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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
elite Binder (2012), Tertullian, on Idolatry and Mishnah Avodah Zarah: Questioning the Parting of the Ways Between Christians and Jews, 33, 90, 100, 200
Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 49, 70, 129, 177, 194
Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 151
Maier and Waldner (2022), Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time, 149
Nikolsky and Ilan (2014), Rabbinic Traditions Between Palestine and Babylonia, 17, 35
Rupke (2016), Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality?, 95
Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 17, 60, 61, 62, 63, 92, 93, 96, 100, 119, 134, 143
Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 85, 105, 108, 156, 160, 161, 212, 251, 254, 255
Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 225, 226, 248, 287, 288, 290
Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 85, 178, 212, 236, 248, 298, 299, 300, 301, 313, 321, 322
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 1, 7, 9, 19, 25, 29, 37, 61, 70, 147, 150, 157, 159, 164, 173, 175, 262, 282, 294, 295
Williams (2023), Criminalization in Acts of the Apostles Race, Rhetoric, and the Prosecution of an Early Christian Movement. 15, 35, 36, 38, 47, 49, 53, 58, 60, 66, 72, 84, 99, 103, 104, 111, 117, 125, 137, 140, 160, 163, 169, 173, 176, 183, 184, 191
elite, acts of paul and thecla, and Bremmer (2017), Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays, 153
elite, aigina, aiginetans, commercial, maritime Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 88, 89, 102, 210, 211, 212, 213, 215, 216, 218, 219, 253, 256
elite, and civic concerns, rhodes, integration of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 257, 258, 259, 265, 384
elite, and competition Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 74, 80, 82, 92, 95, 96, 98, 150, 165, 175
elite, and social mobility Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 147
elite, and societal image, local Ferrándiz (2022), Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms: Gone Under Sea, 13, 110
elite, archaic Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 54, 72, 74, 82, 143
elite, as aristocrats Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 92, 103
elite, as mind or soul senatorial, animus Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 13
elite, as stomach, senatorial Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 7, 8, 11
elite, associations, collegia, reciprocity with Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 234, 236, 291
elite, athenian Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 200, 203, 207, 214
elite, athletes, as members of the Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 66
elite, attitudes toward, brothels McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93
elite, background and wealth of flavia papiane Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 69, 70, 298
elite, bias Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 60, 134, 185, 186
elite, bias of homer, homeric Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 25, 37, 39, 44, 48, 68, 127
elite, biases in sources Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 211, 212, 213
elite, changes and continuities in the evolution of Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 143, 144
elite, christian rhetoric, amulets Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 198, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207
elite, christian rhetoric, healers Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 158
elite, christian rhetoric, healing sites Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 72, 93, 94, 201
elite, christian rhetoric, judaism Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 182, 183, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 204, 205
elite, christian rhetoric, magic Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 205, 206, 207
elite, christian rhetoric, maioumas festival Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 105
elite, christian rhetoric, polytheist traditions Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 198, 199, 200, 201, 205
elite, christianity/christians, among social/educated Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 390
elite, commagenian Merz and Tieleman (2012), Ambrosiaster's Political Theology, 14, 18, 21, 26, 28, 32, 33, 40, 52, 54, 55, 65, 67, 69, 75, 79, 92, 94
elite, community and identity, symposium and symposium literature, links with König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 8, 10, 139, 140, 144, 180, 187, 192, 210, 242, 255, 274, 303, 333
elite, competition and interaction in epinikion Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 130, 218, 257, 297, 385, 386, 387
elite, competition in festivals Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 385, 386, 387, 391
elite, competition, republic, roman Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 53, 55, 72, 113
elite, connectivity, piedmont, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 130
elite, continuity Tacoma (2020), Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship, 89, 254
elite, cosmopolitan Merz and Tieleman (2012), Ambrosiaster's Political Theology, 59
elite, criticisms of senatorial Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 13, 14, 15
elite, cultural/media Williamson (2021), Urban Rituals in Sacred Landscapes in Hellenistic Asia Minor, 96, 119, 124, 126, 147, 293, 297, 303, 304, 305, 306, 310, 311, 336, 375, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 388
elite, demos, and Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 36, 147, 150, 154, 233
elite, discourse Rupke (2016), Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality?, 64
elite, display by Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 80, 82, 84, 87, 95, 96, 97, 135, 136, 150, 151, 155, 173, 204, 216, 217
elite, dress Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 27, 29, 33, 34, 37, 38, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 96, 97, 108, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 147, 148, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 198, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 259, 261, 263, 264, 266
elite, ecclesial van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 116
elite, egyptian, social Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 110, 112, 122, 141, 142
elite, egyptians in alexandria, among social Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 37
elite, elitism, Balberg (2023), Fractured Tablets: Forgetfulness and Fallibility in Late Ancient Rabbinic Culture, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 174, 178, 179, 186, 191, 232, 247, 249
elite, elvira, council of Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 165
elite, epistolary correspondence van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 117
elite, financiers Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 64, 65
elite, greek Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 415, 494, 530, 563, 576, 660, 754, 780, 881, 883
elite, greek, social Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 40, 128, 257
elite, ideological agency Barbato (2020), The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 68, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 79
elite, ideology Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 25
elite, imperial administration and the city Breytenbach and Tzavella (2022), Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas, 362
elite, in demes, athenian, demos and Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 233
elite, in fifth-century athens, demos, and Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 144, 146, 147, 155, 156
elite, in fourth-century athens, demos, and Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 200, 243
elite, in greek cities Rupke (2016), Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality?, 109
elite, in the archaic period, demos, and Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 74, 82, 87, 146
elite, in the fourth century ce, christianisation of the König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 8
elite, in xenophon, asceticsm, and the Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 254
elite, initiatives, grain-supply Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 215, 216
elite, its contributions to the polis in the archaic period Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 74, 75, 76, 79, 84
elite, jew/jewish Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 350, 352, 354, 355
elite, jewish rhetoric, amulets and tefillin Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 185, 186, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194
elite, jewish rhetoric, christian cures Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 182, 183, 185, 186
elite, jewish rhetoric, healing sites Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 82, 187, 188, 189
elite, jewish rhetoric, magic Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 184
elite, jewish rhetoric, maioumas festival Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 105
elite, jewish rhetoric, sabbath restrictions Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 82, 138, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193
elite, jewish, social Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 44
elite, judges Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 55, 60
elite, limits, amulet users, transgression of Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 67, 202
elite, lineage of iulius philippus, c. Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 78, 79, 80
elite, local citizens, art, to Galinsky (2016), Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity, 253
elite, magistrates Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 70, 71, 72, 212, 252
elite, male roman, body Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 48, 49
elite, manhood late-roman Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 5, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, 38, 65, 83, 84, 85, 88, 90, 91, 93, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 127, 135, 139, 164
elite, marriage, roman Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 69, 70
elite, masculinity, roman Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 352, 353
elite, members, gift-exchange, among Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 92
elite, migration Tacoma (2016), Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla, 36, 37, 38, 64, 172
elite, mobility, travel, egyptian Huebner (2013), The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity and Conflict. 110, 112, 113
elite, model, philosophy and altruism Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 178, 182
elite, neighbourhood on, rome Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 189
elite, of andros, maritime Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 87, 88, 94, 101, 256
elite, onomastics, families, greek east Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 281
elite, ownership, brothels McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 30, 31, 35, 36
elite, polis, citizen, ekklesiastai/sitometrumenoi Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 453
elite, politicians Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 73
elite, private sphere/privacy, and mutual suspicion among Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 163
elite, privilege of senatorial Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 11, 12
elite, religion Rupke (2016), Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality?, 56
elite, resentment of augustan legislation Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 116, 117
elite, rhetoric on, amulets, christian Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 198, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207
elite, rhetoric on, amulets, jewish Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 185, 186, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194
elite, rhetoric on, continuity of practice Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 93, 182, 183, 186, 187, 188, 201
elite, rhetoric on, exorcism and demons Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 187, 190, 191, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 205
elite, rhetoric on, hot springs, christian Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 72, 93, 94, 201
elite, rhetoric on, hot springs, jewish Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 82, 187, 188, 189
elite, rhetoric on, jesus’ miracles, christian Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195, 196, 197
elite, rhetoric on, prayers, jewish Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 186
elite, rhetoric, amulets Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 16, 43
elite, rhetoric, charismatic wonderworkers Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 149, 150, 158
elite, rhetoric, christian Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207
elite, rhetoric, communal identity Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 182, 183, 202
elite, rhetoric, creates communal identity Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 182, 183
elite, rhetoric, jesus’ christian miracles, legitimacy of Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195, 196, 197
elite, rhetoric, jewish Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194
elite, rhetoric, jewish miracles, legitimacy of Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 191
elite, rhetoric, magic Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 150, 158, 184, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 205, 206, 207
elite, roman women as patrons of judeans, non-judean women, adopting judean practices Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 229
elite, roman, and deliberate family limitation Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 31, 39
elite, roman, and voluntary childlessness Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 5, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48, 58, 92, 93, 117, 143
elite, roman, assimilation of values Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 92, 106, 107
elite, roman, definition of Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 3
elite, roman, patterns of childbearing Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 31, 35, 39
elite, roman, rewards for Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 154, 155, 171, 172
elite, roman, social Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 109, 294
elite, roman, value of children to Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 19, 22, 136
elite, self-fashioning Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 247
elite, self-image-making, roman era Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210
elite, senators Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 72, 235, 236, 237
elite, social and cultural, study largely, confined to Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 10
elite, socialization of Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 31, 101, 102, 115, 118, 119, 130, 131, 190
elite, sponsorship of performance Duffalo (2006), The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate. 8, 22
elite, status, apuleius, worries about König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 279, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285
elite, tarpeia as amazon, as Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 69
elite, their relationship with other members of the Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 92, 96
elite, tombs, villae rusticae, on Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 243, 244
elite, tyrants, compared to other members of the Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 91, 96, 97, 98
elite, versus, non-elite, viewers Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 9, 80, 81, 82, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 121
elite, wealth of their relationship with other members of the Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 92, 94, 95, 97, 98
elite, women and, remarriage Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 25, 26, 27
elite, women, in village Ruffini (2018), Life in an Egyptian Village in Late Antiquity: Aphrodito Before and After the Islamic Conquest, 153
elites Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 34, 39, 121, 122, 279
Bricault et al. (2007), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 364
Clark (2007), Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome, 14, 41
Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 76, 79, 153, 252
Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 10, 137
Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 61, 66, 70, 73, 155
Huebner (2013), The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity , 16, 20, 34, 35, 82, 94, 95, 157, 172
Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 5, 16, 74, 80, 87, 89, 92, 102, 107, 113, 114, 115, 117, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 139, 140, 141, 146, 147, 149, 156, 165, 174, 175, 238, 247
Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 97, 151, 196, 197, 248
Ogereau (2023), Early Christianity in Macedonia: From Paul to the Late Sixth Century. 121, 124, 170, 171, 175, 176, 196, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 249, 257, 258, 259, 277, 309, 317, 324, 331
Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 14, 51, 60, 86, 89, 91, 101, 120, 123, 127, 130, 132, 204, 216, 240, 242
elites, and augustus’s palatine hill complex Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 65
elites, and black sea trade Parkins and Smith (1998), Trade, Traders and the Ancient City, 67
elites, and burial Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 223, 229, 233, 234, 235, 236, 238, 239, 240, 243, 244, 245, 246
elites, and choral song Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 5, 395
elites, and collective security Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 155
elites, and community Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 8, 154, 156
elites, and delatores Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 161
elites, and dress Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 220, 222, 223
elites, and emperors Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 154
elites, and grain-supply Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
elites, and maiestas trials Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 161
elites, and one-man rule Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 166
elites, and palatine hill Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 63
elites, and performance of authority Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 58
elites, and political fear Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 166
elites, and privacy Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 8, 156
elites, and public eye Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 62, 79, 81
elites, and the polis Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 3, 171, 172, 257, 258
elites, and villas and otium Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 68
elites, and women of imperial household Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 30
elites, and, elites, Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 154
elites, archaeology of class Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 205, 210, 247
elites, as agoranomoi Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 143
elites, as telōnai Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 142
elites, at jerusalem, temple of bel, palmyra, on priestly Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 174, 175
elites, at the jerusalem temple, priestly Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 16, 17, 45, 64, 88, 92, 113, 116, 119, 129, 152, 162, 168, 169, 174, 175, 182, 185, 187, 188, 191, 194, 205, 222, 233
elites, at the temple of artemis, priestly Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 157, 158
elites, at the temple of bel, priestly Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 159, 160
elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 3, 99, 100, 101, 102, 164, 165, 169, 172, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 257, 258, 259, 260, 265, 284, 325, 326, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 395
elites, civic, in religious life of ephesos Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 94
elites, civic, influence of in polis Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 24, 29
elites, civic, reciprocal relationship with plebs media and sordida Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 234, 291
elites, civic, shared commercial interests of Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 236
elites, court of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 71, 180
elites, creditors Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 80, 102, 103, 105, 106
elites, drama see also comedy, satyrplay, theatre, tragedy , written in greek by roman Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 98
elites, estates, roman, and Parkins and Smith (1998), Trade, Traders and the Ancient City, 158, 159
elites, flattery, adulatio, among roman Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 132
elites, forging civic and regional integration, thebes Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391
elites, greek Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 19, 33, 36, 46, 47
elites, greek culture see also philhellenism , and roman Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 93
elites, greek, civic institutions, and Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 46
elites, greek, exclusivity, and Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 47, 94
elites, greek, imperial period, in Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 31, 90
elites, greek, readers of novels, as Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 44
elites, house of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 61
elites, images of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 157, 158, 159, 160
elites, imperial representation, pagan or christian Ruiz and Puertas (2021), Emperors and Emperorship in Late Antiquity: Images and Narratives, 36, 69, 70
elites, in apollo pythios, delphi Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 164, 165, 172
elites, in armozel, role of religious Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 97, 98, 99
elites, in athenian empire Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 87, 88, 99, 100, 101, 102, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256
elites, italian Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 23, 30, 31
elites, italian, as patrons of artisans Parkins and Smith (1998), Trade, Traders and the Ancient City, 47
elites, jerusalem Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 42, 45, 91
elites, joppe, on taxation by judaean Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 129
elites, josephus, on taxation by judaean Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 129
elites, local Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 9, 94, 516, 526
Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 40, 58
elites, local, greek east Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 251, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 261, 262, 263, 264, 266, 267, 268
elites, local, italy and western provinces Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 242, 243, 244, 245
elites, maiestas, treason, among roman Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 132
elites, maritime and commercial Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260
elites, mutual suspicion among Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 162, 163
elites, of demes, athenian Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 248
elites, of roman society Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 212, 231
elites, old comedy, attic, countering arrogance of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 167, 169, 172
elites, on, rhodes, maritime Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259
elites, one-man rule, and Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 166
elites, political philosophy, and greco-roman Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 107, 108, 109
elites, priestly Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 222, 234, 236, 240, 246, 247
elites, private lives of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 154
elites, provincial Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 242, 243, 244, 245
elites, rabbis as intellectual, elite, Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 334, 335
elites, rabbis as local provincial, subelites, Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 317
elites, rabbis, as Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 117, 334, 335
elites, regional Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 237
elites, reputation of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 157, 158
elites, role of the Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021), Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity, 22, 164, 174, 178, 210, 212, 238, 243, 246
elites, roman, and estates Parkins and Smith (1998), Trade, Traders and the Ancient City, 158, 159
elites, romans govern through Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 58, 59, 363
elites, romans govern through, embassies, diplomacy and Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 93
elites, romans govern through, emperor, divinity of Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 208, 295, 296, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 385, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395
elites, romans govern through, empire, division of Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 269, 270
elites, security of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 156, 157, 158, 160, 163, 165
elites, self-presentation of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 11
elites, society Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 55, 216, 218, 219, 221, 241
elites, spiritual direction, and urban Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman (2005), Religion and the Self in Antiquity. 189, 190
elites, taxation, by Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 111, 118, 119, 121, 122, 128, 129, 133, 138, 141, 143
elites, themistokles, hated by greek Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 217
elites, under seleucids Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 15
elites, urban development Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 17, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 31, 36, 39, 55, 62, 63, 64
elites, welfare of Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 156
elites, ἔμβολον Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 257
elites, ἔναυλος κιθάρισις Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129
elites’, envy of vedius iii, campanile, domitilla, on Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 307, 308
elitism Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 193, 196, 197, 206
Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 189
Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
elitism, and tithing Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124
elitism, bishops, between universalism and Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 274, 275, 290, 291
elitism, godlikeness, and Bartninkas (2023), Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy. 151, 238
elitism, gregory of nazianzus, between universalism and Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279
elitism, in academies, rabbinic Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124
elitism, john chrysostom, between universalism and Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 274, 275
elitism, julian, and platonic Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 269, 270, 271, 272
elitism, of sages Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124
elitism, of stammaim Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124
elitism, philosophy from oracles, and platonic Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 270, 271
elitism, purity/impurity, and Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124, 127
elitism, social relations, and Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124
elitism, torah study, and Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 124, 125
elitist/elitism van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 161, 198
non-elite, burials, copper scroll, on elite, and Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 245, 246
non-elite, viewers, plutarch, on elite, versus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 82

List of validated texts:
84 validated results for "elite"
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 4.37, 6.4-6.5, 6.9, 7.6-7.7, 10.15, 14.2, 22.11, 30.11-30.14, 30.16, 30.20, 31.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Elect/Election • Election • Jewish elite rhetoric • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • Jewish elite rhetoric, amulets and tefillin • Socialization of elite • Wisdom, For/of the Elect/Righteous • amulet users, transgression of elite limits • amulets, Jewish elite rhetoric on • elect of God • elect, status of • elite rhetoric, amulets • elite, elitism • elites, and dress • elitism • pre-election • status, of elect

 Found in books: Balberg (2023), Fractured Tablets: Forgetfulness and Fallibility in Late Ancient Rabbinic Culture, 55; Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 198; Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 115, 118; Grypeou and Spurling (2009), The Exegetical Encounter between Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity, 7; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 220; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 84, 91; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 48; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 43, 67, 193, 194; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 10, 282; Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 126, 136; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 73, 191

sup>
4.37 וְתַחַת כִּי אָהַב אֶת־אֲבֹתֶיךָ וַיִּבְחַר בְּזַרְעוֹ אַחֲרָיו וַיּוֹצִאֲךָ בְּפָנָיו בְּכֹחוֹ הַגָּדֹל מִמִּצְרָיִם׃
6.4
שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָד׃ 6.5 וְאָהַבְתָּ אֵת יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּכָל־לְבָבְךָ וּבְכָל־נַפְשְׁךָ וּבְכָל־מְאֹדֶךָ׃
6.9
וּכְתַבְתָּם עַל־מְזוּזֹת בֵּיתֶךָ וּבִשְׁעָרֶיךָ׃
7.6
כִּי עַם קָדוֹשׁ אַתָּה לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּךָ בָּחַר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לִהְיוֹת לוֹ לְעַם סְגֻלָּה מִכֹּל הָעַמִּים אֲשֶׁר עַל־פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה׃ 7.7 לֹא מֵרֻבְּכֶם מִכָּל־הָעַמִּים חָשַׁק יְהוָה בָּכֶם וַיִּבְחַר בָּכֶם כִּי־אַתֶּם הַמְעַט מִכָּל־הָעַמִּים׃
10.15
רַק בַּאֲבֹתֶיךָ חָשַׁק יְהוָה לְאַהֲבָה אוֹתָם וַיִּבְחַר בְּזַרְעָם אַחֲרֵיהֶם בָּכֶם מִכָּל־הָעַמִּים כַּיּוֹם הַזֶּה׃
14.2
כִּי עַם קָדוֹשׁ אַתָּה לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ וּבְךָ בָּחַר יְהוָה לִהְיוֹת לוֹ לְעַם סְגֻלָּה מִכֹּל הָעַמִּים אֲשֶׁר עַל־פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה׃
14.2
כָּל־עוֹף טָהוֹר תֹּאכֵלוּ׃
22.11
לֹא תִלְבַּשׁ שַׁעַטְנֵז צֶמֶר וּפִשְׁתִּים יַחְדָּו׃
30.11
כִּי הַמִּצְוָה הַזֹּאת אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיּוֹם לֹא־נִפְלֵאת הִוא מִמְּךָ וְלֹא רְחֹקָה הִוא׃ 30.12 לֹא בַשָּׁמַיִם הִוא לֵאמֹר מִי יַעֲלֶה־לָּנוּ הַשָּׁמַיְמָה וְיִקָּחֶהָ לָּנוּ וְיַשְׁמִעֵנוּ אֹתָהּ וְנַעֲשֶׂנָּה׃ 30.13 וְלֹא־מֵעֵבֶר לַיָּם הִוא לֵאמֹר מִי יַעֲבָר־לָנוּ אֶל־עֵבֶר הַיָּם וְיִקָּחֶהָ לָּנוּ וְיַשְׁמִעֵנוּ אֹתָהּ וְנַעֲשֶׂנָּה׃ 30.14 כִּי־קָרוֹב אֵלֶיךָ הַדָּבָר מְאֹד בְּפִיךָ וּבִלְבָבְךָ לַעֲשֹׂתוֹ׃
30.16
אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיּוֹם לְאַהֲבָה אֶת־יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לָלֶכֶת בִּדְרָכָיו וְלִשְׁמֹר מִצְוֺתָיו וְחֻקֹּתָיו וּמִשְׁפָּטָיו וְחָיִיתָ וְרָבִיתָ וּבֵרַכְךָ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בָּאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר־אַתָּה בָא־שָׁמָּה לְרִשְׁתָּהּ׃' 31.11 בְּבוֹא כָל־יִשְׂרָאֵל לֵרָאוֹת אֶת־פְּנֵי יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בַּמָּקוֹם אֲשֶׁר יִבְחָר תִּקְרָא אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה הַזֹּאת נֶגֶד כָּל־יִשְׂרָאֵל בְּאָזְנֵיהֶם׃'' None
sup>
4.37 And because He loved thy fathers, and chose their seed after them, and brought thee out with His presence, with His great power, out of Egypt,
6.4
HEAR, O ISRAEL: THE LORD OUR GOD, THE LORD IS ONE. 6.5 And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.
6.9
And thou shalt write them upon the door-posts of thy house, and upon thy gates.
7.6
For thou art a holy people unto the LORD thy God: the LORD thy God hath chosen thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that are upon the face of the earth. 7.7 The LORD did not set His love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people—for ye were the fewest of all peoples—
10.15
Only the LORD had a delight in thy fathers to love them, and He chose their seed after them, even you, above all peoples, as it is this day.
14.2
For thou art a holy people unto the LORD thy God, and the LORD hath chosen thee to be His own treasure out of all peoples that are upon the face of the earth.
22.11
Thou shalt not wear a mingled stuff, wool and linen together. .
30.11
For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not too hard for thee, neither is it far off. 30.12 It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say: ‘Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, and make us to hear it, that we may do it?’ 30.13 Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say: ‘Who shall go over the sea for us, and bring it unto us, and make us to hear it, that we may do it?’ 30.14 But the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou mayest do it.
30.16
in that I command thee this day to love the LORD thy God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments and His statutes and His ordices; then thou shalt live and multiply, and the LORD thy God shall bless thee in the land whither thou goest in to possess it.
30.20
to love the LORD thy God, to hearken to His voice, and to cleave unto Him; for that is thy life, and the length of thy days; that thou mayest dwell in the land which the LORD swore unto thy fathers, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give them.
31.11
when all Israel is come to appear before the LORD thy God in the place which He shall choose, thou shalt read this law before all Israel in their hearing.'' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26, 2.1-2.3, 8.20-8.21, 9.3-9.5, 9.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Christian elite rhetoric, healing sites • Elect • Elect group, • elect • electio, election • election, Abraham’s God • election, Church from gentiles • elitism • hot springs, Christian elite rhetoric on

 Found in books: Allen and Dunne (2022), Ancient Readers and their Scriptures: Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity, 35; Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 6, 258, 266, 279; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 101; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 211; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 72; Pomeroy (2021), Chrysostom as Exegete: Scholarly Traditions and Rhetorical Aims in the Homilies on Genesis, 65, 132, 238, 283; Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 136; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 98, 99, 724

sup>
1.26 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃
2.1
וְנָהָרּ יֹצֵא מֵעֵדֶן לְהַשְׁקוֹת אֶת־הַגָּן וּמִשָּׁם יִפָּרֵד וְהָיָה לְאַרְבָּעָה רָאשִׁים׃
2.1
וַיְכֻלּוּ הַשָּׁמַיִם וְהָאָרֶץ וְכָל־צְבָאָם׃ 2.2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה׃ 2.2 וַיִּקְרָא הָאָדָם שֵׁמוֹת לְכָל־הַבְּהֵמָה וּלְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּלְכֹל חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה וּלְאָדָם לֹא־מָצָא עֵזֶר כְּנֶגְדּוֹ׃ 2.3 וַיְבָרֶךְ אֱלֹהִים אֶת־יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי וַיְקַדֵּשׁ אֹתוֹ כִּי בוֹ שָׁבַת מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר־בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים לַעֲשׂוֹת׃' '8.21 וַיָּרַח יְהוָה אֶת־רֵיחַ הַנִּיחֹחַ וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־לִבּוֹ לֹא־אֹסִף לְקַלֵּל עוֹד אֶת־הָאֲדָמָה בַּעֲבוּר הָאָדָם כִּי יֵצֶר לֵב הָאָדָם רַע מִנְּעֻרָיו וְלֹא־אֹסִף עוֹד לְהַכּוֹת אֶת־כָּל־חַי כַּאֲשֶׁר עָשִׂיתִי׃
9.3
כָּל־רֶמֶשׂ אֲשֶׁר הוּא־חַי לָכֶם יִהְיֶה לְאָכְלָה כְּיֶרֶק עֵשֶׂב נָתַתִּי לָכֶם אֶת־כֹּל׃ 9.4 אַךְ־בָּשָׂר בְּנַפְשׁוֹ דָמוֹ לֹא תֹאכֵלוּ׃ 9.5 וְאַךְ אֶת־דִּמְכֶם לְנַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם אֶדְרֹשׁ מִיַּד כָּל־חַיָּה אֶדְרְשֶׁנּוּ וּמִיַּד הָאָדָם מִיַּד אִישׁ אָחִיו אֶדְרֹשׁ אֶת־נֶפֶשׁ הָאָדָם׃
9.7
וְאַתֶּם פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ שִׁרְצוּ בָאָרֶץ וּרְבוּ־בָהּ׃'' None
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1.26 And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’
2.1
And the heaven and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. 2.2 And on the seventh day God finished His work which He had made; and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had made. 2.3 And God blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; because that in it He rested from all His work which God in creating had made.
8.20
And Noah builded an altar unto the LORD; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt-offerings on the altar. 8.21 And the LORD smelled the sweet savour; and the LORD said in His heart: ‘I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done.
9.3
Every moving thing that liveth shall be for food for you; as the green herb have I given you all. 9.4 Only flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat. 9.5 And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it; and at the hand of man, even at the hand of every man’s brother, will I require the life of man.
9.7
And you, be ye fruitful, and multiply; swarm in the earth, and multiply therein.’ .' ' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 19.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elites, and dress • elitism

