purchase, of the mercy due to human infirmity must be held out to the Mitylenians. Their offence was not involuntary, but of malice and deliberate; and mercy is only for unwilling offenders. 3.40.4. To sum up shortly, I say that if you follow my advice you will do what is just towards the Mitylenians, and at the same time expedient; while by a different decision you will not oblige them so much as pass sentence upon yourselves. For if they were right in rebelling, you must be wrong in ruling. However, if, right or wrong, you determine to rule, you must carry out your principle and punish the Mitylenians as your interest requires; or else you must give up your empire and cultivate honesty without danger. 3.42.1. ‘I do not blame the persons who have reopened the case of the Mitylenians, nor do I approve the protests which we have heard against important questions being frequently debated. I think the two things most opposed to good counsel are haste and passion; haste usually goes hand in hand with folly, passion with coarseness and narrowness of mind. 3.43.2. Plain good advice has thus come to be no less suspected than bad; and the advocate of the most monstrous measures is not more obliged to use deceit to gain the people, than the best counsellor is to lie in order to be believed. 3.43.5. For if those who gave the advice, and those who took it, suffered equally, you would judge more calmly; as it is, you visit the disasters into which the whim of the moment may have led you, upon the single person of your adviser, not upon yourselves, his numerous companions in error. 3.49.4. Luckily they met with no contrary wind, and the first ship making no haste upon so horrid an errand, while the second pressed on in the manner described, the first arrived so little before them, that Paches had only just had time to read the decree, and to prepare to execute the sentence, when the second put into port and prevented the massacre. The danger of Mitylene had indeed been great. 8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens , for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily . 8.27.2. Where they could hereafter contend, after full and undisturbed preparation, with an exact knowledge of the number of the enemy's fleet and of the force which they could oppose to him, he would never allow the reproach of disgrace to drive him into a risk that was unreasonable. 8.27.3. It was no disgrace for an Athenian fleet to retreat when it suited them: put it as they would, it would be more disgraceful to be beaten, and to expose the city not only to disgrace, but to the most serious danger. After its late misfortunes it could hardly be justified in voluntarily taking the offensive even with the strongest force, except in a case of absolute necessity: much less then without compulsion could it rush upon peril of its own seeking.
31. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 428
32. Theocritus, Idylls, 2.163-2.166, 3.40-3.54, 6.1-6.19, 11.1-11.81, 22.210-22.211 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 482, 498, 501
33. Callimachus, Aetia, 21.11, 178.11-178.20 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 482, 490
34. Anaximenes of Lampsacus, Rhetoric To Alexander, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 221
35. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 220
36. Aristotle, Physics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 31
37. Aristotle, Metaphysics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 40
38. Aristotle, Great Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 634
39. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 401
40. Aristotle, Soul, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 30
41. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 35
42. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.91-1.94, 1.151, 1.190-1.198, 1.347, 1.460-1.495, 1.609-1.909, 1.1051, 1.1172-1.1253, 1.1284-1.1344, 2.1-2.29, 2.89, 2.714-2.719, 2.1077, 3.270, 3.367-3.385, 3.475-3.483, 3.515-3.516, 3.545-3.554, 3.556-3.566, 3.576-3.608, 3.1170, 3.1252-3.1253, 4.198, 4.212-4.235, 4.350-4.393, 4.1719-4.1730, 4.1765-4.1772 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 473, 474, 480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487, 488, 489, 490, 491, 593, 594
1.91. οὐδʼ ὁμόθεν· νόσφιν γὰρ ἀλευάμενοι κατένασθεν 1.92. Αἰγίνης, ὅτε Φῶκον ἀδελφεὸν ἐξενάριξαν 1.93. ἀφραδίῃ. Τελαμὼν μὲν ἐν Ἀτθίδι νάσσατο νήσῳ· 1.94. Πηλεὺς δὲ Φθίῃ ἐνὶ δώματα ναῖε λιασθείς. 1.151. οἵ τʼ Ἀφαρητιάδαι Λυγκεὺς καὶ ὑπέρβιος Ἴδας 1.190. Οἰνεΐδης δʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν ἀφορμηθεὶς Καλυδῶνος 1.191. ἀλκήεις Μελέαγρος ἀνήλυθε, Λαοκόων τε, 1.192. Λαοκόων Οἰνῆος ἀδελφεός, οὐ μὲν ἰῆς γε 1.193. μητέρος· ἀλλά ἑ θῆσσα γυνὴ τέκε· τὸν μὲν ἄρʼ Οἰνεὺς 1.194. ἤδη γηραλέον κοσμήτορα παιδὸς ἴαλλεν· 1.195. ὧδʼ ἔτι κουρίζων περιθαρσέα δῦνεν ὅμιλον 1.196. ἡρώων. τοῦ δʼ οὔτινʼ ὑπέρτερον ἄλλον ὀίω, 1.197. νόσφιν γʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ἐπελθέμεν, εἴ κʼ ἔτι μοῦνον 1.198. αὖθι μένων λυκάβαντα μετετράφη Αἰτωλοῖσιν. 1.347. αὐτός, ὅτις ξυνάγειρε, καὶ ἀρχεύοι ὁμάδοιο.’ 1.460. ἔνθʼ αὖτʼ Αἰσονίδης μὲν ἀμήχανος εἰν ἑοῖ αὐτῷ 1.461. πορφύρεσκεν ἕκαστα κατηφιόωντι ἐοικώς. 1.462. τὸν δʼ ἄρʼ ὑποφρασθεὶς μεγάλῃ ὀπὶ νείκεσεν Ἴδας· 1.463. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε μετὰ φρεσὶ μῆτιν ἑλίσσεις; 1.464. αὔδα ἐνὶ μέσσοισι τεὸν νόον. ἦέ σε δαμνᾷ 1.465. τάρβος ἐπιπλόμενον, τό τʼ ἀνάλκιδας ἄνδρας ἀτύζει; 1.466. ἴστω νῦν δόρυ θοῦρον, ὅτῳ περιώσιον ἄλλων 1.467. κῦδος ἐνὶ πτολέμοισιν ἀείρομαι, οὐδέ μʼ ὀφέλλει 1.468. Ζεὺς τόσον, ὁσσάτιόν περ ἐμὸν δόρυ, μή νύ τι πῆμα 1.469. λοίγιον ἔσσεσθαι, μηδʼ ἀκράαντον ἄεθλον 1.470. Ἴδεω ἑσπομένοιο, καὶ εἰ θεὸς ἀντιόῳτο. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.474. χείλεα, κυάνεαί τε γενειάδες· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν 1.475. πάντες ὁμῶς, Ἴδμων δὲ καὶ ἀμφαδίην ἀγόρευσεν· 1.476. ‘δαιμόνιε, φρονέεις ὀλοφώια καὶ πάρος αὐτῷ. 1.477. ἦέ τοι εἰς ἄτην ζωρὸν μέθυ θαρσαλέον κῆρ 1.478. οἰδάνει ἐν στήθεσσι, θεοὺς δʼ ἀνέηκεν ἀτίζειν; 1.479. ἄλλοι μῦθοι ἔασι παρήγοροι, οἷσί περ ἀνὴρ 1.480. θαρσύνοι ἕταρον· σὺ δʼ ἀτάσθαλα πάμπαν ἔειπας, 1.481. τοῖα φάτις καὶ τοὺς πρὶν ἐπιφλύειν μακάρεσσιν 1.482. υἷας Ἀλωιάδας, οἷς οὐδʼ ὅσον ἰσοφαρίζεις 1.483. ἠνορέην· ἔμπης δὲ θοοῖς ἐδάμησαν ὀιστοῖς 1.484. ἄμφω Λητοΐδαο, καὶ ἴφθιμοί περ ἐόντες.’ 1.485. ὧς ἔφατʼ· ἐκ δʼ ἐγέλασσεν ἄδην Ἀφαρήιος Ἴδας 1.486. καί μιν ἐπιλλίζων ἠμείβετο κερτομίοισιν· 1.487. ‘ἄγρει νυν τόδε σῇσι θεοπροπίῃσιν ἐνίσπες, 1.488. εἰ καὶ ἐμοὶ τοιόνδε θεοὶ τελέουσιν ὄλεθρον, 1.489. οἷον Ἀλωιάδῃσι πατὴρ τεὸς ἐγγυάλιξεν. 1.490. φράζεο δʼ ὅππως χεῖρας ἐμὰς σόος ἐξαλέοιο, 1.491. χρειὼ θεσπίζων μεταμώνιον εἴ κεν ἁλῴης.’ 1.492. Χώετʼ ἐνιπτάζων· προτέρω δέ κε νεῖκος ἐτύχθη, 1.493. εἰ μὴ δηριόωντας ὁμοκλήσαντες ἑταῖροι 1.494. αὐτός τʼ Αἰσονίδης κατερήτυεν· ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 1.495. λαιῇ ἀνασχόμενος κίθαριν πείραζεν ἀοιδῆς. 1.609. ἔνθʼ ἄμυδις πᾶς δῆμος ὑπερβασίῃσι γυναικῶν 1.610. νηλειῶς δέδμητο παροιχομένῳ λυκάβαντι. 1.611. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπηνήναντο γυναῖκας 1.612. ἀνέρες ἐχθήραντες, ἔχον δʼ ἐπὶ ληιάδεσσιν 1.613. τρηχὺν ἔρον, ἃς αὐτοὶ ἀγίνεον ἀντιπέρηθεν 1.614. Θρηικίην δῃοῦντες· ἐπεὶ χόλος αἰνὸς ὄπαζεν 1.615. Κύπιδος, οὕνεκά μιν γεράων ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἄτισσαν. 1.616. ὦ μέλεαι, ζήλοιό τʼ ἐπισμυγερῶς ἀκόρητοι. 1.617. οὐκ οἶον σὺν τῇσιν ἑοὺς ἔρραισαν ἀκοίτας 1.618. ἀμφʼ εὐνῇ, πᾶν δʼ ἄρσεν ὁμοῦ γένος, ὥς κεν ὀπίσσω 1.619. μήτινα λευγαλέοιο φόνου τίσειαν ἀμοιβήν. 1.620. οἴη δʼ ἐκ πασέων γεραροῦ περιφείσατο πατρὸς 1.621. Ὑψιπύλεια Θόαντος, ὃ δὴ κατὰ δῆμον ἄνασσεν· 1.622. λάρνακι δʼ ἐν κοίλῃ μιν ὕπερθʼ ἁλὸς ἧκε φέρεσθαι, 1.623. αἴ κε φύγῃ. καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐς Οἰνοίην ἐρύσαντο 1.624. πρόσθεν, ἀτὰρ Σίκινόν γε μεθύστερον αὐδηθεῖσαν 1.625. νῆσον, ἐπακτῆρες, Σικίνου ἄπο, τόν ῥα Θόαντι 1.626. νηιὰς Οἰνοίη νύμφη τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα. 1.627. τῇσι δὲ βουκόλιαί τε βοῶν χάλκειά τε δύνειν 1.628. τεύχεα, πυροφόρους τε διατμήξασθαι ἀροὔρας 1.629. ῥηίτερον πάσῃσιν Ἀθηναίης πέλεν ἔργων, 1.630. οἷς αἰεὶ τὸ πάροιθεν ὁμίλεον. ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔμπης 1.631. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ πάπταινον ἐπὶ πλατὺν ὄμμασι πόντον 1.632. δείματι λευγαλέῳ, ὁπότε Θρήικες ἴασιν. 1.633. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἐγγύθι νήσου ἐρεσσομένην ἴδον Ἀργώ, 1.634. αὐτίκα πασσυδίῃ πυλέων ἔκτοσθε Μυρίνης 1.635. δήια τεύχεα δῦσαι ἐς αἰγιαλὸν προχέοντο, 1.636. Θυιάσιν ὠμοβόροις ἴκελαι· φὰν γάρ που ἱκάνειν 1.637. Θρήικας· ἡ δʼ ἅμα τῇσι Θοαντιὰς Ὑψιπύλεια 1.638. δῦνʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσι πατρός. ἀμηχανίῃ δʼ ἐχέοντο 1.639. ἄφθογγοι· τοῖόν σφιν ἐπὶ δέος ᾐωρεῖτο. 1.640. τείως δʼ αὖτʼ ἐκ νηὸς ἀριστῆες προέηκαν 1.641. Αἰθαλίδην κήρυκα θοόν, τῷπέρ τε μέλεσθαι 1.642. ἀγγελίας καὶ σκῆπτρον ἐπέτρεπον Ἑρμείαο, 1.643. σφωιτέροιο τοκῆος, ὅ οἱ μνῆστιν πόρε πάντων 1.644. ἄφθιτον· οὐδʼ ἔτι νῦν περ ἀποιχομένου Ἀχέροντος 1.645. δίνας ἀπροφάτους ψυχὴν ἐπιδέδρομε λήθη· 1.646. ἀλλʼ ἥγʼ ἔμπεδον αἰὲν ἀμειβομένη μεμόρηται, 1.647. ἄλλοθʼ ὑποχθονίοις ἐναρίθμιος, ἄλλοτʼ ἐς αὐγὰς 1.648. ἠελίου ζωοῖσι μετʼ ἀνδράσιν. ἀλλὰ τί μύθους 1.649. Αἰθαλίδεω χρειώ με διηνεκέως ἀγορεύειν; 1.650. ὅς ῥα τόθʼ Ὑψιπύλην μειλίξατο δέχθαι ἰόντας 1.651. ἤματος ἀνομένοιο διὰ κνέφας· οὐδὲ μὲν ἠοῖ 1.652. πείσματα νηὸς ἔλυσαν ἐπὶ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.653. Λημνιάδες δὲ γυναῖκες ἀνὰ πτόλιν ἷζον ἰοῦσαι 1.654. εἰς ἀγορήν· αὐτὴ γὰρ ἐπέφραδεν Ὑψιπύλεια. 1.655. καί ῥʼ ὅτε δὴ μάλα πᾶσαι ὁμιλαδὸν ἠγερέθοντο, 1.656. αὐτίκʼ ἄρʼ ἥγʼ ἐνὶ τῇσιν ἐποτρύνουσʼ ἀγόρευεν· 1.657. ‘Ὦφιλαι, εἰ δʼ ἄγε δὴ μενοεικέα δῶρα πόρωμεν 1.658. ἀνδράσιν, οἷά τʼ ἔοικεν ἄγειν ἐπὶ νηὸς ἔχοντας, 1.659. ἤια, καὶ μέθυ λαρόν, ἵνʼ ἔμπεδον ἔκτοθι πύργων 1.660. μίμνοιεν, μηδʼ ἄμμε κατὰ χρειὼ μεθέποντες 1.661. ἀτρεκέως γνώωσι, κακὴ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλὸν ἵκηται 1.662. βάξις· ἐπεὶ μέγα ἔργον ἐρέξαμεν, οὐδέ τι πάμπαν 1.663. θυμηδὲς καὶ τοῖσι τόγʼ ἔσσεται, εἴ κε δαεῖεν. 1.664. ἡμετέρη μὲν νῦν τοίη παρενήνοθε μῆτις· 1.665. ὑμέων δʼ εἴ τις ἄρειον ἔπος μητίσεται ἄλλη, 1.666. ἐγρέσθω· τοῦ γάρ τε καὶ εἵνεκα δεῦρʼ ἐκάλεσσα.’ 1.667. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη, καὶ θῶκον ἐφίζανε πατρὸς ἑοῖο 1.668. λάινον· αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα φίλη τροφὸς ὦρτο Πολυξώ, 1.669. γήραϊ δὴ ῥικνοῖσιν ἐπισκάζουσα πόδεσσιν, 1.670. βάκτρῳ ἐρειδομένη, περὶ δὲ μενέαινʼ ἀγορεῦσαι. 1.671. τῇ καὶ παρθενικαὶ πίσυρες σχεδὸν ἑδριόωντο 1.672. ἀδμῆτες λευκῇσιν ἐπιχνοαούσῃ ἐθείραις. 