 Found in books: Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 220; Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 126

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19.19 אֶת־חֻקֹּתַי תִּשְׁמֹרוּ בְּהֶמְתְּךָ לֹא־תַרְבִּיעַ כִּלְאַיִם שָׂדְךָ לֹא־תִזְרַע כִּלְאָיִם וּבֶגֶד כִּלְאַיִם שַׁעַטְנֵז לֹא יַעֲלֶה עָלֶיךָ׃'' None
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19.19 Ye shall keep My statutes. Thou shalt not let thy cattle gender with a diverse kind; thou shalt not sow thy field with two kinds of seed; neither shall there come upon thee a garment of two kinds of stuff mingled together.'' None
4. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 24.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • elect

 Found in books: Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 258; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 70

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24.17 אֶרְאֶנּוּ וְלֹא עַתָּה אֲשׁוּרֶנּוּ וְלֹא קָרוֹב דָּרַךְ כּוֹכָב מִיַּעֲקֹב וְקָם שֵׁבֶט מִיִּשְׂרָאֵל וּמָחַץ פַּאֲתֵי מוֹאָב וְקַרְקַר כָּל־בְּנֵי־שֵׁת׃'' None
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24.17 I see him, but not now; I behold him, but not nigh; There shall step forth a star out of Jacob, And a scepter shall rise out of Israel, And shall smite through the corners of Moab, And break down all the sons of Seth.'' None
5. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 10.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elect/Election • Socialization of elite

 Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 119; Grypeou and Spurling (2009), The Exegetical Encounter between Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity, 169

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10.8 חֲכַם־לֵב יִקַּח מִצְוֺת וֶאֱוִיל שְׂפָתַיִם יִלָּבֵט׃'' None
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10.8 The wise in heart will receive commandments; but a prating fool shall fall.'' None
6. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 2.7, 33.12, 89.27-89.28, 118.22, 135.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Chosen/Elect One • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Elect • Elect/Election • Election • Election, God’s patronage • Jew/Jewish, elite

 Found in books: Grypeou and Spurling (2009), The Exegetical Encounter between Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity, 7; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 276, 354, 355; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 10, 12; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 84, 85; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 73, 604

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2.7 אֲסַפְּרָה אֶל חֹק יְהוָה אָמַר אֵלַי בְּנִי אַתָּה אֲנִי הַיּוֹם יְלִדְתִּיךָ׃
89.27
הוּא יִקְרָאֵנִי אָבִי אָתָּה אֵלִי וְצוּר יְשׁוּעָתִי׃ 89.28 אַף־אָנִי בְּכוֹר אֶתְּנֵהוּ עֶלְיוֹן לְמַלְכֵי־אָרֶץ׃
118.22
אֶבֶן מָאֲסוּ הַבּוֹנִים הָיְתָה לְרֹאשׁ פִּנָּה׃
135.4
כִּי־יַעֲקֹב בָּחַר לוֹ יָהּ יִשְׂרָאֵל לִסְגֻלָּתוֹ׃' ' None
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2.7 I will tell of the decree: The LORD said unto me: 'Thou art My son, this day have I begotten thee." 89.27 He shall call unto Me: Thou art my Father, My God, and the rock of my salvation. . 89.28 I also will appoint him first-born, The highest of the kings of the earth.
118.22
The stone which the builders rejected Is become the chief corner-stone.
135.4
For the LORD hath chosen Jacob unto Himself, And Israel for His own treasure.' " None
7. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 12.10 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Socialization of elite • Wisdom, For/of the Elect/Righteous

 Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 130; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 282

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12.10 And the young men that were grown up with him spoke unto him, saying: ‘Thus shalt thou say unto this people that spoke unto thee, saying: Thy father made our yoke heavy, but make thou it lighter unto us; thus shalt thou speak unto them: My little finger is thicker than my father’s loins.'' None
8. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 25.19 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Socialization of elite

 Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 118; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 117

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25.19 וּמִן־הָעִיר לָקַח סָרִיס אֶחָד אֲ\u200dשֶׁר־הוּא פָקִיד עַל־אַנְשֵׁי הַמִּלְחָמָה וַחֲמִשָּׁה אֲנָשִׁים מֵרֹאֵי פְנֵי־הַמֶּלֶךְ אֲשֶׁר נִמְצְאוּ בָעִיר וְאֵת הַסֹּפֵר שַׂר הַצָּבָא הַמַּצְבִּא אֶת־עַם הָאָרֶץ וְשִׁשִּׁים אִישׁ מֵעַם הָאָרֶץ הַנִּמְצְאִים בָּעִיר׃'' None
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25.19 and out of the city he took an officer that was set over the men of war; and five men of them that saw the king’s face, who were found in the city; and the scribe of the captain of the host, who mustered the people of the land; and threescore men of the people of the land, that were found in the city.'' None
9. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 14.1, 41.8, 43.10, 44.1-44.2, 49.7, 60.21 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Election • Election (of Israel) • pre-election

 Found in books: Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 47; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 10; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 73, 76, 127; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 487

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14.1 כִּי יְרַחֵם יְהוָה אֶת־יַעֲקֹב וּבָחַר עוֹד בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל וְהִנִּיחָם עַל־אַדְמָתָם וְנִלְוָה הַגֵּר עֲלֵיהֶם וְנִסְפְּחוּ עַל־בֵּית יַעֲקֹב׃
14.1
כֻּלָּם יַעֲנוּ וְיֹאמְרוּ אֵלֶיךָ גַּם־אַתָּה חֻלֵּיתָ כָמוֹנוּ אֵלֵינוּ נִמְשָׁלְתָּ׃
41.8
וְאַתָּה יִשְׂרָאֵל עַבְדִּי יַעֲקֹב אֲשֶׁר בְּחַרְתִּיךָ זֶרַע אַבְרָהָם אֹהֲבִי׃' 44.1 וְעַתָּה שְׁמַע יַעֲקֹב עַבְדִּי וְיִשְׂרָאֵל בָּחַרְתִּי בוֹ׃
44.1
מִי־יָצַר אֵל וּפֶסֶל נָסָךְ לְבִלְתִּי הוֹעִיל׃ 44.2 כֹּה־אָמַר יְהוָה עֹשֶׂךָ וְיֹצֶרְךָ מִבֶּטֶן יַעְזְרֶךָּ אַל־תִּירָא עַבְדִּי יַעֲקֹב וִישֻׁרוּן בָּחַרְתִּי בוֹ׃ 44.2 רֹעֶה אֵפֶר לֵב הוּתַל הִטָּהוּ וְלֹא־יַצִּיל אֶת־נַפְשׁוֹ וְלֹא יֹאמַר הֲלוֹא שֶׁקֶר בִּימִינִי׃
49.7
כֹּה אָמַר־יְהוָה גֹּאֵל יִשְׂרָאֵל קְדוֹשׁוֹ לִבְזֹה־נֶפֶשׁ לִמְתָעֵב גּוֹי לְעֶבֶד מֹשְׁלִים מְלָכִים יִרְאוּ וָקָמוּ שָׂרִים וְיִשְׁתַּחֲוּוּ לְמַעַן יְהוָה אֲשֶׁר נֶאֱמָן קְדֹשׁ יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּבְחָרֶךָּ׃
60.21
וְעַמֵּךְ כֻּלָּם צַדִּיקִים לְעוֹלָם יִירְשׁוּ אָרֶץ נֵצֶר מטעו מַטָּעַי מַעֲשֵׂה יָדַי לְהִתְפָּאֵר׃'' None
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14.1 For the LORD will have compassion on Jacob, and will yet choose Israel, and set them in their own land; and the stranger shall join himself with them, and they shall cleave to the house of Jacob.
41.8
But thou, Israel, My servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, The seed of Abraham My friend;
43.10
Ye are My witnesses, saith the LORD, and My servant whom I have chosen; that ye may know and believe Me, and understand That I am He; before Me there was no God formed, neither shall any be after Me.
44.1
Yet now hear, O Jacob My servant, And Israel, whom I have chosen; 44.2 Thus saith the LORD that made thee, And formed thee from the womb, who will help thee: Fear not, O Jacob My servant, And thou, Jeshurun, whom I have chosen.
49.7
Thus saith the LORD, The Redeemer of Israel, his Holy One, To him who is despised of men, To him who is abhorred of nations, To a servant of rulers: Kings shall see and arise, Princes, and they shall prostrate themselves; Because of the LORD that is faithful, Even the Holy One of Israel, who hath chosen thee.
60.21
Thy people also shall be all righteous, They shall inherit the land for ever; The branch of My planting, the work of My hands, Wherein I glory.'' None
10. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 20.5 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Election

 Found in books: Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 10; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 73

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20.5 וְאָמַרְתָּ אֲלֵיהֶם כֹּה־אָמַר אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה בְּיוֹם בָּחֳרִי בְיִשְׂרָאֵל וָאֶשָּׂא יָדִי לְזֶרַע בֵּית יַעֲקֹב וָאִוָּדַע לָהֶם בְּאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם וָאֶשָּׂא יָדִי לָהֶם לֵאמֹר אֲנִי יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם׃'' None
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20.5 and say unto them: Thus saith the Lord GOD: In the day when I chose Israel, and lifted up My hand unto the seed of the house of Jacob, and made Myself known unto them in the land of Egypt, when I lifted up My hand unto them, saying: I am the LORD your God;'' None
11. Hebrew Bible, Zechariah, 13.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elect group, • elect

 Found in books: Allen and Dunne (2022), Ancient Readers and their Scriptures: Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity, 141; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 93

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13.7 חֶרֶב עוּרִי עַל־רֹעִי וְעַל־גֶּבֶר עֲמִיתִי נְאֻם יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת הַךְ אֶת־הָרֹעֶה וּתְפוּצֶיןָ הַצֹּאן וַהֲשִׁבֹתִי יָדִי עַל־הַצֹּעֲרִים׃'' None
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13.7 Awake, O sword, against My shepherd, And against the man that is near unto Me, Saith the LORD of hosts; Smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered; And I will turn My hand upon the little ones.'' None
12. Herodotus, Histories, 5.67, 5.92, 6.132 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aigina, Aiginetans, commercial, maritime elite • Homer, Homeric,, elite bias of • election • elite, and competition • elite, as aristocrats • elite, display by • elites, and grain-supply • elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy • elites, in Athenian empire • elites, maritime and commercial • elites, ἔναυλος κιθάρισις • grain-supply, elite initiatives • their relationship with other members of the elite • their relationship with other members of the elite, wealth of • tyrants, compared to other members of the elite

 Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 96, 97, 103; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 129, 215; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 48, 79

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5.67 ταῦτα δέ, δοκέειν ἐμοί, ἐμιμέετο ὁ Κλεισθένης οὗτος τὸν ἑωυτοῦ μητροπάτορα Κλεισθένεα τὸν Σικυῶνος τύραννον. Κλεισθένης γὰρ Ἀργείοισι πολεμήσας τοῦτο μὲν ῥαψῳδοὺς ἔπαυσε ἐν Σικυῶνι ἀγωνίζεσθαι τῶν Ὁμηρείων ἐπέων εἵνεκα, ὅτι Ἀργεῖοί τε καὶ Ἄργος τὰ πολλὰ πάντα ὑμνέαται· τοῦτο δέ, ἡρώιον γὰρ ἦν καὶ ἔστι ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ἀγορῇ τῶν Σικυωνίων Ἀδρήστου τοῦ Ταλαοῦ, τοῦτον ἐπεθύμησε ὁ Κλεισθένης ἐόντα Ἀργεῖον ἐκβαλεῖν ἐκ τῆς χώρης. ἐλθὼν δὲ ἐς Δελφοὺς ἐχρηστηριάζετο εἰ ἐκβάλοι τὸν Ἄδρηστον· ἡ δὲ Πυθίη οἱ χρᾷ φᾶσα Ἄδρηστον μὲν εἶναι Σικυωνίων βασιλέα, κεῖνον δὲ λευστῆρα. ἐπεὶ δὲ ὁ θεὸς τοῦτό γε οὐ παρεδίδου, ἀπελθὼν ὀπίσω ἐφρόντιζε μηχανὴν τῇ αὐτὸς ὁ Ἄδρηστος ἀπαλλάξεται. ὡς δέ οἱ ἐξευρῆσθαι ἐδόκεε, πέμψας ἐς Θήβας τὰς Βοιωτίας ἔφη θέλειν ἐπαγαγέσθαι Μελάνιππον τὸν Ἀστακοῦ· οἱ δὲ Θηβαῖοι ἔδοσαν. ἐπαγαγόμενος δὲ ὁ Κλεισθένης τὸν Μελάνιππον τέμενός οἱ ἀπέδεξε ἐν αὐτῷ τῷ πρυτανηίῳ καί μιν ἵδρυσε ἐνθαῦτα ἐν τῷ ἰσχυροτάτῳ. ἐπηγάγετο δὲ τὸν Μελάνιππον ὁ Κλεισθένης ʽ καὶ γὰρ τοῦτο δεῖ ἀπηγήσασθαἰ ὡς ἔχθιστον ἐόντα Ἀδρήστῳ, ὃς τόν τε ἀδελφεόν οἱ Μηκιστέα ἀπεκτόνεε καὶ τὸν γαμβρὸν Τυδέα. ἐπείτε δέ οἱ τὸ τέμενος ἀπέδεξε, θυσίας τε καὶ ὁρτὰς Ἀδρήστου ἀπελόμενος ἔδωκε τῷ Μελανίππῳ. οἱ δὲ Σικυώνιοι ἐώθεσαν μεγαλωστὶ κάρτα τιμᾶν τὸν Ἄδρηστον· ἡ γὰρ χώρη ἦν αὕτη Πολύβου, ὁ δὲ Ἄδρηστος ἦν Πολύβου θυγατριδέος, ἄπαις δὲ Πόλυβος τελευτῶν διδοῖ Ἀδρήστῳ τὴν ἀρχήν. τά τε δὴ ἄλλα οἱ Σικυώνιοι ἐτίμων τὸν Ἄδρηστον καὶ δὴ πρὸς τὰ πάθεα αὐτοῦ τραγικοῖσι χοροῖσι ἐγέραιρον, τὸν μὲν Διόνυσον οὐ τιμῶντες, τὸν δὲ Ἄδρηστον. Κλεισθένης δὲ χοροὺς μὲν τῷ Διονύσῳ ἀπέδωκε, τὴν δὲ ἄλλην θυσίην Μελανίππῳ.
5.92
Ἠετίωνι δὲ μετὰ ταῦτα ὁ παῖς ηὐξάνετο, καί οἱ διαφυγόντι τοῦτον τὸν κίνδυνον ἀπὸ τῆς κυψέλης ἐπωνυμίην Κύψελος οὔνομα ἐτέθη. ἀνδρωθέντι δὲ καὶ μαντευομένῳ Κυψέλῳ ἐγένετο ἀμφιδέξιον χρηστήριον ἐν Δελφοῖσι, τῷ πίσυνος γενόμενος ἐπεχείρησέ τε καὶ ἔσχε Κόρινθον. ὁ δὲ χρησμὸς ὅδε ἦν. ὄλβιος οὗτος ἀνὴρ ὃς ἐμὸν δόμον ἐσκαταβαίνει, Κύψελος Ἠετίδης, βασιλεὺς κλειτοῖο Κορίνθου αὐτὸς καὶ παῖδες, παίδων γε μὲν οὐκέτι παῖδες. τὸ μὲν δὴ χρηστήριον τοῦτο ἦν, τυραννεύσας δὲ ὁ Κύψελος τοιοῦτος δή τις ἀνὴρ ἐγένετο· πολλοὺς μὲν Κορινθίων ἐδίωξε, πολλοὺς δὲ χρημάτων ἀπεστέρησε, πολλῷ δέ τι πλείστους τῆς ψυχῆς.
5.92
Κορινθίοισι γὰρ ἦν πόλιος κατάστασις τοιήδε· ἦν ὀλιγαρχίη, καὶ οὗτοι Βακχιάδαι καλεόμενοι ἔνεμον τὴν πόλιν, ἐδίδοσαν δὲ καὶ ἤγοντο ἐξ ἀλλήλων. Ἀμφίονι δὲ ἐόντι τούτων τῶν ἀνδρῶν γίνεται θυγάτηρ χωλή· οὔνομα δέ οἱ ἦν Λάβδα. ταύτην Βακχιαδέων γὰρ οὐδεὶς ἤθελε γῆμαι, ἴσχει Ἠετίων ὁ Ἐχεκράτεος, δήμου μὲν ἐὼν ἐκ Πέτρης, ἀτὰρ τὰ ἀνέκαθεν Λαπίθης τε καὶ Καινείδης. ἐκ δέ οἱ ταύτης τῆς γυναικὸς οὐδʼ ἐξ ἄλλης παῖδες ἐγίνοντο. ἐστάλη ὦν ἐς Δελφοὺς περὶ γόνου. ἐσιόντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἰθέως ἡ Πυθίη προσαγορεύει τοῖσιδε τοῖσι ἔπεσι. Ἠετίων, οὔτις σε τίει πολύτιτον ἐόντα. Λάβδα κύει, τέξει δʼ ὀλοοίτροχον· ἐν δὲ πεσεῖται ἀνδράσι μουνάρχοισι, δικαιώσει δὲ Κόρινθον. ταῦτα χρησθέντα τῷ Ἠετίωνι ἐξαγγέλλεταί κως τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι, τοῖσι τὸ μὲν πρότερον γενόμενον χρηστήριον ἐς Κόρινθον ἦν ἄσημον, φέρον τε ἐς τὠυτὸ καὶ τὸ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος καὶ λέγον ὧδε. αἰετὸς ἐν πέτρῃσι κύει, τέξει δὲ λέοντα καρτερὸν ὠμηστήν· πολλῶν δʼ ὑπὸ γούνατα λύσει. ταῦτά νυν εὖ φράζεσθε, Κορίνθιοι, οἳ περὶ καλήν Πειρήνην οἰκεῖτε καὶ ὀφρυόεντα Κόρινθον.
5.92
Περίανδρος δὲ συνιεὶς τὸ ποιηθὲν καὶ νόῳ ἴσχων ὥς οἱ ὑπετίθετο Θρασύβουλος τοὺς ὑπειρόχους τῶν ἀστῶν φονεύειν, ἐνθαῦτα δὴ πᾶσαν κακότητα ἐξέφαινε ἐς τοὺς πολιήτας. ὅσα γὰρ Κύψελος ἀπέλιπε κτείνων τε καὶ διώκων, Περίανδρος σφέα ἀπετέλεσε, μιῇ δὲ ἡμέρῃ ἀπέδυσε πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας διὰ τὴν ἑωυτοῦ γυναῖκα Μέλισσαν. πέμψαντι γάρ οἱ ἐς Θεσπρωτοὺς ἐπʼ Ἀχέροντα ποταμὸν ἀγγέλους ἐπὶ τὸ νεκυομαντήιον παρακαταθήκης πέρι ξεινικῆς οὔτε σημανέειν ἔφη ἡ Μέλισσα ἐπιφανεῖσα οὔτε κατερέειν ἐν τῷ κέεται χώρῳ ἡ παρακαταθήκη· ῥιγοῦν τε γὰρ καὶ εἶναι γυμνή· τῶν γάρ οἱ συγκατέθαψε ἱματίων ὄφελος εἶναι οὐδὲν οὐ κατακαυθέντων· μαρτύριον δέ οἱ εἶναι ὡς ἀληθέα ταῦτα λέγει, ὅτι ἐπὶ ψυχρὸν τὸν ἰπνὸν Περίανδρος τοὺς ἄρτους ἐπέβαλε. ταῦτα δὲ ὡς ὀπίσω ἀπηγγέλθη τῷ Περιάνδρῳ, πιστὸν γάρ οἱ ἦν τὸ συμβόλαιον ὃς νεκρῷ ἐούσῃ Μελίσσῃ ἐμίγη, ἰθέως δὴ μετὰ τὴν ἀγγελίην κήρυγμα ἐποιήσατο ἐς τὸ Ἥραιον ἐξιέναι πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας. αἳ μὲν δὴ ὡς ἐς ὁρτὴν ἤισαν κόσμῳ τῷ καλλίστῳ χρεώμεναι, ὃ δʼ ὑποστήσας τοὺς δορυφόρους ἀπέδυσε σφέας πάσας ὁμοίως, τάς τε ἐλευθέρας καὶ τὰς ἀμφιπόλους, συμφορήσας δὲ ἐς ὄρυγμα Μελίσσῃ ἐπευχόμενος κατέκαιε. ταῦτα δέ οἱ ποιήσαντι καὶ τὸ δεύτερον πέμψαντι ἔφρασε τὸ εἴδωλον τὸ Μελίσσης ἐς τὸν κατέθηκε χῶρον τοῦ ξείνου τὴν παρακαταθήκην. τοιοῦτο μὲν ὑμῖν ἐστὶ ἡ τυραννίς, ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι, καὶ τοιούτων ἔργων. ἡμέας δὲ τοὺς Κορινθίους τότε αὐτίκα θῶμα μέγα εἶχε ὅτε ὑμέας εἴδομεν μεταπεμπομένους Ἱππίην, νῦν τε δὴ καὶ μεζόνως θωμάζομεν λέγοντας ταῦτα, ἐπιμαρτυρόμεθά τε ἐπικαλεόμενοι ὑμῖν θεοὺς τοὺς Ἑλληνίους μὴ κατιστάναι τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις. οὔκων παύσεσθε ἀλλὰ πειρήσεσθε παρὰ τὸ δίκαιον κατάγοντες Ἱππίην· ἴστε ὑμῖν Κορινθίους γε οὐ συναινέοντας.”
5.92
ἄρξαντος δὲ τούτου ἐπὶ τριήκοντα ἔτεα καὶ διαπλέξαντος τὸν βίον εὖ, διάδοχός οἱ τῆς τυραννίδος ὁ παῖς Περίανδρος γίνεται. ὁ τοίνυν Περίανδρος κατʼ ἀρχὰς μὲν ἦν ἠπιώτερος τοῦ πατρός, ἐπείτε δὲ ὡμίλησε διʼ ἀγγέλων Θρασυβούλῳ τῷ Μιλήτου τυράννῳ, πολλῷ ἔτι ἐγένετο Κυψέλου μιαιφονώτερος. πέμψας γὰρ παρὰ Θρασύβουλον κήρυκα ἐπυνθάνετο ὅντινα ἂν τρόπον ἀσφαλέστατον καταστησάμενος τῶν πρηγμάτων κάλλιστα τὴν πόλιν ἐπιτροπεύοι. Θρασύβουλος δὲ τὸν ἐλθόντα παρὰ τοῦ Περιάνδρου ἐξῆγε ἔξω τοῦ ἄστεος, ἐσβὰς δὲ ἐς ἄρουραν ἐσπαρμένην ἅμα τε διεξήιε τὸ λήιον ἐπειρωτῶν τε καὶ ἀναποδίζων τὸν κήρυκα κατὰ τὴν ἀπὸ Κορίνθου ἄπιξιν, καὶ ἐκόλουε αἰεὶ ὅκως τινὰ ἴδοι τῶν ἀσταχύων ὑπερέχοντα, κολούων δὲ ἔρριπτε, ἐς ὃ τοῦ ληίου τὸ κάλλιστόν τε καὶ βαθύτατον διέφθειρε τρόπῳ τοιούτω· διεξελθὼν δὲ τὸ χωρίον καὶ ὑποθέμενος ἔπος οὐδὲν ἀποπέμπει τὸν κήρυκα. νοστήσαντος δὲ τοῦ κήρυκος ἐς τὴν Κόρινθον ἦν πρόθυμος πυνθάνεσθαι τὴν ὑποθήκην ὁ Περίανδρος· ὁ δὲ οὐδέν οἱ ἔφη Θρασύβουλον ὑποθέσθαι, θωμάζειν τε αὐτοῦ παρʼ οἷόν μιν ἄνδρα ἀποπέμψειε, ὡς παραπλῆγά τε καὶ τῶν ἑωυτοῦ σινάμωρον, ἀπηγεόμενος τά περ πρὸς Θρασυβούλου ὀπώπεε.
5.92
ἔδει δὲ ἐκ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος γόνου Κορίνθῳ κακὰ ἀναβλαστεῖν. ἡ Λάβδα γὰρ πάντα ταῦτα ἤκουε ἑστεῶσα πρὸς αὐτῇσι τῇσι θύρῃσι· δείσασα δὲ μή σφι μεταδόξῃ καὶ τὸ δεύτερον λαβόντες τὸ παιδίον ἀποκτείνωσι, φέρουσα κατακρύπτει ἐς τὸ ἀφραστότατόν οἱ ἐφαίνετο εἶναι, ἐς κυψέλην, ἐπισταμένη ὡς εἰ ὑποστρέψαντες ἐς ζήτησιν ἀπικνεοίατο πάντα ἐρευνήσειν μέλλοιεν· τὰ δὴ καὶ ἐγίνετο. ἐλθοῦσι δὲ καὶ διζημένοισι αὐτοῖσι ὡς οὐκ ἐφαίνετο, ἐδόκεε ἀπαλλάσσεσθαι καὶ λέγειν πρὸς τοὺς ἀποπέμψαντας ὡς πάντα ποιήσειαν τὰ ἐκεῖνοι ἐνετείλαντο. οἳ μὲν δὴ ἀπελθόντες ἔλεγον ταῦτα.
5.92
οἳ μὲν ταῦτα ἔλεγον, τῶν δὲ συμμάχων τὸ πλῆθος οὐκ ἐνεδέκετο τοὺς λόγους. οἱ μέν νυν ἄλλοι ἡσυχίην ἦγον, Κορίνθιος δὲ Σωκλέης ἔλεξε τάδε.
5.92
τοῦτο μὲν δὴ τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι πρότερον γενόμενον ἦν ἀτέκμαρτον· τότε δὲ τὸ Ἠετίωνι γενόμενον ὡς ἐπύθοντο, αὐτίκα καὶ τὸ πρότερον συνῆκαν ἐὸν συνῳδὸν τῷ Ἠετίωνος. συνέντες δὲ καὶ τοῦτο εἶχον ἐν ἡσυχίῃ, ἐθέλοντες τὸν μέλλοντα Ἠετίωνι γίνεσθαι γόνον διαφθεῖραι. ὡς δʼ ἔτεκε ἡ γυνὴ τάχιστα, πέμπουσι σφέων αὐτῶν δέκα ἐς τὸν δῆμον ἐν τῷ κατοίκητο ὁ Ἠετίων ἀποκτενέοντας τὸ παιδίον. ἀπικόμενοι δὲ οὗτοι ἐς τὴν Πέτρην καὶ παρελθόντες ἐς τὴν αὐλὴν τὴν Ἠετίωνος αἴτεον τὸ παιδίον· ἡ δὲ Λάβδα εἰδυῖά τε οὐδὲν τῶν εἵνεκα ἐκεῖνοι ἀπικοίατο, καὶ δοκέουσα σφέας φιλοφροσύνης τοῦ πατρὸς εἵνεκα αἰτέειν, φέρουσα ἐνεχείρισε αὐτῶν ἑνί. τοῖσι δὲ ἄρα ἐβεβούλευτο κατʼ ὁδὸν τὸν πρῶτον αὐτῶν λαβόντα τὸ παιδίον προσουδίσαι. ἐπεὶ ὦν ἔδωκε φέρουσα ἡ Λάβδα, τὸν λαβόντα τῶν ἀνδρῶν θείῃ τύχῃ προσεγέλασε τὸ παιδίον, καὶ τὸν φρασθέντα τοῦτο οἶκτός τις ἴσχει ἀποκτεῖναι, κατοικτείρας δὲ παραδιδοῖ τῷ δευτέρῳ, ὁ δὲ τῷ τρίτῳ. οὕτω δὴ διεξῆλθε διὰ πάντων τῶν δέκα παραδιδόμενον, οὐδενὸς βουλομένου διεργάσασθαι. ἀποδόντες ὦν ὀπίσω τῇ τεκούσῃ τὸ παιδίον καὶ ἐξελθόντες ἔξω, ἑστεῶτες ἐπὶ τῶν θυρέων ἀλλήλων ἅπτοντο καταιτιώμενοι, καὶ μάλιστα τοῦ πρώτου λαβόντος, ὅτι οὐκ ἐποίησε κατὰ τὰ δεδογμένα, ἐς ὃ δή σφι χρόνου ἐγγινομένου ἔδοξε αὖτις παρελθόντας πάντας τοῦ φόνου μετίσχειν.
5.92
‘ἦ δὴ ὅ τε οὐρανὸς ἔνερθε ἔσται τῆς γῆς καὶ ἡ γῆ μετέωρος ὑπὲρ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ ἄνθρωποι νομὸν ἐν θαλάσσῃ ἕξουσι καὶ ἰχθύες τὸν πρότερον ἄνθρωποι, ὅτε γε ὑμεῖς ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι ἰσοκρατίας καταλύοντες τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις κατάγειν παρασκευάζεσθε, τοῦ οὔτε ἀδικώτερον ἐστὶ οὐδὲν κατʼ ἀνθρώπους οὔτε μιαιφονώτερον. εἰ γὰρ δὴ τοῦτό γε δοκέει ὑμῖν εἶναι χρηστὸν ὥστε τυραννεύεσθαι τὰς πόλις, αὐτοὶ πρῶτοι τύραννον καταστησάμενοι παρὰ σφίσι αὐτοῖσι οὕτω καὶ τοῖσι ἄλλοισι δίζησθε κατιστάναι· νῦν δὲ αὐτοὶ τυράννων ἄπειροι ἐόντες, καὶ φυλάσσοντες τοῦτο δεινότατα ἐν τῇ Σπάρτῃ μὴ γενέσθαι, παραχρᾶσθε ἐς τοὺς συμμάχους. εἰ δὲ αὐτοῦ ἔμπειροι ἔατε κατά περ ἡμεῖς, εἴχετε ἂν περὶ αὐτοῦ γνώμας ἀμείνονας συμβαλέσθαι ἤ περ νῦν.
6.132
μετὰ δὲ τὸ ἐν Μαραθῶνι τρῶμα γενόμενον Μιλτιάδης, καὶ πρότερον εὐδοκιμέων παρὰ Ἀθηναίοισι, τότε μᾶλλον αὔξετο. αἰτήσας δὲ νέας ἑβδομήκοντα καὶ στρατιήν τε καὶ χρήματα Ἀθηναίους, οὐ φράσας σφι ἐπʼ ἣν ἐπιστρατεύσεται χώρην, ἀλλὰ φὰς αὐτοὺς καταπλουτιεῖν ἤν οἱ ἕπωνται· ἐπὶ γὰρ χώρην τοιαύτην δή τινα ἄξειν ὅθεν χρυσὸν εὐπετέως ἄφθονον οἴσονται· λέγων τοιαῦτα αἴτεε τὰς νέας. Ἀθηναῖοι δὲ τούτοισι ἐπαερθέντες παρέδοσαν.'' None
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5.67 In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. " 5.92 These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him:
6.132 After the Persian disaster at Marathon, the reputation of Miltiades, already great at Athens, very much increased. He asked the Athenians for seventy ships, an army, and money, not revealing against what country he would lead them, but saying that he would make them rich if they followed him; he would bring them to a country from which they could easily carry away an abundance of gold; so he said when he asked for the ships. The Athenians were induced by these promises and granted his request.'" None
13. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.37.4, 6.16.3-6.16.4, 6.54.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • democracy, Athenian, mass-elite relations in • demos, and elite in fifth-century Athens • election • elections • elite, display by • elites/masses

 Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 155; Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 165; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 558; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 82; Spatharas (2019), Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens, 69, 136

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3.37.4 οἱ μὲν γὰρ τῶν τε νόμων σοφώτεροι βούλονται φαίνεσθαι τῶν τε αἰεὶ λεγομένων ἐς τὸ κοινὸν περιγίγνεσθαι, ὡς ἐν ἄλλοις μείζοσιν οὐκ ἂν δηλώσαντες τὴν γνώμην, καὶ ἐκ τοῦ τοιούτου τὰ πολλὰ σφάλλουσι τὰς πόλεις: οἱ δ’ ἀπιστοῦντες τῇ ἐξ αὑτῶν ξυνέσει ἀμαθέστεροι μὲν τῶν νόμων ἀξιοῦσιν εἶναι, ἀδυνατώτεροι δὲ τοῦ καλῶς εἰπόντος μέμψασθαι λόγον, κριταὶ δὲ ὄντες ἀπὸ τοῦ ἴσου μᾶλλον ἢ ἀγωνισταὶ ὀρθοῦνται τὰ πλείω.
6.16.3
καὶ ὅσα αὖ ἐν τῇ πόλει χορηγίαις ἢ ἄλλῳ τῳ λαμπρύνομαι, τοῖς μὲν ἀστοῖς φθονεῖται φύσει, πρὸς δὲ τοὺς ξένους καὶ αὕτη ἰσχὺς φαίνεται. καὶ οὐκ ἄχρηστος ἥδ’ ἡ ἄνοια, ὃς ἂν τοῖς ἰδίοις τέλεσι μὴ ἑαυτὸν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ τὴν πόλιν ὠφελῇ. 6.16.4 οὐδέ γε ἄδικον ἐφ’ ἑαυτῷ μέγα φρονοῦντα μὴ ἴσον εἶναι, ἐπεὶ καὶ ὁ κακῶς πράσσων πρὸς οὐδένα τῆς ξυμφορᾶς ἰσομοιρεῖ: ἀλλ’ ὥσπερ δυστυχοῦντες οὐ προσαγορευόμεθα, ἐν τῷ ὁμοίῳ τις ἀνεχέσθω καὶ ὑπὸ τῶν εὐπραγούντων ὑπερφρονούμενος, ἢ τὰ ἴσα νέμων τὰ ὁμοῖα ἀνταξιούτω.
6.54.6
τὰ δὲ ἄλλα αὐτὴ ἡ πόλις τοῖς πρὶν κειμένοις νόμοις ἐχρῆτο, πλὴν καθ’ ὅσον αἰεί τινα ἐπεμέλοντο σφῶν αὐτῶν ἐν ταῖς ἀρχαῖς εἶναι. καὶ ἄλλοι τε αὐτῶν ἦρξαν τὴν ἐνιαύσιον Ἀθηναίοις ἀρχὴν καὶ Πεισίστρατος ὁ Ἱππίου τοῦ τυραννεύσαντος υἱός, τοῦ πάππου ἔχων τοὔνομα, ὃς τῶν δώδεκα θεῶν βωμὸν τὸν ἐν τῇ ἀγορᾷ ἄρχων ἀνέθηκε καὶ τὸν τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐν Πυθίου.'' None
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3.37.4 The latter are always wanting to appear wiser than the laws, and to overrule every proposition brought forward, thinking that they cannot show their wit in more important matters, and by such behavior too often ruin their country; while those who mistrust their own cleverness are content to be less learned than the laws, and less able to pick holes in the speech of a good speaker; and being fair judges rather than rival athletes, generally conduct affairs successfully.
6.16.3
Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city: 6.16.4 nor is it unfair that he who prides himself on his position should refuse to be upon an equality with the rest. He who is badly off has his misfortunes all to himself, and as we do not see men courted in adversity, on the like principle a man ought to accept the insolence of prosperity; or else, let him first mete out equal measure to all, and then demand to have it meted out to him.
6.54.6
For the rest, the city was left in full enjoyment of its existing laws, except that care was always taken to have the offices in the hands of some one of the family. Among those of them that held the yearly archonship at Athens was Pisistratus, son of the tyrant Hippias, and named after his grandfather, who dedicated during his term of office the altar to the twelve gods in the market-place, and that of Apollo in the Pythian precinct. '' None
14. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • demos, and elite • demos, and elite in the archaic period • elite, and competition • elite, archaic • elite, display by • non-elites, private parties

 Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 230; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 80, 82, 150

15. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • demos, and elite • demos, and elite in fourth-century Athens • elite, Athenian • elite, and competition • elite, display by • elite, ideological agency • elites/masses

 Found in books: Barbato (2020), The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past, 68; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 150, 200, 203; Spatharas (2019), Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens, 182

16. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • election • election, of the strategoi • elections • elite, ideological agency • elite, its contributions to the polis in the archaic period • judges, elite

 Found in books: Barbato (2020), The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past, 74; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 75; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 30, 138, 497, 746; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 656; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 4, 60, 61, 62, 82, 102, 143, 174

17. Anon., 1 Enoch, 10.16, 10.18-10.19, 25.3, 25.5, 56.8, 89.52, 91.12 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Election • Wisdom, For/of the Elect/Righteous • elect • elect of God • status, of elect

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 66; Estes (2020), The Tree of Life, 167; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 91; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 184; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 59, 67, 76, 79, 116, 121, 123, 124, 130, 134, 154, 176, 208, 209, 524, 609

sup>6 And it came to pass when the children of men had multiplied that in those days were born unto",them beautiful and comely daughters. And the angels, the children of the heaven, saw and lusted after them, and said to one another: \'Come, let us choose us wives from among the children of men,and beget us children.\' And Semjaza, who was their leader, said unto them: \'I fear ye will not,indeed agree to do this deed, and I alone shall have to pay the penalty of a great sin.\' And they all answered him and said: \'Let us all swear an oath, and all bind ourselves by mutual imprecations,not to abandon this plan but to do this thing.\' Then sware they all together and bound themselves",by mutual imprecations upon it. And they were in all two hundred; who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon, and they called it Mount Hermon, because they had sworn,and bound themselves by mutual imprecations upon it. And these are the names of their leaders: Samlazaz, their leader, Araklba, Rameel, Kokablel, Tamlel, Ramlel, Danel, Ezeqeel, Baraqijal,,Asael, Armaros, Batarel, Ael, Zaq1el, Samsapeel, Satarel, Turel, Jomjael, Sariel. These are their chiefs of tens.' "7 And all the others together with them took unto themselves wives, and each chose for himself one, and they began to go in unto them and to defile themselves with them, and they taught them charms,and enchantments, and the cutting of roots, and made them acquainted with plants. And they,became pregt, and they bare great giants, whose height was three thousand ells: Who consumed,all the acquisitions of men. And when men could no longer sustain them, the giants turned against,them and devoured mankind. And they began to sin against birds, and beasts, and reptiles, and,fish, and to devour one another's flesh, and drink the blood. Then the earth laid accusation against the lawless ones." "8 And Azazel taught men to make swords, and knives, and shields, and breastplates, and made known to them the metals of the earth and the art of working them, and bracelets, and ornaments, and the use of antimony, and the beautifying of the eyelids, and all kinds of costly stones, and all,colouring tinctures. And there arose much godlessness, and they committed fornication, and they,were led astray, and became corrupt in all their ways. Semjaza taught enchantments, and root-cuttings, 'Armaros the resolving of enchantments, Baraqijal (taught) astrology, Kokabel the constellations, Ezeqeel the knowledge of the clouds, Araqiel the signs of the earth, Shamsiel the signs of the sun, and Sariel the course of the moon. And as men perished, they cried, and their cry went up to heaven . . ." "9 And then Michael, Uriel, Raphael, and Gabriel looked down from heaven and saw much blood being,shed upon the earth, and all lawlessness being wrought upon the earth. And they said one to another: 'The earth made without inhabitant cries the voice of their cryingst up to the gates of heaven.,And now to you, the holy ones of heaven, the souls of men make their suit, saying, 'Bring our cause,before the Most High.' And they said to the Lord of the ages: 'Lord of lords, God of gods, King of kings, and God of the ages, the throne of Thy glory (standeth) unto all the generations of the,ages, and Thy name holy and glorious and blessed unto all the ages! Thou hast made all things, and power over all things hast Thou: and all things are naked and open in Thy sight, and Thou seest all,things, and nothing can hide itself from Thee. Thou seest what Azazel hath done, who hath taught all unrighteousness on earth and revealed the eternal secrets which were (preserved) in heaven, which,men were striving to learn: And Semjaza, to whom Thou hast given authority to bear rule over his associates. And they have gone to the daughters of men upon the earth, and have slept with the,women, and have defiled themselves, and revealed to them all kinds of sins. And the women have,borne giants, and the whole earth has thereby been filled with blood and unrighteousness. And now, behold, the souls of those who have died are crying and making their suit to the gates of heaven, and their lamentations have ascended: and cannot cease because of the lawless deeds which are,wrought on the earth. And Thou knowest all things before they come to pass, and Thou seest these things and Thou dost suffer them, and Thou dost not say to us what we are to do to them in regard to these.'" 10.16 they have wronged mankind. Destroy all wrong from the face of the earth and let every evil work come to an end: and let the plant of righteousness and truth appear: and it shall prove a blessing; the works of righteousness and truth\' shall be planted in truth and joy for evermore."
10.18
And then shall the whole earth be tilled in righteousness, and shall all be planted with trees and 10.19 be full of blessing. And all desirable trees shall be planted on it, and they shall plant vines on it: and the vine which they plant thereon shall yield wine in abundance, and as for all the seed which is sown thereon each measure (of it) shall bear a thousand, and each measure of olives shall yield' "10 Then said the Most High, the Holy and Great One spake, and sent Uriel to the son of Lamech,,and said to him: \'Go to Noah and tell him in my name \'Hide thyself!\' and reveal to him the end that is approaching: that the whole earth will be destroyed, and a deluge is about to come,upon the whole earth, and will destroy all that is on it. And now instruct him that he may escape,and his seed may be preserved for all the generations of the world.\' And again the Lord said to Raphael: \'Bind Azazel hand and foot, and cast him into the darkness: and make an opening,in the desert, which is in Dudael, and cast him therein. And place upon him rough and jagged rocks, and cover him with darkness, and let him abide there for ever, and cover his face that he may,not see light. And on the day of the great judgement he shall be cast into the fire. And heal the earth which the angels have corrupted, and proclaim the healing of the earth, that they may heal the plague, and that all the children of men may not perish through all the secret things that the,Watchers have disclosed and have taught their sons. And the whole earth has been corrupted",through the works that were taught by Azazel: to him ascribe all sin.\' And to Gabriel said the Lord: \'Proceed against the bastards and the reprobates, and against the children of fornication: and destroy the children of fornication and the children of the Watchers from amongst men and cause them to go forth: send them one against the other that they may destroy each other in,battle: for length of days shall they not have. And no request that they (i.e. their fathers) make of thee shall be granted unto their fathers on their behalf; for they hope to live an eternal life, and,that each one of them will live five hundred years.\' And the Lord said unto Michael: \'Go, bind Semjaza and his associates who have united themselves with women so as to have defiled themselves,with them in all their uncleanness. And when their sons have slain one another, and they have seen the destruction of their beloved ones, bind them fast for seventy generations in the valleys of the earth, till the day of their judgement and of their consummation, till the judgement that is,for ever and ever is consummated. In those days they shall be led off to the abyss of fire: and",to the torment and the prison in which they shall be confined for ever. And whosoever shall be condemned and destroyed will from thenceforth be bound together with them to the end of all",generations. And destroy all the spirits of the reprobate and the children of the Watchers, because,they have wronged mankind. Destroy all wrong from the face of the earth and let every evil work come to an end: and let the plant of righteousness and truth appear: and it shall prove a blessing; the works of righteousness and truth\' shall be planted in truth and joy for evermore.",And then shall all the righteous escape, And shall live till they beget thousands of children, And all the days of their youth and their old age Shall they complete in peace.,And then shall the whole earth be tilled in righteousness, and shall all be planted with trees and,be full of blessing. And all desirable trees shall be planted on it, and they shall plant vines on it: and the vine which they plant thereon shall yield wine in abundance, and as for all the seed which is sown thereon each measure (of it) shall bear a thousand, and each measure of olives shall yield,ten presses of oil. And cleanse thou the earth from all oppression, and from all unrighteousness, and from all sin, and from all godlessness: and all the uncleanness that is wrought upon the earth,destroy from off the earth. And all the children of men shall become righteous, and all nations,shall offer adoration and shall praise Me, and all shall worship Me. And the earth shall be cleansed from all defilement, and from all sin, and from all punishment, and from all torment, and I will never again send (them) upon it from generation to generation and for ever.'11 And in those days I will open the store chambers of blessing which are in the heaven, so as to send,them down upon the earth over the work and labour of the children of men. And truth and peace shall be associated together throughout all the days of the world and throughout all the generations of men.\'" 13 And Enoch went and said: \'Azazel, thou shalt have no peace: a severe sentence has gone forth,against thee to put thee in bonds: And thou shalt not have toleration nor request granted to thee, because of the unrighteousness which thou hast taught, and because of all the works of godlessness,and unrighteousness and sin which thou hast shown to men.\' Then I went and spoke to them all",together, and they were all afraid, and fear and trembling seized them. And they besought me to draw up a petition for them that they might find forgiveness, and to read their petition in the presence,of the Lord of heaven. For from thenceforward they could not speak (with Him) nor lift up their",eyes to heaven for shame of their sins for which they had been condemned. Then I wrote out their petition, and the prayer in regard to their spirits and their deeds individually and in regard to their,requests that they should have forgiveness and length. And I went off and sat down at the waters of Dan, in the land of Dan, to the south of the west of Hermon: I read their petition till I fell,asleep. And behold a dream came to me, and visions fell down upon me, and I saw visions of chastisement, and a voice came bidding (me) I to tell it to the sons of heaven, and reprimand them.,And when I awaked, I came unto them, and they were all sitting gathered together, weeping in,Abelsjail, which is between Lebanon and Seneser, with their faces covered. And I recounted before them all the visions which I had seen in sleep, and I began to speak the words of righteousness, and to reprimand the heavenly Watchers. 17 And they took and brought me to a place in which those who were there were like flaming fire,,and, when they wished, they appeared as men. And they brought me to the place of darkness, and to a mountain the point of whose summit reached to heaven. And I saw the places of the luminaries and the treasuries of the stars and of the thunder and in the uttermost depths, where were,a fiery bow and arrows and their quiver, and a fiery sword and all the lightnings. And they took,me to the living waters, and to the fire of the west, which receives every setting of the sun. And I came to a river of fire in which the fire flows like water and discharges itself into the great sea towards,the west. I saw the great rivers and came to the great river and to the great darkness, and went,to the place where no flesh walks. I saw the mountains of the darkness of winter and the place",whence all the waters of the deep flow. I saw the mouths of all the rivers of the earth and the mouth of the deep." 18 I saw the treasuries of all the winds: I saw how He had furnished with them the whole creation",and the firm foundations of the earth. And I saw the corner-stone of the earth: I saw the four",winds which bear the earth and the firmament of the heaven. And I saw how the winds stretch out the vaults of heaven, and have their station between heaven and earth: these are the pillars,of the heaven. I saw the winds of heaven which turn and bring the circumference of the sun and",all the stars to their setting. I saw the winds on the earth carrying the clouds: I saw the paths",of the angels. I saw at the end of the earth the firmament of the heaven above. And I proceeded and saw a place which burns day and night, where there are seven mountains of magnificent stones,,three towards the east, and three towards the south. And as for those towards the east, was of coloured stone, and one of pearl, and one of jacinth, and those towards the south of red stone.,But the middle one reached to heaven like the throne of God, of alabaster, and the summit of the,throne was of sapphire. And I saw a flaming fire. And beyond these mountains Is a region the end of the great earth: there the heavens were completed. And I saw a deep abyss, with columns of heavenly fire, and among them I saw columns of fire fall, which were beyond measure alike towards,the height and towards the depth. And beyond that abyss I saw a place which had no firmament of the heaven above, and no firmly founded earth beneath it: there was no water upon it, and no,birds, but it was a waste and horrible place. I saw there seven stars like great burning mountains,,and to me, when I inquired regarding them, The angel said: \'This place is the end of heaven and earth: this has become a prison for the stars and the host of heaven. And the stars which roll over the fire are they which have transgressed the commandment of the Lord in the beginning of,their rising, because they did not come forth at their appointed times. And He was wroth with them, and bound them till the time when their guilt should be consummated (even) for ten thousand years.\' 19 And Uriel said to me: \'Here shall stand the angels who have connected themselves with women, and their spirits assuming many different forms are defiling mankind and shall lead them astray into sacrificing to demons as gods, (here shall they stand,) till the day of the great judgement in,which they shall be judged till they are made an end of. And the women also of the angels who",went astray shall become sirens.\' And I, Enoch, alone saw the vision, the ends of all things: and no man shall see as I have seen. 20 And these are the names of the holy angels who watch. Uriel, one of the holy angels, who is,over the world and over Tartarus. Raphael, one of the holy angels, who is over the spirits of men.,Raguel, one of the holy angels who takes vengeance on the world of the luminaries. Michael, one,of the holy angels, to wit, he that is set over the best part of mankind and over chaos. Saraqael,,one of the holy angels, who is set over the spirits, who sin in the spirit. Gabriel, one of the holy,angels, who is over Paradise and the serpents and the Cherubim. Remiel, one of the holy angels, whom God set over those who rise. 21 And I proceeded to where things were chaotic. And I saw there something horrible: I saw neither",a heaven above nor a firmly founded earth, but a place chaotic and horrible. And there I saw,seven stars of the heaven bound together in it, like great mountains and burning with fire. Then,I said: \'For what sin are they bound, and on what account have they been cast in hither\' Then said Uriel, one of the holy angels, who was with me, and was chief over them, and said: \'Enoch, why,dost thou ask, and why art thou eager for the truth These are of the number of the stars of heaven, which have transgressed the commandment of the Lord, and are bound here till ten thousand years,,the time entailed by their sins, are consummated.\' And from thence I went to another place, which was still more horrible than the former, and I saw a horrible thing: a great fire there which burnt and blazed, and the place was cleft as far as the abyss, being full of great descending columns of,fire: neither its extent or magnitude could I see, nor could I conjecture. Then I said: \'How,fearful is the place and how terrible to look upon!\' Then Uriel answered me, one of the holy angels who was with me, and said unto me: \'Enoch, why hast thou such fear and affright\' And,I answered: \'Because of this fearful place, and because of the spectacle of the pain.\' And he said unto me: \'This place is the prison of the angels, and here they will be imprisoned for ever.\' 22 And thence I went to another place, and he mountain and of hard rock.,And there was in it four hollow places, deep and wide and very smooth. How smooth are the hollow places and deep and dark to look at.,Then Raphael answered, one of the holy angels who was with me, and said unto me: \'These hollow places have been created for this very purpose, that the spirits of the souls of the dead should,assemble therein, yea that all the souls of the children of men should assemble here. And these places have been made to receive them till the day of their judgement and till their appointed period till the period appointed, till the great judgement (comes) upon them.\' I saw (the spirit of) a dead man making suit,,and his voice went forth to heaven and made suit. And I asked Raphael the angel who was",with me, and I said unto him: \'This spirit which maketh suit, whose is it, whose voice goeth forth and maketh suit to heaven \',And he answered me saying: \'This is the spirit which went forth from Abel, whom his brother Cain slew, and he makes his suit against him till his seed is destroyed from the face of the earth, and his seed is annihilated from amongst the seed of men.\',The I asked regarding it, and regarding all the hollow places: \'Why is one separated from the other\',And he answered me and said unto me: \'These three have been made that the spirits of the dead might be separated. And such a division has been make (for) the spirits of the righteous, in which there is the bright spring of,water. And such has been made for sinners when they die and are buried in the earth and judgement has not been executed on them in their",lifetime. Here their spirits shall be set apart in this great pain till the great day of judgement and punishment and torment of those who curse for ever and retribution for their spirits. There",He shall bind them for ever. And such a division has been made for the spirits of those who make their suit, who make disclosures concerning their destruction, when they were slain in the days,of the sinners. Such has been made for the spirits of men who were not righteous but sinners, who were complete in transgression, and of the transgressors they shall be companions: but their spirits shall not be slain in the day of judgement nor shall they be raised from thence.\',The I blessed the Lord of glory and said: \'Blessed be my Lord, the Lord of righteousness, who ruleth for ever.\' 23 From thence I went to another place to the west of the ends of the earth. And I saw a burning",fire which ran without resting, and paused not from its course day or night but (ran) regularly. And,I asked saying: \'What is this which rests not\' Then Raguel, one of the holy angels who was with me, answered me and said unto me: \'This course of fire which thou hast seen is the fire in the west which persecutes all the luminaries of heaven.\'' "24 And from thence I went to another place of the earth, and he showed me a mountain range of,fire which burnt day and night. And I went beyond it and saw seven magnificent mountains all differing each from the other, and the stones (thereof) were magnificent and beautiful, magnificent as a whole, of glorious appearance and fair exterior: three towards the east, one founded on the other, and three towards the south, one upon the other, and deep rough ravines, no one of which,joined with any other. And the seventh mountain was in the midst of these, and it excelled them,in height, resembling the seat of a throne: and fragrant trees encircled the throne. And amongst them was a tree such as I had never yet smelt, neither was any amongst them nor were others like it: it had a fragrance beyond all fragrance, and its leaves and blooms and wood wither not for ever:,and its fruit is beautiful, and its fruit n resembles the dates of a palm. Then I said: 'How beautiful is this tree, and fragrant, and its leaves are fair, and its blooms very delightful in appearance.',Then answered Michael, one of the holy and honoured angels who was with me, and was their leader." 25.3 know about everything, but especially about this tree.' And he answered saying: 'This high mountain which thou hast seen, whose summit is like the throne of God, is His throne, where the Holy Great One, the Lord of Glory, the Eternal King, will sit, when He shall come down to visit" 25.5 for ever. It shall then be given to the righteous and holy. Its fruit shall be for food to the elect: it shall be transplanted to the holy place, to the temple of the Lord, the Eternal King.' "25 And he said unto me: \'Enoch, why dost thou ask me regarding the fragrance of the tree,,and why dost thou wish to learn the truth\' Then I answered him saying: \'I wish to",know about everything, but especially about this tree.\' And he answered saying: \'This high mountain which thou hast seen, whose summit is like the throne of God, is His throne, where the Holy Great One, the Lord of Glory, the Eternal King, will sit, when He shall come down to visit,the earth with goodness. And as for this fragrant tree no mortal is permitted to touch it till the great judgement, when He shall take vengeance on all and bring (everything) to its consummation,for ever. It shall then be given to the righteous and holy. Its fruit shall be for food to the elect: it shall be transplanted to the holy place, to the temple of the Lord, the Eternal King.,Then shall they rejoice with joy and be glad, And into the holy place shall they enter; And its fragrance shall be in their bones, And they shall live a long life on earth, Such as thy fathers lived:And in their days shall no sorrow or plague Or torment or calamity touch them.\',Then blessed I the God of Glory, the Eternal King, who hath prepared such things for the righteous, and hath created them and promised to give to them. 26 And I went from thence to the middle of the earth, and I saw a blessed place in which there were,trees with branches abiding and blooming of a dismembered tree. And there I saw a holy mountain,,and underneath the mountain to the east there was a stream and it flowed towards the south. And I saw towards the east another mountain higher than this, and between them a deep and narrow,ravine: in it also ran a stream underneath the mountain. And to the west thereof there was another mountain, lower than the former and of small elevation, and a ravine deep and dry between them: and another deep and dry ravine was at the extremities of the three mountains. And all the ravines were deep rand narrow, (being formed) of hard rock, and trees were not planted upon,them. And I marveled at the rocks, and I marveled at the ravine, yea, I marveled very much. 27 Then said I: \'For what object is this blessed land, which is entirely filled with trees, and this,accursed valley between\' Then Uriel, one of the holy angels who was with me, answered and said: \'This accursed valley is for those who are accursed for ever: Here shall all the accursed be gathered together who utter with their lips against the Lord unseemly words and of His glory speak hard things. Here shall they be gathered together, and here,shall be their place of judgement. In the last days there shall be upon them the spectacle of righteous judgement in the presence of the righteous for ever: here shall the merciful bless the Lord of glory, the Eternal King.,In the days of judgement over the former, they shall bless Him for the mercy in accordance with,which He has assigned them (their lot).\' Then I blessed the Lord of Glory and set forth His glory and lauded Him gloriously." 28 And thence I went towards the east, into the midst of the mountain range of the desert, and,I saw a wilderness and it was solitary, full of trees and plants. And water gushed forth from,above. Rushing like a copious watercourse which flowed towards the north-west it caused clouds and dew to ascend on every side." 29 And thence I went to another place in the desert, and approached to the east of this mountain,range. And there I saw aromatic trees exhaling the fragrance of frankincense and myrrh, and the trees also were similar to the almond tree. 30 And beyond these, I went afar to the east, and I saw another place, a valley (full) of water. And,therein there was a tree, the colour () of fragrant trees such as the mastic. And on the sides of those valleys I saw fragrant cinnamon. And beyond these I proceeded to the east. 31 And I saw other mountains, and amongst them were groves of trees, and there flowed forth from,them nectar, which is named sarara and galbanum. And beyond these mountains I saw another mountain to the east of the ends of the earth, whereon were aloe-trees, and all the trees were full,of stacte, being like almond-trees. And when one burnt it, it smelt sweeter than any fragrant odour.' "32 And after these fragrant odours, as I looked towards the north over the mountains I saw seven mountains full of choice nard and fragrant trees and cinnamon and pepper.,And thence I went over the summits of all these mountains, far towards the east of the earth, and passed above the Erythraean sea and went far from it, and passed over the angel Zotiel. And I came to the Garden of Righteousness,,I and from afar off trees more numerous than I these trees and great-two trees there, very great, beautiful, and glorious, and magnificent, and the tree of knowledge, whose holy fruit they eat and know great wisdom.,That tree is in height like the fir, and its leaves are like (those of) the Carob tree: and its fruit,is like the clusters of the vine, very beautiful: and the fragrance of the tree penetrates afar. Then,I said: 'How beautiful is the tree, and how attractive is its look!' Then Raphael the holy angel, who was with me, answered me and said: 'This is the tree of wisdom, of which thy father old (in years) and thy aged mother, who were before thee, have eaten, and they learnt wisdom and their eyes were opened, and they knew that they were naked and they were driven out of the garden.'" '33 And from thence I went to the ends of the earth and saw there great beasts, and each differed from the other; and (I saw) birds also differing in appearance and beauty and voice, the one differing from the other. And to the east of those beasts I saw the ends of the earth whereon the heaven,rests, and the portals of the heaven open. And I saw how the stars of heaven come forth, and,I counted the portals out of which they proceed, and wrote down all their outlets, of each individual star by itself, according to their number and their names, their courses and their positions, and their,times and their months, as Uriel the holy angel who was with me showed me. He showed all things to me and wrote them down for me: also their names he wrote for me, and their laws and their companies. 34 And from thence I went towards the north to the ends of the earth, and there I saw a great and,glorious device at the ends of the whole earth. And here I saw three portals of heaven open in the heaven: through each of them proceed north winds: when they blow there is cold, hail, frost,,snow, dew, and rain. And out of one portal they blow for good: but when they blow through the other two portals, it is with violence and affliction on the earth, and they blow with violence. 35 And from thence I went towards the west to the ends of the earth, and saw there three portals of the heaven open such as I had seen in the east, the same number of portals, and the same number of outlets. 36 And from thence I went to the south to the ends of the earth, and saw there three open portals,of the heaven: and thence there come dew, rain, and wind. And from thence I went to the east to the ends of the heaven, and saw here the three eastern portals of heaven open and small portals,above them. Through each of these small portals pass the stars of heaven and run their course to the west on the path which is shown to them. And as often as I saw I blessed always the Lord of Glory, and I continued to bless the Lord of Glory who has wrought great and glorious wonders, to show the greatness of His work to the angels and to spirits and to men, that they might praise His work and all His creation: that they might see the work of His might and praise the great work of His hands and bless Him for ever.
56.8
In those days Sheol shall open its jaws, And they shall be swallowed up thereinAnd their destruction shall be at an end; Sheol shall devour the sinners in the presence of the elect.'" 89.52 but the sheep began to slay them. And one of them was saved and was not slain, and it sped away and cried aloud over the sheep; and they sought to slay it, but the Lord of the sheep saved it from
91.12
And after that there shall be another, the eighth week, that of righteousness, And a sword shall be given to it that a righteous judgement may be executed on the oppressors, And sinners shall be delivered into the hands of the righteous. ' None
18. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 7.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Elect group, • Priestly elite