1.673. στῆ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐνὶ μέσσῃ ἀγορῇ, ἀνὰ δʼ ἔσχεθε δειρὴν 1.674. ἦκα μόλις κυφοῖο μεταφρένου, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.675. ‘δῶρα μέν, ὡς αὐτῇ περ ἐφανδάνει Ὑψιπυλείῃ, 1.676. πέμπωμεν ξείνοισιν, ἐπεὶ καὶ ἄρειον ὀπάσσαι. 1.677. ὔμμι γε μὴν τίς μῆτις ἐπαύρεσθαι βιότοιο, 1.678. αἴ κεν ἐπιβρίσῃ Θρήιξ στρατός, ἠέ τις ἄλλος 1.679. δυσμενέων, ἅ τε πολλὰ μετʼ ἀνθρώποισι πέλονται; 1.680. ὡς καὶ νῦν ὅδʼ ὅμιλος ἀνωίστως ἐφικάνει. 1.681. εἰ δὲ τὸ μὲν μακάρων τις ἀποτρέποι, ἄλλα δʼ ὀπίσσω 1.682. μυρία δηιοτῆτος ὑπέρτερα πήματα μίμνει, 1.683. εὖτʼ ἂν δὴ γεραραὶ μὲν ἀποφθινύθωσι γυναῖκες, 1.684. κουρότεραι δʼ ἄγονοι στυγερὸν ποτὶ γῆρας ἵκησθε. 1.685. πῶς τῆμος βώσεσθε δυσάμμοροι; ἦε βαθείαις 1.686. αὐτόματοι βόες ὔμμιν ἐνιζευχθέντες ἀρούραις 1.687. γειοτόμον νειοῖο διειρύσσουσιν ἄροτρον, 1.688. καὶ πρόκα τελλομένου ἔτεος στάχυν ἀμήσονται; 1.689. ἦ μὲν ἐγών, εἰ καί με τὰ νῦν ἔτι πεφρίκασιν 1.690. κῆρες, ἐπερχόμενόν που ὀίομαι εἰς ἔτος ἤδη 1.691. γαῖαν ἐφέσσεσθαι, κτερέων ἀπὸ μοῖραν ἑλοῦσαν 1.692. αὔτως, ἣ θέμις ἐστί, πάρος κακότητα πελάσσαι. 1.693. ὁπλοτέρῃσι δὲ πάγχυ τάδε φράζεσθαι ἄνωγα. 1.694. νῦν γὰρ δὴ παρὰ ποσσὶν ἐπήβολός ἐστʼ ἀλεωρή, 1.695. εἴ κεν ἐπιτρέψητε δόμους καὶ ληίδα πᾶσαν 1.696. ὑμετέρην ξείνοισι καὶ ἀγλαὸν ἄστυ μέλεσθαι.’ 1.697. ὧς ἔφατʼ· ἐν δʼ ἀγορὴ πλῆτο θρόου. εὔαδε γάρ σφιν 1.698. μῦθος. ἀτὰρ μετὰ τήνγε παρασχεδὸν αὖτις ἀνῶρτο 1.699. Ὑψιπύλη, καὶ τοῖον ὑποβλήδην ἔπος ηὔδα· 1.700. ‘εἰ μὲν δὴ πάσῃσιν ἐφανδάνει ἥδε μενοινή, 1.701. ἤδη κεν μετὰ νῆα καὶ ἄγγελον ὀτρύναιμι.’ 1.702. ἦ ῥα, καὶ Ἰφινόην μετεφώνεεν ἆσσον ἐοῦσαν· 1.703. ‘ὄρσο μοι, Ἰφινόη, τοῦδʼ ἀνέρος ἀντιόωσα, 1.704. ἡμέτερόνδε μολεῖν, ὅστις στόλου ἡγεμονεύει, 1.705. ὄφρα τί οἱ δήμοιο ἔπος θυμῆρες ἐνίσπω· 1.706. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς γαίης τε καὶ ἄστεος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλωσιν, 1.707. κέκλεο θαρσαλέως ἐπιβαινέμεν εὐμενέοντας.’ 1.708. ἦ, καὶ ἔλυσʼ ἀγορήν, μετὰ δʼ εἰς ἑὸν ὦρτο νέεσθαι. 1.709. ὧς δὲ καὶ Ἰφινόη Μινύας ἵκεθʼ· οἱ δʼ ἐρέεινον, 1.710. χρεῖος ὅ τι φρονέουσα μετήλυθεν. ὦκα δὲ τούσγε 1.711. πασσυδίῃ μύθοισι προσέννεπεν ἐξερέοντας· 1.712. ‘κούρη τοί μʼ ἐφέηκε Θοαντιὰς ἐνθάδʼ ἰοῦσαν, 1.713. Ὑψιπύλη, καλέειν νηὸς πρόμον, ὅστις ὄρωρεν, 1.714. ὄφρα τί οἱ δήμοιο ἔπος θυμῆρες ἐνίσπῃ· 1.715. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς γαίης τε καὶ ἄστεος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλητε, 1.716. κέκλεται αὐτίκα νῦν ἐπιβαινέμεν εὐμενέοντας.’ 1.717. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πάντεσσι δʼ ἐναίσιμος ἥνδανε μῦθος. 1.718. Υψιπύλην δʼ εἴσαντο καταφθιμένοιο Θόαντος 1.719. τηλυγέτην γεγαυῖαν ἀνασσέμεν· ὦκα δὲ τόνγε 1.720. πέμπον ἴμεν, καὶ δʼ αὐτοὶ ἐπεντύνοντο νέεσθαι. 1.721. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ἀμφʼ ὤμοισι θεᾶς Τριτωνίδος ἔργον, 1.722. δίπλακα πορφυρέην περονήσατο, τήν οἱ ὄπασσεν 1.723. Παλλάς, ὅτε πρῶτον δρυόχους ἐπεβάλλετο νηὸς 1.724. Ἀργοῦς, καὶ κανόνεσσι δάε ζυγὰ μετρήσασθαι. 1.725. τῆς μὲν ῥηίτερόν κεν ἐς ἠέλιον ἀνιόντα 1.726. ὄσσε βάλοις, ἢ κεῖνο μεταβλέψειας ἔρευθος. 1.727. δὴ γάρ τοι μέσση μὲν ἐρευθήεσσʼ ἐτέτυκτο, 1.728. ἄκρα δὲ πορφυρέη πάντῃ πέλεν· ἐν δʼ ἄρʼ ἑκάστῳ 1.729. τέρματι δαίδαλα πολλὰ διακριδὸν εὖ ἐπέπαστο. 1.730. ἐν μὲν ἔσαν Κύκλωπες ἐπʼ ἀφθίτῳ ἥμενοι ἔργῳ, 1.731. Ζηνὶ κεραυνὸν ἄνακτι πονεύμενοι· ὃς τόσον ἤδη 1.732. παμφαίνων ἐτέτυκτο, μιῆς δʼ ἔτι δεύετο μοῦνον 1.733. ἀκτῖνος, τὴν οἵδε σιδηρείῃς ἐλάασκον 1.734. σφύρῃσιν, μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ζείουσαν ἀυτμήν. 1.735. ἐν δʼ ἔσαν Ἀντιόπης Ἀσωπίδος υἱέε δοιώ, 1.736. Ἀμφίων καὶ Ζῆθος· ἀπύργωτος δʼ ἔτι Θήβη 1.737. κεῖτο πέλας, τῆς οἵγε νέον βάλλοντο δομαίους 1.738. ἱέμενοι. Ζῆθος μὲν ἐπωμαδὸν ἠέρταζεν 1.739. οὔρεος ἠλιβάτοιο κάρη, μογέοντι ἐοικώς· 1.740. Ἀμφίων δʼ ἐπί οἱ χρυσέῃ φόρμιγγι λιγαίνων 1.741. ἤιε, δὶς τόσση δὲ μετʼ ἴχνια νίσσετο πέτρη 1.742. ἑξείης δʼ ἤσκητο βαθυπλόκαμος Κυθέρεια 1.743. Ἄρεος ὀχμάζουσα θοὸν σάκος· ἐκ δέ οἱ ὤμου 1.744. πῆχυν ἔπι σκαιὸν ξυνοχὴ κεχάλαστο χιτῶνος 1.745. νέρθεν ὑπὲκ μαζοῖο· τὸ δʼ ἀντίον ἀτρεκὲς αὔτως 1.746. χαλκείῃ δείκηλον ἐν ἀσπίδι φαίνετʼ ἰδέσθαι. 1.747. ἐν δὲ βοῶν ἔσκεν λάσιος νομός· ἀμφὶ δὲ βουσὶν 1.748. Τηλεβόαι μάρναντο καὶ υἱέες Ἠλεκτρύωνος· 1.749. οἱ μὲν ἀμυνόμενοι, ἀτὰρ οἵγʼ ἐθέλοντες ἀμέρσαι, 1.750. ληισταὶ Τάφιοι· τῶν δʼ αἵματι δεύετο λειμὼν 1.751. ἑρσήεις, πολέες δʼ ὀλίγους βιόωντο νομῆας. 1.752. ἐν δὲ δύω δίφροι πεπονήατο δηριόωντες. 1.753. καὶ τὸν μὲν προπάροιθε Πέλοψ ἴθυνε, τινάσσων 1.754. ἡνία, σὺν δέ οἱ ἔσκε παραιβάτις Ἱπποδάμεια· 1.755. τὸν δὲ μεταδρομάδην ἐπὶ Μυρτίλος ἤλασεν ἵππους, 1.756. σὺν τῷ δʼ Οἰνόμαος προτενὲς δόρυ χειρὶ μεμαρπὼς 1.757. ἄξονος ἐν πλήμνῃσι παρακλιδὸν ἀγνυμένοιο 1.758. πῖπτεν, ἐπεσσύμενος Πελοπήια νῶτα δαΐξαι. 1.759. ἐν καὶ Ἀπόλλων Φοῖβος ὀιστεύων ἐτέτυκτο, 1.760. βούπαις οὔπω πολλός, ἑὴν ἐρύοντα καλύπτρης 1.761. μητέρα θαρσαλέως Τιτυὸν μέγαν, ὅν ῥʼ ἔτεκέν γε 1.762. δῖʼ Ἐλάρη, θρέψεν δὲ καὶ ἂψ ἐλοχεύσατο Γαῖα. 1.763. ἐν καὶ Φρίξος ἔην Μινυήιος ὡς ἐτεόν περ 1.764. εἰσαΐων κριοῦ, ὁ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐξενέποντι ἐοικώς. 1.765. κείνους κʼ εἰσορόων ἀκέοις, ψεύδοιό τε θυμόν, 1.766. ἐλπόμενος πυκινήν τινʼ ἀπὸ σφείων ἐσακοῦσαι 1.767. βάξιν, ὃ καὶ δηρόν περ ἐπʼ ἐλπίδι θηήσαιο. 1.768. τοῖʼ ἄρα δῶρα θεᾶς Τριτωνίδος ἦεν Ἀθήνης. 1.769. δεξιτερῇ δʼ ἕλεν ἔγχος ἑκηβόλον, ὅ ῥʼ Ἀταλάντη 1.770. Μαινάλῳ ἔν ποτέ οἱ ξεινήιον ἐγγυάλιξεν, 1.771. πρόφρων ἀντομένη· περὶ γὰρ μενέαινεν ἕπεσθαι 1.772. τὴν ὁδόν· ἀλλὰ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἀπερήτυε κούρην, 1.773. δεῖσεν δʼ ἀργαλέας ἔριδας φιλότητος ἕκητι. 1.774. βῆ δʼ ἴμεναι προτὶ ἄστυ, φαεινῷ ἀστέρι ἶσος, 1.775. ὅν ῥά τε νηγατέῃσιν ἐεργόμεναι καλύβῃσιν 1.776. νύμφαι θηήσαντο δόμων ὕπερ ἀντέλλοντα, 1.777. καί σφισι κυανέοιο διʼ ἠέρος ὄμματα θέλγει 1.778. καλὸν ἐρευθόμενος, γάνυται δέ τε ἠιθέοιο 1.779. παρθένος ἱμείρουσα μετʼ ἀλλοδαποῖσιν ἐόντος 1.780. ἀνδράσιν, ᾧ καί μιν μνηστὴν κομέουσι τοκῆες· 1.781. τῷ ἴκελος πρὸ πόληος ἀνὰ στίβον ἤιεν ἥρως. 1.782. καί ῥʼ ὅτε δὴ πυλέων τε καὶ ἄστεος ἐντὸς ἔβησαν, 1.783. δημότεραι μὲν ὄπισθεν ἐπεκλονέοντο γυναῖκες, 1.784. γηθόσυναι ξείνῳ· ὁ δʼ ἐπὶ χθονὸς ὄμματʼ ἐρείσας 1.785. νίσσετʼ ἀπηλεγέως, ὄφρʼ ἀγλαὰ δώμαθʼ ἵκανεν 1.786. Ὑψιπύλης· ἄνεσαν δὲ πύλας προφανέντι θεράπναι 1.787. δικλίδας, εὐτύκτοισιν ἀρηρεμένας σανίδεσσιν. 1.788. ἔνθα μιν Ἰφινόη κλισμῷ ἔνι παμφανόωντι 1.789. ἐσσυμένως καλῆς διὰ παστάδος εἷσεν ἄγουσα 1.790. ἀντία δεσποίνης· ἡ δʼ ἐγκλιδὸν ὄσσε βαλοῦσα 1.791. παρθενικὰς ἐρύθηνε παρηίδας· ἔμπα δὲ τόνγε 1.792. αἰδομένη μύθοισι προσέννεπεν αἱμυλίοισιν· 1.793. ‘ξεῖνε, τίη μίμνοντες ἐπὶ χρόνον ἔκτοθι πύργων 1.794. ἧσθʼ αὔτως; ἐπεὶ οὐ μὲν ὑπʼ ἀνδράσι ναίεται ἄστυ, 1.795. ἀλλὰ Θρηικίης ἐπινάστιοι ἠπείροιο 1.796. πυροφόρους ἀρόωσι γύας. κακότητα δὲ πᾶσαν 1.797. ἐξερέω νημερτές, ἵνʼ εὖ γνοίητε καὶ αὐτοί. 1.798. εὖτε Θόας ἀστοῖσι πατὴρ ἐμὸς ἐμβασίλευεν, 1.799. τηνίκα Θρηικίην, οἵ τʼ ἀντία ναιετάουσιν, 1.800. δήμου ἀπορνύμενοι λαοὶ πέρθεσκον ἐπαύλους 1.801. ἐκ νηῶν, αὐτῇσι δʼ ἀπείρονα ληίδα κούραις 1.802. δεῦρʼ ἄγον· οὐλομένης δὲ θεᾶς πορσύνετο μῆτις 1.803. Κύπριδος, ἥ τέ σφιν θυμοφθόρον ἔμβαλεν ἄτην. 1.804. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπέστυγον, ἐκ δὲ μελάθρων, 1.805. ᾗ ματίῃ εἴξαντες, ἀπεσσεύοντο γυναῖκας· 1.806. αὐτὰρ ληιάδεσσι δορικτήταις παρίαυον, 1.807. σχέτλιοι. ἦ μὲν δηρὸν ἐτέτλαμεν, εἴ κέ ποτʼ αὖτις 1.808. ὀψὲ μεταστρέψωσι νόον· τὸ δὲ διπλόον αἰεὶ 1.809. πῆμα κακὸν προύβαινεν. ἀτιμάζοντο δὲ τέκνα 1.810. γνήσιʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροις, σκοτίη δʼ ἀνέτελλε γενέθλη. 1.811. αὔτως δʼ ἀδμῆτές τε κόραι, χῆραί τʼ ἐπὶ τῇσιν 1.812. μητέρες ἂμ πτολίεθρον ἀτημελέες ἀλάληντο. 1.813. οὐδὲ πατὴρ ὀλίγον περ ἑῆς ἀλέγιζε θυγατρός, 1.814. εἰ καὶ ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖσι δαϊζομένην ὁρόῳτο 1.815. μητρυιῆς ὑπὸ χερσὶν ἀτασθάλου· οὐδʼ ἀπὸ μητρὸς 1.816. λώβην, ὡς τὸ πάροιθεν, ἀεικέα παῖδες ἄμυνον· 1.817. οὐδὲ κασιγνήτοισι κασιγνήτη μελε θυμῷ. 1.818. ἀλλʼ οἶαι κοῦραι ληίτιδες ἔν τε δόμοισιν 1.819. ἔν τε χοροῖς ἀγορῇ τε καὶ εἰλαπίνῃσι μέλοντο· 1.820. εἰσόκε τις θεὸς ἄμμιν ὑπέρβιον ἔμβαλε θάρσος, 1.821. ἂψ ἀναερχομένους Θρῃκῶν ἄπο μηκέτι πύργοις 1.822. δέχθαι, ἵνʼ ἢ φρονέοιεν ἅπερ θέμις, ἠέ πῃ ἄλλῃ 1.823. αὐταῖς ληιάδεσσιν ἀφορμηθέντες ἵκοιντο. 1.824. οἱ δʼ ἄρα θεσσάμενοι παίδων γένος, ὅσσον ἔλειπτο 1.825. ἄρσεν ἀνὰ πτολίεθρον, ἔβαν πάλιν, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 1.826. Θρηικίης ἄροσιν χιονώδεα ναιετάουσιν. 1.827. τῶ ὑμεῖς στρωφᾶσθʼ ἐπιδήμιοι· εἰ δέ κεν αὖθι 1.828. ναιετάειν ἐθέλοις, καί τοι ἅδοι, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔπειτα 1.829. πατρὸς ἐμεῖο Θόαντος ἔχοις γέρας· οὐδέ τί σʼ οἴω 1.830. γαῖαν ὀνόσσεσθαι· περὶ γὰρ βαθυλήιος ἄλλων 1.831. νήσων, Αἰγαίῃ ὅσαι εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν. 1.832. ἀλλʼ ἄγε νῦν ἐπὶ νῆα κιὼν ἑτάροισιν ἐνίσπες 1.833. μύθους ἡμετέρους, μηδʼ ἔκτοθι μίμνε πόληος.’ 1.834. Ἴσκεν, ἀμαλδύνουσα φόνου τέλος, οἷον ἐτύχθη 1.835. ἀνδράσιν· αὐτὰρ ὁ τήνγε παραβλήδην προσέειπεν 1.836. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, μάλα κεν θυμηδέος ἀντιάσαιμεν 1.837. χρησμοσύνης, ἣν ἄμμι σέθεν χατέουσιν ὀπάζεις. 1.838. εἶμι δʼ ὑπότροπος αὖτις ἀνὰ πτόλιν, εὖτʼ ἂν ἕκαστα 1.839. ἐξείπω κατὰ κόσμον. ἀνακτορίη δὲ μελέσθω 1.840. σοίγʼ αὐτῇ καὶ νῆσος· ἔγωγε μὲν οὐκ ἀθερίζων 1.841. χάζομαι, ἀλλά με λυγροὶ ἐπισπέρχουσιν ἄεθλοι.’ 1.842. ἦ, καὶ δεξιτερῆς χειρὸς θίγεν· αἶψα δʼ ὀπίσσω 1.843. βῆ ῥʼ ἴμεν, ἀμφὶ δὲ τόνγε νεήνιδες ἄλλοθεν ἄλλαι 1.844. μυρίαι εἱλίσσοντο κεχαρμέναι, ὄφρα πυλάων 1.845. ἐξέμολεν. μετέπειτα δʼ ἐυτροχάλοισιν ἀμάξαις 1.846. ἀκτὴν εἰσαπέβαν, ξεινήια πολλὰ φέρουσαι, 1.847. μῦθον ὅτʼ ἤδη πάντα διηνεκέως ἀγόρευσεν, 1.848. τόν ῥα καλεσσαμένη διεπέφραδεν Ὑψιπύλεια· 1.849. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὺς ξεινοῦσθαι ἐπὶ σφέα δώματʼ ἄγεσκον 1.850. ῥηιδίως. Κύπρις γὰρ ἐπὶ γλυκὺν ἵμερον ὦρσεν 1.851. Ἡφαίστοιο χάριν πολυμήτιος, ὄφρα κεν αὖτις 1.852. ναίηται μετόπισθεν ἀκήρατος ἀνδράσι Λῆμνος. 1.853. ἔνθʼ ὁ μὲν Ὑψιπύλης βασιλήιον ἐς δόμον ὦρτο 1.854. Αἰσονίδης· οἱ δʼ ἄλλοι ὅπῃ καὶ ἔκυρσαν ἕκαστος, 1.855. Ἡρακλῆος ἄνευθεν, ὁ γὰρ παρὰ νηὶ λέλειπτο 1.856. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν παῦροί τε διακρινθέντες ἑταῖροι. 1.857. αὐτίκα δʼ ἄστυ χοροῖσι καὶ εἰλαπίνῃσι γεγήθει 1.858. καπνῷ κνισήεντι περίπλεον· ἔξοχα δʼ ἄλλων 1.859. ἀθανάτων Ἥρης υἷα κλυτὸν ἠδὲ καὶ αὐτὴν 1.860. Κύπριν ἀοιδῇσιν θυέεσσί τε μειλίσσοντο. 1.861. ἀμβολίη δʼ εἰς ἦμαρ ἀεὶ ἐξ ἤματος ἦεν 1.862. ναυτιλίης· δηρὸν δʼ ἂν ἐλίνυον αὖθι μένοντες, 1.863. εἰ μὴ ἀολλίσσας ἑτάρους ἀπάνευθε γυναικῶν 1.864. Ἡρακλέης τοίοισιν ἐνιπτάζων μετέειπεν· 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.867. κεῖθεν, ὀνοσσάμενοι πολιήτιδας; αὖθι δʼ ἕαδεν 1.868. ναίοντας λιπαρὴν ἄροσιν Λήμνοιο ταμέσθαι; 1.869. οὐ μὰν εὐκλειεῖς γε σὺν ὀθνείῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.870. ἐσσόμεθʼ ὧδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἐελμένοι· οὐδέ τι κῶας 1.871. αὐτόματον δώσει τις ἑλὼν θεὸς εὐξαμένοισιν. 