 Found in books: Allen and Dunne (2022), Ancient Readers and their Scriptures: Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity, 152; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 165

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7.13 חָזֵה הֲוֵית בְּחֶזְוֵי לֵילְיָא וַאֲרוּ עִם־עֲנָנֵי שְׁמַיָּא כְּבַר אֱנָשׁ אָתֵה הֲוָה וְעַד־עַתִּיק יוֹמַיָּא מְטָה וּקְדָמוֹהִי הַקְרְבוּהִי׃'' None
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7.13 I saw in the night visions, And, behold, there came with the clouds of heaven One like unto a son of man, And he came even to the Ancient of days, And he was brought near before Him.'' None
19. Polybius, Histories, 6.53, 6.56.6-6.56.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, elite • elites • non-elites • viewers, elite versus non-elite • vitium, at elections

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 37, 38; Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Konrad (2022), The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic, 191, 192; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 106

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6.56.6 μεγίστην δέ μοι δοκεῖ διαφορὰν ἔχειν τὸ Ῥωμαίων πολίτευμα πρὸς βέλτιον ἐν τῇ περὶ θεῶν διαλήψει. 6.56.7 καί μοι δοκεῖ τὸ παρὰ τοῖς ἄλλοις ἀνθρώποις ὀνειδιζόμενον, τοῦτο συνέχειν τὰ Ῥωμαίων πράγματα, λέγω δὲ τὴν δεισιδαιμονίαν· 6.56.8 ἐπὶ τοσοῦτον γὰρ ἐκτετραγῴδηται καὶ παρεισῆκται τοῦτο τὸ μέρος παρʼ αὐτοῖς εἴς τε τοὺς κατʼ ἰδίαν βίους καὶ τὰ κοινὰ τῆς πόλεως ὥστε μὴ καταλιπεῖν ὑπερβολήν. ὃ καὶ δόξειεν ἂν πολλοῖς εἶναι θαυμάσιον. 6.56.9 ἐμοί γε μὴν δοκοῦσι τοῦ πλήθους χάριν τοῦτο πεποιηκέναι. 6.56.10 εἰ μὲν γὰρ ἦν σοφῶν ἀνδρῶν πολίτευμα συναγαγεῖν, ἴσως οὐδὲν ἦν ἀναγκαῖος ὁ τοιοῦτος τρόπος· 6.56.11 ἐπεὶ δὲ πᾶν πλῆθός ἐστιν ἐλαφρὸν καὶ πλῆρες ἐπιθυμιῶν παρανόμων, ὀργῆς ἀλόγου, θυμοῦ βιαίου, λείπεται τοῖς ἀδήλοις φόβοις καὶ τῇ τοιαύτῃ τραγῳδίᾳ τὰ πλήθη συνέχειν. 6.56.12 διόπερ οἱ παλαιοὶ δοκοῦσί μοι τὰς περὶ θεῶν ἐννοίας καὶ τὰς ὑπὲρ τῶν ἐν ᾅδου διαλήψεις οὐκ εἰκῇ καὶ ὡς ἔτυχεν εἰς τὰ πλήθη παρεισαγαγεῖν, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον οἱ νῦν εἰκῇ καὶ ἀλόγως ἐκβάλλειν αὐτά.' ' None
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6.53 1. \xa0Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the soâ\x80\x91called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2. \xa0Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3. \xa0As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4. \xa0Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5. \xa0This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6. \xa0On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7. \xa0These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8. \xa0They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9. \xa0and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10. \xa0For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this?
6.56.6
\xa0But the quality in which the Roman commonwealth is most distinctly superior is in my opinion the nature of their religious convictions. < 6.56.7 \xa0I\xa0believe that it is the very thing which among other peoples is an object of reproach, I\xa0mean superstition, which maintains the cohesion of the Roman State. < 6.56.8 \xa0These matters are clothed in such pomp and introduced to such an extent into their public and private life that nothing could exceed it, a fact which will surprise many. < 6.56.9 \xa0My own opinion at least is that they have adopted this course for the sake of the common people. < 6.56.10 \xa0It is a course which perhaps would not have been necessary had it been possible to form a state composed of wise men, < 6.56.11 \xa0but as every multitude is fickle, full of lawless desires, unreasoned passion, and violent anger, the multitude must be held in by invisible terrors and suchlike pageantry. < 6.56.12 \xa0For this reason I\xa0think, not that the ancients acted rashly and at haphazard in introducing among the people notions concerning the gods and beliefs in the terrors of hell, but that the moderns are most rash and foolish in banishing such beliefs. <'' None
20. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 12.40 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Jewish elite rhetoric • Jewish elite rhetoric, Christian cures • Jewish elite rhetoric, amulets and tefillin • Jewish elite rhetoric, miracles, legitimacy of • amulets, Jewish elite rhetoric on

 Found in books: Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 185; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 381

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12.40 Then under the tunic of every one of the dead they found sacred tokens of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbids the Jews to wear. And it became clear to all that this was why these men had fallen.'"" None
21. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 3.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • pre-election

 Found in books: Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 85; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 524

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3.1 But the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God,and no torment will ever touch them.3.1 Why sleepest thou, O my soul, And blessest not the Lord? ' None
22. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elites • elites, Romans govern through • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple

 Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 58; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 113

23. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • brothels, elite attitudes toward • viewers, elite versus non-elite

 Found in books: McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 91; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 80

24. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Copper Scroll (, on elite and non-elite burials • Jewish elite rhetoric • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • Jewish elite rhetoric, amulets and tefillin • Jewish elite rhetoric, miracles, legitimacy of • amulets, Jewish elite rhetoric on • elect of God • elites, and burial • exorcism and demons, elite rhetoric on • non-elites, and burial • villae rusticae, on non-elite burials

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 40; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 245; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 191

25. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • elect

 Found in books: Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 247; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 213

26. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Copper Scroll (, on elite and non-elite burials • Jewish elite rhetoric • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • Jewish elite rhetoric, amulets and tefillin • Jewish elite rhetoric, miracles, legitimacy of • amulets, Jewish elite rhetoric on • elites, and burial • exorcism and demons, elite rhetoric on • non-elites, and burial • villae rusticae, on non-elite burials

 Found in books: Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 245; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 191

27. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Elect • Elect group, • Jew/Jewish, elite • elect of God • status, of elect

 Found in books: Allen and Dunne (2022), Ancient Readers and their Scriptures: Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity, 30; Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 41, 42; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 211, 355; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 91; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 213

28. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • elites, under Seleucids

 Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 15; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 549

29. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 13 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Josephus Essenes, group election and membership • non-Judean women, adopting Judean practices, elite Roman women as patrons of Judeans

 Found in books: Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 229; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 101

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13 Then, because of their anxious desire for an immortal and blessed existence, thinking that their mortal life has already come to an end, they leave their possessions to their sons or daughters, or perhaps to other relations, giving them up their inheritance with willing cheerfulness; and those who know no relations give their property to their companions or friends, for it followed of necessity that those who have acquired the wealth which sees, as if ready prepared for them, should be willing to surrender that wealth which is blind to those who themselves also are still blind in their minds. '' None
30. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • body, elite male Roman • viewers, elite versus non-elite

 Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 49; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 106

31. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elite • elites, local

 Found in books: Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 94; Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 96

32. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • brothels, elite ownership • land, and elite status • non-elites, taverns/cookshops

 Found in books: Bowditch (2001), Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination, 236; Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 237; McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 30

33. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, Q., dictator, elected by the people • Republic, Roman, elite competition • Terentius Varro, C., election of • appointed, veto elections • dress, elite • interregnum, patrician control of elections during • interrex, elections in • vitium, at elections

 Found in books: Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 72, 73; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 67, 92, 151; Konrad (2022), The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic, 136, 271, 279, 280; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 55

34. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.122-2.123, 2.126, 2.128, 2.139-2.142 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Election (of Israel) • Josephus Essenes, group election and membership • election/elect • elites, and dress • priestly elites • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple

 Found in books: Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 222; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 74, 101; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 417; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 26

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2.122 Καταφρονηταὶ δὲ πλούτου, καὶ θαυμάσιον αὐτοῖς τὸ κοινωνικόν, οὐδὲ ἔστιν εὑρεῖν κτήσει τινὰ παρ' αὐτοῖς ὑπερέχοντα: νόμος γὰρ τοὺς εἰς τὴν αἵρεσιν εἰσιόντας δημεύειν τῷ τάγματι τὴν οὐσίαν, ὥστε ἐν ἅπασιν μήτε πενίας ταπεινότητα φαίνεσθαι μήθ' ὑπεροχὴν πλούτου, τῶν δ' ἑκάστου κτημάτων ἀναμεμιγμένων μίαν ὥσπερ ἀδελφοῖς ἅπασιν οὐσίαν εἶναι." "2.123 κηλῖδα δ' ὑπολαμβάνουσι τὸ ἔλαιον, κἂν ἀλειφθῇ τις ἄκων, σμήχεται τὸ σῶμα: τὸ γὰρ αὐχμεῖν ἐν καλῷ τίθενται λευχειμονεῖν τε διαπαντός. χειροτονητοὶ δ' οἱ τῶν κοινῶν ἐπιμεληταὶ καὶ ἀδιαίρετοι πρὸς ἁπάντων εἰς τὰς χρείας ἕκαστοι." 2.126 καταστολὴ δὲ καὶ σχῆμα σώματος ὅμοιον τοῖς μετὰ φόβου παιδαγωγουμένοις παισίν. οὔτε δὲ ἐσθῆτας οὔτε ὑποδήματα ἀμείβουσι πρὶν διαρραγῆναι τὸ πρότερον παντάπασιν ἢ δαπανηθῆναι τῷ χρόνῳ.
2.128
Πρός γε μὴν τὸ θεῖον εὐσεβεῖς ἰδίως: πρὶν γὰρ ἀνασχεῖν τὸν ἥλιον οὐδὲν φθέγγονται τῶν βεβήλων, πατρίους δέ τινας εἰς αὐτὸν εὐχὰς ὥσπερ ἱκετεύοντες ἀνατεῖλαι.' "
2.139
πρὶν δὲ τῆς κοινῆς ἅψασθαι τροφῆς ὅρκους αὐτοῖς ὄμνυσι φρικώδεις, πρῶτον μὲν εὐσεβήσειν τὸ θεῖον, ἔπειτα τὰ πρὸς ἀνθρώπους δίκαια φυλάξειν καὶ μήτε κατὰ γνώμην βλάψειν τινὰ μήτε ἐξ ἐπιτάγματος, μισήσειν δ' ἀεὶ τοὺς ἀδίκους καὶ συναγωνιεῖσθαι τοῖς δικαίοις:" "2.141 τὴν ἀλήθειαν ἀγαπᾶν ἀεὶ καὶ τοὺς ψευδομένους προβάλλεσθαι: χεῖρας κλοπῆς καὶ ψυχὴν ἀνοσίου κέρδους καθαρὰν φυλάξειν καὶ μήτε κρύψειν τι τοὺς αἱρετιστὰς μήθ' ἑτέροις αὐτῶν τι μηνύσειν, κἂν μέχρι θανάτου τις βιάζηται." '2.142 πρὸς τούτοις ὄμνυσιν μηδενὶ μὲν μεταδοῦναι τῶν δογμάτων ἑτέρως ἢ ὡς αὐτὸς μετέλαβεν, ἀφέξεσθαι δὲ λῃστείας καὶ συντηρήσειν ὁμοίως τά τε τῆς αἱρέσεως αὐτῶν βιβλία καὶ τὰ τῶν ἀγγέλων ὀνόματα. τοιούτοις μὲν ὅρκοις τοὺς προσιόντας ἐξασφαλίζονται.' " None
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2.122 3. These men are despisers of riches, and so very communicative as raises our admiration. Nor is there anyone to be found among them who hath more than another; for it is a law among them, that those who come to them must let what they have be common to the whole order,—insomuch that among them all there is no appearance of poverty, or excess of riches, but every one’s possessions are intermingled with every other’s possessions; and so there is, as it were, one patrimony among all the brethren. 2.123 They think that oil is a defilement; and if anyone of them be anointed without his own approbation, it is wiped off his body; for they think to be sweaty is a good thing, as they do also to be clothed in white garments. They also have stewards appointed to take care of their common affairs, who every one of them have no separate business for any, but what is for the use of them all.
2.126
But the habit and management of their bodies is such as children use who are in fear of their masters. Nor do they allow of the change of garments, or of shoes, till they be first entirely torn to pieces or worn out by time.
2.128
5. And as for their piety towards God, it is very extraordinary; for before sunrising they speak not a word about profane matters, but put up certain prayers which they have received from their forefathers, as if they made a supplication for its rising.
2.139
And before he is allowed to touch their common food, he is obliged to take tremendous oaths, that, in the first place, he will exercise piety towards God, and then that he will observe justice towards men, and that he will do no harm to any one, either of his own accord, or by the command of others; that he will always hate the wicked, and be assistant to the righteous; 2.141 that he will be perpetually a lover of truth, and propose to himself to reprove those that tell lies; that he will keep his hands clear from theft, and his soul from unlawful gains; and that he will neither conceal anything from those of his own sect, nor discover any of their doctrines to others, no, not though anyone should compel him so to do at the hazard of his life. 2.142 Moreover, he swears to communicate their doctrines to no one any otherwise than as he received them himself; that he will abstain from robbery, and will equally preserve the books belonging to their sect, and the names of the angels or messengers. These are the oaths by which they secure their proselytes to themselves.' ' None
35. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.363-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, elite • remarriage, elite women and

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 143, 153; Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 27

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2.363 Shall give Hesperia peace and end her toils. Who then will reign shall find no need for war. You ask, \'Why follow Magnus? If he wins He too will claim the Empire of the world.\' Then let him, conquering with my service, learn Not for himself to conquer." Thus he spoke And stirred the blood that ran in Brutus\' veins Moving the youth to action in the war. Soon as the sun dispelled the chilly night, The sounding doors flew wide, and from the tomb 2.364 Shall give Hesperia peace and end her toils. Who then will reign shall find no need for war. You ask, \'Why follow Magnus? If he wins He too will claim the Empire of the world.\' Then let him, conquering with my service, learn Not for himself to conquer." Thus he spoke And stirred the blood that ran in Brutus\' veins Moving the youth to action in the war. Soon as the sun dispelled the chilly night, The sounding doors flew wide, and from the tomb '' None
36. Mishnah, Sanhedrin, 10.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jewish elite rhetoric • Jewish elite rhetoric, Christian cures • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • Jewish elite rhetoric, amulets and tefillin • Jewish elite rhetoric, miracles, legitimacy of • amulets, Jewish elite rhetoric on • continuity of practice, elite rhetoric on • elitism • exorcism and demons, elite rhetoric on • prayers, Jewish elite rhetoric on

 Found in books: Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 186, 190; Rubenstein (2003), The Culture of the Babylonian Talmud. 137

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10.1 כָּל יִשְׂרָאֵל יֵשׁ לָהֶם חֵלֶק לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה ס) וְעַמֵּךְ כֻּלָּם צַדִּיקִים לְעוֹלָם יִירְשׁוּ אָרֶץ נֵצֶר מַטָּעַי מַעֲשֵׂה יָדַי לְהִתְפָּאֵר. וְאֵלּוּ שֶׁאֵין לָהֶם חֵלֶק לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, הָאוֹמֵר אֵין תְּחִיַּת הַמֵּתִים מִן הַתּוֹרָה, וְאֵין תּוֹרָה מִן הַשָּׁמָיִם, וְאֶפִּיקוֹרֶס. רַבִּי עֲקִיבָא אוֹמֵר, אַף הַקּוֹרֵא בַסְּפָרִים הַחִיצוֹנִים, וְהַלּוֹחֵשׁ עַל הַמַּכָּה וְאוֹמֵר (שמות טו) כָּל הַמַּחֲלָה אֲשֶׁר שַׂמְתִּי בְמִצְרַיִם לֹא אָשִׂים עָלֶיךָ כִּי אֲנִי ה' רֹפְאֶךָ. אַבָּא שָׁאוּל אוֹמֵר, אַף הַהוֹגֶה אֶת הַשֵּׁם בְּאוֹתִיּוֹתָיו:"" None
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10.1 All Israel have a portion in the world to come, for it says, “Your people, all of them righteous, shall possess the land for ever; They are the shoot that I planted, my handiwork in which I glory” (Isaiah 60:2. And these are the ones who have no portion in the world to come: He who maintains that resurrection is not a biblical doctrine, that the torah was not divinely revealed, and an epikoros. Rabbi Akiva says: “Even one who reads non-canonical books and one who whispers a charm over a wound and says, “I will not bring upon you any of the diseases which i brought upon the Egyptians: for I the lord am you healer” (Exodus 15:26). Abba Shaul says: “Also one who pronounces the divine name as it is spelled.”'' None
37. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Election • elect of God