1.872. ἴομεν αὖτις ἕκαστοι ἐπὶ σφέα· τὸν δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 1.873. Ὑψιπύλης εἰᾶτε πανήμερον, εἰσόκε Λῆμνον 1.874. παισὶν ἐσανδρώσῃ, μεγάλη τέ ἑ βάξις ἵκηται.’ 1.875. ὧς νείκεσσεν ὅμιλον· ἐναντία δʼ οὔ νύ τις ἔτλη 1.876. ὄμματʼ ἀνασχεθέειν, οὐδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι· 1.877. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀγορῆθεν ἐπαρτίζοντο νέεσθαι 1.878. σπερχόμενοι. ταὶ δέ σφιν ἐπέδραμον, εὖτʼ ἐδάησαν. 1.879. ὡς δʼ ὅτε λείρια καλὰ περιβρομέουσι μέλισσαι 1.880. πέτρης ἐκχύμεναι σιμβληίδος, ἀμφὶ δὲ λειμὼν 1.881. ἑρσήεις γάνυται, ταὶ δὲ γλυκὺν ἄλλοτε ἄλλον 1.882. καρπὸν ἀμέργουσιν πεποτημέναι· ὧς ἄρα ταίγε 1.883. ἐνδυκὲς ἀνέρας ἀμφὶ κινυρόμεναι προχέοντο, 1.884. χερσί τε καὶ μύθοισιν ἐδεικανόωντο ἕκαστον, 1.885. εὐχόμεναι μακάρεσσιν ἀπήμονα νόστον ὀπάσσαι. 1.886. ὧς δὲ καὶ Ὑψιπύλη ἠρήσατο χεῖρας ἑλοῦσα 1.887. Αἰσονίδεω, τὰ δέ οἱ ῥέε δάκρυα χήτει ἰόντος· 1.888. ‘Νίσσεο, καὶ σὲ θεοὶ σὺν ἀπηρέσιν αὖτις ἑταίροις 1.889. χρύσειον βασιλῆι δέρος κομίσειαν ἄγοντα 1.890. αὔτως, ὡς ἐθέλεις καί τοι φίλον. ἥδε δὲ νῆσος 1.891. σκῆπτρά τε πατρὸς ἐμεῖο παρέσσεται, ἢν καὶ ὀπίσσω 1.892. δή ποτε νοστήσας ἐθέλῃς ἄψορρον ἱκέσθαι. 1.893. ῥηιδίως δʼ ἂν ἑοῖ καὶ ἀπείρονα λαὸν ἀγείραις 1.894. ἄλλων ἐκ πολίων· ἀλλʼ οὐ σύγε τήνδε μενοινὴν 1.895. σχήσεις, οὔτʼ αὐτὴ προτιόσσομαι ὧδε τελεῖσθαι. 1.896. μνώεο μὴν ἀπεών περ ὁμῶς καὶ νόστιμος ἤδη 1.897. Ὑψιπύλης· λίπε δʼ ἧμιν ἔπος, τό κεν ἐξανύσαιμι 1.898. πρόφρων, ἢν ἄρα δή με θεοὶ δώωσι τεκέσθαι.’ 1.899. τὴν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἀγαιόμενος προσέειπεν· 1.900. ‘Ὑψιπύλη, τὰ μὲν οὕτω ἐναίσιμα πάντα γένοιτο 1.901. ἐκ μακάρων· τύνη δʼ ἐμέθεν πέρι θυμὸν ἀρείω 1.902. ἴσχανʼ, ἐπεὶ πάτρην μοι ἅλις Πελίαο ἕκητι 1.903. ναιετάειν· μοῦνόν με θεοὶ λύσειαν ἀέθλων. 1.904. εἰ δʼ οὔ μοι πέπρωται ἐς Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι 1.905. τηλοῦ ἀναπλώοντι, σὺ δʼ ἄρσενα παῖδα τέκηαι, 1.906. πέμπε μιν ἡβήσαντα Πελασγίδος ἔνδον Ἰωλκοῦ 1.907. πατρί τʼ ἐμῷ καὶ μητρὶ δύης ἄκος, ἢν ἄρα τούσγε 1.908. τέτμῃ ἔτι ζώοντας, ἵνʼ ἄνδιχα τοῖο ἄνακτος 1.909. σφοῖσιν πορσύνωνται ἐφέστιοι ἐν μεγάροισιν.’ 1.1051. ἐς δὲ πύλας ὁμάδῳ πέσον ἀθρόοι· αἶψα δʼ ἀυτῆς 1.1172. ἦμος δʼ ἀγρόθεν εἶσι φυτοσκάφος ἤ τις ἀροτρεὺς 1.1173. ἀσπασίως εἰς αὖλιν ἑήν, δόρποιο χατίζων, 1.1174. αὐτοῦ δʼ ἐν προμολῇ τετρυμένα γούνατʼ ἔκαμψεν 1.1175. αὐσταλέος κονίῃσι, περιτριβέας δέ τε χεῖρας 1.1176. εἰσορόων κακὰ πολλὰ ἑῇ ἠρήσατο γαστρί· 1.1177. τῆμος ἄρʼ οἵγʼ ἀφίκοντο Κιανίδος ἤθεα γαίης 1.1178. ἀμφʼ Ἀργανθώνειον ὄρος προχοάς τε Κίοιο. 1.1179. τοὺς μὲν ἐυξείνως Μυσοὶ φιλότητι κιόντας 1.1180. δειδέχατʼ, ἐνναέται κείνης χθονός, ἤιά τέ σφιν 1.1181. μῆλά τε δευομένοις μέθυ τʼ ἄσπετον ἐγγυάλιξαν. 1.1182. ἔνθα δʼ ἔπειθʼ οἱ μὲν ξύλα κάγκανα, τοὶ δὲ λεχαίην 1.1183. φυλλάδα λειμώνων φέρον ἄσπετον ἀμήσαντες, 1.1184. στόρνυσθαι· τοὶ δʼ ἀμφὶ πυρήια δινεύεσκον· 1.1185. οἱ δʼ οἶνον κρητῆρσι κέρων, πονέοντο τε δαῖτα, 1.1186. Ἐκβασίῳ ῥέξαντες ὑπὸ κνέφας Ἀπόλλωνι. 1.1187. αὐτὰρ ὁ δαίνυσθαι ἑτάροις οἷς εὖ ἐπιτείλας 1.1188. βῆ ῥ̓ ἴμεν εἰς ὕλην υἱὸς Διός, ὥς κεν ἐρετμὸν 1.1189. οἷ αὐτῷ φθαίη καταχείριον ἐντύνασθαι. 1.1190. εὗρεν ἔπειτʼ ἐλάτην ἀλαλήμενος, οὔτε τι πολλοῖς 1.1191. ἀχθομένην ὄζοις, οὐδὲ μέγα τηλεθόωσαν, 1.1192. ἀλλʼ οἷον ταναῆς ἔρνος πέλει αἰγείροιο· 1.1193. τόσση ὁμῶς μῆκός τε καὶ ἐς πάχος ἦεν ἰδέσθαι. 1.1194. ῥίμφα δʼ ὀιστοδόκην μὲν ἐπὶ χθονὶ θῆκε φαρέτρην 1.1195. αὐτοῖσιν τόξοισιν, ἔδυ δʼ ἀπὸ δέρμα λέοντος. 1.1196. τὴν δʼ ὅγε χαλκοβαρεῖ ῥοπάλῳ δαπέδοιο τινάξας 1.1197. νειόθεν ἀμφοτέρῃσι περὶ στύπος ἔλλαβε χερσίν, 1.1198. ἠνορέῃ πίσυνος· ἐν δὲ πλατὺν ὦμον ἔρεισεν 1.1199. εὖ διαβάς· πεδόθεν δὲ βαθύρριζόν περ ἐοῦσαν 1.1200. προσφὺς ἐξήειρε σὺν αὐτοῖς ἔχμασι γαίης. 1.1201. ὡς δʼ ὅταν ἀπροφάτως ἱστόν νεός, εὖτε μάλιστα 1.1202. χειμερίη ὀλοοῖο δύσις πέλει Ὠρίωνος, 1.1203. ὑψόθεν ἐμπλήξασα θοὴ ἀνέμοιο κατάιξ 1.1204. αὐτοῖσι σφήνεσσιν ὑπὲκ προτόνων ἐρύσηται· 1.1205. ὧς ὅγε τὴν ἤειρεν. ὁμοῦ δʼ ἀνὰ τόξα καὶ ἰοὺς 1.1206. δέρμα θʼ ἑλὼν ῥόπαλόν τε παλίσσυτος ὦρτο νέεσθαι. 1.1207. τόφρα δʼ Ὕλας χαλκέῃ σὺν κάλπιδι νόσφιν ὁμίλου 1.1208. δίζητο κρήνης ἱερὸν ῥόον, ὥς κέ οἱ ὕδωρ 1.1209. φθαίη ἀφυσσάμενος ποτιδόρπιον, ἄλλα τε πάντα 1.1210. ὀτραλέως κατὰ κόσμον ἐπαρτίσσειεν ἰόντι. 1.1211. δὴ γάρ μιν τοίοισιν ἐν ἤθεσιν αὐτὸς ἔφερβεν, 1.1212. νηπίαχον τὰ πρῶτα δόμων ἐκ πατρὸς ἀπούρας, 1.1213. δίου Θειοδάμαντος, ὃν ἐν Δρυόπεσσιν ἔπεφνεν 1.1214. νηλειῶς, βοὸς ἀμφὶ γεωμόρου ἀντιόωντα. 1.1215. ἤτοι ὁ μὲν νειοῖο γύας τέμνεσκεν ἀρότρῳ 1.1216. Θειοδάμας ἀνίῃ βεβολημένος· αὐτὰρ ὁ τόνγε 1.1217. βοῦν ἀρότην ἤνωγε παρασχέμεν οὐκ ἐθέλοντα. 1.1218. ἵετο γὰρ πρόφασιν πολέμου Δρυόπεσσι βαλέσθαι 1.1219. λευγαλέην, ἐπεὶ οὔτι δίκης ἀλέγοντες ἔναιον. 1.1220. ἀλλὰ τὰ μὲν τηλοῦ κεν ἀποπλάγξειεν ἀοιδῆς. 1.1221. αἶψα δʼ ὅγε κρήνην μετεκίαθεν, ἣν καλέουσιν 1.1222. πηγὰς ἀγχίγυοι περιναιέται. οἱ δέ που ἄρτι 1.1223. νυμφάων ἵσταντο χοροί· μέλε γάρ σφισι πάσαις, 1.1224. ὅσσαι κεῖσʼ ἐρατὸν νύμφαι ῥίον ἀμφενέμοντο, 1.1225. Ἄρτεμιν ἐννυχίῃσιν ἀεὶ μέλπεσθαι ἀοιδαῖς. 1.1226. αἱ μέν, ὅσαι σκοπιὰς ὀρέων λάχον ἢ καὶ ἐναύλους, 1.1227. αἵγε μὲν ὑλήωροι ἀπόπροθεν ἐστιχόωντο, 1.1228. ἡ δὲ νέον κρήνης ἀνεδύετο καλλινάοιο 1.1229. νύμφη ἐφυδατίη· τὸν δὲ σχεδὸν εἰσενόησεν 1.1230. κάλλεϊ καὶ γλυκερῇσιν ἐρευθόμενον χαρίτεσσιν. 1.1231. πρὸς γάρ οἱ διχόμηνις ἀπʼ αἰθέρος αὐγάζουσα 1.1232. βάλλε σεληναίη. τὴν δὲ φρένας ἐπτοίησεν 1.1233. Κύπρις, ἀμηχανίῃ δὲ μόλις συναγείρατο θυμόν. 1.1234. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ὡς τὰ πρῶτα ῥόῳ ἔνι κάλπιν ἔρεισεν 1.1235. λέχρις ἐπιχριμφθείς, περὶ δʼ ἄσπετον ἔβραχεν ὕδωρ 1.1236. χαλκὸν ἐς ἠχήεντα φορεύμενον, αὐτίκα δʼ ἥγε 1.1237. λαιὸν μὲν καθύπερθεν ἐπʼ αὐχένος ἄνθετο πῆχυν 1.1238. κύσσαι ἐπιθύουσα τέρεν στόμα· δεξιτερῇ δὲ 1.1239. ἀγκῶνʼ ἔσπασε χειρί, μέσῃ δʼ ἐνικάββαλε δίνῃ. 1.1240. τοῦ δʼ ἥρως ἰάχοντος ἐπέκλυεν οἶος ἑταίρων 1.1241. Εἰλατίδης Πολύφημος, ἰὼν προτέρωσε κελεύθου, 1.1242. δέκτο γὰρ Ἡρακλῆα πελώριον, ὁππόθʼ ἵκοιτο. 1.1243. βῆ δὲ μεταΐξας Πηγέων σχεδόν, ἠύτε τις θὴρ 1.1244. ἄγριος, ὅν ῥά τε γῆρυς ἀπόπροθεν ἵκετο μήλων, 1.1245. λιμῷ δʼ αἰθόμενος μετανίσσεται, οὐδʼ ἐπέκυρσεν 1.1246. ποίμνῃσιν· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἐνὶ σταθμοῖσι νομῆες 1.1247. ἔλσαν· ὁ δὲ στενάχων βρέμει ἄσπετον, ὄφρα κάμῃσιν· 1.1248. ὧς τότʼ ἄρʼ Εἰλατίδης μεγάλʼ ἔστενεν, ἀμφὶ δὲ χῶρον 1.1249. φοίτα κεκληγώς· μελέη δέ οἱ ἔπλετο φωνή. 1.1250. αἶψα δʼ ἐρυσσάμενος μέγα φάσγανον ὦρτο δίεσθαι, 1.1251. μήπως ἢ θήρεσσιν ἕλωρ πέλοι, ἠέ μιν ἄνδρες 1.1252. μοῦνον ἐόντʼ ἐλόχησαν, ἄγουσι δὲ ληίδʼ ἑτοίμην. 1.1253. ἔνθʼ αὐτῷ ξύμβλητο κατὰ στίβον Ἡρακλῆι 1.1284. ἐν δέ σφιν κρατερὸν νεῖκος πέσεν, ἐν δὲ κολῳὸς 1.1285. ἄσπετος, εἰ τὸν ἄριστον ἀποπρολιπόντες ἔβησαν 1.1286. σφωιτέρων ἑτάρων. ὁ δʼ ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἀτυχθεὶς 1.1287. οὔτε τι τοῖον ἔπος μετεφώνεεν, οὔτε τι τοῖον 1.1288. Αἰσονίδης· ἀλλʼ ἧστο βαρείῃ νειόθεν ἄτῃ 1.1289. θυμὸν ἔδων· Τελαμῶνα δʼ ἕλεν χόλος, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.1290. ‘ἧσʼ αὔτως εὔκηλος, ἐπεί??ύ τοι ἄρμενον ἦεν 1.1291. Ἡρακλῆα λιπεῖν· σέο δʼ ἔκτοθι μῆτις ὄρωρεν, 1.1292. ὄφρα τὸ κείνου κῦδος ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα μή σε καλύψῃ, 1.1293. αἴ κε θεοὶ δώωσιν ὑπότροπον οἴκαδε νόστον. 1.1294. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἐπεὶ καὶ νόσφιν ἑταίρων 1.1295. εἶμι τεῶν, οἳ τόνγε δόλον συνετεκτήναντο.’ 1.1296. ἦ, καὶ ἐς Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θόρε· τὼ δέ οἱ ὄσσε 1.1297. ὄστλιγγες μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ὣς ἰνδάλλοντο. 1.1298. καί νύ κεν ἂψ ὀπίσω Μυσῶν ἐπὶ γαῖαν ἵκοντο 1.1299. λαῖτμα βιησάμενοι ἀνέμου τʼ ἄλληκτον ἰωήν, 1.1300. εἰ μὴ Θρηικίοιο δύω υἷες Βορέαο 1.1301. Αἰακίδην χαλεποῖσιν ἐρητύεσκον ἔπεσσιν, 1.1302. σχέτλιοι· ἦ τέ σφιν στυγερὴ τίσις ἔπλετʼ ὀπίσσω 1.1303. χερσὶν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ὅ μιν δίζεσθαι ἔρυκον. 1.1304. ἄθλων γὰρ Πελίαο δεδουπότος ἂψ ἀνιόντας 1.1305. τήνῳ ἐν ἀμφιρύτῃ πέφνεν, καὶ ἀμήσατο γαῖαν 1.1306. ἀμφʼ αὐτοῖς, στήλας τε δύω καθύπερθεν ἔτευξεν, 1.1307. ὧν ἑτέρη, θάμβος περιώσιον ἀνδράσι λεύσσειν, 1.1308. κίνυται ἠχήεντος ὑπὸ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.1309. καὶ τὰ μὲν ὧς ἤμελλε μετὰ χρόνον ἐκτελέεσθαι. 1.1310. τοῖσιν δὲ Γλαῦκος βρυχίης ἁλὸς ἐξεφαάνθη, 1.1311. Νηρῆος θείοιο πολυφράδμων ὑποφήτης· 1.1312. ὕψι δὲ λαχνῆέν τε κάρη καὶ στήθεʼ ἀείρας 1.1313. νειόθεν ἐκ λαγόνων στιβαρῇ ἐπορέξατο χειρὶ 1.1314. νηίου ὁλκαίοιο, καὶ ἴαχεν ἐσσυμένοισιν· 1.1315. ‘τίπτε παρὲκ μεγάλοιο Διὸς μενεαίνετε βουλὴν 1.1316. Αἰήτεω πτολίεθρον ἄγειν θρασὺν Ἡρακλῆα; 1.1317. Ἄργεΐ οἱ μοῖρʼ ἐστὶν ἀτασθάλῳ Εὐρυσθῆι 1.1318. ἐκπλῆσαι μογέοντα δυώδεκα πάντας ἀέθλους, 1.1319. ναίειν δʼ ἀθανάτοισι συνέστιον, εἴ κʼ ἔτι παύρους 1.1320. ἐξανύσῃ· τῶ μή τι ποθὴ κείνοιο πελέσθω. 1.1321. αὔτως δʼ αὖ Πολύφημον ἐπὶ προχοῇσι Κίοιο 1.1322. πέπρωται Μυσοῖσι περικλεὲς ἄστυ καμόντα 1.1323. μοῖραν ἀναπλήσειν Χαλύβων ἐν ἀπείρονι γαίῃ. 1.1324. αὐτὰρ Ὕλαν φιλότητι θεὰ ποιήσατο νύμφη 1.1325. ὃν πόσιν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀποπλαγχθέντες ἔλειφθεν.’ 1.1326. ἦ, καὶ κῦμʼ ἀλίαστον ἐφέσσατο νειόθι δύψας· 1.1327. ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ δίνῃσι κυκώμενον ἄφρεεν ὕδωρ 1.1328. πορφύρεον, κοίλην δὲ διὲξ ἁλὸς ἔκλυσε νῆα. 1.1329. γήθησαν δʼ ἥρωες· ὁ δʼ ἐσσυμένως ἐβεβήκει 1.1330. Αἰακίδης Τελαμὼν ἐς Ἰήσονα, χεῖρα δὲ χειρὶ 1.1331. ἄκρην ἀμφιβαλὼν προσπτύξατο, φώνησέν τε· 1.1332. ‘Αἰσονίδη, μή μοί τι χολώσεαι, ἀφραδίῃσιν 1.1333. εἴ τί περ ἀασάμην· πέρι γάρ μʼ ἄχος εἷλεν ἐνισπεῖν 1.1334. μῦθον ὑπερφίαλόν τε καὶ ἄσχετον, ἀλλʼ ἀνέμοισιν 1.1335. δώομεν ἀμπλακίην, ὡς καὶ πάρος εὐμενέοντες.’ 1.1336. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἐπιφραδέως προσέειπεν· 1.1337. ‘ὦ πέπον, ἦ μάλα δή με κακῷ ἐκυδάσσαο μύθῳ, 1.1338. φὰς ἐνὶ τοῖσιν ἅπασιν ἐνηέος ἀνδρὸς ἀλείτην 1.1339. ἔμμεναι. ἀλλʼ οὐ θήν τοι ἀδευκέα μῆνιν ἀέξω, 1.1340. πρίν περ ἀνιηθείς· ἐπεὶ οὐ περὶ πώεσι μήλων, 1.1341. οὐδὲ περὶ κτεάτεσσι χαλεψάμενος μενέηνας, 1.1342. ἀλλʼ ἑτάρου περὶ φωτός. ἔολπα δέ τοι σὲ καὶ ἄλλῳ 1.1343. ἀμφʼ ἐμεῦ, εἰ τοιόνδε πέλοι ποτέ, δηρίσασθαι.’ 1.1344. ἦ ῥα, καὶ ἀρθμηθέντες, ὅπῃ πάρος, ἑδριόωντο. 2.1. 2.1. ἔνθα δʼ ἔσαν σταθμοί τε βοῶν αὖλίς τʼ Ἀμύκοιο, 2.2. Βεβρύκων βασιλῆος ἀγήνορος, ὅν ποτε νύμφη 2.3. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι Γενεθλίῳ εὐνηθεῖσα 2.4. Βιθυνὶς Μελίη, ὑπεροπληέστατον ἀνδρῶν· 2.5. ὅς τʼ ἐπὶ καὶ ξείνοισιν ἀεικέα θεσμὸν ἔθηκεν, 2.6. μήτινʼ ἀποστείχειν, πρὶν πειρήσασθαι ἑοῖο 2.7. πυγμαχίης· πολέας δὲ περικτιόνων ἐδάιξεν. 2.8. καὶ δὲ τότε προτὶ νῆα κιών, χρειώ μιν ἐρέσθαι 2.9. ναυτιλίης, οἵ τʼ εἶεν, ὑπερβασίῃσιν ἄτισσεν, 2.10. τοῖον δʼ ἐν πάντεσσι παρασχεδὸν ἔκφατο μῦθον· 2.11. ‘Κέκλυθʼ, ἁλίπλαγκτοι, τάπερ ἴδμεναι ὔμμιν ἔοικεν. 