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 198; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 12

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2.9 ὑμεῖς δὲ γένος ἐκλεκτόν, βασίλειον ἱεράτευμα, ἔθνος ἅγιον, λαὸς εἰς περιποίησιν, ὅπως τὰς ἀρετὰς ἐξαγγείλητε τοῦ ἐκ σκότους ὑμᾶς καλέσαντος εἰς τὸ θαυμαστὸν αὐτοῦ φῶς·'' None
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2.9 But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for God's own possession, that you may show forth the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light: "" None
38. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 3.1, 4.7, 5.1-5.5, 12.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elitism • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • elect of God • electio, election • election/elect • elite rhetoric, charismatic wonderworkers • elite rhetoric, magic • pre-election

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 85; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 266; Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 196; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 120, 299, 300; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 138, 150; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 14, 106, 142, 145, 185, 208, 216, 221, 237, 260, 274

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3.1 Κἀγώ, ἀδελφοί, οὐκ ἠδυνήθην λαλῆσαι ὑμῖν ὡς πνευματικοῖς ἀλλʼ ὡς σαρκίνοις, ὡς νηπίοις ἐν Χριστῷ.
4.7
τίς γάρ σε διακρίνει; τί δὲ ἔχεις ὃ οὐκ ἔλαβες; εἰ δὲ καὶ ἔλαβες, τί καυχᾶσαι ὡς μὴ λαβών;
5.1
Ὅλως ἀκούεται ἐν ὑμῖν πορνεία, καὶ τοιαύτη πορνεία ἥτις οὐδὲ ἐν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, ὥστε γυναῖκά τινα τοῦ πατρὸς ἔχειν. 5.2 καὶ ὑμεῖς πεφυσιωμένοι ἐστέ, καὶ οὐχὶ μᾶλλον ἐπενθήσατε, ἵνα ἀρθῇ ἐκ μέσου ὑμῶν ὁ τὸ ἔργον τοῦτο πράξας; 5.3 Ἐγὼ μὲν γάρ, ἀπὼν τῷ σώματι παρὼν δὲ τῷ πνεύματι, ἤδη κέκρικα ὡς παρὼν τὸν οὕτως τοῦτο κατεργασάμενον 5.4 ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ, συναχθέντων ὑμῶν καὶ τοῦ ἐμοῦ πνεύματος σὺν τῇ δυνάμει τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ, 5.5 παραδοῦναι τὸν τοιοῦτον τῷ Σατανᾷ εἰς ὄλεθρον τῆς σαρκός, ἵνα τὸ πνεῦμα σωθῇ ἐν τῇ ᾑμέρᾳ τοῦ κυρίου.
12.9
ἑτέρῳ πίστις ἐν τῷ αὐτῷ πνεύματι, ἄλλῳ δὲ χαρίσματα ἰαμάτων ἐν τῷ ἑνὶ πνεύματι,'' None
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3.1 Brothers, I couldn't speak to you as to spiritual, but as tofleshly, as to babies in Christ." "
4.7
For who makes you different? And what doyou have that you didn't receive? But if you did receive it, why do youboast as if you had not received it?" "
5.1
It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality amongyou, and such sexual immorality as is not even named among theGentiles, that one has his father's wife." "5.2 You are puffed up, anddidn't rather mourn, that he who had done this deed might be removedfrom among you." '5.3 For I most assuredly, as being absent in body butpresent in spirit, have already, as though I were present, judged himwho has done this thing. 5.4 In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ,you being gathered together, and my spirit, with the power of our LordJesus Christ, 5.5 are to deliver such a one to Satan for thedestruction of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in the day ofthe Lord Jesus.
12.9
to another faith, by the sameSpirit; and to another gifts of healings, by the same Spirit;'" None
39. New Testament, 2 Peter, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elect of God • election/elect

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 198; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 168

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1.3 ὡς πάντα ἡμῖν τῆς θείας δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ τὰ πρὸς ζωὴν καὶ εὐσέβειαν δεδωρημένης διὰ τῆς ἐπιγνώσεως τοῦ καλέσαντος ἡμᾶς διὰ δόξης καὶ ἀρετῆς,'' None
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1.3 seeing that his divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and virtue; '' None
40. New Testament, Acts, 2.22, 2.24, 4.6, 5.12-5.13, 5.27-5.41, 16.31, 17.22-17.31, 17.34, 21.28-21.30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Christian elite rhetoric, healers • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Elect (Manichaean) • Election (of Israel) • elect of God • election (of God) • election/elect • elite • elite rhetoric, charismatic wonderworkers • elite rhetoric, magic • elites • elites, and burial • non-elites • pre-election • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple • taxation, by elites

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 198; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116, 122, 233, 238; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 88, 245; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 158; Pedersen (2004), Demonstrative Proof in Defence of God: A Study of Titus of Bostra’s Contra Manichaeos. 60; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 189; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 1; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 378; Williams (2023), Criminalization in Acts of the Apostles Race, Rhetoric, and the Prosecution of an Early Christian Movement. 15, 35, 53, 103, 104, 111, 163, 173, 191; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 201

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2.22 Ἄνδρες Ἰσραηλεῖται, ἀκούσατε τοὺς λόγους τούτους. Ἰησοῦν τὸν Ναζωραῖον, ἄνδρα ἀποδεδειγμένον ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ εἰς ὑμᾶς δυνάμεσι καὶ τέρασι καὶ σημείοις οἷς ἐποίησεν διʼ αὐτοῦ ὁ θεὸς ἐν μέσῳ ὑμῶν, καθὼς αὐτοὶ οἴδατε,
2.24
ὃν ὁ θεὸς ἀνέστησεν λύσας τὰς ὠδῖνας τοῦ θανάτου, καθότι οὐκ ἦν δυνατὸν κρατεῖσθαι αὐτὸν ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ·
4.6
Ἰερουσαλήμ (καὶ Ἅννας ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς καὶ Καιάφας καὶ Ἰωάννης καὶ Ἀλέξανδρος καὶ ὅσοι ἦσαν ἐκ γένους ἀρχιερατικοὖ)
5.12
Διὰ δὲ τῶν χειρῶν τῶν ἀποστόλων ἐγίνετο σημεῖα καὶ τέρατα πολλὰ ἐν τῷ λαῷ· καὶ ἦσαν ὁμοθυμαδὸν πάντες ἐν τῇ Στοᾷ Σολομῶντος· 5.13 τῶν δὲ λοιπῶν οὐδεὶς ἐτόλμα κολλᾶσθαι αὐτοῖς·
5.27
δὲ αὐτοὺς ἔστησαν ἐν τῷ συνεδρίῳ. καὶ ἐπηρώτησεν αὐτοὺς ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς 5.28 λέγων Παραγγελίᾳ παρηγγείλαμεν ὑμῖν μὴ διδάσκειν ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματι τούτῳ, καὶ ἰδοὺ πεπληρώκατε τὴν Ἰερουσαλὴμ τῆς διδαχῆς ὑμῶν, καὶ βούλεσθε ἐπαγαγεῖν ἐφʼ ἡμᾶς τὸ αἷμα τοῦ ἀνθρώπου τούτου. 5.29 ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ Πέτρος καὶ οἱ ἀπόστολοι εἶπαν Πειθαρχεῖν δεῖ θεῷ μᾶλλον ἢ ἀνθρώποις. 5.30 ὁ θεὸς τῶν πατέρων ἡμῶν ἤγειρεν Ἰησοῦν, ὃν ὑμεῖς διεχειρίσασθεκρεμάσαντες ἐπὶ ξύλου· 5.31 τοῦτον ὁ θεὸς ἀρχηγὸν καὶ σωτῆρα ὕψωσεν τῇ δεξιᾷ αὐτοῦ, τοῦ δοῦναι μετάνοιαν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ καὶ ἄφεσιν ἁμαρτιῶν· 5.32 καὶ ἡμεῖς ἐσμὲν μάρτυρες τῶν ῥημάτων τούτων, καὶ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον ὃ ἔδωκεν ὁ θεὸς τοῖς πειθαρχοῦσιν αὐτῷ. 5.33 οἱ δὲ ἀκούσαντες διεπρίοντο καὶ ἐβούλοντο ἀνελεῖν αὐτούς. 5.34 Ἀναστὰς δέ τις ἐν τῷ συνεδρίῳ Φαρισαῖος ὀνόματι Γαμαλιήλ, νομοδιδάσκαλος τίμιος παντὶ τῷ λαῷ, ἐκέλευσεν ἔξω βραχὺ τοὺς ἀνθρώπους ποιῆσαι, 5.35 εἶπέν τε πρὸς αὐτούς Ἄνδρες Ἰσραηλεῖται, προσέχετε ἑαυτοῖς ἐπὶ τοῖς ἀνθρώποις τούτοις τί μέλλετε πράσσειν. 5.36 πρὸ γὰρ τούτων τῶν ἡμερῶν ἀνέστη Θευδᾶς, λέγων εἶναί τινα ἑαυτόν, ᾧ προσεκλίθη ἀνδρῶν ἀριθμὸς ὡς τετρακοσίων· ὃς ἀνῃρέθη, καὶ πάντες ὅσοι ἐπείθοντο αὐτῷ διελύθησαν καὶ ἐγένοντο εἰς οὐδέν. 5.37 μετὰ τοῦτον ἀνέστη Ἰούδας ὁ Γαλιλαῖος ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις τῆς ἀπογραφῆς καὶ ἀπέστησε λαὸν ὀπίσω αὐτοῦ· κἀκεῖνος ἀπώλετο, καὶ πάντες ὅσοι ἐπείθοντο αὐτῷ διεσκορπίσθησαν. 5.38 καὶ τὰ νῦν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἀπόστητε ἀπὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων τούτων καὶ ἄφετε αὐτούς·?̔ὅτι ἐὰν ᾖ ἐξ ἀνθρώπων ἡ βουλὴ αὕτη ἢ τὸ ἔργον τοῦτο, καταλυθήσεται· 5.39 εἰ δὲ ἐκ θεοῦ ἐστίν, οὐ δυνήσεσθε καταλῦσαι αὐτούς·̓ μή ποτε καὶ θεομάχοι εὑρεθῆτε. 5.40 ἐπείσθησαν δὲ αὐτῷ, καὶ προσκαλεσάμενοι τοὺς ἀποστόλους δείραντες παρήγγειλαν μὴ λαλεῖν ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ Ἰησοῦ καὶ ἀπέλυσαν. 5.41 Οἱ μὲν οὖν ἐπορεύοντο χαίροντες ἀπὸ προσώπου τοῦ συνεδρίου ὅτι κατηξιώθησαν ὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνόματος ἀτιμασθῆναι·
16.31
οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Πίστευσον ἐπὶ τὸν κύριον Ἰησοῦν, καὶ σωθήσῃ σὺ καὶ ὁ οἶκός σου.
17.22
σταθεὶς δὲ Παῦλος ἐν μέσῳ τοῦ Ἀρείου Πάγου ἔφη Ἄνδρες Ἀθηναῖοι, κατὰ πάντα ὡς δεισιδαιμονεστέρους ὑμᾶς θεωρῶ· 17.23 διερχόμενος γὰρ καὶ ἀναθεωρῶν τὰ σεβάσματα ὑμῶν εὗρον καὶ βωμὸν ἐν ᾧ ἐπεγέγραπτο ΑΓΝΩΣΤΩ ΘΕΩ. ὃ οὖν ἀγνοοῦντες εὐσεβεῖτε, τοῦτο ἐγὼ καταγγέλλω ὑμῖν. 17.24 ὁ θεὸς ὁ ποιήσας τὸν κόσμον καὶ πάντατὰ ἐν αὐτῷ, οὗτος οὐρανοῦ καὶ γῆς ὑπάρχων κύριος οὐκ ἐν χειροποιήτοις ναοῖς κατοικεῖ 17.25 οὐδὲ ὑπὸ χειρῶν ἀνθρωπίνων θεραπεύεται προσδεόμενός τινος, αὐτὸςδιδοὺς πᾶσι ζωὴν καὶ πνοὴν καὶ τὰ πάντα· 17.26 ἐποίησέν τε ἐξ ἑνὸς πᾶν ἔθνος ανθρώπων κατοικεῖν ἐπὶ παντὸς προσώπου τῆς γῆς, ὁρίσας προστεταγμένους καιροὺς καὶ τὰς ὁροθεσίας τῆς κατοικίας αὐτῶν, 17.27 ζητεῖν τὸν θεὸν εἰ ἄρα γε ψηλαφήσειαν αὐτὸν καὶ εὕροιεν, καί γε οὐ μακρὰν ἀπὸ ἑνὸς ἑκάστου ἡμῶν ὑπάρχοντα. 17.28 ἐν αὐτῷ γὰρ ζῶμεν καὶ κινούμεθα καὶ ἐσμέν, ὡς καί τινες τῶν καθʼ ὑμᾶς ποιητῶν εἰρήκασιν 17.29 γένος οὖν ὑπάρχοντες τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ὀφείλομεν νομίζειν χρυσῷ ἢ ἀργύρῳ ἢ λίθῳ, χαράγματι τέχνής καὶ ἐνθυμήσεως ἀνθρώπου, τὸ θεῖον εἶναι ὅμοιον. 17.30 τοὺς μὲν οὖν χρόνους τῆς ἀγνοίας ὑπεριδὼν ὁ θεὸς τὰ νῦν ἀπαγγέλλει τοῖς ἀνθρώποις πάντας πανταχοῦ μετανοεῖν, 17.31 καθότι ἔστησεν ἡμέραν ἐν ᾗ μέλλει κρίνειν τὴν οἰκουμένην ἐν δικαιοσύνῃ ἐν ἀνδρὶ ᾧ ὥρισεν, πίστιν παρασχὼν πᾶσιν ἀναστήσας αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν.
17.34
τινὲς δὲ ἄνδρες κολληθέντες αὐτῷ ἐπίστευσαν, ἐν οἷς καὶ Διονύσιος ὁ Ἀρεοπαγίτης καὶ γυνὴ ὀνόματι Δάμαρις καὶ ἕτεροι σὺν αὐτοῖς.
21.28 κράζοντες Ἄνδρες Ἰσραηλεῖται, βοηθεῖτε· οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ ἄνθρωπος ὁ κατὰ τοῦ λαοῦ καὶ τοῦ νόμου καὶ τοῦ τόπου τούτου πάντας πανταχῇ διδάσκων, ἔτι τε καὶ Ἕλληνας εἰσήγαγεν εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν καὶ κεκοίνωκεν τὸν ἅγιον τόπον τοῦτον. 21.29 ἦσαν γὰρ προεωρακότες Τρόφιμον τὸν Ἐφέσιον ἐν τῇ πόλει σὺν αὐτῷ, ὃν ἐνόμιζον ὅτι εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν εἰσήγαγεν ὁ Παῦλος.' ' None
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2.22 "You men of Israel, hear these words. Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved by God to you by mighty works and wonders and signs which God did by him in the midst of you, even as you yourselves know,
2.24
whom God raised up, having freed him from the agony of death, because it was not possible that he should be held by it.
4.6
Annas the high priest was there, with Caiaphas, John, Alexander, and as many as were relatives of the high priest. ' "
5.12
By the hands of the apostles many signs and wonders were done among the people. They were all with one accord in Solomon's porch. " '5.13 None of the rest dared to join them, however the people honored them.
5.27
When they had brought them, they set them before the council. The high priest questioned them, 5.28 saying, "Didn\'t we strictly charge you not to teach in this name? Behold, you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching, and intend to bring this man\'s blood on us." 5.29 But Peter and the apostles answered, "We must obey God rather than men. 5.30 The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom you killed, hanging him on a tree. 5.31 God exalted him with his right hand to be a Prince and a Savior, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins. 5.32 We are His witnesses of these things; and so also is the Holy Spirit, whom God has given to those who obey him." 5.33 But they, when they heard this, were cut to the heart, and determined to kill them. 5.34 But one stood up in the council, a Pharisee named Gamaliel, a teacher of the law, honored by all the people, and commanded to take the apostles out a little while. 5.35 He said to them, "You men of Israel, be careful concerning these men, what you are about to do. 5.36 For before these days Theudas rose up, making himself out to be somebody; to whom a number of men, about four hundred, joined themselves: who was slain; and all, as many as obeyed him, were dispersed, and came to nothing. 5.37 After this man, Judas of Galilee rose up in the days of the enrollment, and drew away some people after him. He also perished, and all, as many as obeyed him, were scattered abroad. 5.38 Now I tell you, refrain from these men, and leave them alone. For if this counsel or this work is of men, it will be overthrown. 5.39 But if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow it, and you would be found even to be fighting against God!" 5.40 They agreed with him. Summoning the apostles, they beat them and charged them not to speak in the name of Jesus, and let them go. ' "5.41 They therefore departed from the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for Jesus' name. " 16.31 They said, "Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, you and your household."
17.22
Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus, and said, "You men of Athens, I perceive that you are very religious in all things. ' "17.23 For as I passed along, and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I announce to you. " '17.24 The God who made the world and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, dwells not in temples made with hands, ' "17.25 neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, seeing he himself gives to all life and breath, and all things. " '17.26 He made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the surface of the earth, having determined appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation, 17.27 that they should seek the Lord, if perhaps they might reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us. ' "17.28 'For in him we live, and move, and have our being.' As some of your own poets have said, 'For we are also his offspring.' " '17.29 Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold, or silver, or stone, engraved by art and device of man. 17.30 The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked. But now he commands that all men everywhere should repent, 17.31 because he has appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he has ordained; whereof he has given assurance to all men, in that he has raised him from the dead."
17.34
But certain men joined with him, and believed, among whom also was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and others with them.
21.28
crying out, "Men of Israel, help! This is the man who teaches all men everywhere against the people, and the law, and this place. Moreover, he also brought Greeks into the temple, and has defiled this holy place!" 21.29 For they had seen Trophimus, the Ephesian, with him in the city, and they supposed that Paul had brought him into the temple. ' ' None
41. New Testament, Colossians, 3.9-3.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elect • elite

 Found in books: Richter et al. (2015), Mani in Dublin: Selected Papers from the Seventh International Conference of the International Association of Manichaean Studies, 59; Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 76

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3.9 μὴ ψεύδεσθε εἰς ἀλλήλους· ἀπεκδυσάμενοι τὸν παλαιὸν ἄνθρωπον σὺν ταῖς πράξεσιν αὐτοῦ, 3.10 καὶ ἐνδυσάμενοι τὸν ϝέον τὸν ἀνακαινούμενον εἰς ἐπίγνωσινκατʼ εἰκόνα τοῦ κτίσαντοςαὐτόν,'' None
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3.9 Don't lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old man with his doings, " '3.10 and have put on the new man, that is being renewed in knowledge after the image of his Creator, '" None
42. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.1, 1.4-1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 2.2, 4.22-4.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elect • Election (of Israel) • elect • election/elect • election/the elect • election/the elect, Valentinian • election/the elect, spiritual • elite • pre-election

 Found in books: Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 279; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 88, 120, 299, 300; Richter et al. (2015), Mani in Dublin: Selected Papers from the Seventh International Conference of the International Association of Manichaean Studies, 59; Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 76; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 487; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 55, 203, 261, 273; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 328, 331

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1.1 ΠΑΥΛΟΣ ἀπόστολος Χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ διὰ θελήματος θεοῦ τοῖς ἁγίοις τοῖς οὖσιν ἐν Ἐφέσῳ καὶ πιστοῖς ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ·
1.4
καθὼς ἐξελέξατο ἡμᾶς ἐν αὐτῷ πρὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου, εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ ἐν ἀγάπῃ, 1.5 προορίσας ἡμᾶς εἰς υἱοθεσίαν διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς αὐτόν, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, 1.6 εἰς ἔπαινον δόξης τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ ἧς ἐχαρίτωσεν ἡμᾶς ἐν τῷ ἠγαπημένῳ, 1.7 ἐν ᾧ ἔχομεν τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν διὰ τοῦ αἵματος αὐτοῦ, τὴν ἄφεσιν τῶν παραπτωμάτων, 1.8 κατὰ τὸ πλοῦτος τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ 1.9 ἧς ἐπερίσσευσεν εἰς ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ σοφίᾳ καὶ φρονήσει γνωρίσας ἡμῖν τὸ μυστήριον τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν αὐτοῦ ἣν προέθετο ἐν αὐτῷ
1.10
εἰς οἰκονομίαν τοῦ πληρώματος τῶν καιρῶν, ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι τὰ πάντα ἐν τῷ χριστῷ, τὰ ἐπὶ τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς· ἐν αὐτῷ,
1.11
ἐν ᾧ καὶ ἐκληρώθημεν προορισθέντες κατὰ πρόθεσιν τοῦ τὰ πάντα ἐνεργοῦντος κατὰ τὴν βουλὴν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ,

1.13
ἐν ᾧ καὶ ὑμεῖς ἀκούσαντες τὸν λόγον τῆς ἀληθείας, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς σωτηρίας ὑμῶν, ἐν ᾧ καὶ πιστεύσαντες, ἐσφραγίσθητε τῷ πνεύματι τῆς ἐπαγγελίας τῷ ἁγίῳ,
1.22
καὶ πάντα ὑπέταξεν ὑπὸ τοὺς πόδας αὐτοῦ, καὶ αὐτὸν ἔδωκεν κεφαλὴν ὑπὲρ πάντα τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ,
2.2
ἐν αἷς ποτὲ περιεπατήσατε κατὰ τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, κατὰ τὸν ἄρχοντα τῆς ἐξουσίας τοῦ ἀέρος, τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ νῦν ἐνεργοῦντος ἐν τοῖς υἱοῖς τῆς ἀπειθίας·
4.22
ἀποθέσθαι ὑμᾶς κατὰ τὴν προτέραν ἀναστροφὴν τὸν παλαιὸν ἄνθρωπον τὸν φθειρόμενον κατὰ τὰς ἐπιθυμίας τῆς ἀπάτης, 4.23 ἀνανεοῦσθαι δὲ τῷ πνεύματι τοῦ νοὸς ὑμῶν, 4.24 καὶ ἐνδύσασθαι τὸν καινὸν ἄνθρωπον τὸν κατὰ θεὸν κτισθέντα ἐν δικαιοσύνῃ καὶ ὁσιότητι τῆς ἀληθείας.'' None
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1.1 Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus through the will of God, to the saints who are at Ephesus, and the faithful in Christ Jesus:
1.4
even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we would be holy and without blemish before him in love; 1.5 having predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his desire, 1.6 to the praise of the glory of his grace, by which he freely bestowed favor on us in the Beloved, 1.7 in whom we have our redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace, 1.8 which he made to abound toward us in all wisdom and prudence, 1.9 making known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he purposed in him
1.10
to an administration of the fullness of the times, to sum up all things in Christ, the things in the heavens, and the things on the earth, in him;
1.11
in whom also we were assigned an inheritance, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who works all things after the counsel of his will;

1.13
in whom you also, having heard the word of the truth, the gospel of your salvation, -- in whom, having also believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise,
1.22
He put all things in subjection under his feet, and gave him to be head over all things for the assembly,
2.2
in which you once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the powers of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience;
4.22
that you put away, as concerning your former way of life, the old man, that grows corrupt after the lusts of deceit; 4.23 and that you be renewed in the spirit of your mind, 4.24 and put on the new man, who in the likeness of God has been created in righteousness and holiness of truth. '' None
43. New Testament, Galatians, 2.4, 2.9, 3.19, 4.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Election (of Israel) • Election, God’s patronage • election/the elect • pre-election

 Found in books: Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 48, 126; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 89; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 99; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 378, 455; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 330

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2.4 διὰ δὲ τοὺς παρεισάκτους ψευδαδέλφους, οἵτινες παρεισῆλθον κατασκοπῆσαι τὴν ἐλευθερίαν ἡμῶν ἣν ἔχομεν ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ, ἵνα ἡμᾶς καταδουλώσουσιν,
2.9
καὶ γνόντες τὴν χάριν τὴν δοθεῖσάν μοι, Ἰάκωβος καὶ Κηφᾶς καὶ Ἰωάνης, οἱ δοκοῦντες στύλοι εἶναι, δεξιὰς ἔδωκαν ἐμοὶ καὶ Βαρνάβᾳ κοινωνίας, ἵνα ἡμεῖς εἰς τὰ ἔθνη, αὐτοὶ δὲ εἰς τὴν περιτομήν·
3.19
Τί οὖν ὁ νόμος; τῶν παραβάσεων χάριν προσετέθη, ἄχρις ἂν ἔλθῃ τὸ σπέρμα ᾧ ἐπήγγελται, διαταγεὶς διʼ ἀγγέλων ἐν χειρὶ μεσίτου·
4.5
ἵνα τοὺς ὑπὸ νόμον ἐξαγοράσῃ, ἵνα τὴν υἱοθεσίαν ἀπολάβωμεν.'' None
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2.4 Thiswas because of the false brothers secretly brought in, who stole in tospy out our liberty which we have in Christ Jesus, that they mightbring us into bondage;
2.9
and when they perceived the grace that was given tome, James and Cephas and John, they who were reputed to be pillars,gave to me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, that we should goto the Gentiles, and they to the circumcision.
3.19
What then is the law? It was added because of transgressions,until the seed should come to whom the promise has been made. It wasordained through angels by the hand of a mediator.
4.5
thathe might redeem those who were under the law, that we might receive theadoption of sons. '' None
44. New Testament, Philippians, 2.13, 3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Election (of Israel) • electio, election • election/elect • election/the elect, spiritual

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 259; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 182; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 69; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 331