2.12. οὔτινα θέσμιόν ἐστιν ἀφορμηθέντα νέεσθαι 2.13. ἀνδρῶν ὀθνείων, ὅς κεν Βέβρυξι πελάσσῃ, 2.14. πρὶν χείρεσσιν ἐμῇσιν ἑὰς ἀνὰ χεῖρας ἀεῖραι. 2.15. τῶ καί μοι τὸν ἄριστον ἀποκριδὸν οἶον ὁμίλου 2.16. πυγμαχίῃ στήσασθε καταυτόθι δηρινθῆναι. 2.17. εἰ δʼ ἂν ἀπηλεγέοντες ἐμὰς πατέοιτε θέμιστας, 2.18. ἧ κέν τις στυγερῶς κρατερὴ ἐπιέψετʼ ἀνάγκη.’ 2.19. ἦ ῥα μέγα φρονέων· τοὺς δʼ ἄγριος εἰσαΐοντας 2.20. εἷλε χόλος· περὶ δʼ αὖ Πολυδεύκεα τύψεν ὁμοκλη 2.21. αἶψα δʼ ἑῶν ἑτάρων πρόμος ἵστατο, φώνησέν τε· 2.22. ‘ἴσχεο νῦν, μηδʼ ἄμμι κακήν, ὅτις εὔχεαι εἶναι, 2.23. φαῖνε βίην· θεσμοῖς γὰρ ὑπείξομεν, ὡς ἀγορεύεις. 2.24. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἤδη τοι ὑπίσχομαι ἀντιάασθαι.’ 2.25. ὧς φάτʼ ἀπηλεγέως· ὁ δʼ ἐσέδρακεν ὄμμαθʼ ἑλίξας, 2.26. ὥστε λέων ὑπʼ ἄκοντι τετυμμένος, ὅν τʼ ἐν ὄρεσσιν 2.27. ἀνέρες ἀμφιπένονται· ὁ δʼ ἰλλόμενός περ ὁμίλῳ 2.28. τῶν μὲν ἔτʼ οὐκ ἀλέγει, ἐπὶ δʼ ὄσσεται οἰόθεν οἶον 2.29. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς μιν ἔτυψε παροίτατος, οὐδʼ ἐδάμασσεν. 2.89. φορβάδος ἀμφὶ βοὸς κεκοτηότε δηριάασθον. 2.714. αὐτὰρ ἐπειδὴ τόνγε χορείῃ μέλψαν ἀοιδῇ, 2.715. λοιβαῖς εὐαγέεσσιν ἐπώμοσαν, ἦ μὲν ἀρήξειν 2.716. ἀλλήλοις εἰσαιὲν ὁμοφροσύνῃσι νόοιο, 2.717. ἁπτόμενοι θυέων· καί τʼ εἰσέτι νῦν γε τέτυκται 2.718. κεῖσʼ Ὁμονοίης ἱρὸν ἐύφρονος, ὅ ῥʼ ἐκάμοντο 2.719. αὐτοὶ κυδίστην τότε δαίμονα πορσαίνοντες. 2.1077. οἵη δὲ κλαγγὴ δῄου πέλει ἐξ ὁμάδοιο 3.270. Χαλκιόπης ἀίουσα· τὸ δʼ αὐτίκα πᾶν ὁμάδοιο 3.367. τοῖα παρέννεπεν Ἄργος· ἄναξ δʼ ἐπεχώσατο μύθοις 3.368. εἰσαΐων· ὑψοῦ δὲ χόλῳ φρένες ἠερέθοντο. 3.369. φῆ δʼ ἐπαλαστήσας· μενέαινε δὲ παισὶ μάλιστα 3.370. Χαλκιόπης· τῶν γάρ σφε μετελθέμεν οὕνεκʼ ἐώλπει· 3.371. ἐκ δέ οἱ ὄμματʼ ἔλαμψεν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἱεμένοιο· 3.372. ‘οὐκ ἄφαρ ὀφθαλμῶν μοι ἀπόπροθι, λωβητῆρες, 3.373. νεῖσθʼ αὐτοῖσι δόλοισι παλίσσυτοι ἔκτοθι γαίης, 3.374. πρίν τινα λευγαλέον τε δέρος καὶ Φρίξον ἰδέσθαι; 3.375. αὐτίχʼ ὁμαρτήσαντες ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος, οὐκ ἐπὶ κῶας, 3.376. σκῆπτρα δὲ καὶ τιμὴν βασιληίδα δεῦρο νέεσθε. 3.377. εἰ δέ κε μὴ προπάροιθεν ἐμῆς ἥψασθε τραπέζης, 3.378. ἦ τʼ ἂν ἀπὸ γλώσσας τε ταμὼν καὶ χεῖρε κεάσσας 3.379. ἀμφοτέρας, οἴοισιν ἐπιπροέηκα πόδεσσιν, 3.380. ὥς κεν ἐρητύοισθε καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι, 3.381. οἷα δὲ καὶ μακάρεσσιν ἐπεψεύσασθε θεοῖσιν.’ 3.382. φῆ ῥα χαλεψάμενος· μέγα δὲ φρένες Αἰακίδαο 3.383. νειόθεν οἰδαίνεσκον· ἐέλδετο δʼ ἔνδοθι θυμὸς 3.384. ἀντιβίην ὀλοὸν φάσθαι ἔπος· ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.385. Αἰσονίδης· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἀμείψατο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.475. ‘Αἰσονίδη, μῆτιν μὲν ὀνόσσεαι, ἥντινʼ ἐνίψω· 3.476. πείρης δʼ οὐ μάλʼ ἔοικε μεθιέμεν ἐν κακότητι. 3.477. κούρην δή τινα πρόσθεν ὑπέκλυες αὐτὸς ἐμεῖο 3.478. φαρμάσσειν Ἑκάτης Περσηίδος ἐννεσίῃσιν. 3.479. τὴν εἴ κεν πεπίθοιμεν, ὀίομαι, οὐκέτι τάρβος 3.480. ἔσσετʼ ἀεθλεύοντι δαμήμεναι· ἀλλὰ μάλʼ αἰνῶς 3.481. δείδω, μή πως οὔ μοι ὑποσταίη τόγε μήτηρ. 3.482. ἔμπης δʼ ἐξαῦτις μετελεύσομαι ἀντιβολήσων, 3.483. ξυνὸς ἐπεὶ πάντεσσιν ἐπικρέμαθʼ ἧμιν ὄλεθρος.’ 3.515. ὧς ἔφατʼ Αἰακίδης· Τελαμῶνι δὲ θυμὸς ὀρίνθη· 3.516. σπερχόμενος δʼ ἀνόρουσε θοῶς· ἐπὶ δὲ τρίτος Ἴδας 3.545. ‘ὔμμι, φίλοι, τόδε σῆμα θεῶν ἰότητι τέτυκται· 3.546. οὐδέ τῃ ἄλλως ἐστὶν ὑποκρίνασθαι ἄρειον, 3.547. παρθενικὴν δʼ ἐπέεσσι μετελθέμεν ἀμφιέποντας 3.548. μήτι παντοίῃ. δοκέω δέ μιν οὐκ ἀθερίζειν, 3.549. εἰ ἐτεὸν Φινεύς γε θεᾷ ἐνὶ Κύπριδι νόστον 3.550. πέφραδεν ἔσσεσθαι. κείνης δʼ ὅγε μείλιχος ὄρνις 3.551. πότμον ὑπεξήλυξε· κέαρ δέ μοι ὡς ἐνὶ θυμῷ 3.552. τόνδε κατʼ οἰωνὸν προτιόσσεται, ὧς δὲ πέλοιτο. 3.553. ἀλλά, φίλοι, Κυθέρειαν ἐπικλείοντες ἀμύνειν, 3.554. ἤδη νῦν Ἄργοιο παραιφασίῃσι πίθεσθε.’ 3.556. μνησάμενοι· μοῦνος δʼ Ἀφαρήιος ἄνθορεν Ἴδας, 3.557. δείνʼ ἐπαλαστήσας μεγάλῃ ὀπί, φώνησέν τε· 3.558. ‘ὦ πόποι, ἦ ῥα γυναιξὶν ὁμόστολοι ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν, 3.559. οἳ Κύπριν καλέουσιν ἐπίρροθον ἄμμι πέλεσθαι, 3.560. οὐκέτʼ Ἐνυαλίοιο μέγα σθένος; ἐς δὲ πελείας 3.561. καὶ κίρκους λεύσσοντες ἐρητύεσθε ἀέθλων; 3.562. ἔρρετε, μηδʼ ὔμμιν πολεμήια ἔργα μέλοιτο, 3.563. παρθενικὰς δὲ λιτῇσιν ἀνάλκιδας ἠπεροπεύειν.’ 3.564. ὧς ηὔδα μεμαώς· πολέες δʼ ὁμάδησαν ἑταῖροι 3.565. ἦκα μάλʼ, οὐδʼ ἄρα τίς οἱ ἐναντίον ἔκφατο μῦθον. 3.566. χωόμενος δʼ ὅγʼ ἔπειτα καθέζετο· τοῖσι δʼ Ἰήσων 3.576. αὐτίκα δʼ Αἰήτης ἀγορὴν ποιήσατο Κόλχων 3.577. νόσφιν ἑοῖο δόμου, τόθι περ καὶ πρόσθε κάθιζον, 3.578. ἀτλήτους Μινύῃσι δόλους καὶ κήδεα τεύχων. 3.579. στεῦτο δʼ, ἐπεί κεν πρῶτα βόες διαδηλήσωνται 3.580. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς ῥʼ ὑπέδεκτο βαρὺν καμέεσθαι ἄεθλον, 3.581. δρυμὸν ἀναρρήξας λασίης καθύπερθε· κολώνης 3.582. αὔτανδρον φλέξειν δόρυ νήιον, ὄφρʼ ἀλεγεινὴν 3.583. ὕβριν ἀποφλύξωσιν ὑπέρβια μηχανόωντες. 3.584. οὐδὲ γὰρ Αἰολίδην Φρίξον μάλα περ χατέοντα 3.585. δέχθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐφέστιον, ὃς περὶ πάντων 3.586. ξείνων μελιχίῃ τε θεουδείῃ τʼ ἐκέκαστο, 3.587. εἰ μή οἱ Ζεὺς αὐτὸς ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἄγγελον ἧκεν 3.588. Ἑρμείαν, ὥς κεν προσκηδέος ἀντιάσειεν· 3.589. μὴ καὶ ληιστῆρας ἑὴν ἐς γαῖαν ἰόντας 3.590. ἔσσεσθαι δηναιὸν ἀπήμονας, οἷσι μέμηλεν 3.591. ὀθνείοις ἐπὶ χεῖρα ἑὴν κτεάτεσσιν ἀείρειν, 3.592. κρυπταδίους τε δόλους τεκταινέμεν, ἠδὲ βοτήρων 3.593. αὔλια δυσκελάδοισιν ἐπιδρομίῃσι δαΐξαι. 3.594. νόσφι δὲ οἷ αὐτῷ φάτʼ ἐοικότα μείλια τίσειν 3.595. υἱῆας Φρίξοιο, κακορρέκτῃσιν ὀπηδοὺς 3.596. ἀνδράσι νοστήσαντας ὁμιλαδόν, ὄφρα ἑ τιμῆς 3.597. καὶ σκήπτρων ἐλάσειαν ἀκηδέες· ὥς ποτε βάξιν 3.598. λευγαλέην οὗ πατρὸς ἐπέκλυεν Ἠελίοιο, 3.599. χρειώ μιν πυκινόν τε δόλον βουλάς τε γενέθλης 3.600. σφωιτέρης ἄτην τε πολύτροπον ἐξαλέασθαι· 3.601. τῶ καὶ ἐελδομένους πέμπειν ἐς Ἀχαιίδα γαῖαν 3.602. πατρὸς ἐφημοσύνῃ, δολιχὴν ὁδόν. οὐδὲ θυγατρῶν 3.603. εἶναί οἱ τυτθόν γε δέος, μή πού τινα μῆτιν 3.604. φράσσωνται στυγερήν, οὐδʼ υἱέος Ἀψύρτοιο· 3.605. ἀλλʼ ἐνὶ Χαλκιόπης γενεῇ τάδε λυγρὰ τετύχθαι. 3.606. καί ῥʼ ὁ μὲν ἄσχετα ἔργα πιφαύσκετο δημοτέροισιν 3.607. χωόμενος· μέγα δέ σφιν ἀπείλεε νῆά τʼ ἔρυσθαι 3.608. ἠδʼ αὐτούς, ἵνα μήτις ὑπὲκ κακότητος ἀλύξῃ. 3.1170. Ἴδας ἧστʼ ἀπάνευθε δακὼν χόλον· οἱ δὲ δὴ ἄλλοι 3.1252. αὐτὰρ ὁ τοῖς ἄμοτον κοτέων Ἀφαρήιος Ἴδας 3.1253. κόψε παρʼ οὐρίαχον μεγάλῳ ξίφει· ἆλτο δʼ ἀκωκὴ 4.198. Αἰήτης ὁμάδῳ πόντονδʼ ἴμεν ἐκ ποταμοῖο. 4.212. ἤδη δʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι πᾶσί τε Κόλχοις 4.213. Μηδείης περίπυστος ἔρως καὶ ἔργʼ ἐτέτυκτο. 4.214. ἐς δʼ ἀγορὴν ἀγέροντʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσιν· ὅσσα δέ πόντου 4.215. κύματα χειμερίοιο κορύσσεται ἐξ ἀνέμοιο, 4.216. ἢ ὅσα φύλλα χαμᾶζε περικλαδέος πέσεν ὕλης 4.217. φυλλοχόῳ ἐνὶ μηνί--τίς ἂν τάδε τεκμήραιτο; 4.218. ὧς οἱ ἀπειρέσιοι ποταμοῦ παρεμέτρεον ὄχθας, 4.219. κλαγγῇ μαιμώοντες· ὁ δʼ εὐτύκτῳ ἐνὶ δίφρῳ 4.220. Αἰήτης ἵπποισι μετέπρεπεν, οὕς οἱ ὄπασσεν 4.221. ἠέλιος πνοιῇσιν ἐειδομένους ἀνέμοιο, 4.222. σκαιῇ μέν ῥ̓ ἐνὶ χειρὶ σάκος δινωτὸν ἀείρων, 4.223. τῇ δʼ ἑτέρῃ πεύκην περιμήκεα· πὰρ δέ οἱ ἔγχος 4.224. ἀντικρὺ τετάνυστο πελώριον. ἡνία δʼ ἵππων 4.225. γέντο χεροῖν Ἄψυρτος. υπεκπρὸ δὲ πόντον ἔταμνεν 4.226. νηῦς ἤδη κρατεροῖσιν ἐπειγομένη ἐρέτῃσιν, 4.227. καὶ μεγάλου ποταμοῖο καταβλώσκοντι ῥεέθρῳ. 4.228. αὐτὰρ ἄναξ ἄτῃ πολυπήμονι χεῖρας ἀείρας 4.229. ἠέλιον καὶ Ζῆνα κακῶν ἐπιμάρτυρας ἔργων 4.230. κέκλετο· δεινὰ δὲ παντὶ παρασχεδὸν ἤπυε λαῷ 4.231. εἰ μή οἱ κούρην αὐτάγρετον, ἢ ἀνὰ γαῖαν, 4.232. ἢ πλωτῆς εὑρόντες ἔτʼ εἰν ἁλὸς οἴδματι νῆα, 4.233. ἄξουσιν, καὶ θυμὸν ἐνιπλήσει μενεαίνων 4.234. τίσασθαι τάδε πάντα, δαήσονται κεφαλῇσιν 4.235. πάντα χόλον καὶ πᾶσαν ἑὴν ὑποδέγμενοι ἄτην. 4.350. ἔνθα δʼ ἐπεὶ τὰ ἕκαστα νόῳ πεμπάσσατο κούρη, 4.351. δή ῥά μιν ὀξεῖαι κραδίην ἐλέλιξαν ἀνῖαι 4.352. νωλεμές· αἶψα δὲ νόσφιν Ἰήσονα μοῦνον ἑταίρων 4.353. ἐκπροκαλεσσαμένη ἄγεν ἄλλυδις, ὄφρʼ ἐλίασθεν 4.354. πολλὸν ἑκάς, στονόεντα δʼ ἐνωπαδὶς ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.355. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε συναρτύνασθε μενοινὴν 4.356. ἀμφʼ ἐμοί; ἦέ σε πάγχυ λαθιφροσύναις ἐνέηκαν 4.357. ἀγλαΐαι, τῶν δʼ οὔτι μετατρέπῃ, ὅσσʼ ἀγόρευες 4.358. χρειοῖ ἐνισχόμενος; ποῦ τοι Διὸς Ἱκεσίοιο 4.359. ὅρκια, ποῦ δὲ μελιχραὶ ὑποσχεσίαι βεβάασιν; 4.360. ᾗς ἐγὼ οὐ κατὰ κόσμον ἀναιδήτῳ ἰότητι 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.364. σῶν ἕνεκεν καμάτων, ἵνα μοι σόος ἀμφί τε βουσὶν 4.365. ἀμφί τε γηγενέεσσιν ἀναπλήσειας ἀέθλους. 4.366. ὕστατον αὖ καὶ κῶας, ἐπεί τʼ ἐπαϊστὸν ἐτύχθη, 4.367. εἷλες ἐμῇ ματίῃ· κατὰ δʼ οὐλοὸν αἶσχος ἔχευα 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι. 4.370. πάντῃ νυν πρόφρων ὑπερίστασο, μηδέ με μούνην 4.371. σεῖο λίπῃς ἀπάνευθεν, ἐποιχόμενος βασιλῆας. 4.372. ἀλλʼ αὔτως εἴρυσο· δίκη δέ τοι ἔμπεδος ἔστω 4.373. καὶ θέμις, ἣν ἄμφω συναρέσσαμεν· ἢ σύγʼ ἔπειτα 4.374. φασγάνῳ αὐτίκα τόνδε μέσον διὰ λαιμὸν ἀμῆσαι, 4.375. ὄφρʼ ἐπίηρα φέρωμαι ἐοικότα μαργοσύνῃσιν. 4.376. σχετλίη, εἴ κεν δή με κασιγνήτοιο δικάσσῃ 4.377. ἔμμεναι οὗτος ἄναξ, τῷ ἐπίσχετε τάσδʼ ἀλεγεινὰς 4.378. ἄμφω συνθεσίας. πῶς ἵξομαι ὄμματα πατρός; 4.379. ἦ μάλʼ ἐυκλειής; τίνα δʼ οὐ τίσιν, ἠὲ βαρεῖαν 4.380. ἄτην οὐ σμυγερῶς δεινῶν ὕπερ, οἷα ἔοργα, 4.381. ὀτλήσω; σὺ δέ κεν θυμηδέα νόστον ἕλοιο; 4.382. μὴ τόγε παμβασίλεια Διὸς τελέσειεν ἄκοιτις, 4.383. ᾗ ἐπικυδιάεις. μνήσαιο δέ καί ποτʼ ἐμεῖο, 4.384. στρευγόμενος καμάτοισι· δέρος δέ τοι ἶσον ὀνείροις 4.385. οἴχοιτʼ εἰς ἔρεβος μεταμώνιον. ἐκ δέ σε πάτρης 4.386. αὐτίκʼ ἐμαί σʼ ἐλάσειαν Ἐρινύες· οἷα καὶ αὐτὴ 4.387. σῇ πάθον ἀτροπίῃ. τὰ μὲν οὐ θέμις ἀκράαντα 4.388. ἐν γαίῃ πεσέειν. μάλα γὰρ μέγαν ἤλιτες ὅρκον, 4.389. νηλεές· ἀλλʼ οὔ θήν μοι ἐπιλλίζοντες ὀπίσσω 4.390. δὴν ἔσσεσθʼ εὔκηλοι ἕκητί γε συνθεσιάων.’ 4.391. ὧς φάτʼ ἀναζείουσα βαρὺν χόλον· ἵετο δʼ ἥγε 4.392. νῆα καταφλέξαι, διά τʼ ἔμπεδα πάντα κεάσσαι, 4.393. ἐν δὲ πεσεῖν αὐτὴ μαλερῷ πυρί. τοῖα δʼ Ἰήσων 4.1719. ῥέζον δʼ ὅσσα περ ἄνδρες ἐρημαίῃ ἐνὶ ῥέζειν 4.1720. ἀκτῇ ἐφοπλίσσειαν· ὃ δή σφεας ὁππότε δαλοῖς 4.1721. ὕδωρ αἰθομένοισιν ἐπιλλείβοντας ἴδοντο 4.1722. Μηδείης δμωαὶ Φαιηκίδες, οὐκέτʼ ἔπειτα 4.1723. ἴσχειν ἐν στήθεσσι γέλω σθένον, οἷα θαμειὰς 4.1724. αἰὲν ἐν Ἀλκινόοιο βοοκτασίας ὁρόωσαι. 4.1725. τὰς δʼ αἰσχροῖς ἥρωες ἐπεστοβέεσκον ἔπεσσιν 4.1726. χλεύῃ γηθόσυνοι· γλυκερὴ δʼ ἀνεδαίετο τοῖσιν 4.1727. κερτομίη καὶ νεῖκος ἐπεσβόλον. ἐκ δέ νυ κείνης 4.1728. μολπῆς ἡρώων νήσῳ ἔνι τοῖα γυναῖκες 4.1729. ἀνδράσι δηριόωνται, ὅτʼ Ἀπόλλωνα θυηλαῖς 4.1730. Αἰγλήτην Ἀνάφης τιμήορον ἱλάσκωνται. 4.1765. κεῖθεν δʼ ἀπτερέως διὰ μυρίον οἶδμα λιπόντες 4.1766. Αἰγίνης ἀκτῇσιν ἐπέσχεθον· αἶψα δὲ τοίγε 4.1767. ὑδρείης πέρι δῆριν ἀμεμφέα δηρίσαντο, 4.1768. ὅς κεν ἀφυσσάμενος φθαίη μετὰ νῆάδʼ ἱκέσθαι. 4.1769. ἄμφθ γὰρ χρειώ τε καὶ ἄσπετος οὖρος ἔπειγεν. 4.1770. ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν πλήθοντας ἐπωμαδὸν ἀμφιφορῆας 4.1771. ἀνθέμενοι κούφοισιν ἄφαρ κατʼ ἀγῶνα πόδεσσιν 4.1772. κοῦροι Μυρμιδόνων νίκης πέρι δηριόωνται.
43. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 4.25, 4.36-4.38, 5.5, 5.11, 5.21-5.22, 7.3, 7.5, 7.24, 7.27, 7.36, 7.39, 9.1-9.18, 10.10, 10.35, 14.37-14.46, 15.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 512, 516
4.25. After receiving the king's orders he returned, possessing no qualification for the high priesthood, but having the hot temper of a cruel tyrant and the rage of a savage wild beast.' 4.36. When the king returned from the region of Cilicia, the Jews in the city appealed to him with regard to the unreasonable murder of Onias, and the Greeks shared their hatred of the crime.' 4.37. Therefore Antiochus was grieved at heart and filled with pity, and wept because of the moderation and good conduct of the deceased;' 4.38. and inflamed with anger, he immediately stripped off the purple robe from Andronicus, tore off his garments, and led him about the whole city to that very place where he had committed the outrage against Onias, and there he dispatched the bloodthirsty fellow. The Lord thus repaid him with the punishment he deserved.' 5.5. When a false rumor arose that Antiochus was dead, Jason took no less than a thousand men and suddenly made an assault upon the city. When the troops upon the wall had been forced back and at last the city was being taken, Menelaus took refuge in the citadel.' 5.11. When news of what had happened reached the king, he took it to mean that Judea was in revolt. So, raging inwardly, he left Egypt and took the city by storm.' 5.21. So Antiochus carried off eighteen hundred talents from the temple, and hurried away to Antioch, thinking in his arrogance that he could sail on the land and walk on the sea, because his mind was elated.' 5.22. And he left governors to afflict the people: at Jerusalem, Philip, by birth a Phrygian and in character more barbarous than the man who appointed him;' 7.3. The king fell into a rage, and gave orders that pans and caldrons be heated.' 7.5. When he was utterly helpless, the king ordered them to take him to the fire, still breathing, and to fry him in a pan. The smoke from the pan spread widely, but the brothers and their mother encouraged one another to die nobly, saying,' 7.24. Antiochus felt that he was being treated with contempt, and he was suspicious of her reproachful tone. The youngest brother being still alive, Antiochus not only appealed to him in words, but promised with oaths that he would make him rich and enviable if he would turn from the ways of his fathers, and that he would take him for his friend and entrust him with public affairs.' 7.27. But, leaning close to him, she spoke in their native tongue as follows, deriding the cruel tyrant: 'My son, have pity on me. I carried you nine months in my womb, and nursed you for three years, and have reared you and brought you up to this point in your life, and have taken care of you.' 7.36. For our brothers after enduring a brief suffering have drunk of everflowing life under God's covet; but you, by the judgment of God, will receive just punishment for your arrogance.' 7.39. The king fell into a rage, and handled him worse than the others, being exasperated at his scorn.' 9.1. About that time, as it happened, Antiochus had retreated in disorder from the region of Persia.' 9.2. For he had entered the city called Persepolis, and attempted to rob the temples and control the city. Therefore the people rushed to the rescue with arms, and Antiochus and his men were defeated, with the result that Antiochus was put to flight by the inhabitants and beat a shameful retreat.' 9.3. While he was in Ecbatana, news came to him of what had happened to Nicanor and the forces of Timothy.' 9.4. Transported with rage, he conceived the idea of turning upon the Jews the injury done by those who had put him to flight; so he ordered his charioteer to drive without stopping until he completed the journey. But the judgment of heaven rode with him! For in his arrogance he said, 'When I get there I will make Jerusalem a cemetery of Jews.' 9.5. But the all-seeing Lord, the God of Israel, struck him an incurable and unseen blow. As soon as he ceased speaking he was seized with a pain in his bowels for which there was no relief and with sharp internal tortures --' 9.6. and that very justly, for he had tortured the bowels of others with many and strange inflictions.' 9.7. Yet he did not in any way stop his insolence, but was even more filled with arrogance, breathing fire in his rage against the Jews, and giving orders to hasten the journey. And so it came about that he fell out of his chariot as it was rushing along, and the fall was so hard as to torture every limb of his body.' 9.8. Thus he who had just been thinking that he could command the waves of the sea, in his superhuman arrogance, and imagining that he could weigh the high mountains in a balance, was brought down to earth and carried in a litter, making the power of God manifest to all.' 9.9. And so the ungodly man's body swarmed with worms, and while he was still living in anguish and pain, his flesh rotted away, and because of his stench the whole army felt revulsion at his decay.' 9.10. Because of his intolerable stench no one was able to carry the man who a little while before had thought that he could touch the stars of heaven." 9.11. Then it was that, broken in spirit, he began to lose much of his arrogance and to come to his senses under the scourge of God, for he was tortured with pain every moment.' 9.12. And when he could not endure his own stench, he uttered these words: 'It is right to be subject to God, and no mortal should think that he is equal to God.' 9.13. Then the abominable fellow made a vow to the Lord, who would no longer have mercy on him, stating' 9.14. that the holy city, which he was hastening to level to the ground and to make a cemetery, he was now declaring to be free;' 9.15. and the Jews, whom he had not considered worth burying but had planned to throw out with their children to the beasts, for the birds to pick, he would make, all of them, equal to citizens of Athens;' 9.16. and the holy sanctuary, which he had formerly plundered, he would adorn with the finest offerings; and the holy vessels he would give back, all of them, many times over; and the expenses incurred for the sacrifices he would provide from his own revenues;' 9.17. and in addition to all this he also would become a Jew and would visit every inhabited place to proclaim the power of God." 9.18. But when his sufferings did not in any way abate, for the judgment of God had justly come upon him, he gave up all hope for himself and wrote to the Jews the following letter, in the form of a supplication. This was its content:' 10.10. Now we will tell what took place under Antiochus Eupator, who was the son of that ungodly man, and will give a brief summary of the principal calamities of the wars.' 10.35. But at dawn of the fifth day, twenty young men in the army of Maccabeus, fired with anger because of the blasphemies, bravely stormed the wall and with savage fury cut down every one they met.' 14.37. A certain Razis, one of the elders of Jerusalem, was denounced to Nicanor as a man who loved his fellow citizens and was very well thought of and for his good will was called father of the Jews.' 14.38. For in former times, when there was no mingling with the Gentiles, he had been accused of Judaism, and for Judaism he had with all zeal risked body and life.' 14.39. Nicanor, wishing to exhibit the enmity which he had for the Jews, sent more than five hundred soldiers to arrest him;' 14.40. for he thought that by arresting him he would do them an injury." 14.41. When the troops were about to capture the tower and were forcing the door of the courtyard, they ordered that fire be brought and the doors burned. Being surrounded, Razis fell upon his own sword,' 14.42. preferring to die nobly rather than to fall into the hands of sinners and suffer outrages unworthy of his noble birth." 14.43. But in the heat of the struggle he did not hit exactly, and the crowd was now rushing in through the doors. He bravely ran up on the wall, and manfully threw himself down into the crowd.' 14.44. But as they quickly drew back, a space opened and he fell in the middle of the empty space.' 14.45. Still alive and aflame with anger, he rose, and though his blood gushed forth and his wounds were severe he ran through the crowd; and standing upon a steep rock,' 14.46. with his blood now completely drained from him, he tore out his entrails, took them with both hands and hurled them at the crowd, calling upon the Lord of life and spirit to give them back to him again. This was the manner of his death.' 15.2. And when the Jews who were compelled to follow him said, 'Do not destroy so savagely and barbarously, but show respect for the day which he who sees all things has honored and hallowed above other days,'
44. Polybius, Histories, 21.31.6-21.31.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218
21.31.6. καὶ γὰρ ἐδόκει μετὰ Δάμωνʼ ὁ Κιχησίου λέων ἄλλα τε καλῶς εἰπεῖν καὶ παραδείγματι πρὸς τὸ παρὸν οἰκείῳ χρήσασθαι κατὰ τὸν λόγον. 21.31.7. ἔφη γὰρ ὀργίζεσθαι μὲν εἰκότως τοῖς Αἰτωλοῖς· πολλὰ γὰρ εὖ πεπονθότας τοὺς Αἰτωλοὺς ὑπὸ Ῥωμαίων οὐ χάριν ἀποδεδωκέναι τούτων, ἀλλʼ εἰς μέγαν ἐνηνοχέναι κίνδυνον τὴν Ῥωμαίων ἡγεμονίαν ἐκκαύσαντας τὸν πρὸς Ἀντίοχον πόλεμον· ἐν τούτῳ δὲ διαμαρτάνειν τὴν σύγκλητον, 21.31.8. ἐν ᾧ τὴν ὀργὴν φέρειν ἐπὶ τοὺς πολλούς. 21.31.9. εἶναι γὰρ τὸ συμβαῖνον ἐν ταῖς πολιτείαις περὶ τὰ πλήθη παραπλήσιον τῷ γινομένῳ περὶ τὴν θάλατταν. 21.31.10. καὶ γὰρ ἐκείνην κατὰ μὲν τὴν αὑτῆς φύσιν ἀεί ποτʼ εἶναι γαληνὴν καὶ καθεστηκυῖαν καὶ συλλήβδην τοιαύτην ὥστε μηδέποτʼ ἂν ἐνοχλῆσαι μηδένα τῶν προσπελαζόντων αὐτῇ καὶ χρωμένων· 21.31.11. ἐπειδὰν δʼ ἐμπεσόντες εἰς αὐτὴν ἄνεμοι βίαιοι ταράξωσι καὶ παρὰ φύσιν ἀναγκάσωσι κινεῖσθαι, τότε μηθὲν ἔτι δεινότερον εἶναι μηδὲ φοβερώτερον θαλάττης· ὃ καὶ νῦν τοῖς κατὰ τὴν Αἰτωλίαν συμπεσεῖν. 21.31.12. "ἕως μὲν γὰρ ἦσαν ἀκέραιοι, πάντων τῶν Ἑλλήνων ὑπῆρχον ὑμῖν εὐνούστατοι καὶ βεβαιότατοι συνεργοὶ πρὸς τὰς πράξεις· 21.31.13. ἐπεὶ δʼ ἀπὸ μὲν τῆς Ἀσίας πνεύσαντες Θόας καὶ Δικαίαρχος, ἀπὸ δὲ τῆς Εὐρώπης Μενεστᾶς καὶ Δαμόκριτος συνετάραξαν τοὺς ὄχλους καὶ παρὰ φύσιν ἠνάγκασαν πᾶν καὶ λέγειν καὶ πράττειν, 21.31.14. τότε δὴ κακῶς φρονοῦντες ἐβουλήθησαν μὲν ὑμῖν, ἐγένοντο δʼ αὑτοῖς αἴτιοι κακῶν. 21.31.15. ἀνθʼ ὧν ὑμᾶς δεῖ πρὸς ἐκείνους ἔχειν ἀπαραιτήτως, ἐλεεῖν δὲ τοὺς πολλοὺς καὶ διαλύεσθαι πρὸς αὐτούς, εἰδότας ὅτι γενόμενοι πάλιν ἀκέραιοι, καὶ πρὸς τοῖς ἄλλοις ἔτι νῦν ὑφʼ ὑμῶν σωθέντες, εὐνούστατοι πάλιν ἔσονται πάντων Ἑλλήνων. 21.31.16. " ὁ μὲν οὖν Ἀθηναῖος ταῦτʼ εἰπὼν ἔπεισε τὴν σύγκλητον διαλύεσθαι πρὸς τοὺς Αἰτωλούς. 21.31.6.  And indeed Leon, son of Kichesias, who followed Damon, was judged to have spoken well on the whole and to have employed in his speech a similitude apt to the present case. 21.31.7.  He said that they were justified in being angry with the Aetolians; for that people after receiving many benefits from the Romans had not shown any gratitude for them but had much endangered the Roman supremacy by stirring up the war against Antiochus. 21.31.8.  In one respect, however, the senate was wrong and that was in being wroth with the populace. 21.31.9.  For what happened in states to the people was very much the same as what befalls the sea. 21.31.10.  The sea by its proper nature was always calm and at rest, and in general of such a character that it would never give trouble to any of those who approach it and make use of it; 21.31.11.  but when violent winds fall upon it and stir it up, compelling it to move contrary to its own nature, nothing was more terrible and appalling than the sea. "And this," he said, "is just what has happened to the Aetolians. 21.31.12.  As long as no one tampered with them, they were of all the Greeks your most warm and trustworthy supporters. 21.31.13.  But when Thoas and Dicaearchus, blowing from Asia, and Menestas and Damocritus from Europe stirred up the people and compelled them, contrary to their nature, to become reckless in word and deed, 21.31.14.  then of a truth in their folly the Aetolians desired to do you evil but brought evil on their own heads. 21.31.15.  Therefore, while being implacable to the men who instigated them, you should take pity on the people, and make peace with them, well knowing, that when again they have none to tamper with them and once more owe their preservation to you, they will again be the best disposed to you of all the Greeks." 21.31.16.  By this speech the Athenian envoy persuaded the Senate to make peace with the Aetolians.
45. Cicero, De Oratore, 2.330 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 226
2.330. Sed quando utendum sit aut non sit narratione, id est consili; neque enim si nota res est nec dubium quid gestum sit, narrare oportet, nec si adversarius narravit, nisi si refellemus; ac si quando erit narrandum, nec illa, quae suspicionem et crimen efficient contraque nos erunt, acriter persequemur et, quicquid potuerit, detrahemus; ne illud, quod Crassus, si quando fiat, perfidia, non stultitia fieri putat, ut causae noceamus, accidat. Nam ad summam totius causae pertinet, caute an contra demonstrata res sit, quod omnis orationis reliquae fons est narratio.
46. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 5.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 136
5.6. "אֱדַיִן מַלְכָּא זִיוֺהִי שְׁנוֹהִי וְרַעיֹנֹהִי יְבַהֲלוּנֵּהּ וְקִטְרֵי חַרְצֵהּ מִשְׁתָּרַיִן וְאַרְכֻבָּתֵהּ דָּא לְדָא נָקְשָׁן׃", 5.6. "Then the king’s countece was changed in him, and his thoughts affrighted him; and the joints of his loins were loosed, and his knees smote one against another.",
47. Sallust, Catiline, 52, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218
48. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.2-5.5, 13.45.10, 13.65.1-13.65.2, 13.98-13.101, 13.100.3-13.100.4, 13.101.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 220
13.101. 1.  When the Athenians learned of their success at the Arginusae, they commended the generals for the victory but were incensed that they had allowed the men who had died to maintain their supremacy to go unburied.,2.  Since Theramenes and Thrasybulus had gone off to Athens in advance of the others, the generals, having assumed that it was they who had made accusations before the populace with respect to the dead, dispatched letters against them to the people stating that it was they whom the generals had ordered to pick up the dead. But this very thing turned out to be the principal cause of their undoing.,3.  For although they could have had the help of Theramenes and his associates in the trial, men who both were able orators and had many friends and, most important of all, had been participants in the events relative to the battle, they had them, on the contrary, as adversaries and bitter accusers.,4.  For when the letters were read before the people, the multitude was at once angered at Theramenes and his associates, but after these had presented their defence, it turned out that their anger was directed again on the generals.,5.  Consequently the people served notice on them of their trial and ordered them to turn over the command of the armaments to Conon, whom they freed of the responsibility, while they decreed that the others should report to Athens with all speed. of the generals Aristogenes and Protomachus, fearing the wrath of the populace, sought safety in flight, but Thrasyllus and Calliades and, besides, Lysias and Pericles and Aristocrates sailed home to Athens with most of their ships, hoping that they would have their crews, which were numerous, to aid them in the trial.,6.  When the populace gathered in the assembly, they gave attention to the accusation and to those who spoke to gratify them, but any who entered a defence they unitedly greeted with clamour and would not allow to speak. And not the least damaging to the generals were the relatives of the dead, who appeared in the assembly in mourning garments and begged the people to punish those who had allowed men who had gladly died on behalf of their country to go unburied.,7.  And in the end the friends of these relatives and the partisans of Theramenes, being many, prevailed and the outcome was that the generals were condemned to death and their property confiscated.
49. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.341-5.661 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
5.341. “Prima Ceres unco glaebam dimovit aratro, 5.342. prima dedit fruges alimentaque mitia terris, 5.343. prima dedit leges: Cereris sunt omnia munus. 5.344. Illa canenda mihi est. Utinam modo dicere possem 5.345. carmina digna dea: certe dea carmine digna est. 5.346. Vasta giganteis ingesta est insula membris 5.347. Trinacris et magnis subiectum molibus urget 5.348. aetherias ausum sperare Typhoea sedes. 5.349. Nititur ille quidem pugnatque resurgere saepe, 5.350. dextra sed Ausonio manus est subiecta Peloro, 5.351. laeva, Pachyne, tibi, Lilybaeo crura premuntur, 5.352. degravat Aetna caput: sub qua resupinus harenas 5.353. eiectat flammamque ferox vomit ore Typhoeus. 5.354. Saepe remoliri luctatur pondera terrae 5.355. oppidaque et magnos devolvere corpore montes. 5.356. Inde tremit tellus, et rex pavet ipse silentum, 5.357. ne pateat latoque solum retegatur hiatu 5.358. inmissusque dies trepidantes terreat umbras. 5.359. Hanc metuens cladem tenebrosa sede tyrannus 5.360. exierat, curruque atrorum vectus equorum 5.361. ambibat Siculae cautus fundamina terrae. 5.362. Postquam exploratum satis est loca nulla labare, 5.363. depositoque metu, videt hunc Erycina vagantem 5.364. monte suo residens, natumque amplexa volucrem 5.365. “arma manusque meae, mea, nate, potentia”, dixit, 5.366. “illa, quibus superas omnes, cape tela, Cupido, 5.367. inque dei pectus celeres molire sagittas, 5.368. cui triplicis cessit fortuna novissima regni. 5.369. Tu superos ipsumque Iovem tu numina ponti 5.370. victa domas ipsumque, regit qui numina ponti. 5.371. Tartara quid cessant? cur non matrisque tuumque 5.372. imperium profers? agitur pars tertia mundi. 5.373. Et tamen in caelo, quae iam patientia nostra est, 5.374. spernimur, ac mecum vires minuuntur Amoris. 5.375. Pallada nonne vides iaculatricemque Dianam 5.376. abscessisse mihi? Cereris quoque filia virgo, 5.377. si patiemur, erit: nam spes adfectat easdem. 5.378. At tu, pro socio, siqua est ea gratia, regno 5.379. iunge deam patruo.” Dixit Venus. Ille pharetram 5.380. solvit et arbitrio matris de mille sagittis 5.381. unam seposuit, sed qua nec acutior ulla 5.382. nec minus incerta est nec quae magis audiat arcus, 5.383. oppositoque genu curvavit flexile cornum 5.384. inque cor hamata percussit harundine Ditem. 5.385. Haud procul Hennaeis lacus est a moenibus altae, 5.386. nomine Pergus, aquae. Non illo plura Caystros 5.387. carmina cycnorum labentibus audit in undis. 5.388. Silva coronat aquas cingens latus omne, suisque 5.389. frondibus ut velo Phoebeos submovet ictus. 5.390. Frigora dant rami, tyrios humus umida flores: 5.391. perpetuum ver est. Quo dum Proserpina luco 5.392. ludit et aut violas aut candida lilia carpit, 5.393. dumque puellari studio calathosque sinumque 5.394. implet et aequales certat superare legendo, 5.395. paene simul visa est dilectaque raptaque Diti: 5.396. usque adeo est properatus amor. Dea territa maesto 5.397. et matrem et comites, sed matrem saepius, ore 5.398. clamat; et, ut summa vestem laniarat ab ora, 5.399. conlecti flores tunicis cecidere remissis. 5.400. Tantaque simplicitas puerilibus adfuit annis, 5.401. haec quoque virgineum movit iactura dolorem. 5.402. Raptor agit currus et nomine quemque vocando 5.403. exhortatur equos, quorum per colla iubasque 5.404. excutit obscura tinctas ferrugine habenas, 5.405. perque lacus altos et olentia sulphure fertur 5.406. stagna Palicorum, rupta fervenu terra, 5.407. et qua Bacchiadae, bimari gens orta Corintho, 5.408. inter inaequales posuerunt moenia portus. 5.409. Est medium Cyanes et Pisaeae Arethusae, 5.410. quod coit angustis inclusum cornibus aequor. 5.411. Hic fuit, a cuius stagnum quoque nomine dictum est, 5.412. inter Sicelidas Cyane celeberrima nymphas. 5.413. Gurgite quae medio summa tenus exstitit alvo 5.414. agnovitque deam. “Nec longius ibitis!” inquit, 5.415. “non potes invitae Cereris gener esse: roganda, 5.416. non rapienda fuit. Quodsi componere magnis 5.417. parva mihi fas est, et me dilexit Anapis: 5.418. exorata tamen, nec, ut haec, exterrita nupsi.” 5.419. Dixit et in partes diversas bracchia tendens 5.420. obstitit. Haud ultra tenuit Saturnius iram, 5.421. terribilesque hortatus equos in gurgitis ima 5.422. contortum valido sceptrum regale lacerto 5.423. condidit. Icta viam tellus in Tartara fecit 5.424. et pronos currus medio cratere recepit. 5.425. At Cyane, raptamque deam contemptaque fontis 5.426. iura sui maerens, inconsolabile vulnus 5.427. mente gerit tacita lacrimisque absumitur omnis, 5.428. et quarum fuerat magnum modo numen, in illas 5.429. ossa pati flexus, ungues posuisse rigorem; 5.430. extenuatur aquas. Molliri membra videres, 5.431. primaque de tota tenuissima quaeque liquescunt, 5.432. caerulei crines digitique et crura pedesque: 5.433. nam brevis in gelidas membris exilibus undas 5.434. transitus est: post haec umeri tergusque latusque 5.435. pectoraque in tenues abeunt evanida rivos. 