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2.13 θεὸς γάρ ἐστιν ὁ ἐνεργῶν ἐν ὑμῖν καὶ τὸ θέλειν καὶ τὸ ἐνεργεῖν ὑπὲρ τῆς εὐδοκίας·
3.20
ἡμῶν γὰρ τὸ πολίτευμα ἐν οὐρανοῖς ὑπάρχει, ἐξ οὗ καὶ σωτῆρα ἀπεκδεχόμεθα κύριον Ἰησοῦν Χριστόν,'' None
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2.13 For it is God who works in you both to will and to work, for his good pleasure.
3.20
For our citizenship is in heaven, from where we also wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ; '' None
45. New Testament, Romans, 1.13, 1.16, 1.18-1.23, 1.26-1.27, 2.9-2.11, 3.9, 3.20, 3.23-3.24, 5.5, 9.3-9.5, 9.11, 9.13-9.18, 9.22-9.23, 10.6, 11.1, 11.5, 11.11, 11.13, 11.17, 11.25, 11.28-11.29, 11.32-11.33 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Elect/Election • Election • Election (of Israel) • Wisdom, For/of the Elect/Righteous • elect • electio, election • election • election/elect • election/the elect • election/the elect, Valentinian • election/the elect, gnostic • elite • elites • manhood (elite late-Roman) • pre-election

 Found in books: Grypeou and Spurling (2009), The Exegetical Encounter between Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity, 165; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 77, 252, 259, 266; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 192, 281, 289; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 238; Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 93; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 47, 48, 88, 299; Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 196, 197; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 282; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 10, 549; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 182, 372; Williams (2023), Criminalization in Acts of the Apostles Race, Rhetoric, and the Prosecution of an Early Christian Movement. 111; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 14, 38, 69, 164, 185, 228, 245, 269, 276; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 36, 236, 330

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1.13 οὐ θέλω δὲ ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν, ἀδελφοί, ὅτι πολλάκις προεθέμην ἐλθεῖν πρὸς ὑμᾶς, καὶ ἐκωλύθην ἄχρι τοῦ δεῦρο, ἵνα τινὰ καρπὸν σχῶ καὶ ἐν ὑμῖν καθὼς καὶ ἐν τοῖς λοιποῖς ἔθνεσιν.
1.16
οὐ γὰρ ἐπαισχύνομαι τὸ εὐαγγέλιον, δύναμις γὰρ θεοῦ ἐστὶν εἰς σωτηρίαν παντὶ τῷ πιστεύοντι, Ἰουδαίῳ τε πρῶτον καὶ Ἕλληνι·
1.18
Ἀποκαλύπτεται γὰρ ὀργὴ θεοῦ ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἐπὶ πᾶσαν ἀσέβειαν καὶ ἀδικίαν ἀνθρώπων τῶν τὴν ἀλήθειαν ἐν ἀδικίᾳ κατεχόντων, 1.19 διότι τὸ γνωστὸν τοῦ θεοῦ φανερόν ἐστιν ἐν αὐτοῖς, ὁ θεὸς γὰρ αὐτοῖς ἐφανέρωσεν. 1.20 τὰ γὰρ ἀόρατα αὐτοῦ ἀπὸ κτίσεως κόσμου τοῖς ποιήμασιν νοούμενα καθορᾶται, ἥ τε ἀΐδιος αὐτοῦ δύναμις καὶ θειότης, εἰς τὸ εἶναι αὐτοὺς ἀναπολογήτους, 1.21 διότι γνόντες τὸν θεὸν οὐχ ὡς θεὸν ἐδόξασαν ἢ ηὐχαρίστησαν, ἀλλὰ ἐματαιώθησαν ἐν τοῖς διαλογισμοῖς αὐτῶν καὶ ἐσκοτίσθη ἡ ἀσύνετος αὐτῶν καρδία· 1.22 φάσκοντες εἶναι σοφοὶ ἐμωράνθησαν, 1.23 καὶἤλλαξαν τὴν δόξαντοῦ ἀφθάρτου θεοῦἐν ὁμοιώματιεἰκόνος φθαρτοῦ ἀνθρώπου καὶ πετεινῶν καὶ τετραπόδων καὶ ἑρπετῶν.
1.26
Διὰ τοῦτο παρέδωκεν αὐτοὺς ὁ θεὸς εἰς πάθη ἀτιμίας· αἵ τε γὰρ θήλειαι αὐτῶν μετήλλαξαν τὴν φυσικὴν χρῆσιν εἰς τὴν παρὰ φύσιν, 1.27 ὁμοίως τε καὶ οἱ ἄρσενες ἀφέντες τὴν φυσικὴν χρῆσιν τῆς θηλείας ἐξεκαύθησαν ἐν τῇ ὀρέξει αὐτῶν εἰς ἀλλήλους ἄρσενες ἐν ἄρσεσιν, τὴν ἀσχημοσύνην κατεργαζόμενοι καὶ τὴν ἀντιμισθίαν ἣν ἔδει τῆς πλάνης αὐτῶν ἐν αὑτοῖς ἀπολαμβάνοντες.
2.9
θλίψις καὶ στενοχωρία, ἐπὶ πᾶσαν ψυχὴν ἀνθρώπου τοῦ κατεργαζομένου τὸ κακόν, Ἰουδαίου τε πρῶτον καὶ Ἕλληνος· 2.10 δόξα δὲ καὶ τιμὴ καὶ εἰρήνη παντὶ τῷ ἐργαζομένῳ τὸ ἀγαθόν, Ἰουδαίῳ τε πρῶτον καὶ Ἕλληνι· 2.11 οὐ γάρ ἐστιν προσωπολημψία παρὰ τῷ θεῷ.
3.9
Τί οὖν; προεχόμεθα; οὐ πάντως, προῃτιασάμεθα γὰρ Ἰουδαίους τε καὶ Ἕλληνας πάντας ὑφʼ ἁμαρτίαν εἶναι,
3.20
διότι ἐξ ἔργων νόμουοὐ δικαιωθήσεται πᾶσα σὰρξ ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ,διὰ γὰρ νόμου ἐπίγνωσις ἁμαρτίας.
3.23
πάντες γὰρ ἥμαρτον καὶ ὑστεροῦνται τῆς δόξης τοῦ θεοῦ, 3.24 δικαιούμενοι δωρεὰν τῇ αὐτοῦ χάριτι διὰ τῆς ἀπολυτρώσεως τῆς ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ·
5.5
ἡ δὲἐλπὶς οὐ καταισχύνει.ὅτι ἡ ἀγάπη τοῦ θεοῦ ἐκκέχυται ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις ἡμῶν διὰ πνεύματος ἁγίου τοῦ δοθέντος ἡμῖν·
9.3
ηὐχόμην γὰρ ἀνάθεμα εἶναι αὐτὸς ἐγὼ ἀπὸ τοῦ χριστοῦ ὑπὲρ τῶν ἀδελφῶν μου τῶν συγγενῶν μου κατὰ σάρκα, οἵτινές εἰσιν Ἰσραηλεῖται, 9.4 ὧν ἡ υἱοθεσία καὶ ἡ δόξα καὶ αἱ διαθῆκαι καὶ ἡ νομοθεσία καὶ ἡ λατρεία καὶ αἱ ἐπαγγελίαι, 9.5 ὧν οἱ πατέρες, καὶ ἐξ ὧν ὁ χριστὸς τὸ κατὰ σάρκα, ὁ ὢν ἐπὶ πάντων, θεὸς εὐλογητὸς εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν.
9.11
μήπω γὰρ γεννηθέντων μηδὲ πραξάντων τι ἀγαθὸν ἢ φαῦλον, ἵνα ἡ κατʼ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις τοῦ θεοῦ μένῃ,
9.13
καθάπερ γέγραπταιΤὸν Ἰακὼβ ἠγάπησα, τὸν δὲ Ἠσαῦ ἐμίσησα. 9.14 Τί οὖν ἐροῦμεν; μὴ ἀδικία παρὰ τῷ θεῷ; μὴ γένοιτο· 9.15 τῷ Μωυσεῖ γὰρ λέγειἘλεήσω ὃν ἄν ἐλεῶ, καὶ οἰκτειρήσω ὃν ἂν οἰκτείρω. 9.16 ἄρα οὖν οὐ τοῦ θέλοντος οὐδὲ τοῦ τρέχοντος, ἀλλὰ τοῦ ἐλεῶντος θεοῦ. 9.17 λέγει γὰρ ἡ γραφὴ τῷ Φαραὼ ὅτι Εἰς αὐτὸ τοῦτο ἐξήγειρά σε ὅπως ἐνδείξωμαι ἐν σοὶ τὴν δύναμίν μου, καὶ ὅπως διαγγελῇ τὸ ὄνομά μου ἐν πάσῃ τῇ γῇ. 9.18 ἄρα οὖν ὃν θέλει ἐλεεῖ, ὃν δὲ θέλεισκληρύνει.
9.22
εἰ δὲ θέλων ὁ θεὸς ἐνδείξασθαι τὴν ὀργὴν καὶ γνωρίσαι τὸ δυνατὸν αὐτοῦἤνεγκενἐν πολλῇ μακροθυμίᾳσκεύη ὀργῆςκατηρτισμέναεἰς ἀπώλειαν, 9.23 ἵνα γνωρίσῃ τὸν πλοῦτον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ σκεύη ἐλέους, ἃ προητοίμασεν εἰς δόξαν,
10.6
ἡ δὲ ἐκ πίστεως δικαιοσύνη οὕτως λέγειΜὴ εἴπῃςἐν τῇ καρδίᾳ σουΤίς ἀναβήσεται εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν;τοῦτʼ ἔστιν Χριστὸν καταγαγεῖν·
11.1
Λέγω οὖν, μὴἀπώσατο ὁ θεὸς τὸν λαὸν αὐτοῦ;μὴ γένοιτο· καὶ γὰρ ἐγὼ Ἰσραηλείτης εἰμί, ἐκ σπέρματος Ἀβραάμ, φυλῆς Βενιαμείν.
11.5
οὕτως οὖν καὶ ἐν τῷ νῦν καιρῷ λίμμα κατʼ ἐκλογὴν χάριτος γέγονεν·

11.11
Λέγω οὖν, μὴ ἔπταισαν ἵνα πέσωσιν; μὴ γένοιτο· ἀλλὰ τῷ αὐτῶν παραπτώματι ἡ σωτηρία τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, εἰς τὸπαραζηλῶσαιαὐτούς. 1
1.13
Ὑμῖν δὲ λέγω τοῖς ἔθνεσιν. ἐφʼ ὅσον μὲν οὖν εἰμὶ ἐγὼ ἐθνῶν ἀπόστολος, τὴν διακονίαν μου δοξάζω,

11.17
Εἰ δέ τινες τῶν κλάδων ἐξεκλάσθησαν, σὺ δὲ ἀγριέλαιος ὢν ἐνεκεντρίσθης ἐν αὐτοῖς καὶ συνκοινωνὸς τῆς ῥίζης τῆς πιότητος τῆς ἐλαίας ἐγένου, μὴ κατακαυχῶ τῶν κλάδων·
11.25
Οὐ γὰρ θέλω ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν, ἀδελφοί, τὸ μυστήριον τοῦτο, ἵνα μὴ ἦτε ἐν ἑαυτοῖς φρόνιμοι, ὅτι πώρωσις ἀπὸ μέρους τῷ Ἰσραὴλ γέγονεν ἄχρι οὗ τὸ πλήρωμα τῶν ἐθνῶν εἰσέλθῃ, καὶ οὕτως πᾶς Ἰσραὴλ σωθήσεται·
11.28
κατὰ μὲν τὸ εὐαγγέλιον ἐχθροὶ διʼ ὑμᾶς, κατὰ δὲ τὴν ἐκλογὴν ἀγαπητοὶ διὰ τοὺς πατέρας· 11.29 ἀμεταμέλητα γὰρ τὰ χαρίσματα καὶ ἡ κλῆσις τοῦ θεοῦ.
11.32
συνέκλεισεν γὰρ ὁ θεὸς τοὺς πάντας εἰς ἀπειθίαν ἵνα τοὺς πάντας ἐλεήσῃ. 11.33 Ὢ βάθος πλούτου καὶ σοφίας καὶ γνώσεως θεοῦ· ὡς ἀνεξεραύνητα τὰ κρίματα αὐτοῦ καὶ ἀνεξιχνίαστοι αἱ ὁδοὶ αὐτοῦ.' ' None
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1.13 Now I don't desire to have you unaware, brothers, that I often planned to come to you, and was hindered so far, that I might have some fruit among you also, even as among the rest of the Gentiles. " 1.16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God for salvation for everyone who believes; for the Jew first, and also for the Greek.
1.18
For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, 1.19 because that which is known of God is revealed in them, for God revealed it to them. 1.20 For the invisible things of him since the creation of the world are clearly seen, being perceived through the things that are made, even his everlasting power and divinity; that they may be without excuse. ' "1.21 Because, knowing God, they didn't glorify him as God, neither gave thanks, but became vain in their reasoning, and their senseless heart was darkened. " '1.22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, 1.23 and traded the glory of the incorruptible God for the likeness of an image of corruptible man, and of birds, and four-footed animals, and creeping things.
1.26
For this reason, God gave them up to vile passions. For their women changed the natural function into that which is against nature. 1.27 Likewise also the men, leaving the natural function of the woman, burned in their lust toward one another, men doing what is inappropriate with men, and receiving in themselves the due penalty of their error.
2.9
oppression and anguish, on every soul of man who works evil, on the Jew first, and also on the Greek. 2.10 But glory and honor and peace to every man who works good, to the Jew first, and also to the Greek. 2.11 For there is no partiality with God.
3.9
What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin.
3.20
Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin.
3.23
for all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; 3.24 being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus; ' "
5.5
and hope doesn't disappoint us, because God's love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us. " "
9.3
For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brothers' sake, my relatives according to the flesh, " '9.4 who are Israelites; whose is the adoption, the glory, the covets, the giving of the law, the service, and the promises; 9.5 of whom are the fathers, and from whom is Christ as concerning the flesh, who is over all, God, blessed forever. Amen.
9.11
For being not yet born, neither having done anything good or bad, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him who calls,
9.13
Even as it is written, "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated." 9.14 What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? May it never be! 9.15 For he said to Moses, "I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion." 9.16 So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy. 9.17 For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, "For this very purpose I caused you to be raised up, that I might show in you my power, and that my name might be published abroad in all the earth." 9.18 So then, he has mercy on whom he desires, and he hardens whom he desires.
9.22
What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much patience vessels of wrath made for destruction, 9.23 and that he might make known the riches of his glory on vessels of mercy, which he prepared beforehand for glory,
10.6
But the righteousness which is of faith says this, "Don\'t say in your heart, \'Who will ascend into heaven?\' (that is, to bring Christ down);
11.1
I ask then, Did God reject his people? May it never be! For I also am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin.
11.5
Even so then at this present time also there is a remt according to the election of grace.

11.11
I ask then, did they stumble that they might fall? May it never be! But by their fall salvation has come to the Gentiles, to provoke them to jealousy. 1
1.13
For I speak to you who are Gentiles. Since then as I am an apostle to Gentiles, I glorify my ministry;

11.17
But if some of the branches were broken off, and you, being a wild olive, were grafted in among them, and became partaker with them of the root and of the richness of the olive tree; ' "
11.25
For I don't desire, brothers, to have you ignorant of this mystery, so that you won't be wise in your own conceits, that a partial hardening has happened to Israel, until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in, " "
11.28
Concerning the gospel, they are enemies for your sake. But concerning the election, they are beloved for the fathers' sake. " '11.29 For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable.
11.32
For God has shut up all to disobedience, that he might have mercy on all. 11.33 Oh the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and the knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past tracing out! ' " None
46. New Testament, Titus, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elect of God • pre-election

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 198; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 88

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1.1 ΠΑΥΛΟΣ δοῦλος θεοῦ, ἀπόστολος δὲ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ κατὰ πίστιν ἐκλεκτῶν θεοῦ καὶ ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας τῆς κατʼ εὐσέβειαν'' None
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1.1 Paul, a servant of God, and an apostle of Jesus Christ, according to the faith of God's elect, and the knowledge of the truth which is according to godliness, "" None
47. New Testament, John, 1.8-1.9, 1.12-1.13, 4.19, 4.50, 4.53, 5.38, 10.23, 10.28-10.29, 10.41, 11.47, 11.49, 14.6, 15.5, 15.19, 17.2, 17.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Armozel, role of religious elites in • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Election • Election (of Israel) • elect • electio, election • election/elect • election/the elect, Valentinian • elite and non-elite, retainers in Galilee • elites • elites, and burial • pre-election • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 120; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 252; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116, 233, 238; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 279; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 86, 88, 187, 205, 206, 235, 236, 257; Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 99; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 73; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 231; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 57, 58, 108, 114, 125, 134, 198, 215, 221, 245; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 36

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1.8 οὐκ ἦν ἐκεῖνος τὸ φῶς, ἀλλʼ ἵνα μαρτυρήσῃ περὶ τοῦ φωτός. 1.9 Ἦν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἀληθινὸν ὃ φωτίζει πάντα ἄνθρωπον ἐρχόμενον εἰς τὸν κόσμον.
1.12
ὅσοι δὲ ἔλαβον αὐτόν, ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς ἐξουσίαν τέκνα θεοῦ γενέσθαι, τοῖς πιστεύουσιν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ, 1.13 οἳ οὐκ ἐξ αἱμάτων οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος σαρκὸς οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος ἀνδρὸς ἀλλʼ ἐκ θεοῦ ἐγεννήθησαν.
4.19
λέγει αὐτῷ ἡ γυνή Κύριε, θεωρῶ ὅτι προφήτης εἶ σύ.
4.50
λέγει αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς Πορεύου· ὁ υἱός σου ζῇ. ἐπίστευσεν ὁ ἄνθρωπος τῷ λόγῳ ὃν εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς καὶ ἐπορεύετο.
4.53
ἔγνω οὖν ὁ πατὴρ ὅτι ἐκείνῃ τῇ ὥρᾳ ἐν ᾗ εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς Ὁ υἱός σου ζῇ, καὶ ἐπίστευσεν αὐτὸς καὶ ἡ οἰκία αὐτοῦ ὅλη.
5.38
καὶ τὸν λόγον αὐτοῦ οὐκ ἔχετε ἐν ὑμῖν μένοντα, ὅτι ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος τούτῳ ὑμεῖς οὐ πιστεύετε.
10.23
καὶ περιεπάτει ὁ Ἰησοῦς ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ ἐν τῇ στοᾷ τοῦ Σολομῶνος.
10.28
κἀγὼ δίδωμι αὐτοῖς ζωὴν αἰώνιον, καὶ οὐ μὴ ἀπόλωνται εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα, καὶ οὐχ ἁρπάσει τις αὐτὰ ἐκ τῆς χειρός μου. 10.29 ὁ πατήρ μου ὃ δέδωκέν μοι πάντων μεῖζόν ἐστιν, καὶ οὐδεὶς δύναται ἁρπάζειν ἐκ τῆς χειρὸς τοῦ πατρός.
10.41
καὶ πολλοὶ ἦλθον πρὸς αὐτὸν καὶ ἔλεγον ὅτι Ἰωάνης μὲν σημεῖον ἐποίησεν οὐδέν, πάντα δὲ ὅσα εἶπεν Ἰωάνης περὶ τούτου ἀληθῆ ἦν.
11.47
Συνήγαγον οὖν οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ οἱ Φαρισαῖοι συνέδριον, καὶ ἔλεγον Τί ποιοῦμεν ὅτι οὗτος ὁ ἄνθρωπος πολλὰ ποιεῖ σημεῖα;
11.49
εἷς δέ τις ἐξ αὐτῶν Καιάφας, ἀρχιερεὺς ὢν τοῦ ἐνιαυτοῦ ἐκείνου, εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Ὑμεῖς οὐκ οἴδατε οὐδέν,
14.6
λέγει αὐτῷ Ἰησοῦς Ἐγώ εἰμι ἡ ὁδὸς καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ἡ ζωή· οὐδεὶς ἔρχεται πρὸς τὸν πατέρα εἰ μὴ διʼ ἐμοῦ.
15.5
ὁ μένων ἐν ἐμοὶ κἀγὼ ἐν αὐτῷ οὗτος φέρει καρπὸν πολύν, ὅτι χωρὶς ἐμοῦ οὐ δύνασθε ποιεῖν οὐδέν.
15.19
ὅτι δὲ ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου οὐκ ἐστέ, ἀλλʼ ἐγὼ ἐξελεξάμην ὑμᾶς ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου, διὰ τοῦτο μισεῖ ὑμᾶς ὁ κόσμος.
17.2
δόξασόν σου τὸν υἱόν, ἵνα ὁ υἱὸς δοξάσῃ σέ, καθὼς ἔδωκας αὐτῷ ἐξουσίαν πάσης σαρκός, ἵνα πᾶν ὃ δέδωκας αὐτῷ δώσει αὐτοῖς ζωὴν αἰώνιον.

17.24
Πατήρ, ὃ δέδωκάς μοι, θέλω ἵνα ὅπου εἰμὶ ἐγὼ κἀκεῖνοι ὦσιν μετʼ ἐμοῦ, ἵνα θεωρῶσιν τὴν δόξαν τὴν ἐμὴν ἣν δέδωκάς μοι, ὅτι ἠγάπησάς με πρὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου.'' None
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1.8 He was not the light, but was sent that he might testify about the light. 1.9 The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. ' "
1.12
But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: " '1.13 who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.
4.19
The woman said to him, "Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet.
4.50
Jesus said to him, "Go your way. Your son lives." The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him, and he went his way.
4.53
So the father knew that it was at that hour in which Jesus said to him, "Your son lives." He believed, as did his whole house. ' "
5.38
You don't have his word living in you; because you don't believe him whom he sent. " "
10.23
It was winter, and Jesus was walking in the temple, in Solomon's porch. " 10.28 I give eternal life to them. They will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. ' "10.29 My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all. No one is able to snatch them out of my Father's hand. " 10.41 Many came to him. They said, "John indeed did no sign, but everything that John said about this man is true."
11.47
The chief priests therefore and the Pharisees gathered a council, and said, "What are we doing? For this man does many signs.
11.49
But a certain one of them, Caiaphas, being high priest that year, said to them, "You know nothing at all,
14.6
Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father, except through me.
15.5
I am the vine. You are the branches. He who remains in me, and I in him, the same bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.
15.19
If you were of the world, the world would love its own. But because you are not of the world, since I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you.
17.2
even as you gave him authority over all flesh, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him.

17.24
Father, I desire that they also whom you have given me be with me where I am, that they may see my glory, which you have given me, for you loved me before the foundation of the world. '' None
48. New Testament, Luke, 10.30-10.37, 12.58-12.59, 14.21-14.23, 16.9, 16.13, 16.19, 16.27-16.31, 18.1-18.8, 19.1-19.10, 19.42, 19.44, 19.48, 21.8, 21.23, 22.66, 24.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Armozel, role of religious elites in • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Christian elite rhetoric • Christian elite rhetoric, Jesus’ miracles, legitimacy of • Christian elite rhetoric, magic • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Election (of Israel) • Jesus’ miracles, Christian elite rhetoric on • Jewish elite rhetoric, Sabbath restrictions • Priestly elite • election/elect • elite and non-elite, retainers in Galilee • elite rhetoric, magic • elites • elites, and dress • elites, as telōnai • elites, creditors • non-elites • priestly elites • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple • travel, Egyptian elite mobility

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 252; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 120; Huebner (2013), The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity and Conflict. 110; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 105, 108, 116, 142, 222; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 138, 195; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 165, 166, 173, 184; Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 99; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 176; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 455; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 114, 221, 261

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10.30 ὑπολαβὼν ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν Ἄνθρωπός τις κατέβαινεν ἀπὸ Ἰερουσαλὴμ εἰς Ἰερειχὼ καὶ λῃσταῖς περιέπεσεν, οἳ καὶ ἐκδύσαντες αὐτὸν καὶ πληγὰς ἐπιθέντες ἀπῆλθον ἀφέντες ἡμιθανῆ. 10.31 κατὰ συγκυρίαν δὲ ἱερεύς τις κατέβαινεν ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἐκείνῃ, καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὸν ἀντιπαρῆλθεν· 10.32 ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ Λευείτης κατὰ τὸν τόπον ἐλθὼν καὶ ἰδὼν ἀντιπαρῆλθεν. 10.33 Σαμαρείτης δέ τις ὁδεύων ἦλθεν κατʼ αὐτὸν καὶ ἰδὼν ἐσπλαγχνίσθη, 10.34 καὶ προσελθὼν κατέδησεν τὰ τραύματα αὐτοῦ ἐπιχέων ἔλαιον καὶ οἶνον, ἐπιβιβάσας δὲ αὐτὸν ἐπὶ τὸ ἴδιον κτῆνος ἤγαγεν αὐτὸν εἰς πανδοχεῖον καὶ ἐπεμελήθη αὐτοῦ. 10.35 καὶ ἐπὶ τὴν αὔριον ἐκβαλὼν δύο δηνάρια ἔδωκεν τῷ πανδοχεῖ καὶ εἶπεν Ἐπιμελήθητι αὐτοῦ, καὶ ὅτι ἂν προσδαπανήσῃς ἐγὼ ἐν τῷ ἐπανέρχεσθαί με ἀποδώσω σοι. 10.36 τίς τούτων τῶν τριῶν πλησίον δοκεῖ σοι γεγονέναι τοῦ ἐμπεσόντος εἰς τοὺς λῃστάς; 10.37 ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Ὁ ποιήσας τὸ ἔλεος μετʼ αὐτοῦ. εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς Πορεύου καὶ σὺ ποίει ὁμοίως.
12.58
ὡς γὰρ ὑπάγεις μετὰ τοῦ ἀντιδίκου σου ἐπʼ ἄρχοντα, ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ δὸς ἐργασίαν ἀπηλλάχθαι ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ, μή ποτε κατασύρῃ σε πρὸς τὸν κριτήν, καὶ ὁ κριτής σε παραδώσει τῷ πράκτορι, καὶ ὁ πράκτωρ σε βαλεῖ εἰς φυλακήν. 12.59 λέγω σοι, οὐ μὴ ἐξέλθῃς ἐκεῖθεν ἕως καὶ τὸ ἔσχατον λεπτὸν ἀποδῷς.
14.21
καὶ παραγενόμενος ὁ δοῦλος ἀπήγγειλεν τῷ κυρίῳ αὐτοῦ ταῦτα. τότε ὀργισθεὶς ὁ οἰκοδεσπότης εἶπεν τῷ δούλῳ αὐτοῦ Ἔξελθε ταχέως εἰς τὰς πλατείας καὶ ῥύμας τῆς πόλεως, καὶ τοὺς πτωχοὺς καὶ ἀναπείρους καὶ τυφλοὺς καὶ χωλοὺς εἰσάγαγε ὧδε. 14.22 καὶ εἶπεν ὁ δοῦλος Κύριε, γέγονεν ὃ ἐπέταξας, καὶ ἔτι τόπος ἐστίν. 14.23 καὶ εἶπεν ὁ κύριος πρὸς τὸν δοῦλον Ἔξελθε εἰς τὰς ὁδοὺς καὶ φραγμοὺς καὶ ἀνάγκασον εἰσελθεῖν, ἵνα γεμισθῇ μου ὁ οἶκος·
16.9
Καὶ ἐγὼ ὑμῖν λέγω, ἑαυτοῖς ποιήσατε φίλους ἐκ τοῦ μαμωνᾶ τῆς ἀδικίας, ἵνα ὅταν ἐκλίπῃ δέξωνται ὑμᾶς εἰς τὰς αἰωνίους σκηνάς.
16.13
Οὐδεὶς οἰκέτης δύναται δυσὶ κυρίοις δουλεύειν· ἢ γὰρ τὸν ἕνα μισήσει καὶ τὸν ἕτερον ἀγαπήσει, ἢ ἑνὸς ἀνθέξεται καὶ τοῦ ἑτέρου καταφρονήσει. οὐ δύνασθε θεῷ δουλεύειν καὶ μαμωνᾷ.
16.19
Ἄνθρωπος δέ τις ἦν πλούσιος, καὶ ἐνεδιδύσκετο πορφύραν καὶ βύσσον εὐφραινόμενος καθʼ ἡμέραν λαμπρῶς.
16.27
εἶπεν δέ Ἐρωτῶ σε οὖν, πάτερ, ἵνα πέμψῃς αὐτὸν εἰς τὸν οἶκον τοῦ πατρός μου, 16.28 ἔχω γὰρ πέντε ἀδελφούς, ὅπως διαμαρτύρηται αὐτοῖς, ἵνα μὴ καὶ αὐτοὶ ἔλθωσιν εἰς τὸν τόπον τοῦτον τῆς βασάνου. 16.29 λέγει δὲ Ἀβραάμ Ἔχουσι Μωυσέα καὶ τοὺς προφήτας· ἀκουσάτωσαν αὐτῶν. 16.30 ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Οὐχί, πάτερ Ἀβραάμ, ἀλλʼ ἐάν τις ἀπὸ νεκρῶν πορευθῇ πρὸς αὐτοὺς μετανοήσουσιν. 16.31 εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ Εἰ Μωυσέως καὶ τῶν προφητῶν οὐκ ἀκούουσιν, οὐδʼ ἐάν τις ἐκ νεκρῶν ἀναστῇ πεισθήσονται.
18.1
Ἔλεγεν δὲ παραβολὴν αὐτοῖς πρὸς τὸ δεῖν πάντοτε προσεύχεσθαι αὐτοὺς καὶ μὴ ἐνκακεῖν, 18.2 λέγων Κριτής τις ἦν ἔν τινι πόλει τὸν θεὸν μὴ φοβούμενος καὶ ἄνθρωπον μὴ ἐντρεπόμενος. 18.3 χήρα δὲ ἦν ἐν τῇ πόλει ἐκείνῃ καὶ ἤρχετο πρὸς αὐτὸν λέγουσα Ἐκδίκησόν με ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀντιδίκου μου. 18.4 καὶ οὐκ ἤθελεν ἐπὶ χρόνον, μετὰ ταῦτα δὲ εἶπεν ἐν ἑαυτῷ Εἰ καὶ τὸν θεὸν οὐ φοβοῦμαι οὐδὲ ἄνθρωπον ἐντρέπομαι, 18.5 διά γε τὸ παρέχειν μοι κόπον τὴν χήραν ταύτην ἐκδικήσω αὐτήν, ἵνα μὴ εἰς τέλος ἐρχομένη ὑπωπιάζῃ με. 18.6 Εἶπεν δὲ ὁ κύριος Ἀκούσατε τί ὁ κριτὴς τῆς ἀδικίας λέγει· 18.7 ὁ δὲ θεὸς οὐ μὴ ποιήσῃ τὴν ἐκδίκησιν τῶν ἐκλεκτῶν αὐτοῦ τῶν βοώντων αὐτῷ ἡμέρας καὶ νυκτός, καὶ μακροθυμεῖ ἐπʼ αὐτοῖς; 18.8 λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι ποιήσει τὴν ἐκδίκησιν αὐτῶν ἐν τάχει. πλὴν ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐλθὼν ἆρα εὑρήσει τὴν πίστιν ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς;
19.1
Καὶ εἰσελθὼν διήρχετο τὴν Ἰερειχώ. 19.2 Καὶ ἰδοὺ ἀνὴρ ὀνόματι καλούμενος Ζακχαῖος, καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν ἀρχιτελώνης καὶ αὐτὸς πλούσιος· 19.3 καὶ ἐζήτει ἰδεῖν τὸν Ἰησοῦν τίς ἐστιν, καὶ οὐκ ἠδύνατο ἀπὸ τοῦ ὄχλου ὅτι τῇ ἡλικίᾳ μικρὸς ἦν. 19.4 καὶ προδραμὼν εἰς τὸ ἔμπροσθεν ἀνέβη ἐπὶ συκομορέαν ἵνα ἴδῃ αὐτόν, ὅτι ἐκείνης ἤμελλεν διέρχεσθαι. 19.5 καὶ ὡς ἦλθεν ἐπὶ τὸν τόπον, ἀναβλέψας ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτόν Ζακχαῖε, σπεύσας κατάβηθι, σήμερον γὰρ ἐν τῷ οἴκῳ σου δεῖ με μεῖναι. 19.6 καὶ σπεύσας κατέβη, καὶ ὑπεδέξατο αὐτὸν χαίρων. 19.7 καὶ ἰδόντες πάντες διεγόγγυζον λέγοντες ὅτι Παρὰ ἁμαρτωλῷ ἀνδρὶ εἰσῆλθεν καταλῦσαι. 19.8 σταθεὶς δὲ Ζακχαῖος εἶπεν πρὸς τὸν κύριον Ἰδοὺ τὰ ἡμίσιά μου τῶν ὑπαρχόντων, κύριε, τοῖς πτωχοῖς δίδωμι, καὶ εἴ τινός τι ἐσυκοφάντησα ἀποδίδωμι τετραπλοῦν. 19.9 εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτὸν ὁ Ἰησοῦς ὅτι Σήμερον σωτηρία τῷ οἴκῳ τούτῳ ἐγένετο, καθότι καὶ αὐτὸς υἱὸς Ἀβραάμ ἐστιν·
19.10
ἦλθεν γὰρ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ζητῆσαι καὶ σῶσαι τὸ ἀπολωλός.
19.42
λέγων ὅτι Εἰ ἔγνως ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ταύτῃ καὶ σὺ τὰ πρὸς εἰρήνην— νῦν δὲ ἐκρύβη ἀπὸ ὀφθαλμῶν σου.
19.44
καὶ ἐδαφιοῦσίν σε καὶ τὰ τέκνα σου ἐν σοί, καὶ οὐκ ἀφήσουσιν λίθον ἐπὶ λίθον ἐν σοί, ἀνθʼ ὧν οὐκ ἔγνως τὸν καιρὸν τῆς ἐπισκοπῆς σου.
19.48
καὶ οὐχ ηὕρισκον τὸ τί ποιήσωσιν, ὁ λαὸς γὰρ ἅπας ἐξεκρέμετο αὐτοῦ ἀκούων.
21.8
ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Βλέπετε μὴ πλανηθῆτε· πολλοὶ γὰρ ἐλεύσονται ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματί μου λέγοντες Ἐγώ εἰμι καί Ὁ καιρὸς ἤγγικεν· μὴ πορευθῆτε ὀπίσω αὐτῶν.
21.23
οὐαὶ ταῖς ἐν γαστρὶ ἐχούσαις καὶ ταῖς θηλαζούσαις ἐν ἐκείναις ταῖς ἡμέραις· ἔσται γὰρ ἀνάγκη μεγάλη ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς καὶ ὀργὴ τῷ λαῷ τούτῳ,
22.66
Καὶ ὡς ἐγένετο ἡμέρα, συνήχθη τὸ πρεσβυτέριον τοῦ λαοῦ, ἀρχιερεῖς τε καὶ γραμματεῖς, καὶ ἀπήγαγον αὐτὸν εἰς τὸ συνέδριον αὐτῶν,
24.19
καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Ποῖα; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν αὐτῷ Τὰ περὶ Ἰησοῦ τοῦ Ναζαρηνοῦ, ὃς ἐγένετο ἀνὴρ προφήτης δυνατὸς ἐν ἔργῳ καὶ λόγῳ ἐναντίον τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ παντὸς τοῦ λαοῦ,'' None
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10.30 Jesus answered, "A certain man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who both stripped him and beat him, and departed, leaving him half dead. 10.31 By chance a certain priest was going down that way. When he saw him, he passed by on the other side. 10.32 In the same way a Levite also, when he came to the place, and saw him, passed by on the other side. 10.33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was. When he saw him, he was moved with compassion, 10.34 came to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. He set him on his own animal, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. ' "10.35 On the next day, when he departed, he took out two denarii, and gave them to the host, and said to him, 'Take care of him. Whatever you spend beyond that, I will repay you when I return.' " '10.36 Now which of these three do you think seemed to be a neighbor to him who fell among the robbers?" 10.37 He said, "He who showed mercy on him."Then Jesus said to him, "Go and do likewise."
12.58
For when you are going with your adversary before the magistrate, try diligently on the way to be released from him, lest perhaps he drag you to the judge, and the judge deliver you to the officer, and the officer throw you into prison. 12.59 I tell you, you will by no means get out of there, until you have paid the very last penny."
14.21
"That servant came, and told his lord these things. Then the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant, \'Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in the poor, maimed, blind, and lame.\ '14.22 "The servant said, \'Lord, it is done as you commanded, and there is still room.\ '14.23 "The lord said to the servant, \'Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.
16.9
I tell you, make for yourselves friends by means of unrighteous mammon, so that when you fail, they may receive you into the eternal tents.
16.13
No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to one, and despise the other. You aren\'t able to serve God and mammon."
16.19
"Now there was a certain rich man, and he was clothed in purple and fine linen, living in luxury every day.
16.27
"He said, \'I ask you therefore, father, that you would send him to my father\'s house; ' "16.28 for I have five brothers, that he may testify to them, so they won't also come into this place of torment.' " '16.29 "But Abraham said to him, \'They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.\ '16.30 "He said, \'No, father Abraham, but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent.\ '16.31 "He said to him, \'If they don\'t listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded if one rises from the dead.\'"
18.1
He also spoke a parable to them that they must always pray, and not give up, 18.2 saying, "There was a judge in a certain city who didn\'t fear God, and didn\'t respect man. ' "18.3 A widow was in that city, and she often came to him, saying, 'Defend me from my adversary!' " "18.4 He wouldn't for a while, but afterward he said to himself, 'Though I neither fear God, nor respect man, " '18.5 yet because this widow bothers me, I will defend her, or else she will wear me out by her continual coming.\'" 18.6 The Lord said, "Listen to what the unrighteous judge says. ' "18.7 Won't God avenge his elect, who are crying out to him day and night, and yet he exercises patience with them? " '18.8 I tell you that he will avenge them quickly. Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?"
19.1
He entered and was passing through Jericho. 19.2 There was a man named Zacchaeus. He was a chief tax collector, and he was rich. ' "19.3 He was trying to see who Jesus was, and couldn't because of the crowd, because he was short. " '19.4 He ran on ahead, and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him, for he was to pass that way. 19.5 When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and saw him, and said to him, "Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for today I must stay at your house." 19.6 He hurried, came down, and received him joyfully. 19.7 When they saw it, they all murmured, saying, "He has gone in to lodge with a man who is a sinner." 19.8 Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, "Behold, Lord, half of my goods I give to the poor. If I have wrongfully exacted anything of anyone, I restore four times as much." 19.9 Jesus said to him, "Today, salvation has come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham.
19.10
For the Son of Man came to seek and to save that which was lost."
19.42
saying, "If you, even you, had known today the things which belong to your peace! But now, they are hidden from your eyes.
19.44
and will dash you and your children within you to the ground. They will not leave in you one stone on another, because you didn\'t know the time of your visitation."' "
19.48
They couldn't find what they might do, for all the people hung on to every word that he said. " 21.8 He said, "Watch out that you don\'t get led astray, for many will come in my name, saying, \'I AM,\' and, \'The time is at hand.\' Therefore don\'t follow them.
21.23
Woe to those who are pregt and to those who nurse infants in those days! For there will be great distress in the land, and wrath to this people.
22.66
As soon as it was day, the assembly of the elders of the people was gathered together, both chief priests and scribes, and they led him away into their council, saying,
24.19
He said to them, "What things?"They said to him, "The things concerning Jesus, the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people; '' None
49. New Testament, Mark, 1.45, 2.14, 3.20, 3.22, 6.3, 6.15, 6.32-6.33, 6.56, 11.18, 12.13-12.17, 12.39, 13.8-13.13, 13.19, 13.22, 14.1-14.2, 14.14, 14.53-14.55, 14.60-14.61, 14.63, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Armozel, role of religious elites in • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Christian elite rhetoric • Christian elite rhetoric, Jesus’ miracles, legitimacy of • Christian elite rhetoric, magic • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Election (of Israel) • Jesus’ miracles, Christian elite rhetoric on • Priestly elite • Temple of Bel (Palmyra), on priestly elites at Jerusalem • elite • elite and non-elite, expendables in Mark • elite and non-elite, in Galilee • elite and non-elite, peasants in Mark • elite and non-elite, retainers in Galilee • elite and non-elite, retainers in Mark • elite and non-elite, urban elite in Mark • elite and non-elite, urban non-elite in Mark • elite rhetoric, magic • elites • health, of urban non-elite • non-elites • pre-election • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple • taxation, by elites • urban development, elites • urban development, non-elites

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 117, 120, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 25, 116, 122, 131, 141, 175; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 257; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 165, 166; Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 98, 99; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 176; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 231; Williams (2023), Criminalization in Acts of the Apostles Race, Rhetoric, and the Prosecution of an Early Christian Movement. 191

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1.45 ὁ δὲ ἐξελθὼν ἤρξατο κηρύσσειν πολλὰ καὶ διαφημίζειν τὸν λόγον, ὥστε μηκέτι αὐτὸν δύνασθαι φανερῶς εἰς πόλιν εἰσελθεῖν, ἀλλὰ ἔξω ἐπʼ ἐρήμοις τόποις ἦν· καὶ ἤρχοντο πρὸς αὐτὸν πάντοθεν.
2.14
Καὶ παράγων εἶδεν Λευεὶν τὸν τοῦ Ἁλφαίου καθήμενον ἐπὶ τὸ τελώνιον, καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Ἀκολούθει μοι. καὶ ἀναστὰς ἠκολούθησεν αὐτῷ.
3.20
Καὶ ἔρχεται εἰς οἶκον· καὶ συνέρχεται πάλιν ὁ ὄχλος, ὥστε μὴ δύνασθαι αὐτοὺς μηδὲ ἄρτον φαγεῖν.
3.22
καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς οἱ ἀπὸ Ἰεροσολύμων καταβάντες ἔλεγον ὅτι Βεεζεβοὺλ ἔχει, καὶ ὅτι ἐν τῷ ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων ἐκβάλλει τὰ δαιμόνια.
6.3
οὐχ οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ τέκτων, ὁ υἱὸς τῆς Μαρίας καὶ ἀδελφὸς Ἰακώβου καὶ Ἰωσῆτος καὶ Ἰούδα καὶ Σίμωνος; καὶ οὐκ εἰσὶν αἱ ἀδελφαὶ αὐτοῦ ὧδε πρὸς ἡμᾶς; καὶ ἐσκανδαλίζοντο ἐν αὐτῷ.
6.15
ἄλλοι δὲ ἔλεγον ὅτι Ἠλείας ἐστίν· ἄλλοι δὲ ἔλεγον ὅτι προφήτης ὡς εἷς τῶν προφητῶν.

6.32
καὶ ἀπῆλθον ἐν τῷ πλοίῳ εἰς ἔρημον τόπον κατʼ ἰδίαν.
6.33
καὶ εἶδαν αὐτοὺς ὑπάγοντας καὶ ἔγνωσαν πολλοί, καὶ πεζῇ ἀπὸ πασῶν τῶν πόλεων συνέδραμον ἐκεῖ καὶ προῆλθον αὐτούς.
6.56
καὶ ὅπου ἂν εἰσεπορεύετο εἰς κώμας ἢ εἰς πόλεις ἢ εἰς ἀγροὺς ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς ἐτἵθεσαν τοὺς ἀσθενοῦντας, καὶ παρεκάλουν αὐτὸν ἵνα κἂν τοῦ κρασπέδου τοῦ ἱματίου αὐτοῦ ἅψωνται· καὶ ὅσοι ἂν ἥψαντο αὐτοῦ ἐσώζοντο.
11.18
καὶ ἤκουσαν οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς, καὶ ἐζήτουν πῶς αὐτὸν ἀπολέσωσιν· ἐφοβοῦντο γὰρ αὐτόν, πᾶς γὰρ ὁ ὄχλος ἐξεπλήσσετο ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ.
12.13
Καὶ ἀποστέλλουσιν πρὸς αὐτόν τινας τῶν Φαρισαίων καὶ τῶν Ἡρῳδιανῶν ἵνα αὐτὸν ἀγρεύσωσιν λόγῳ. 1
2.14
καὶ ἐλθόντες λέγουσιν αὐτῷ Διδάσκαλε, οἴδαμεν ὅτι ἀληθὴς εἶ καὶ οὐ μέλει σοι περὶ οὐδενός, οὐ γὰρ βλέπεις εἰς πρόσωπον ἀνθρώπων, ἀλλʼ ἐπʼ ἀληθείας τὴν ὁδὸν τοῦ θεοῦ διδάσκεις· ἔξεστιν δοῦναι κῆνσον Καίσαρι ἢ οὔ; δῶμεν ἢ μὴ δῶμεν; 12.15 ὁ δὲ εἰδὼς αὐτῶν τὴν ὑπόκρισιν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τί με πειράζετε; φέρετέ μοι δηνάριον ἵνα ἴδω. 12.16 οἱ δὲ ἤνεγκαν. καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς Τίνος ἡ εἰκὼν αὕτη καὶ ἡ ἐπιγραφή; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν αὐτῷ Καίσαρος. 12.17 ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν Τὰ Καίσαρος ἀπόδοτε Καίσαρι καὶ τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ τῷ θεῷ. καὶ ἐξεθαύμαζον ἐπʼ αὐτῷ.
12.39
καὶ πρωτοκαθεδρίας ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς καὶ πρωτοκλισίας ἐν τοῖς δείπνοις,
13.8
ἐγερθήσεται γὰρ ἔθνος ἐπʼ ἔθνος καὶ βασιλεία ἐπὶ βασιλείαν, ἔσονται σεισμοὶ κατὰ τόπους, ἔσονται λιμοί· ἀρχὴ ὠδίνων ταῦτα. 13.9 βλέπετε δὲ ὑμεῖς ἑαυτούς· παραδώσουσιν ὑμᾶς εἰς συνέδρια καὶ εἰς συναγωγὰς δαρήσεσθε καὶ ἐπὶ ἡγεμόνων καὶ βασιλέων σταθήσεσθε ἕνεκεν ἐμοῦ εἰς μαρτύριον αὐτοῖς. 13.10 καὶ εἰς πάντα τὰ ἔθνη πρῶτον δεῖ κηρυχθῆναι τὸ εὐαγγέλιον. 13.11 καὶ ὅταν ἄγωσιν ὑμᾶς παραδιδόντες, μὴ προμεριμνᾶτε τί λαλήσητε, ἀλλʼ ὃ ἐὰν δοθῇ ὑμῖν ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ὥρᾳ τοῦτο λαλεῖτε, οὐ γάρ ἐστε ὑμεῖς οἱ λαλοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον. 13.12 καὶ παραδώσει ἀδελφὸς ἀδελφὸν εἰς θάνατον καὶ πατὴρ τέκνον, καὶ ἐπαναστήσονται τέκνα ἐπὶ γονεῖς καὶ θανατώσουσιν αὐτούς· 13.13 καὶ ἔσεσθε μισούμενοι ὑπὸ πάντων διὰ τὸ ὄνομά μου. ὁ δὲ ὑπομείνας εἰς τέλος οὗτος σωθήσεται.
13.19
ἔσονται γὰρ αἱ ἡμέραι ἐκεῖναι θλίψις οἵα οὐ γέγονεν τοιαύτη ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς κτίσεως ἣν ἔκτισεν ὁ θεὸς ἕως τοῦ νῦν καὶ οὐ μὴ γένηται.
1
3.22
ἐγερθήσονται γὰρ ψευδόχριστοι καὶ ψευδοπροφῆται καὶ δώσουσιν σημεῖα καὶ τέρατα πρὸς τὸ ἀποπλανᾷν εἰ δυνατὸν τοὺς ἐκλεκτούς·
14.1
ΗΝ ΔΕ ΤΟ ΠΑΣΧΑ καὶ τὰ ἄζυμα μετὰ δύο ἡμέρας. Καὶ ἐζήτουν οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς πῶς αὐτὸν ἐν δόλῳ κρατήσαντες ἀποκτείνωσιν, 14.2 ἔλεγον γάρ Μὴ ἐν τῇ ἑορτῇ, μή ποτε ἔσται θόρυβος τοῦ λαοῦ.

14.14
καὶ ὅπου ἐὰν εἰσέλθῃ εἴπατε τῷ οἰκοδεσπότῃ ὅτι Ὁ διδάσκαλος λέγει Ποῦ ἐστὶν τὸ κατάλυμά μου ὅπου τὸ πάσχα μετὰ τῶν μαθητῶν μου φάγω;
14.53
Καὶ ἀπήγαγον τὸν Ἰησοῦν πρὸς τὸν ἀρχιερέα, καὶ συνέρχονται πάντες οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ οἱ πρεσβύτεροι καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς. 14.54 καὶ ὁ Πέτρος ἀπὸ μακρόθεν ἠκολούθησεν αὐτῷ ἕως ἔσω εἰς τὴν αὐλὴν τοῦ ἀρχιερέως, καὶ ἦν συνκαθήμενος μετὰ τῶν ὑπηρετῶν καὶ θερμαινόμενος πρὸς τὸ φῶς. 14.55 οἱ δὲ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ ὅλον τὸ συνέδριον ἐζήτουν κατὰ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ μαρτυρίαν εἰς τὸ θανατῶσαι αὐτόν, καὶ οὐχ ηὕρισκον·
14.60
καὶ ἀναστὰς ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς εἰς μέσον ἐπηρώτησεν τὸν Ἰησοῦν λέγων Οὐκ ἀποκρίνῃ οὐδέν, τί οὗτοί σου καταμαρτυροῦσιν; 14.61 ὁ δὲ ἐσιώπα καὶ οὐκ ἀπεκρίνατο οὐδέν. πάλιν ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς ἐπηρώτα αὐτὸν καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Σὺ εἶ ὁ χριστὸς ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ εὐλογητοῦ;
14.63
ὁ δὲ ἀρχιερεὺς διαρήξας τοὺς χιτῶνας αὐτοῦ λέγει Τί ἔτι χρείαν ἔχομεν μαρτύρων;
15.1
Καὶ εὐθὺς πρωὶ συμβούλιον ποιήσαντες οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς μετὰ τῶν πρεσβυτέρων καὶ γραμματέων καὶ ὅλον τὸ συνέδριον δήσαντες τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἀπήνεγκαν καὶ παρέδωκαν Πειλάτῳ.'' None
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1.45 But he went out, and began to proclaim it much, and to spread about the matter, so that Jesus could no more openly enter into a city, but was outside in desert places: and they came to him from everywhere.
2.14
As he passed by, he saw Levi, the son of Alphaeus, sitting at the tax office, and he said to him, "Follow me." And he arose and followed him.
3.20
The multitude came together again, so that they could not so much as eat bread.
3.22
The scribes who came down from Jerusalem said, "He has Beelzebul," and, "By the prince of the demons he casts out the demons."
6.3
Isn\'t this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of James, Joses, Judas, and Simon? Aren\'t his sisters here with us?" They were offended at him.
6.15
But others said, "It is Elijah." Others said, "It is the Prophet, or like one of the prophets."