5.436. Denique pro vivo vitiatas sanguine venas 5.437. lympha subit, restatque nihil, quod prendere possis. 5.438. Interea pavidae nequiquam filia matri 5.439. omnibus est terris, omni quaesita profundo. 5.440. Illam non udis veniens Aurora capillis 5.441. cessantem vidit, non Hesperus. Illa duabus 5.442. flammiferas pinus manibus succendit ab Aetna 5.443. perque pruinosas tulit inrequieta tenebras. 5.444. Rursus ubi alma dies hebetarat sidera, natam 5.445. solis ab occasu solis quaerebat ad ortus. 5.446. Fessa labore sitim conlegerat oraque nulli 5.447. colluerant fontes; cum tectam stramine vidit 5.448. forte casam parvasque fores pulsavit: at inde 5.449. prodit anus divamque videt, lymphamque roganti 5.450. dulce dedit, tosta quod texerat ante polenta. 5.451. Dum bibit illa datum, duri puer oris et audax 5.452. constitit ante deam risitque avidamque vocavit. 5.453. offensa est neque adhuc epota parte loquentem 5.454. cum liquido mixta perfudit diva polenta. 5.455. Combibit os maculas, et quae modo bracchia gessit, 5.456. crura gerit; cauda est mutatis addita membris; 5.457. inque brevem formam, ne sit vis magna nocendi, 5.458. contrahitur, parvaque minor mensura lacerta est. 5.459. Mirantem flentemque et tangere monstra parantem 5.460. fugit anum latebramque petit; aptumque colori 5.461. nomen habet, variis stellatus corpora guttis. 5.462. Quas dea per terras et quas erraverit undas, 5.463. dicere longa mora est: quaerenti defuit orbis. 5.464. Sicaniam repetit; dumque omnia lustrat eundo, 5.465. venit et ad Cyanen. Ea ni mutata fuisset, 5.466. omnia narrasset: sed et os et lingua volenti 5.467. dicere non aderant, nec quo loqueretur habebat. 5.468. Signa tamen manifesta dedit notamque parenti, 5.469. illo forte loco delapsam in gurgite sacro, 5.470. Persephones zonam summis ostendit in undis. 5.471. Quam simul agnovit, tamquam tunc denique raptam 5.472. scisset, inornatos laniavit diva capillos 5.473. et repetita suis percussit pectora palmis. 5.474. Nescit adhuc, ubi sit: terras tamen increpat omnes 5.475. ingratasque vocat nec frugum munere dignas, 5.476. Trinacriam ante alias, in qua vestigia damni 5.477. repperit. Ergo illic saeva vertentia glaebas 5.478. fregit aratra manu, parilique irata colonos 5.479. ruricolasque boves leto dedit arvaque iussit 5.480. fallere depositum vitiataque semina fecit. 5.481. Fertilitas terrae latum vulgata per orbem 5.482. falsa iacet: primis segetes moriuntur in herbis, 5.483. et modo sol nimius, nimius modo corripit imber 5.484. sideraque ventique nocent, avidaeque volucres 5.485. semina iacta legunt; lolium tribulique fatigant 5.486. triticeas messes et inexpugnabile gramen. 5.487. Tum caput Eleis Alpheias extulit undis 5.488. rorantesque comas a fronte removit ad aures 5.489. atque ait: “O toto quaesitae virginis orbe 5.490. et frugum genetrix, inmensos siste labores 5.491. neve tibi fidae violenta irascere terrae. 5.492. Terra nihil meruit patuitque invita rapinae. 5.493. Nec sum pro patria supplex: huc hospita veni; 5.494. Pisa mihi patria est et ab Elide ducimus ortus; 5.495. Sicaniam peregrina colo, sed gratior omni 5.496. haec mihi terra solo est: hos nunc Arethusa penates, 5.497. hanc habeo sedem: quam tu, mitissima, serva. 5.498. Mota loco cur sim tantique per aequoris undas 5.499. advehar Ortygiam, veniet narratibus hora 5.500. tempestiva meis, cum tu curaque levata 5.501. et vultus melioris eris. Mihi pervia tellus 5.502. praebet iter, subterque imas ablata cavernas 5.503. hic caput attollo desuetaque sidera cerno. 5.504. Ergo dum Stygio sub terris gurgite labor, 5.505. visa tua est oculis illic Proserpina nostris: 5.506. illa quidem tristis neque adhuc interrita vultu, 5.507. sed regina tamen, sed opaci maxima mundi, 5.508. sed tamen inferni pollens matrona tyranni.” 5.509. Mater ad auditas stupuit ceu saxea voces 5.510. attonitaeque diu similis fuit. Utque dolore 5.511. pulsa gravi gravis est amentia, curribus oras 5.512. exit in aetherias. Ibi toto nubila vultu 5.513. ante Iovem passis stetit invidiosa capillis 5.514. “pro” que “meo veni supplex tibi, Iuppiter” inquit, 5.515. “sanguine proque tuo. Si nulla est gratia matris, 5.516. nata patrem moveat, neu sit tibi cura, precamur, 5.517. vilior illius, quod nostro est edita partu. 5.518. En quaesita diu tandem mihi nata reperta est, 5.519. si reperire vocas amittere certius, aut si 5.520. scire, ubi sit, reperire vocas. Quod rapta, feremus, 5.521. dummodo reddat eam: neque enim praedone marito 5.522. filia digna tua est, si iam mea filia non est.” 5.523. Iuppiter excepit: “Commune est pignus onusque 5.524. nata mihi tecum. Sed si modo nomina rebus 5.525. addere vera placet, non hoc iniuria factum, 5.526. verum amor est; neque erit nobis gener ille pudori, 5.527. tu modo, diva, velis. Ut desint cetera, quantum est 5.528. esse Iovis fratrem! — Quid quod non cetera desunt 5.529. nec cedit nisi sorte mihi? sed tanta cupido 5.530. si tibi discidii est, repetet Proserpina caelum, 5.531. lege tamen certa, si nullos contigit illic 5.532. ore cibos; nam sic Parcarum foedere cautum est.” 5.533. Dixerat. At Cereri certum est educere natam. 5.534. Non ita fata sinunt, quoniam ieiunia virgo 5.535. solverat et, cultis dum simplex errat in hortis, 5.536. Poeniceum curva decerpserat arbore pomum 5.537. sumptaque pallenti septem de cortice grana 5.538. presserat ore suo. Solusque ex omnibus illud 5.539. Ascalaphus vidit, quem quondam dicitur Orphne, 5.540. inter Avernales haud ignotissima nymphas, 5.541. ex Acheronte suo silvis peperisse sub atris: 5.542. vidit et indicio reditum crudelis ademit. 5.543. Ingemuit regina Erebi testemque profanam 5.544. fecit avem, sparsumque caput Phlegethontide lympha 5.545. in rostrum et plumas et grandia lumina vertit. 5.546. Ille sibi ablatus fulvis amicitur in alis, 5.547. inque caput crescit, longosque reflectitur ungues 5.548. vixque movet natas per inertia bracchia pennas: 5.549. foedaque fit volucris, venturi nuntia luctus, 5.550. ignavus bubo, dirum mortalibus omen. 5.551. Hic tamen indicio poenam linguaque videri 5.552. commeruisse potest: vobis, Acheloides, unde 5.553. pluma pedesque avium, cum virginis ora geratis? 5.554. an quia, cum legeret vernos Proserpina flores, 5.555. in comitum numero, doctae Sirenes, eratis? 5.556. Quam postquam toto frustra quaesistis in orbe, 5.557. protinus, ut vestram sentirent aequora curam, 5.558. posse super fluctus alarum insistere remis 5.559. optastis, facilesque deos habuistis et artus 5.560. vidistis vestros subitis flavescere pennis. 5.561. Ne tamen ille canor mulcendas natus ad aures 5.562. tantaque dos oris linguae deperderet usum, 5.563. virginei vultus et vox humana remansit. 5.564. At medius fratrisque sui maestaeque sororis 5.565. Iuppiter ex aequo volventem dividit annum. 5.566. Nunc dea, regnorum numen commune duorum, 5.567. cum matre est totidem, totidem cum coniuge menses. 5.568. Vertitur extemplo facies et mentis et oris: 5.569. nam modo quae poterat Diti quoque maesta videri, 5.570. laeta deae frons est, ut sol, qui tectus aquosis 5.571. nubibus ante fuit, victis e nubibus exit. 5.572. Exigit alma Ceres, nata secura recepta, 5.573. quae tibi causa fugae, cur sis, Arethusa, sacer fons. 5.574. Conticuere undae: quarum dea sustulit alto 5.575. fonte caput viridesque manu siccata capillos 5.576. fluminis Elei veteres narravit amores. 5.577. “Pars ego nympharum quae sunt in Achaide” dixit, 5.578. “una fui, nec me studiosius altera saltus 5.579. legit nec posuit studiosius altera casses. 5.580. Sed quamvis formae numquam mihi fama petita est, 5.581. quamvis fortis eram, formosae nomen habebam. 5.582. Nec mea me facies nimium laudata iuvabat, 5.583. quaque aliae gaudere solent, ego rustica dote 5.584. corporis erubui, crimenque placere putavi. 5.585. Lassa revertebar (memini) Stymphalide silva: 5.586. aestus erat, magnumque labor geminaverat aestum. 5.587. Invenio sine vertice aquas, sine murmure euntes, 5.588. perspicuas ad humum, per quas numerabilis alte 5.589. calculus omnis erat, quas tu vix ire putares. 5.590. Cana salicta dabant nutritaque populus unda 5.591. sponte sua natas ripis declivibus umbras. 5.592. Accessi primumque pedis vestigia tinxi, 5.593. poplite deinde tenus: neque eo contenta, recingor 5.594. molliaque impono salici velamina curvae 5.595. nudaque mergor aquis. Quas dum ferioque trahoque 5.596. mille modis labens excussaque bracchia iacto, 5.597. nescio quod medio sensi sub gurgite murmur 5.598. territaque insisto propioris margine ripae. 5.599. “Quo properas, Arethusa?” suis Alpheus ab undis, 5.600. “quo properas?” iterum rauco mihi dixerat ore. 5.601. Sicut eram, fugio sine vestibus: altera vestes 5.602. ripa meas habuit. Tanto magis instat et ardet, 5.603. et quia nuda fui, sum visa paratior illi. 5.604. Sic ego currebam, sic me ferus ille premebat, 5.605. ut fugere accipitrem penna trepidante columbae, 5.606. ut solet accipiter trepidas urgere columbas. 5.607. Usque sub Orchomenon Psophidaque Cyllenenque 5.608. Maenaliosque sinus gelidumque Erymanthon et Elin 5.609. currere sustinui; nec me velocior ille. 5.610. Sed tolerare diu cursus ego, viribus impar, 5.611. non poteram: longi patiens erat ille laboris. 5.612. Per tamen et campos, per opertos arbore montes, 5.613. saxa quoque et rupes et qua via nulla, cucurri. 5.614. Sol erat a tergo: vidi praecedere longam 5.615. ante pedes umbram, nisi si timor illa videbat; 5.616. sed certe sonitusque pedum terrebat et ingens 5.617. crinales vittas adflabat anhelitus oris. 5.618. Fessa labore fugae “fer opem, deprendimur” inquam, 5.619. “armigerae, Diana, tuae, cui saepe dedisti 5.620. ferre tuos arcus inclusaque tela pharetra.” 5.621. Mota dea est spissisque ferens e nubibus unam 5.622. me super iniecit. Lustrat caligine tectam 5.623. amnis et ignarus circum cava nubila quaerit. 5.624. Bisque locum, quo me dea texerat inscius ambit 5.625. et bis “io Arethusa io Arethusa!” vocavit. 5.626. Quid mihi tunc animi miserae fuit? anne quod agnae est, 5.627. siqua lupos audit circum stabula alta frementes, 5.628. aut lepori, qui vepre latens hostilia cernit 5.629. ora canum nullosque audet dare corpore motus? 5.630. Non tamen abscedit: neque enim vestigia cernit 5.631. longius ulla pedum: servat nubemque locumque. 5.632. Occupat obsessos sudor mihi frigidus artus, 5.633. caeruleaeque cadunt toto de corpore guttae, 5.634. quaque pedem movi, manat lacus, eque capillis 5.635. ros cadit, et citius, quam nunc tibi facta renarro, 5.636. in latices mutor. Sed enim cognoscit amatas 5.637. amnis aquas, positoque viri, quod sumpserat, ore 5.638. vertitur in proprias, ut se mihi misceat, undas. 5.639. Delia rupit humum; caecisque ego mersa cavernis 5.640. advehor Ortygiam, quae me cognomine divae 5.641. grata meae superas eduxit prima sub auras.” 5.642. Hac Arethusa tenus. Geminos dea fertilis angues 5.643. curribus admovit frenisque coercuit ora 5.644. et medium caeli terraeque per aera vecta est 5.645. atque levem currum Tritonida misit in urbem 5.646. Triptolemo; partimque rudi data semina iussit 5.647. spargere humo, partim post tempora longa recultae. 5.648. Iam super Europen sublimis et Asida terram 5.649. vectus erat iuvenis; Scythicas advertitur oras. 5.650. Rex ibi Lyncus erat: regis subit ille penates. 5.651. Qua veniat, causamque viae nomenque rogatus 5.652. et patriam, “patria est clarae mihi” dixit “Athenae, 5.653. Triptolemus nomen. Veni nec puppe per undas, 5.654. nec pede per terras: patuit mihi pervius aether. 5.655. Dona fero Cereris latos quae sparsa per agros 5.656. frugiferas messes alimentaque mitia reddant.” 5.657. Barbarus invidit; tantique ut muneris auctor 5.658. ipse sit, hospitio recipit somnoque gravatum 5.659. adgreditur ferro. Cotem figere pectus 5.660. lynca Ceres fecit rursusque per aera iussit 5.661. Mopsopium iuvenem sacros agitare iugales.”
50. Ovid, Fasti, 4.393-4.618 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
4.393. Hinc Cereris ludi. non est opus indice causae; 4.394. sponte deae munus promeritumque patet. 4.395. panis erat primis virides mortalibus herbae, 4.396. quas tellus nullo sollicitante dabat; 4.397. et modo carpebant vivax e cespite gramen, 4.398. nunc epulae tenera fronde cacumen erant, 4.399. postmodo glans nata est: bene erat iam glande reperta, 4.400. duraque magnificas quercus habebat opes. 4.401. prima Ceres homine ad meliora alimenta vocato 4.402. mutavit glandes utiliore cibo. 4.403. illa iugo tauros collum praebere coegit: 4.404. tunc primum soles eruta vidit humus. 4.405. aes erat in pretio, chalybeia massa latebat: 4.406. eheu! perpetuo debuit illa tegi. 4.407. pace Ceres laeta est; et vos orate, coloni, 4.408. perpetuam pacem pacificumque ducem, 4.409. farra deae micaeque licet salientis honorem 4.410. detis et in veteres turea grana focos, 4.411. et, si tura aberunt, unctas accendite taedas: 4.412. parva bonae Cereri, sint modo casta, placent, 4.413. a bove succincti cultros removete ministri: 4.414. bos aret; ignavam sacrificate suem. 4.415. apta iugo cervix non est ferienda securi: 4.416. vivat et in dura saepe laboret humo. 4.417. Exigit ipse locus, raptus ut virginis edam: 4.418. plura recognosces, pauca docendus eris. 4.419. terra tribus scopulis vastum procurrit in aequor 4.420. Trinacris, a positu nomen adepta loci, 4.421. grata domus Cereri, multas ea possidet urbes, 4.422. in quibus est culto fertilis Henna solo. 4.423. frigida caelestum matres Arethusa vocarat: 4.424. venerat ad sacras et dea flava dapes. 4.425. filia, consuetis ut erat comitata puellis, 4.426. errabat nudo per sua prata pede. 4.427. valle sub umbrosa locus est aspergine multa 4.428. uvidus ex alto desilientis aquae. 4.429. tot fuerant illic, quot habet natura, colores, 4.430. pictaque dissimili flore nitebat humus. 4.431. quam simul aspexit, comites, accedite dixit 4.432. et mecum plenos flore referte sinus. 4.433. praeda puellares animos prolectat iis, 4.434. et non sentitur sedulitate labor. 4.435. haec implet lento calathos e vimine nexos, 4.436. haec gremium, laxos degravat illa sinus: 4.437. illa legit calthas, huic sunt violaria curae, 4.438. illa papavereas subsecat ungue comas: 4.439. has, hyacinthe, tenes; illas, amarante, moraris: 4.440. pars thyma, pars rorem, pars meliloton amat. 4.441. plurima lecta rosa est, sunt et sine nomine flores; 4.442. ipsa crocos tenues liliaque alba legit, 4.443. carpendi studio paulatim longius itur, 4.444. et dominam casu nulla secuta comes. 4.445. hanc videt et visam patruus velociter aufert 4.446. regnaque caeruleis in sua portat equis, 4.447. illa quidem clamabat ‘io, carissima mater, 4.448. auferor!’ ipsa suos abscideratque sinus: 4.449. panditur interea Diti via, namque diurnum 4.450. lumen inadsueti vix patiuntur equi. 4.451. at chorus aequalis, cumulatis flore canistris, 4.452. Persephone, clamant ad tua dona veni! 4.453. ut clamata silet, montes ululatibus implent 4.454. et feriunt maesta pectora nuda manu. 4.455. attonita est plangore Ceres (modo venerat Hennam) 4.456. nec mora, me miseram! filia, dixit ubi es? 4.457. mentis inops rapitur, quales audire solemus 4.458. Threicias fusis maenadas ire comis, 4.459. ut vitulo mugit sua mater ab ubere rapto 4.460. et quaerit fetus per nemus omne suos: 4.461. sic dea nec retinet gemitus et concita cursu 4.462. fertur et a campis incipit, Henna, tuis. 4.463. inde puellaris nacta est vestigia plantae 4.464. et pressam noto pondere vidit humum; 4.465. forsitan illa dies erroris summa fuisset, 4.466. si non turbassent signa reperta sues. 4.467. iamque Leontinos Ameaque flumina cursu 4.468. praeterit et ripas, herbifer Aci, tuas; 4.469. praeterit et Cyanen et fontes lenis Anapi 4.470. et te, verticibus non adeunde Gela. 4.471. liquerat Ortygien Megareaque Pantagienque, 4.472. quaque Symaetheas accipit aequor aquas, 4.473. antraque Cyclopum positis exusta caminis, 4.474. quique locus curvae nomina falcis habet, 4.475. Himeraque et Didymen Acragantaque Tauromenumque 4.476. sacrarumque Melan pascua laeta boum. 4.477. hinc Cameri adit Thapsonque et Heloria Tempe. 4.478. quaque iacet Zephyro semper apertus Eryx. 4.479. iamque Peloriadem Lilybaeaque, iamque Pachynon 4.480. lustrarat, terrae cornua trina suae. 4.481. quacumque ingreditur, miseris loca cuncta querellis 4.482. implet, ut amissum cum gemit ales Ityn, 4.483. perque vices modo Persephone! modo filia! clamat, 4.484. clamat et alternis nomen utrumque ciet. 4.485. sed neque Persephone Cererem nec filia matrem 4.486. audit, et alternis nomen utrumque perit; 4.487. unaque, pastorem vidisset an arva colentem, 4.488. vox erat hac gressus ecqua puella tufit? 4.489. iam color unus inest rebus, tenebrisque teguntur 4.490. omnia, iam vigiles conticuere canes: 4.491. alta iacet vasti super ora Typhoeos Aetne, 4.492. cuius anhelatis ignibus ardet humus; 4.493. illic accendit geminas pro lampade pinus: 4.494. hinc Cereris sacris nunc quoque taeda datur. 4.495. est specus exesi structura pumicis asper, 4.496. non homini regio, non adeunda ferae: 4.497. quo simul ac venit, frenatos curribus angues 4.498. iungit et aequoreas sicca pererrat aquas, 4.499. effugit et Syrtes et te, Zanclaea Charybdis, 4.500. et vos, Nisaei, naufraga monstra, canes, 4.501. Hadriacumque patens late bimaremque Corinthum: 4.502. sic venit ad portus, Attica terra, tuos. 4.503. hic primum sedit gelido maestissima saxo: 4.504. illud Cecropidae nunc quoque triste vocant. 4.505. sub Iove duravit multis inmota diebus, 4.506. et lunae patiens et pluvialis aquae, 4.507. fors sua cuique loco est: quod nunc Cerialis Eleusin 4.508. dicitur, hoc Celei rura fuere senis. 4.509. ille domum glandes excussaque mora rubetis 4.510. portat et arsuris arida ligna focis. 4.511. filia parva duas redigebat monte capellas, 4.512. et tener in cunis filius aeger erat. 4.513. mater! ait virgo (mota est dea nomine matris) 4.514. quid facis in solis incomitata locis? 4.515. restitit et senior, quamvis onus urget, et orat, 4.516. tecta suae subeat quantulacumque casae. 4.517. illa negat, simularat anum mitraque capillos 4.518. presserat. instanti talia dicta refert: 4.519. ‘sospes eas semperque parens! mihi filia rapta est. 4.520. heu, melior quanto sors tua sorte mea est!’ 4.521. dixit, et ut lacrimae (neque enim lacrimare deorum est) 4.522. decidit in tepidos lucida gutta sinus, 4.523. flent pariter molles animis virgoque senexque; 4.524. e quibus haec iusti verba fuere senis: 4.525. ‘sic tibi, quam raptam quaeris, sit filia sospes, 4.526. surge nec exiguae despice tecta casae.’ 4.527. cui dea duc! inquit scisti, qua cogere posses, 4.528. seque levat saxo subsequiturque senem, 4.529. dux comiti narrat, quam sit sibi filius aeger 4.530. nec capiat somnos invigiletque malis. 4.531. illa soporiferum, parvos initura penates, 4.532. colligit agresti lene papaver humo; 4.533. dum legit, oblito fertur gustasse palato 4.534. longamque imprudens exsoluisse famem. 4.535. quae quia principio posuit ieiunia noctis, 4.536. tempus habent mystae sidera visa cibi. 4.537. limen ut intravit, luctus videt omnia plena: 4.538. iam spes in puero nulla salutis erat. 4.539. matre salutata (mater Metanira vocatur) 4.540. iungere dignata est os puerile suo. 4.541. pallor abit, subitasque vident in corpore vires: 4.542. tantus caelesti venit ab ore vigor. 4.543. tota domus laeta est, hoc est materque paterque 4.544. nataque: tres illi tota fuere domus. 4.545. mox epulas ponunt, liquefacta coagula lacte 4.546. pomaque et in ceris aurea mella suis. 4.547. abstinet alma Ceres somnique papavera causas 4.548. dat tibi cum tepido lacte bibenda, puer. 4.549. noctis erat medium placidique silentia somni: 4.550. Triptolemum gremio sustulit illa suo 4.551. terque manu permulsit eum, tria carmina dixit, 4.552. carmina mortali non referenda sono, 4.553. inque foco corpus pueri vivente favilla 4.554. obruit, humanum purget ut ignis onus. 4.555. excutitur somno stulte pia mater et amens 4.556. quid facis? exclamat membraque ab igne rapit. 4.557. cui dea dum non es dixit ‘scelerata, fuisti: 4.558. inrita materno sunt mea dona metu. 4.559. iste quidem mortalis erit, sed primus arabit 4.560. et seret et culta praemia tollet humo.’ 4.561. dixit et egrediens nubem trahit inque dracones 4.562. transit et alifero tollitur axe Ceres. 4.563. Sunion expositum Piraeaque tuta recessu 4.564. linquit et in dextrum quae iacet ora latus. 4.565. hinc init Aegaeum, quo Cycladas aspicit omnes, 4.566. Ioniumque rapax Icariumque legit, 4.567. perque urbes Asiae longum petit Hellespontum, 4.568. diversumque locis alta pererrat iter. 4.569. nam modo turilegos Arabas, modo despicit Indos, 4.570. hinc Libys, hinc Meroe siccaque terra subest; 4.571. nunc adit Hesperios Rhenum Rhodanumque Padumque 4.572. teque, future parens, Thybri, potentis aquae, 4.573. quo feror? inmensum est erratas dicere terras: 4.574. praeteritus Cereri nullus in orbe locus. 4.575. errat et in caelo liquidique inmunia ponti 4.576. adloquitur gelido proxima signa polo: 4.577. ‘Parrhasides stellae (namque omnia nosse potestis, 4.578. aequoreas numquam cum subeatis aquas), 4.579. Persephonen natam miserae monstrate parenti!’ 4.580. dixerat, huic Helice talia verba refert: 4.581. ‘crimine nox vacua est; Solem de virgine rapta 4.582. consule, qui late facta diurna videt.’ 4.583. Sol aditus quam quaeris, ait ‘ne vana labores, 4.584. nupta Iovis fratri tertia regna tenet.’ 4.585. questa diu secum, sic est adfata Totem, 4.586. maximaque in voltu signa dolentis erant: 4.587. ‘si memor es, de quo mihi sit Proserpina nata, 4.588. dimidium curae debet habere tuae. 4.589. orbe pererrato sola est iniuria facti 4.590. cognita: commissi praemia raptor habet. 4.591. at neque Persephone digna est praedone marito, 4.592. nec gener hoc nobis more parandus erat. 4.593. quid gravius victore Gyge captiva tulissem, 4.594. quam nunc te caeli sceptra tenente tuli? 4.595. verum impune ferat, nos haec patiemur inultae; 4.596. reddat et emendet facta priora novis.’ 4.597. Iuppiter hanc lenit factumque excusat amore, 4.598. nec gener est nobis ille pudendus ait. 4.599. ‘non ego nobilior: posita est mihi regia caelo, 4.600. possidet alter aquas, alter ie chaos, 4.601. sed si forte tibi non est mutabile pectus, 4.602. statque semel iuncti rumpere vincla tori, 4.603. hoc quoque temptemus, siquidem ieiuna remansit; 4.604. si minus, inferni coniugis uxor erit.’ 4.605. Tartara iussus adit sumptis Caducifer alis 4.606. speque redit citius visaque certa refert: 4.607. rapta tribus dixit ‘solvit ieiunia granis, 4.608. Punica quae lento cortice poma tegunt.’ 4.609. non secus indoluit, quam si modo rapta fuisset, 4.610. maesta parens, longa vixque refecta mora est, 4.611. atque ita nec nobis caelum est habitabile dixit; 4.612. Taenaria recipi me quoque valle iube. 4.613. et factura fuit, pactus nisi Iuppiter esset, 4.614. bis tribus ut caelo mensibus illa foret. 4.615. tum demum voltumque Ceres animumque recepit 4.616. imposuitque suae spicea serta comae; 4.617. largaque provenit cessatis messis in arvis, 4.618. et vix congestas area cepit opes. 4.393. Next, the Games of Ceres, there’s no need to say why: 4.394. Obvious: the bounteous promise and gifts of the goddess. 4.395. The bread of primitive humans was made of plants, 4.396. That the earth produced without being asked: 4.397. They sometimes plucked wild grasses from the turf, 4.398. Sometimes tender leaves from the treetops made a meal. 4.399. Later the acorn was known: its discovery was fine, 4.400. Since the sturdy oak offered a rich horde. 4.401. Ceres was first to summon men to a better diet, 4.402. Replacing their acorns with more nourishing food. 4.403. She forced bulls to bow their necks to the yoke: 4.404. So the deep-ploughed soil first saw the light. 4.405. Copper was prized then, iron was still hidden: 4.406. Ah! If only it could have been hidden forever. 4.407. Ceres delights in peace: pray, you farmers, 4.408. Pray for endless peace and a peace-loving leader. 4.409. Honour the goddess with wheat, and dancing salt grains, 4.410. And grains of incense offered on the ancient hearths, 4.411. And if there’s no incense, burn your resinous torches: 4.412. Ceres is pleased with little, if it’s pure in kind. 4.413. You girded attendants lift those knives from the ox: 4.414. Let the ox plough, while you sacrifice the lazy sow, 4.415. It’s not fitting for an axe to strike a neck that’s yoked: 4.416. Let the ox live, and toil through the stubborn soil. 4.417. Now, this part requires me to tell of a virgin’s rape: 4.418. You’ll recognise much you know, but part is new. 4.419. The Trinacrian land took its name from its shape: 4.420. It runs out in three rocky capes to the vast ocean. 4.421. It’s a place dear to Ceres. She owns, there, many cities, 4.422. Among them fertile Enna, with its well-ploughed soul. 4.423. Cool Arethusa gathered together the mothers of the gods: 4.424. And the yellow-haired goddess came to the sacred feast. 4.425. Her daughter, Persephone, attended by girls, as ever, 4.426. Wandered barefoot through Enna’s meadows. 4.427. In a shadow-filled valley there’s a place, 4.428. Wet by the copious spray from a high fall. 4.429. All the colours of nature were displayed there, 4.430. And the earth was bright with hues of various flowers. 4.431. On seeing it she cried: ‘Come here to me, my friends, 4.432. And each carry back, with me, a lapful of flowers.’ 4.433. The foolish prize enticed their girlish spirits, 4.434. And they were too busy to feel weary. 4.435. One filled baskets woven from supple willow, 4.436. Another her lap, the next loose folds of her robe: 4.437. One picked marigolds: another loved violets, 4.438. And one nipped the poppy-heads with her nails: 4.439. Some you tempt, hyacinth: others, amaranth, you delay: 4.440. Others desire thyme, cornflowers or clover. 4.441. Many a rose was taken, and flowers without name: 4.442. Proserpine herself plucked fragile crocuses and white lilies. 4.443. Intent on gathering them, she gradually strayed, 4.444. And none of her friends chanced to follow their lady. 4.445. Dis, her uncle saw her, and swiftly carried her off, 4.446. And bore her on shadowy horses to his realm. 4.447. She called out: ‘Oh, dearest Mother, I’m being 4.448. Carried away!’ and tore at the breast of her robe: 4.449. Meanwhile a path opened for Dis, since his horse 4.450. Can scarcely endure the unaccustomed daylight. 4.451. When her crowd of friends had gathered their flowers, 4.452. They shouted: ‘Persephone, come for your gifts!’ 4.453. But silence met their call: they filled the hills with their cries, 4.454. And sadly beat their naked breasts with their hands. 4.455. Ceres was startled by their grief (she’d just now come from Enna), 4.456. And cried instantly ‘Ah me! Daughter, where are you?’ 4.457. She rushed about, distracted, as we’ve heard 4.458. The Thracian Maenads run with flowing hair. 4.459. As a cow bellows, when her calf’s torn from her udder, 4.460. And goes searching for her child, through the woods, 4.461. So the goddess groaned freely, and ran quickly, 4.462. As she made her way, Enna, from your plains. 4.463. There she found marks of the girlish feet, and saw 4.464. Where her familiar form had printed the ground: 4.465. Perhaps her wandering would have ended that day, 4.466. If wild pigs hadn’t muddied the trail she found. 4.467. She’d already passed Leontini, the river Ameas, 4.468. And your grassy banks, Acis, on her way: 4.469. She’d passed Cyane, the founts of slow Anapus, 4.470. And you, Gelas, with whirlpools to be shunned. 4.471. She’d left Ortygia, Megara and the Pantagias, 4.472. And the place where the sea receives Symaethus’ waves, 4.473. And the caves of Cyclopes, scorched by their forges, 4.474. And the place who’s name’s derived from a curving sickle, 4.475. And Himera, Didyme, Acragas and Tauromenium, 4.476. And the Mylae, that rich pasture for sacred cattle. 4.477. Next she reached Camerina, Thapsus, and Helorus’ Tempe, 4.478. And where Eryx stands, ever open to the Western winds. 4.479. She’d crossed Pelorias, Lilybaeum and Pachynum, 4.480. Those three projecting horns of her land. 4.481. Wherever she set foot, she filled the place with sad cries, 4.482. Like the bird mourning for her lost Itys. 4.483. Alternately she cried: ‘Persephone!’ and ‘My daughter’, 4.484. Calling and shouting both the names in turn, 4.485. But Persephone heard not Ceres, nor the daughter 4.486. Her mother, and both names by turns died away: 4.487. If she spied a shepherd or farmer at work, 4.488. Her cry was: ‘Has a girl passed this way?’ 4.489. Now the colours faded, and the darkness hid 4.490. Everything. Now the wakeful dogs fell silent. 4.491. High Etna stands above vast Typhoeus’ mouth, 4.492. Who scorches the earth with his fiery breath: 4.493. There the goddess lit twin pine branches as torches: 4.494. And since then there are torches handed out at her rites. 4.495. There’s a cave, its interior carved from sharp pumice, 4.496. A place not to be approached by man or beast: 4.497. Reaching it she yoked serpents to her chariot, 4.498. And roamed the ocean waves above the spray. 4.499. She shunned the Syrtes and Zanclaean Charybdis, 4.500. And you, hounds of Scylla, wrecking monsters, 4.501. Shunned the wide Adriatic, and Corinth between two seas: 4.502. And so came to your harbour, country of Attica. 4.503. Here she sat for the first time, mournfully, on cold stone: 4.504. That stone the Athenians named the Sorrowful. 4.505. She lingered many days under the open sky, 4.506. Enduring both the moonlight and the rain. 4.507. Every place has its destiny: What’s now called 4.508. Ceres’ Eleusis was then old Celeus’ farm. 4.509. He was bringing acorns home, and berries he’d picked 4.510. From the briars, and dry wood for the blazing hearth. 4.511. His little daughter was driving two she-goats from the hill, 4.512. While confined in his cradle was a sickly son. 4.513. ‘Mother!’ the girl said (the goddess was moved 4.514. By that word mother) ‘Why are you alone in the wilderness?’ 4.515. The old man stopped too, despite his heavy load, 4.516. And begged her to shelter under his insignificant roof. 4.517. She refused. She was disguised as an old woman, her hair 4.518. Covered with a cap. When he urged her she replied: 4.519. ‘Be happy, and always a father! My daughter’s been 4.520. Stolen from me. Ah, how much better your fate than mine!’ 4.521. She spoke, and a crystal drop (though goddesses cannot weep), 4.522. Like a tear, fell on her warm breast. Those tender hearts, 4.523. The old man and the virgin girl, wept with her: 4.524. And these were the righteous old man’s words: 4.525. ‘Rise, and don’t scorn the shelter of my humble hut, 4.526. And may the lost daughter you mourn be safe and sound.’ 4.527. The goddess said: ‘Lead on! You’ve found what could persuade me’ 4.528. And she rose from the stone and followed the old man. 4.529. Leading, he told his follower, how his son was sick 4.530. Lying there sleepless, kept awake by his illness. 4.531. About to enter the humble house, she plucked 4.532. A tender, sleep-inducing, poppy from the bare ground: 4.533. And as she picked it, they say, unthinkingly, she tasted it, 4.534. And so, unwittingly, eased her long starvation. 4.535. And because she first broke her fast at nightfall, 4.536. Her priests of the Mysteries eat once the stars appear. 4.537. When she crossed the threshold, she saw all were grieving: 4.538. Since they’d lost hope of the child’s recovery. 4.539. Greeting the mother (who was called Metanira) 4.540. The goddess deigned to join her lips to the child’s. 4.541. His pallor fled, his body suddenly seemed healthier: 4.542. Such power flowed out of the goddess’ mouth. 4.543. There was joy in the house, in the father, mother 4.544. And daughter: those three were the whole house. 4.545. They soon set out a meal, curds in whey, 4.546. Apples, and golden honey on the comb. 4.547. Kind Ceres abstained, and gave to the boy 4.548. Poppy seeds in warm milk to make him sleep. 4.549. It was midnight: silent in peaceful slumber, 4.550. The goddess took Triptolemus on her lap, 4.551. Caressed him with her hand three times, and spoke 4.552. Three spells, not to be sounded by mortal tongue, 4.553. And she covered the boy’s body with live ember 4.554. On the hearth, so the fire would purge his mortal burden. 4.555. His good, fond, foolish mother, waking from sleep, 4.556. Crying: ‘What are you doing?’ snatched him from the coals, 4.557. To her the goddess said: ‘Though sinless, you’ve sinned: 4.558. My gift’s been thwarted by a mother’s fear. 4.559. He will still be mortal, but first to plough, 4.560. And sow, and reap a harvest from the soil.’ 4.561. Ceres spoke, and left the house, trailing mist, and crossed 4.562. To her dragons, and was carried away in her winged chariot. 4.563. She left Sunium’s exposed cape behind, and Piraeus’ safe harbour, 4.564. And all that coast that lies towards the west. 4.565. From there she crossed the Aegean, saw all the Cyclades, 4.566. Skimmed the wild Ionian, and the Icarian Sea, 4.567. And, passing through Asia’s cities, sought the long Hellespont, 4.568. And wandered her course, on high, among diverse regions. 4.569. Now she gazed at incense-gathering Arabs, now Ethiopians, 4.570. Beneath her Libya now, now Meroe and the desert lands: 4.571. Then she saw the western rivers, Rhine, Rhone, Po, 4.572. And you, Tiber, parent of a stream full of future power. 4.573. Where, now? Too long to tell of the lands she wandered: 4.574. No place on earth remained unvisited by Ceres. 4.575. She wandered the sky too, and spoke to the constellation 4.576. Those near the chilly pole, free of the ocean waves: 4.577. ‘You Arcadian stars (since you can see all things, 4.578. Never plunging beneath the watery wastes) 4.579. Show this wretched mother, her daughter, Proserpine!’ 4.580. She spoke, and Helice answered her in this way: 4.581. ‘Night’s free of blame: Ask the Light about your 4.582. Stolen daughter: the Sun views, widely, things done by day.’ 4.583. The Sun, asked, said: ‘To save you grief, she whom you seek 4.584. Is married to Jupiter’s brother, and rules the third realm.’ 4.585. After grieving a while, she addressed the Thunderer: 4.586. And there were deep marks of sorrow in her face: 4.587. ‘If you remember by whom I conceived Persephone, 4.588. Half of the care she ought to be shown is yours. 4.589. Wandering the world I’ve learnt only of her wrong: 4.590. While her ravisher is rewarded for his crime. 4.591. But Persephone didn’t deserve a thief as husband: 4.592. It’s not right to have found a son-in-law this way. 4.593. How could I have suffered more, as captive to a conquering 4.594. Gyges, than now, while you hold the sceptre of the heavens? 4.595. Well, let him escape unpunished, I’ll suffer it, un-avenged, 4.596. If he returns her, amending his old actions by the new.’ 4.597. Jupiter soothed her, excusing it as an act of love, 4.598. ‘He’s not a son-in-law who’ll shames us,’ he said, 4.599. ‘I’m no nobler than him: my kingdom’s in the sky, 4.600. Another owns the waters, another the empty void. 4.601. But if your mind is really so set against alteration, 4.602. And you’re determined to break firm marriage bonds, 4.603. Let’s make the attempt, but only if she’s kept her fast: 4.604. If not, she’ll remain the wife of her infernal spouse.’ 4.605. The Messenger God had his orders, and took flight for Tartarus, 4.606. And, back sooner than expected, told what he’d clearly seen: 4.607. ‘The ravished girl,’ he said ‘broke her fast with three seed 4.608. Concealed in the tough rind of a pomegranate.’ 4.609. Her gloomy mother grieved, no less than if her daughter 4.610. Had just been taken, and was a long time recovering even a little. 4.611. Then she said: ‘Heaven’s no place for me to be, either: 4.612. Order that I too may be received by the Taenarian vale.’ 4.613. And so it would have been, if Jupiter hadn’t promised, 4.614. That Persephone should spend six months each year in heaven. 4.615. Then, at last, Ceres recovered her countece and spirits, 4.616. And set garlands, woven from ears of corn, on her hair: 4.617. And the tardy fields delivered a copious harvest, 4.618. And the threshing-floor barely held the heaped sheaves.
51. Plutarch, Themistocles, 26.4-26.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 638
26.4. τοῦ δὲ Σολόεντος ὡς ἀπέγνω ῥίψαντος ἑαυτὸν εἰς ποταμόν τινα καὶ διαφθαρέντος, ᾐσθημένον τότε τὴν αἰτίαν καὶ τὸ πάθος τοῦ νεανίσκου τὸν Θησέα βαρέως ἐνεγκεῖν, καὶ δυσφοροῦντα λόγιόν τι πυθόχρηστον ἀνενεγκεῖν πρὸς ἑαυτόν· εἶναι γὰρ αὐτῷ προστεταγμένον ἐν Δελφοῖς ὑπὸ τῆς Πυθίας, ὅταν ἐπὶ ξένης ἀνιαθῇ μάλιστα καὶ περίλυπος γένηται, πόλιν ἐκεῖ κτίσαι καὶ τῶν ἀμφʼ αὐτόν τινας ἡγεμόνας καταλιπεῖν. 26.5. ἐκ δὲ τούτου τὴν μὲν πόλιν, ἣν ἔκτισεν, ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ Πυθόπολιν προσαγορεῦσαι, Σολόεντα δὲ τὸν πλησίον ποταμὸν ἐπὶ τιμῇ τοῦ νεανίσκου. καταλιπεῖν δὲ καὶ τοὺς ἀδελφοὺς αὐτοῦ, οἷν ἐπιστάτας καὶ νομοθέτας, καὶ σὺν αὐτοῖς Ἕρμον ἄνδρα τῶν Ἀθήνησιν εὐπατριδῶν· ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ τόπον Ἑρμοῦ καλεῖν οἰκίαν τοὺς Πυθοπολίτας, οὐκ ὀρθῶς τὴν δευτέραν συλλαβὴν περισπῶντας καὶ τὴν δόξαν ἐπὶ θεὸν ἀπὸ ἥρωος μετατιθέντας.
52. Plutarch, Coriolanus, 36, 35 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 218
53. Statius, Thebais, 8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 668
54. Tacitus, Annals, 4.1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 182
55. Arrian, Periplus, 21, 23, 22 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 659
56. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 4.2.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 226
57. Longinus, On The Sublime, 8.4, 9.2, 9.9-9.10, 17.1, 27.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 614, 615
58. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.1.22-1.1.25, 1.2.26, 1.2.30, 1.6.29-1.6.30, 1.7.31, 1.9.10-1.9.19, 1.11, 1.11.1, 1.13-1.15, 1.18, 1.18.3-1.18.7, 1.18.11, 1.26, 1.26.5-1.26.7, 1.28, 1.28.7-1.28.9, 2.8.9-2.8.14, 2.14, 2.18.12-2.18.13, 2.19-2.20, 2.19.19-2.19.24, 2.19.29, 2.19.32-2.19.34, 2.20.28, 2.23.20-2.23.21, 2.24-2.25, 3.1, 3.2.16, 3.4, 3.6-3.7, 3.9, 3.10.19, 3.16.7, 3.20.9, 3.21.19, 3.22, 3.22.1, 3.22.13, 3.22.30-3.22.37, 3.22.62, 3.22.67, 3.22.77, 3.22.83, 3.23.33, 3.24.84-3.24.88, 4.1.151 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 620, 621, 622, 623, 624, 625, 626, 627, 628, 629, 630, 631
59. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 2.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 226
60. Lucian, A True Story, 2.15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 660
61. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 1.2.1-1.2.2, 1.2.5, 1.3.3-1.3.4, 1.4.12, 3.4.1, 3.7.6, 3.9.4, 4.5.10, 5.1.1, 5.8.2, 5.24.3, 6.6.1, 6.6.7, 8.1.3-8.1.4, 8.1.15, 8.4.4, 8.5.8, 8.5.15, 8.6.8, 8.6.10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 634, 638, 639, 640, 645
62. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.11.3, 2.5.2, 2.13.2, 2.29.1-2.29.3, 5.5.7, 5.24.3, 6.10.5, 6.26, 7.1.1, 7.3.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 637, 638
63. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 10.5, 12.2, 14.2, 16.5, 18.4, 18.5, 19.1, 21.9, 22.1, 22.2, 23.4, 25.9, 25.16, 25.17, 26.11, 27.12, 33.21, 33.34, 33.36, 33.38, 35.5, 35.10, 36.4, 42.4, 43.2, 43.8, 44.5, 44.5-45.1, 45.3, 45.6, 45.7, 45.8, 46.2, 48.6, 48.8, 48.9, 48.11, 48.15, 48.18, 48.19, 48.21, 48.22, 51.3, 51.4, 51.8, 53.10, 53.15, 53.17, 53.19, 53.23, 54.1, 54.4, 54.5, 54.8, 54.12, 54.13, 55.2, 55.3, 55.4, 56.1, 56.2, 56.3, 56.4, 56.6, 56.7, 56.8, 56.9, 56.10, 56.11, 57.1, 57.15, 57.17, 58.2 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 655, 661
64. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.12, 4.16, 4.23 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 652, 653, 656, 657, 661
4.12. ὁ δὲ ̓Απολλώνιος περὶ ὄρθρον ἥκων “ποῦ” ἔφη “̓Αντισθένης ὁ Πάριος”; ἑβδόμην δὲ οὗτος ἡμέραν ἐτύγχανεν ἤδη προσπεφοιτηκὼς αὐτῷ ἐν ̓Ιλίῳ. ὑπακούσαντος δὲ τοῦ ̓Αντισθένους “προσήκεις τι”, ἔφη “ὦ νεανία, τῇ Τροίᾳ”; “σφόδρα”, εἶπεν “εἰμὶ γὰρ δὴ ἄνωθεν Τρώς”. “ἦ καὶ Πριαμίδης;” “νὴ Δί',” εἶπεν “ἐκ τούτου γὰρ δὴ ἀγαθός τε οἶμαι κἀξ ἀγαθῶν εἶναι”. “εἰκότως οὖν” ἔφη “ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς ἀπαγορεύει μοι μὴ ξυνεῖναί σοι, κελεύσαντος γὰρ αὐτοῦ πρεσβεῦσαί με πρὸς τοὺς Θετταλοὺς περὶ ὧν αἰτιᾶται σφᾶς, ὡς ἠρόμην, τί ἂν πρὸς τούτῳ ἕτερον πρὸς χάριν αὐτῷ πράττοιμι, τὸ μειράκιον ἔφη τὸ ἐκ Πάρου μὴ ποιούμενος ξυνέμπορον τῆς ἑαυτοῦ σοφίας, Πριαμίδης τε γὰρ ἱκανῶς ἐστι καὶ τὸν ̔́Εκτορα ὑμνῶν οὐ παύεται.” 4.16. δεομένων δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων τοῦ λόγου τούτου καὶ φιληκόως ἐχόντων αὐτοῦ “ἀλλ' οὐχὶ βόθρον” εἶπεν “̓Οδυσσέως ὀρυξάμενος, οὐδὲ ἀρνῶν αἵματι ψυχαγωγήσας ἐς διάλεξιν τοῦ ̓Αχιλλέως ἦλθον, ἀλλ' εὐξάμενος, ὁπόσα τοῖς ἥρωσιν ̓Ινδοί φασιν εὔχεσθαι, “ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ,” ἔφην “τεθνάναι σε οἱ πολλοὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων φασίν, ἐγὼ δὲ οὐ ξυγχωρῶ τῷ λόγῳ, οὐδὲ Πυθαγόρας σοφίας ἐμῆς πρόγονος. εἰ δὴ ἀληθεύομεν, δεῖξον ἡμῖν τὸ σεαυτοῦ εἶδος, καὶ γὰρ ἂν ὄναιο ἄγαν τῶν ἐμῶν ὀφθαλμῶν, εἰ μάρτυσιν αὐτοῖς τοῦ εἶναι χρήσαιο.” ἐπὶ τούτοις σεισμὸς μὲν περὶ τὸν κολωνὸν βραχὺς ἐγένετο, πεντάπηχυς δὲ νεανίας ἀνεδόθη Θετταλικὸς τὴν χλαμύδα, τὸ δὲ εἶδος οὐκ ἀλαζών τις ἐφαίνετο, ὡς ἐνίοις ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς δοκεῖ, δεινός τε ὁρώμενος οὐκ ἐξήλλαττε τοῦ φαιδροῦ, τὸ δὲ κάλλος οὔπω μοι δοκεῖ ἐπαινέτου ἀξίου ἐπειλῆφθαι καίτοι ̔Ομήρου πολλὰ ἐπ' αὐτῷ εἰπόντος, ἀλλὰ ἄρρητον εἶναι καὶ καταλύεσθαι μᾶλλον ὑπὸ τοῦ ὑμνοῦντος ἢ παραπλησίως ἑαυτῷ ᾅδεσθαι. ὁρώμενος δέ, ὁπόσον εἶπον, μείζων ἐγίγνετο καὶ διπλάσιος καὶ ὑπὲρ τοῦτο, δωδεκάπηχυς γοῦν ἐφάνη μοι, ὅτε δὴ τελεώτατος ἑαυτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ τὸ κάλλος ἀεὶ ξυνεπεδίδου τῷ μήκει. τὴν μὲν δὴ κόμην οὐδὲ κείρασθαί ποτε ἔλεγεν, ἀλλὰ ἄσυλον φυλάξαι τῷ Σπερχειῷ, ποταμῶν γὰρ πρώτῳ Σπερχειῷ χρήσασθαι, τὰ γένεια δ' αὐτῷ πρώτας ἐκβολὰς εἶχε. προσειπὼν δέ με “ἀσμένως” εἶπεν “ἐντετύχηκά σοι, πάλαι δεόμενος ἀνδρὸς τοιῦδε: Θετταλοὶ γὰρ τὰ ἐναγίσματα χρόνον ἤδη πολὺν ἐκλελοίπασί μοι, καὶ μηνίειν μὲν οὔπω ἀξιῶ, μηνίσαντος γὰρ ἀπολοῦνται μᾶλλον ἢ οἱ ἐνταῦθά ποτε ̔́Ελληνες, ξυμβουλίᾳ δὲ ἐπιεικεῖ χρῶμαι, μὴ ὑβρίζειν σφᾶς ἐς τὰ νόμιμα, μηδὲ κακίους ἐλέγχεσθαι τουτωνὶ τῶν Τρώων, οἳ τοσούσδε ἄνδρας ὑπ' ἐμοῦ ἀφαιρεθέντες δημοσίᾳ τε θύουσί μοι καὶ ὡραίων ἀπάρχονται καὶ ἱκετηρίαν τιθέμενοι σπονδὰς αἰτοῦσιν, ἃς ἐγὼ οὐ δώσω: τὰ γὰρ ἐπιορκηθέντα τούτοις ἐπ' ἐμὲ οὐκ ἐάσει τὸ ̓́Ιλιόν ποτε τὸ ἀρχαῖον ἀναλαβεῖν εἶδος, οὐδὲ τυχεῖν ἀκμῆς, ὁπόση περὶ πολλὰς τῶν καθῃρημένων ἐγένετο, ἀλλ' οἰκήσουσιν αὐτὸ βελτίους οὐδὲν ἢ εἰ χθὲς ἥλωσαν. ἵν' οὖν μὴ καὶ τὰ Θετταλῶν ἀποφαίνω ὅμοια, πρέσβευε παρὰ τὸ κοινὸν αὐτῶν ὑπὲρ ὧν εἶπον.” “πρεσβεύσω”, ἔφην “ὁ γὰρ νοῦς τῆς πρεσβείας ἦν μὴ ἀπολέσθαι αὐτούς. ἀλλ' ἐγώ τί σου, ̓Αχιλλεῦ, δέομαι.” “ξυνίημι”, ἔφη “δῆλος γὰρ εἶ περὶ τῶν Τρωικῶν ̔ἐρωτήσων': ἐρώτα δὲ λόγους πέντε, οὓς αὐτός τε βούλει καὶ Μοῖραι ξυγχωροῦσιν.” ἠρόμην οὖν πρῶτον, εἰ κατὰ τὸν τῶν ποιητῶν λόγον ἔτυχε τάφου. “κεῖμαι μέν,” εἶπεν “ὡς ἔμοιγε ἥδιστον καὶ Πατρόκλῳ ἐγένετο, ξυνέβημεν γὰρ δὴ κομιδῇ νέοι, ξυνέχει δὲ ἄμφω χρυσοῦς ἀμφορεὺς κειμένους, ὡς ἕνα. Μουσῶν δὲ θρῆνοι καὶ Νηρηίδων, οὓς ἐπ' ἐμοὶ γενέσθαι φασί, Μοῦσαι μὲν οὐδ' ἀφίκοντό ποτε ἐνταῦθα, Νηρηίδες δὲ ἔτι φοιτῶσι.” μετὰ ταῦτα δὲ ἠρόμην, εἰ ἡ Πολυξένη ἐπισφαγείη αὐτῷ, ὁ δὲ ἀληθὲς μὲν ἔφη τοῦτο εἶναι, σφαγῆναι δὲ αὐτὴν οὐχ ὑπὸ τῶν ̓Αχαιῶν, ἀλλ' ἑκοῦσαν ἐπὶ τὸ σῆμα ἐλθοῦσαν καὶ τὸν ἑαυτῆς τε κἀκείνου ἔρωτα μεγάλων ἀξιῶσαι προσπεσοῦσαν ξίφει ὀρθῷ. τρίτον ἠρόμην: ἡ ̔Ελένη, ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ, ἐς Τροίαν ἦλθεν ἢ ̔Ομήρῳ ἔδοξεν ὑποθέσθαι ταῦτα;” “πολὺν” ἔφη “χρόνον ἐξηπατώμεθα πρεσβευόμενοί τε παρὰ τοὺς Τρῶας καὶ ποιούμενοι τὰς ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς μάχας, ὡς ἐν τῷ ̓Ιλίῳ οὔσης, ἡ δ' Αἴγυπτὸν τε ᾤκει καὶ τὸν Πρωτέως οἶκον ἁρπασθεῖσα ὑπὸ τοῦ Πάριδος. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐπιστεύθη τοῦτο, ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς τῆς Τροίας λοιπὸν ἐμαχόμεθα, ὡς μὴ αἰσχρῶς ἀπέλθοιμεν.” ἡψάμην καὶ τετάρτης ἐρωτήσεως καὶ θαυμάζειν ἔφην, εἰ τοσούσδε ὁμοῦ καὶ τοιούσδε ἄνδρας ἡ ̔Ελλὰς ἤνεγκεν, ὁπόσους ̔́Ομηρος ἐπὶ τὴν Τροίαν ξυντάττει. ὁ δὲ ̓Αχιλλεὺς “οὐδὲ οἱ βάρβαροι” ἔφη “πολὺ ἡμῶν ἐλείποντο, οὕτως ἡ γῆ πᾶσα ἀρετῆς ἤνθησε.” πέμπτον δ' ἠρόμην: τί παθὼν ̔́Ομηρος τὸν Παλαμήδην οὐκ οἶδεν, ἢ οἶδε μέν, ἐξαιρεῖ δὲ τοῦ περὶ ὑμῶν λόγου; “εἰ Παλαμήδης” εἶπεν “ἐς Τροίαν οὐκ ἦλθεν, οὐδὲ Τροία ἐγένετο: ἐπεὶ δὲ ἀνὴρ σοφώτατός τε καὶ μαχιμώτατος ἀπέθανεν, ὡς ̓Οδυσσεῖ ἔδοξεν, οὐκ ἐσάγεται αὐτὸν ἐς τὰ ποιήματα ̔́Ομηρος, ὡς μὴ τὰ ὀνείδη τοῦ ̓Οδυσσέως ᾅδοι.” καὶ ἐπολοφυράμενος αὐτῷ ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς ὡς μεγίστῳ τε καὶ καλλίστῳ νεωτάτῳ τε καὶ πολεμικωτάτῳ σωφροσύνῃ τε ὑπερβαλομένῳ πάντας καὶ πολλὰ ξυμβαλομένῳ ταῖς Μούσαις “ἀλλὰ σύ,” ἔφη “̓Απολλώνιε, σοφοῖς γὰρ πρὸς σοφοὺς ἐπιτήδεια, τοῦ τε τάφου ἐπιμελήθητι καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα τοῦ Παλαμήδους ἀνάλαβε φαύλως ἐρριμμένον: κεῖται δὲ ἐν τῇ Αἰολίδι κατὰ Μήθυμναν τὴν ἐν Λέσβῳ.” ταῦτα εἰπὼν καὶ ἐπὶ πᾶσι τὰ περὶ τὸν νεανίαν τὸν ἐκ Πάρου ἀπῆλθε ξὺν ἀστραπῇ μετρίᾳ, καὶ γὰρ δὴ καὶ ἀλεκτρυόνες ἤδη ᾠδῆς ἥπτοντο. 4.23. ἐπρέσβευσε δὲ καὶ παρὰ τοὺς Θετταλοὺς ὑπὲρ τοῦ ̓Αχιλλέως κατὰ τοὺς ἐν Πυλαίᾳ ξυλλόγους, ἐν οἷς οἱ Θετταλοὶ τὰ ̓Αμφικτυονικὰ πράττουσιν, οἱ δὲ δείσαντες ἐψηφίσαντο ἀναλαβεῖν τὰ προσήκοντα τῷ τάφῳ. καὶ τὸ Λεωνίδου σῆμα τοῦ Σπαρτιάτου μονονοὺ περιέβαλεν ἀγασθεὶς τὸν ἄνδρα. ἐπὶ δὲ τὸν κολωνὸν βαδίζων, ἐφ' οὗ λέγονται Λακεδαιμόνιοι περιχωσθῆναι τοῖς τοξεύμασιν, ἤκουσε τῶν ὁμιλητῶν διαφερομένων ἀλλήλοις, ὅ τι εἴη τὸ ὑψηλότατον τῆς ̔Ελλάδος, παρεῖχε δὲ ἄρα τὸν λόγον ἡ Οἴτη τὸ ὄρος ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖς οὖσα, καὶ ἀνελθὼν ἐπὶ τὸν λόφον, “ἐγὼ” ἔφη “τὸ ὑψηλότατον τοῦτο ἡγοῦμαι, οἱ γὰρ ἐνταῦθα ὑπὲρ ἐλευθερίας ἀποθανόντες ἀντανήγαγον αὐτὸ τῇ Οἴτῃ καὶ ὑπὲρ πολλοὺς ̓Ολύμπους ἦραν. ἐγὼ δὲ ἄγαμαι μὲν καὶ τούσδε τοὺς ἄνδρας, τὸν δὲ ̓Ακαρνᾶνα Μεγιστίαν καὶ πρὸ τούτων, ἃ γὰρ πεισομένους ἐγίγνωσκε, τούτων ἐπεθύμησε κοινωνῆσαι τοῖς ἀνδράσιν, οὐ τὸ ἀποθανεῖν δείσας, ἀλλὰ τὸ μετὰ τοιῶνδε μὴ τεθνάναι.” 4.12. But Apollonius came about dawn to them and said: Where is Antisthenes of Paros? And this person had joined their society seven days before in Ilium. And when Antisthenes answered that he was there, he said: Have you, O young man, any Trojan blood in your veins? Certainly I have, he said, for I am a Trojan by ancestry. And a descendant of Priam as well? asked Apollonius.Why yes, by Zeus, answered the other, and that is why I consider myself a good man and of good stock. That explains then, said the sage, why Achilles forbids me to associate with you; for after he bade me go as his deputy to the Thessalians in the matter of a complaint which he has against them, and I asked him whether there was anything else which I could do to please him, “yes', he said, “you must take care not to initiate the young man from Paros in your wisdom, for he is too much of a descendant of Priam, and the praise of Hector is never out of his mouth.' 4.16. Therest of the company also besought him to tell them all about it, and as they were in a mood to listen to him, he said: Well, it was not by digging a ditch like Odysseus, nor by tempting souls with the blood of sheep, that I obtained a conversation with Achilles; but I offered up the prayer which the Indians say they use in approaching their heroes. “O Achilles,' I said, “most of mankind declare that you are dead, but I cannot agree with them, nor can Pythagoras, my spiritual ancestor. If then we hold the truth, show to us your own form; for you would profit not a little by showing yourself to my eyes, if you should be able to use them to attest your existence.” Thereupon a slight earthquake shook the neighborhood of the barrow, and a youth issued forth five cubits high, wearing a cloak ofThessalian fashion; but in appearance he was by no means the braggart figure which some imagine Achilles to have been. Though he was stern to look upon, he had never lost his bright look; and it seems to me that his beauty has never received its meed of praise, even though Homer dwelt at length upon it; for it was really beyond the power of words, and it is easier for the singer to ruin his fame in this respect than to praise him as he deserved. At first sight he was of the size which I have mentioned, but he grew bigger, till he was twice as large and even more than that; at any rate he appeared to me to be twelve cubits high just at that moment when he reached his complete stature, and his beauty grew apace with his length. He told me then that he had never at any time shorn off his hair, bit preserved it to inviolate for the river Spercheus, for this was the river of his first intimacy; but on his cheeks you saw the first down.And he addressed me and said: “I am pleased to have met you, since I have long wanted a man like yourself. For the Thessalians for a long time past have failed to present their offerings to my tomb, and I do not yet wish to show my wrath against them; for if I did so, they would perish more thoroughly than ever the Hellenes did on this spot; accordingly I resort to gentle advice, and would warn them not to violate ancient custom, nor to prove themselves worse men than the Trojans here, who though they were robbed of so many of their heroes by myself, yet sacrifice publicly to me, and also give me the tithes of their fruits of season, and olive branch in hand ask for a truce from my hostility. But this I will not grant, for the perjuries which they committed against me will not suffer Ilium ever to resume its pristine beauty, nor to regain the prosperity which yet has favored many a city that was destroyed of old; nay, if they rebuild it, things shall go as hard with them as if their city had been captured only yesterday. In order then to save me from bringing the Thessalian polity then to the same condition, you must go as my envoy to their council in behalf of the object I have mentioned.” “I will be your envoy,” I replied, “for the object of my embassy were to save them from ruin. But, O Achilles, I would ask something of you.” “I understand,” said he, “for it is plain you are going to ask about the Trojan war. So ask me five questions about whatever you like, and that the Fates approve of.” I accordingly asked him firstly, if he had obtained burial in accordance with the story of the poets. “I lie here,” he answered, “as was most delightful to myself and Patroclus; for you know we met in mere youth, and a single golden jar holds the remains of both of us, as if we were one. But as for the dirges of the Muses and Nereids, which they say are sung over me, the Muses, I may tell you, never once came here at all, though the Nereids still resort to the spot.” Next I asked him, if Polyxena was really slaughtered over his tomb; and he replied that this was true, but that she was not slain by the Achaeans, but that she came of her own free will to the sepulcher, and that so high was the value she set on her passion for him and she for her, that she threw herself upon an upright sword. The third questions was this: “Did Helen, O Achilles, really come to Troy or was it Homer that was pleased to make up the story?' “For a long time,” he replied, “we were deceived and tricked into sending envoys to the Trojans and fighting battles in her behalf, in the belief that she was in Ilium, whereas she really was living in Egypt and in the house of Proteus, whither she had been snatched away by Paris. But when we became convinced thereof, we continued to fight to win Troy itself, so as not to disgrace ourselves by retreat.” The fourth question which I ventured upon was this: “I wonder,” I said, “that Greece ever produced at any one time so many and such distinguished heroes as Homer says were gathered against Troy.' But Achilles answered: “Why even the barbarians did not fall far short of us, so abundantly then did excellence flourish all over the earth.” And my fifth question was this: “Why was it that Homer knew nothing about Palamedes, or if he knew him, then kept him out of your story?' “If Palamedes,' he answered, “never came to Troy, then Troy never existed either. But since this wisest and most warlike hero fell in obedience to Odysseus' whim, Homer does not introduce him into his poems, lest he should have to record the shame of Odysseus in his song.” And withal Achilles raised a wail over him as over one who was the greatest and most beautiful of men, the youngest and also the most warlike, one who in sobriety surpassed all others, and had often foregathered with the Muses. “But you,” he added, “O Apollonius, since sages have a tender regard for one another, you must care for his tomb and restore the image of Palamedes that has been so contemptuously cast aside; and it lies in Aeolis close to Methymna in Lesbos.' Wit these words and with the closing remarks concerning the youth from Paros, Achilles vanished with a flash of summer lightning, for indeed the cocks were already beginning their chant. 4.23. And he also went as envoy to the Thessalians in behalf of Achilles at the time of the conferences held in Pylaea, at which the Thessalians transact the Amphictyonic business. And they were so frightened that they passed a resolution for the resumption of the ceremonies at the tomb. As for the monument of Leonidas of Spartan, he almost clasped it in his arms, so great was his admiration for the hero; and as he was coming to the mound where the Lacedaemonians are said to have been overwhelmed by the bolts which the enemy rained upon them, he heard his companions discussing with one another which was the loftiest hill in Hellas, this topic being suggested it seems by the sight of Oeta which rose before their eyes; so ascending the mound, he said: I consider this the loftiest spot of all, for those who fell here in defense of freedom raised it to a level with Oeta and carried it to a height surpassing many mountains like Olympus. It is these men that I admire, and beyond any of them Megistias of Acarian; for he knew the death that they were about to die, and deliberately made up his mind to share in it with these heroes, fearing not so much death, as the prospect that he should miss death in such company.
65. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.30.7, 2.7.1, 2.12.5, 7.2.4, 7.8.6, 7.29.1, 8.7.1, 10.3.3, 10.6, 16.1, 22.4, 38.4, 39.1 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 637, 638, 645
66. Maximus of Tyre, Dialexeis, 9.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 659
67. Philostratus, Pictures, 2.2.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 655
68. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 5.565-5.621, 6.1-6.168 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 668
69. Claudianus, De Raptu Prosperine, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 672
70. Nilus of Ancyra, Narrationes Septem De Monachis In Sina, 1.3, 2.2, 2.6, 4.7, 4.9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 689
71. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.4, 1.107-1.111, 1.353-1.355, 2.378-2.384, 2.391-2.392, 3.462-3.480, 3.485-3.486, 3.517-3.520, 3.598-3.725, 4.2, 4.7-4.8, 4.13-4.14, 7.12, 7.154, 7.307, 7.315  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586, 587, 588, 589, 590, 591, 592, 593, 594, 595, 596, 597
72. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 12.13  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 512
12.13. As a man, were you not ashamed, you most savage beast, to cut out the tongues of men who have feelings like yours and are made of the same elements as you, and to maltreat and torture them in this way?
73. Anon., Life of Homer, 57  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 615
74. Ctesias, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 419
75. Epigraphy, Ig I , 1162, 850, 1240  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 375
76. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1, 1.203-1.206, 2.631, 4.532, 6.77-6.80, 7.312, 7.474, 10.315, 11.336-11.446, 12.64-12.69, 12.206-12.211, 12.957  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 37, 584, 588, 589, 597, 669, 672
1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way, 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 2.631. till, fresh and strong, he sheds his annual scales 4.532. for gods, I trow, that such a task disturbs 6.77. On great Achilles! Thou hast guided me 6.78. Through many an unknown water, where the seas 6.79. Break upon kingdoms vast, and to the tribes 6.80. of the remote Massyli, whose wild land 7.312. from Ilium burning: with this golden bowl 7.474. that wretch will leave deserted, bearing far 10.315. he called: “So late on watch, O son of Heaven, 11.336. in battling neath her lofty walls we bore, 11.337. nor of dead warriors sunk in Simois' wave) 11.338. have paid the penalty in many a land 11.339. with chastisement accurst and changeful woe, 11.340. till Priam's self might pity. Let the star 11.341. of Pallas tell its tale of fatal storm, 11.342. off grim Caphereus and Eubcea's crags. 11.343. Driven asunder from one field of war, 11.344. Atrides unto farthest Egypt strayed, 11.345. and wise Ulysses saw from Aetna 's caves 11.346. the Cyclops gathering. Why name the throne 11.347. of Pyrrhus, or the violated hearth 11.348. whence fled Idomeneus? Or Locri cast 11.349. on Libya 's distant shore? For even he, 11.350. Lord of Mycenae by the Greeks obeyed, 11.351. fell murdered on his threshold by the hand 11.352. of that polluted wife, whose paramour 11.353. trapped Asia 's conqueror. The envious gods 11.354. withheld me also from returning home 11.355. to see once more the hearth-stone of my sires, 11.356. the wife I yearn for, and my Calydon, 11.357. the beauteous land. For wonders horrible 11.358. pursue me still. My vanished followers 11.359. through upper air take wing, or haunt and rove 11.360. in forms of birds the island waters o'er: 11.361. ah me, what misery my people feel! 11.362. The tall rocks ring with their lament and cry. 11.363. Naught else had I to hope for from that day 11.364. when my infatuate sword on gods I drew, 11.365. and outraged with abominable wound 11.366. the hand of Venus. Urge me not, I pray, 11.367. to conflicts in this wise. No more for me 11.368. of war with Trojans after Ilium 's fall! 11.369. I take no joy in evils past, nor wish 11.370. uch memory to renew. Go, lay these gifts, 11.371. brought to my honor from your ancient land, 11.372. at great Aeneas' feet. We twain have stood 11.373. confronting close with swords implacable 11.374. in mortal fray. Believe me, I have known 11.375. the stature of him when he lifts his shield, 11.376. and swings the whirlwind of his spear. If Troy 11.377. two more such sons had bred, the Dardan horde 11.378. had stormed at Argos ' gates, and Greece to-day 11.379. were for her fallen fortunes grieving sore. 11.380. Our lingering at Ilium 's stubborn wall, 11.381. our sluggard conquest halting ten years Iong, 11.382. was his and Hector's work. Heroic pair! 11.383. Each one for valor notable, and each 11.384. famous in enterprise of arms,—but he 11.385. was first in piety. Enclasp with his 11.386. your hands in plighted peace as best ye may: 11.387. but shock of steel on steel ye well may shun.’ 11.388. now hast thou heard, good King, a king's reply, 11.390. Soon as the envoys ceased, an answering sound 11.391. of troubled voices through the council flowed 11.392. of various note, as when its rocky bed 11.393. impedes an arrowy stream, and murmurs break 11.394. from the strait-channelled flood; the fringing shores 11.395. repeat the tumult of the clamorous wave. 11.396. But when their hearts and troublous tongues were still, 11.397. the King, invoking first the gods in heaven, 11.399. “Less evil were our case, if long ago 11.400. ye had provided for your country's weal, 11.401. O Latins, as I urged. It is no time 11.402. to hold dispute, while, compassing our walls, 11.403. the foeman waits. Ill-omened war is ours 11.404. against a race of gods, my countrymen, 11.405. invincible, unwearied in the fray, 11.406. and who, though lost and fallen, clutch the sword. 11.407. If hope ye cherished of Aetolia 's power, 11.408. dismiss it! For what hope ye have is found 11.409. in your own bosoms only. But ye know 11.410. how slight it is and small. What ruin wide 11.411. has fallen, is now palpable and clear. 11.412. No blame I cast. What valor's uttermost 11.413. may do was done; our kingdom in this war 11.414. trained its last thews. Now therefore I will tell 11.415. uch project as my doubtful mind may frame, 11.416. and briefly, if ye give good heed, unfold: 11.417. an ancient tract have I, close-bordering 11.418. the river Tiber ; it runs westward far 11.419. beyond Sicania's bound, and filth it bears 11.420. to Rutule and Auruncan husbandmen, 11.421. who furrow its hard hills or feed their flocks 11.422. along the stonier slopes. Let this demesne, 11.423. together with its pine-clad mountain tall, 11.424. be given the Teucrian for our pledge of peace, 11.425. confirmed by free and equitable league, 11.426. and full alliance with our kingly power. 11.427. Let them abide there, if it please them so, 11.428. and build their city's wall. But if their hearts 11.429. for other land or people yearn, and fate 11.430. permits them hence to go, then let us build 11.431. twice ten good galleys of Italian oak, 11.432. or more, if they can man them. All the wood 11.433. lies yonder on the shore. Let them but say 11.434. how numerous and large the ships they crave, 11.435. and we will give the brass, the artisans, 11.436. and ship-supplies. Let us for envoys choose 11.437. a hundred of the Latins noblest born 11.438. to tell our message and arrange the peace, 11.439. bearing mild olive-boughs and weighty gifts 11.440. of ivory and gold, with chair of state 11.441. and purple robe, our emblems as a king. 11.442. But freely let this council speak; give aid 11.443. to our exhausted cause.” Then Drances rose, 11.444. that foe inveterate, whom Turnus' fame 11.445. to stinging hate and envy double-tongued 11.446. ever pricked on. of liberal wealth was he 12.64. who even now thy absence daily mourns 12.65. in Ardea , his native land and thine.” 12.66. But to this pleading Turnus' frenzied soul 12.67. yields not at all, but rather blazes forth 12.68. more wildly, and his fever fiercer burns 12.69. beneath the healer's hand. In answer he, 12.206. in our Olympian realm. So blame not me, 12.207. but hear, Juturna, what sore grief is thine: 12.208. while chance and destiny conceded aught 12.209. of strength to Latium 's cause, I shielded well 12.210. both Turnus and thy city's wall; but now 12.211. I see our youthful champion make his war 12.957. Swift striding forth where spread the vacant plain,
77. Anon., Scholia In Homeri Iliadem, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 35
78. Orphic Hymns., Argonautica, 1186-1196, 17-20, 22-31, 21  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667
81. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 2.34.3, 4.22.1, 4.23.1  Tagged with subjects: •emotions, anger/rage Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 638, 645
2.34.3. 4.22.1. 4.23.1.
88. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 667