6.32
They went away in the boat to a desert place by themselves.
6.33
They saw them going, and many recognized him and ran there on foot from all the cities. They arrived before them and came together to him.
6.56
Wherever he entered, into villages, or into cities, or into the country, they laid the sick in the marketplaces, and begged him that they might touch just the fringe of his garment; and as many as touched him were made well.
11.18
The chief priests and the scribes heard it, and sought how they might destroy him. For they feared him, for all the multitude was astonished at his teaching.
12.13
They sent some of the Pharisees and of the Herodians to him, that they might trap him with words. 1
2.14
When they had come, they asked him, "Teacher, we know that you are honest, and don\'t defer to anyone; for you aren\'t partial to anyone, but truly teach the way of God. Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? 12.15 Shall we give, or shall we not give?"But he, knowing their hypocrisy, said to them, "Why do you test me? Bring me a denarius, that I may see it." 12.16 They brought it. He said to them, "Whose is this image and inscription?"They said to him, "Caesar\'s." 12.17 Jesus answered them, "Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar\'s, and to God the things that are God\'s."They marveled greatly at him.
12.39
and the best seats in the synagogues, and the best places at feasts:
13.8
For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be earthquakes in various places. There will be famines and troubles. These things are the beginning of birth pains. 13.9 But watch yourselves, for they will deliver you up to councils. You will be beaten in synagogues. You will stand before rulers and kings for my sake, for a testimony to them. 13.10 The gospel must first be preached to all the nations. ' "13.11 When they lead you away and deliver you up, don't be anxious beforehand, or premeditate what you will say, but say whatever will be given you in that hour. For it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit. " '13.12 "Brother will deliver up brother to death, and the father his child. Children will rise up against parents, and cause them to be put to death. ' "13.13 You will be hated by all men for my name's sake, but he who endures to the end, the same will be saved. " 13.19 For in those days there will be oppression, such as there has not been the like from the beginning of the creation which God created until now, and never will be.
1
3.22
For there will arise false christs and false prophets, and will show signs and wonders, that they may lead astray, if possible, even the chosen ones.
14.1
It was now two days before the feast of the Passover and the unleavened bread, and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might sieze him by deception, and kill him. 14.2 For they said, "Not during the feast, because there might be a riot of the people."

14.14
and wherever he enters in, tell the master of the house, \'The Teacher says, "Where is the guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?"\ 14.53 They led Jesus away to the high priest. All the chief priests, the elders, and the scribes came together with him. 14.54 Peter had followed him from a distance, until he came into the court of the high priest. He was sitting with the officers, and warming himself in the light of the fire. 14.55 Now the chief priests and the whole council sought witnesses against Jesus to put him to death, and found none.
14.60
The high priest stood up in the midst, and asked Jesus, "Have you no answer? What is it which these testify against you?" 14.61 But he stayed quiet, and answered nothing. Again the high priest asked him, "Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?"
14.63
The high priest tore his clothes, and said, "What further need have we of witnesses?
15.1
Immediately in the morning the chief priests, with the elders and scribes, and the whole council, held a consultation, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him up to Pilate. '' None
50. New Testament, Matthew, 5.25-5.26, 6.17, 20.16, 21.11, 24.5, 24.7-24.12, 24.21, 26.59 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Armozel, role of religious elites in • Chosen Ones; see also Election • Christian elite rhetoric • Christian elite rhetoric, Jesus’ miracles, legitimacy of • Christian elite rhetoric, magic • Egypt, Egyptian, Elect, community of, suffering of • Elect (Manichaean) • Election (of Israel) • Jesus’ miracles, Christian elite rhetoric on • Josephus Essenes, group election and membership • Priestly elite • electio, election • election (of God) • elite and non-elite, retainers in Galilee • elite rhetoric, magic • non-elites • priestly elites, at the Jerusalem Temple

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 120; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 77; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 108, 116; Nutzman (2022), Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine 195; Pedersen (2004), Demonstrative Proof in Defence of God: A Study of Titus of Bostra’s Contra Manichaeos. 60; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 165, 166; Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 99; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 176; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 74; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 245

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5.25 ἴσθι εὐνοῶν τῷ ἀντιδίκῳ σου ταχὺ ἕως ὅτου εἶ μετʼ αὐτοῦ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ, μή ποτέ σε παραδῷ ὁ ἀντίδικος τῷ κριτῇ, καὶ ὁ κριτὴς τῷ ὑπηρέτῃ, καὶ εἰς φυλακὴν βληθήσῃ· 5.26 ἀμὴν λέγω σοι, οὐ μὴ ἐξέλθῃς ἐκεῖθεν ἕως ἂν ἀποδῷς τὸν ἔσχατον κοδράντην.
6.17
σὺ δὲ νηστεύων ἄλειψαί σου τὴν κεφαλὴν καὶ τὸ πρόσωπόν σου νίψαι,
20.16
Οὕτως ἔσονται οἱ ἔσχατοι πρῶτοι καὶ οἱ πρῶτοι ἔσχατοι.
21.11
πόλις λέγουσα Τίς ἐστιν οὗτος; οἱ δὲ ὄχλοι ἔλεγον Οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ προφήτης Ἰησοῦς ὁ ἀπὸ Ναζαρὲθ τῆς Γαλιλαίας.
24.5
πολλοὶ γὰρ ἐλεύσονται ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματί μου λέγοντες Ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ χριστός, καὶ πολλοὺς πλανήσουσιν.
24.7
ἐγερθήσεται γὰρ ἔθνος ἐπὶ ἔθνος καὶ βασιλεία ἐπὶ βασιλείαν, καὶ ἔσονται λιμοὶ καὶ σεισμοὶ κατὰ τόπους· 24.8 πάντα δὲ ταῦτα ἀρχὴ ὠδίνων. 24.9 τότε παραδώσουσιν ὑμᾶς εἰς θλίψιν καὶ ἀποκτενοῦσιν ὑμᾶς, καὶ ἔσεσθε μισούμενοι ὑπὸ πάντων τῶν ἐθνῶν διὰ τὸ ὄνομά μου. 24.10 καὶ τότε σκανδαλισθήσονται πολλοὶ καὶ ἀλλήλους παραδώσουσιν καὶ μισήσουσιν ἀλλήλους· 24.11 καὶ πολλοὶ ψευδοπροφῆται ἐγερθήσονται καὶ πλανήσουσιν πολλούς· 24.12 καὶ διὰ τὸ πληθυνθῆναι τὴν ἀνομίαν ψυγήσεται ἡ ἀγάπη τῶν πολλῶν.
24.21
ἔσται γὰρ τότε θλίψις μεγάλη οἵα οὐ γέγονεν ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς κόσμου ἕως τοῦ νῦν οὐδʼ οὐ μὴ γένηται.
26.59
οἱ δὲ ἀρχιερεῖς καὶ τὸ συνέδριον ὅλον ἐζήτουν ψευδομαρτυρίαν κατὰ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ ὅπως αὐτὸν θανατώσωσιν,'' None
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5.25 Agree with your adversary quickly, while you are with him in the way; lest perhaps the prosecutor deliver you to the judge, and the judge deliver you to the officer, and you be cast into prison. 5.26 Most assuredly I tell you, you shall by no means get out of there, until you have paid the last penny.
6.17
But you, when you fast, anoint your head, and wash your face;
20.16
So the last will be first, and the first last. For many are called, but few are chosen."
21.11
The multitudes said, "This is the prophet, Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee."' "
24.5
For many will come in my name, saying, 'I am the Christ,' and will lead many astray. " 24.7 For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; and there will be famines, plagues, and earthquakes in various places. 24.8 But all these things are the beginning of birth pains. ' "24.9 Then they will deliver you up to oppression, and will kill you. You will be hated by all of the nations for my name's sake. " '24.10 Then many will stumble, and will deliver up one another, and will hate one another. 24.11 Many false prophets will arise, and will lead many astray. 24.12 Because iniquity will be multiplied, the love of many will grow cold.
24.21
for then there will be great oppression, such as has not been from the beginning of the world until now, no, nor ever will be.
26.59
Now the chief priests, the elders, and the whole council sought false testimony against Jesus, that they might put him to death; '' None
51. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.7, 13.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aigina, Aiginetans, commercial, maritime elite • Themistokles, hated by Greek elites • demos, and elite • elite, archaic • elite, changes and continuities in the evolution of • elites, and grain-supply • elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy • elites, in Athenian empire • elites, maritime and commercial • grain-supply, elite initiatives

 Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 143, 154; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 216, 217

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13.7 λέγεται δὲ καὶ τῶν μακρῶν τειχῶν, ἃ σκέλη καλοῦσι, συντελεσθῆναι μὲν ὕστερον τὴν οἰκοδομίαν, τὴν δὲ πρώτην θεμελίωσιν εἰς τόπους ἑλώδεις καὶ διαβρόχους τῶν ἔργων ἐμπεσόντων ἐρεισθῆναι διὰ Κίμωνος ἀσφαλῶς, χάλικι πολλῇ καὶ λίθοις βαρέσι τῶν ἑλῶν πιεσθέντων, ἐκείνου χρήματα πορίζοντος καὶ διδόντος.' ' None
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13.7 ' ' None
52. Tacitus, Annals, 1.15, 1.74, 3.22, 3.28, 3.34, 3.65 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustan legislation, elite resentment of • Republic, Roman, elite competition • dress, elite • elite, Roman, and voluntary childlessness • elites • elites, and collective security • elites, and delatores • elites, and maiestas trials • elites, images of • elites, reputation of • elites, security of • emperor,, at elections • emperor,, role in elections • praetor,, election • quaestor,, timing of election • senate, in Latin and Greek,, elects magistrates • taxation, by elites • viewers, elite versus non-elite

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 79; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 90; Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 155, 157, 159, 161; Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 116, 117; Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 93; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 128; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 105; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 184, 204, 342; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 53

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1.15 Tum primum e campo comitia ad patres translata sunt: nam ad eam diem, etsi potissima arbitrio principis, quaedam tamen studiis tribuum fiebant. neque populus ademptum ius questus est nisi ii rumore, et senatus largitionibus ac precibus sordidis exsolutus libens tenuit, moderante Tiberio ne plures quam quattuor candidatos commendaret sine repulsa et ambitu desigdos. inter quae tribuni plebei petivere ut proprio sumptu ederent ludos qui de nomine Augusti fastis additi Augustales vocarentur. sed decreta pecunia ex aerario, utque per circum triumphali veste uterentur: curru vehi haud permissum. mox celebratio annua ad praetorem translata cui inter civis et peregrinos iurisdictio evenisset.' "
1.74
Nec multo post Granium Marcellum praetorem Bithyniae quaestor ipsius Caepio Crispinus maiestatis postulavit, subscribente Romano Hispone: qui formam vitae iniit, quam postea celebrem miseriae temporum et audaciae hominum fecerunt. nam egens, ignotus, inquies, dum occultis libellis saevitiae principis adrepit, mox clarissimo cuique periculum facessit, potentiam apud unum, odium apud omnis adeptus dedit exemplum, quod secuti ex pauperibus divites, ex contemptis metuendi perniciem aliis ac postremum sibi invenere. sed Marcellum insimulabat sinistros de Tiberio sermones habuisse, inevitabile crimen, cum ex moribus principis foedissima quaeque deligeret accusator obiectaretque reo. nam quia vera erant, etiam dicta credebantur. addidit Hispo statuam Marcelli altius quam Caesarum sitam, et alia in statua amputato capite Augusti effigiem Tiberii inditam. ad quod exarsit adeo, ut rupta taciturnitate proclamaret se quoque in ea causa laturum sententiam palam et iuratum, quo ceteris eadem necessitas fieret. manebant etiam tum vestigia morientis libertatis. igitur Cn. Piso 'quo' inquit 'loco censebis, Caesar? si primus, habebo quod sequar: si post omnis, vereor ne inprudens dissentiam.' permotus his, quantoque incautius efferverat, paenitentia patiens tulit absolvi reum criminibus maiestatis: de pecuniis repetundis ad reciperatores itum est." 3.22 At Romae Lepida, cui super Aemiliorum decus L. Sulla et Cn. Pompeius proavi erant, defertur simulavisse partum ex P. Quirinio divite atque orbo. adiciebantur adulteria venena quaesitumque per Chaldaeos in domum Caesaris, defendente ream Manio Lepido fratre. Quirinius post dictum repudium adhuc infensus quamvis infami ac nocenti miserationem addiderat. haud facile quis dispexerit illa in cognitione mentem principis: adeo vertit ac miscuit irae et clementiae signa. deprecatus primo senatum ne maiestatis crimina tractarentur, mox M. Servilium e consularibus aliosque testis inlexit ad proferenda quae velut reicere voluerat. idemque servos Lepidae, cum militari custodia haberentur, transtulit ad consules neque per tormenta interrogari passus est de iis quae ad domum suam pertinerent. exemit etiam Drusum consulem designatum dicendae primo loco sententiae; quod alii civile rebantur, ne ceteris adsentiendi necessitas fieret, quidam ad saevitiam trahebant: neque enim cessurum nisi damdi officio.
3.28
Tum Cn. Pompeius, tertium consul corrigendis moribus delectus et gravior remediis quam delicta erant suarumque legum auctor idem ac subversor, quae armis tuebatur armis amisit. exim continua per viginti annos discordia, non mos, non ius; deterrima quaeque impune ac multa honesta exitio fuere. sexto demum consulatu Caesar Augustus, potentiae securus, quae triumviratu iusserat abolevit deditque iura quis pace et principe uteremur. acriora ex eo vincla, inditi custodes et lege Papia Poppaea praemiis inducti ut, si a privilegiis parentum cessaretur, velut parens omnium populus vacantia teneret. sed altius penetrabant urbemque et Italiam et quod usquam civium corripuerant, multorumque excisi status. et terror omnibus intentabatur ni Tiberius statuendo remedio quinque consularium, quinque e praetoriis, totidem e cetero senatu sorte duxisset apud quos exsoluti plerique legis nexus modicum in praesens levamentum fuere.
3.34
Paucorum haec adsensu audita: plures obturbabant neque relatum de negotio neque Caecinam dignum tantae rei censorem. mox Valerius Messalinus, cui parens Mes- sala ineratque imago paternae facundiae, respondit multa duritiae veterum in melius et laetius mutata; neque enim, ut olim, obsideri urbem bellis aut provincias hostilis esse. et pauca feminarum necessitatibus concedi quae ne coniugum quidem penatis, adeo socios non onerent; cetera promisca cum marito nec ullum in eo pacis impedimentum. bella plane accinctis obeunda: sed revertentibus post laborem quod honestius quam uxorium levamentum? at quasdam in ambitionem aut avaritiam prolapsas. quid? ipsorum magistratuum nonne plerosque variis libidinibus obnoxios? non tamen ideo neminem in provinciam mitti. corruptos saepe pravitatibus uxorum maritos: num ergo omnis caelibes integros? placuisse quondam Oppias leges, sic temporibus rei publicae postulantibus: remissum aliquid postea et mitigatum, quia expedierit. frustra nostram ignaviam alia ad vocabula transferri: nam viri in eo culpam si femina modum excedat. porro ob unius aut alterius imbecillum animum male eripi maritis consortia rerum secundarum adversarumque. simul sexum natura invalidum deseri et exponi suo luxu, cupidinibus alienis. vix praesenti custodia manere inlaesa coniugia: quid fore si per pluris annos in modum discidii oblitterentur? sic obviam irent iis quae alibi peccarentur ut flagitiorum urbis meminissent. addidit pauca Drusus de matrimonio suo; nam principibus adeunda saepius longinqua imperii. quoties divum Augustum in Occidentem atque Orientem meavisse comite Livia! se quoque in Illyricum profectum et, si ita conducat, alias ad gentis iturum, haud semper aequo animo si ab uxore carissima et tot communium liberorum parente divelleretur. sic Caecinae sententia elusa.' "
3.65
Exequi sententias haud institui nisi insignis per honestum aut notabili dedecore, quod praecipuum munus annalium reor ne virtutes sileantur utque pravis dictis factisque ex posteritate et infamia metus sit. ceterum tempora illa adeo infecta et adulatione sordida fuere ut non modo primores civitatis, quibus claritudo sua obsequiis protegenda erat, sed omnes consulares, magna pars eorum qui praetura functi multique etiam pedarii senatores certatim exsurgerent foedaque et nimia censerent. memoriae proditur Tiberium, quoties curia egrederetur, Graecis verbis in hunc modum eloqui solitum 'o homines ad servitutem paratos!' scilicet etiam illum qui libertatem publicam nollet tam proiectae servientium patientiae taedebat."' None
sup>
1.15 \xa0The elections were now for the first time transferred from the Campus to the senate: up to that day, while the most important were determined by the will of the sovereign, a\xa0few had still been left to the predilections of the Tribes. From the people the withdrawal of the right brought no protest beyond idle murmurs; and the senate, relieved from the necessity of buying or begging votes, was glad enough to embrace the change, Tiberius limiting himself to the recommendation of not more than four candidates, to be appointed without rejection or competition. At the same time, the plebeian tribunes asked leave to exhibit games at their own expense â\x80\x94 to be called after the late emperor and added to the calendar as the Augustalia. It was decided, however, that the cost should be borne by the treasury; also, that the tribunes should have the use of the triumphal robe in the Circus; the chariot was not to be permissible. The whole function, before long, was transferred to the praetor who happened to have the jurisdiction in suits between natives and aliens.
1.74
\xa0Before long, Granius Marcellus, praetor of Bithynia, found himself accused of treason by his own quaestor, Caepio Crispinus, with Hispo Romanus to back the charge. Caepio was the pioneer in a walk of life which the miseries of the age and effronteries of men soon rendered popular. Indigent, unknown, unresting, first creeping, with his private reports, into the confidence of his pitiless sovereign, then a terror to the noblest, he acquired the favour of one man, the hatred of all, and set an example, the followers of which passed from beggary to wealth, from being despised to being feared, and crowned at last the ruin of others by their own. He alleged that Marcellus had retailed sinister anecdotes about Tiberius: a\xa0damning indictment, when the accuser selected the foulest qualities of the imperial character, and attributed their mention to the accused. For, as the facts were true, they were also believed to have been related! Hispo added that Marcellus\' own statue was placed on higher ground than those of the Caesars, while in another the head of Augustus had been struck off to make room for the portrait of Tiberius. This incensed the emperor to such a degree that, breaking through his taciturnity, he exclaimed that, in this case, he too would vote, openly and under oath, â\x80\x94 the object being to impose a similar obligation on the rest. There remained even yet some traces of dying liberty. Accordingly Gnaeus Piso inquired: "In what order will you register your opinion, Caesar? If first, I\xa0shall have something to follow: if last of all, I\xa0fear I\xa0may inadvertently find myself on the other side." The words went home; and with a meekness that showed how profoundly he rued his unwary outburst, he voted for the acquittal of the defendant on the counts of treason. The charge of peculation went before the appropriate commission. <' "
3.22
\xa0At Rome, in the meantime, Lepida, who, over and above the distinction of the Aemilian family, owned Sulla and Pompey for great-grandsires, was accused of feigning to be a mother by Publius Quirinius, a rich man and childless. There were complementary charges of adulteries, of poisonings, and of inquiries made through the astrologers with reference to the Caesarian house. The defence was in the hands of her brother, Manius Lepidus. Despite her infamy and her guilt, Quirinius, by persisting in his malignity after divorcing her, had gained her a measure of sympathy. It is not easy to penetrate the emperor's sentiments during this trial: so adroitly did he invert and confuse the symptoms of anger and of mercy. He began by requesting the senate not to deal with the charges of treason; then he lured the former consul, Marcus Servilius, with a\xa0number of other witnesses, into stating the very facts he had apparently wished to have suppressed. Lepida's slaves, again, were being held in military custody; he transferred them to the consuls, and would not allow them to be questioned under torture upon the issues concerning his own family. Similarly, he exempted Drusus, who was consul designate, from speaking first to the question. By some this was read as a concession relieving the rest of the members from the need of assenting: others took it to mark a sinister purpose on the ground that he would have ceded nothing save the duty of condemning. <" "
3.28
\xa0Then came Pompey's third consulate. But this chosen reformer of society, operating with remedies more disastrous than the abuses, this maker and breaker of his own enactments, lost by the sword what he was holding by the sword. The followed twenty crowded years of discord, during which law and custom ceased to exist: villainy was immune, decency not rarely a sentence of death. At last, in his sixth consulate, Augustus Caesar, feeling his power secure, cancelled the behests of his triumvirate, and presented us with laws to serve our needs in peace and under a prince. Thenceforward the fetters were tightened: sentries were set over us and, under the Papia-Poppaean law, lured on by rewards; so that, if a man shirked the privileges of paternity, the state, as universal parent, might step into the vacant inheritance. But they pressed their activities too far: the capital, Italy, every corner of the Roman world, had suffered from their attacks, and the positions of many had been wholly ruined. Indeed, a reign of terror was threatened, when Tiberius, for the fixing of a remedy, chose by lot five former consuls, five former praetors, and an equal number of ordinary senators: a\xa0body which, by untying many of the legal knots, gave for the time a measure of relief. <" 3.34 \xa0A\xa0few members listened to the speech with approval: most interrupted with protests that neither was there a motion on the subject nor was Caecina a competent censor in a question of such importance. He was presently answered by Valerius Messalinus, a son of Messala, in whom there resided some echo of his father\'s eloquence:â\x80\x94 "Much of the old-world harshness had been improved and softened; for Rome was no longer environed with wars, nor were the provinces hostile. A\xa0few allowances were now made to the needs of women; but not such as to embarrass even the establishment of their consorts, far less our allies: everything else the wife shared with her husband, and in peace the arrangement created no difficulties. Certainly, he who set about a war must gird up his loins; but, when he returned after his labour, what consolations more legitimate than those of his helpmeet? â\x80\x94 But a\xa0few women had lapsed into intrigue or avarice. â\x80\x94 Well, were not too many of the magistrates themselves vulnerable to temptation in more shapes than one? Yet governors still went out to governorships! â\x80\x94 Husbands had often been corrupted by the depravity of their wives. â\x80\x94 And was every single man, then, incorruptible? The Oppian laws in an earlier day were sanctioned because the circumstances of the commonwealth so demanded: later remissions and mitigations were due to expediency. It was vain to label our own inertness with another title: if the woman broke bounds, the fault lay with the husband. Moreover, it was unjust that, through the weakness of one or two, married men in general should be torn from their partners in weal and woe, while at the same time a sex frail by nature was left alone, exposed to its own voluptuousness and the appetites of others. Hardly by surveillance on the spot could the marriage-tie be kept undamaged: what would be the case if, for a term of years, it were dissolved as completely as by divorce? While they were taking steps to meet abuses elsewhere, it would be well to remember the scandals of the capital! Drusus added a\xa0few sentences upon his own married life:â\x80\x94 "Princes not infrequently had to visit the remote parts of the empire. How often had the deified Augustus travelled to west and east with Livia for his companion! He had himself made an excursion to Illyricum; and, if there was a purpose to serve, he was prepared to go to other countries â\x80\x94 but not always without a pang, if he were severed from the well-beloved wife who was the mother of their many common children." Caecina\'s motion was thus evaded. <
3.65
\xa0It is not my intention to dwell upon any senatorial motions save those either remarkable for their nobility or of memorable turpitude; in which case they fall within my conception of the first duty of history â\x80\x94 to ensure that merit shall not lack its record and to hold before the vicious word and deed the terrors of posterity and infamy. But so tainted was that age, so mean its sycophancy, that not only the great personages of the state, who had to shield their magnificence by their servility, but all senators of consular rank, a large proportion of the ex-praetors, many ordinary members even, vied with one another in rising to move the most repulsive and extravagant resolutions. The tradition runs that Tiberius, on leaving the curia, had a habit of ejaculating in Greek, "These men! â\x80\x94 how ready they are for slavery!" Even he, it was manifest, objecting though he did to public liberty, was growing weary of such grovelling patience in his slaves. <'' None
53. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Old Comedy (Attic), countering arrogance of elites • dress, elite • elections • elites

 Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 149; Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 33; Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 66

54. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elites • dress, elite

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 279; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 108

55. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • aedile,, timing of election • flattery (adulatio), among Roman elites • maiestas (treason), among Roman elites • praetor,, election • quaestor,, timing of election • tribune (of plebs),, timing of election

 Found in books: Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 132; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 206

56. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • brothels, elite attitudes toward • elites, Romans govern through, emperor, divinity of

 Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 369; McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 86

57. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elite, elitism • rabbis, as elites

 Found in books: Balberg (2023), Fractured Tablets: Forgetfulness and Fallibility in Late Ancient Rabbinic Culture, 174; Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 117

58. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elect • Election (of Israel) • elect of God • election/elect • elite • pre-election

 Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 85; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 276; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 120; Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 76, 108; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 182, 455; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 114

59. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apuleius, worries about elite status • Roman era, elite self-image-making • Society, elites • bias, elite • election posters, candidatorum programmata, at Pompeii

 Found in books: Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 103; Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 206; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 134; Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 219, 221; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 283

60. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, elite • elite • viewers, elite versus non-elite

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 78, 79, 80, 81, 90; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 9, 107; Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 92

61. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elite, Roman, assimilation of values • elites

 Found in books: Huebner (2013), The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity , 20, 34, 35; Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 107

62. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aigina, Aiginetans, commercial, maritime elite • demos, and elite in fifth-century Athens • elite, changes and continuities in the evolution of • elites, and grain-supply • elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy • elites, in Athenian empire • elites, maritime and commercial • grain-supply, elite initiatives

 Found in books: Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 144; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 216

63. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 51.20.6-51.20.8, 56.46.4, 58.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Rome, elite neighbourhood on • dress, elite • elections • emperor,, role in elections • priestly elites, at the Temple of Artemis • senate, in Latin and Greek,, elects magistrates • social elite, Roman

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 90; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 157; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 189; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 109; Tacoma (2020), Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship, 114, 116; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 342

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51.20.6 \xa0Caesar, meanwhile, besides attending to the general business, gave permission for the dedication of sacred precincts in Ephesus and in Nicaea to Rome and to Caesar, his father, whom he named the hero Julius. These cities had at that time attained chief place in Asia and in Bithynia respectively. 51.20.7 \xa0He commanded that the Romans resident in these cities should pay honour to these two divinities; but he permitted the aliens, whom he styled Hellenes, to consecrate precincts to himself, the Asians to have theirs in Pergamum and the Bithynians theirs in Nicomedia. This practice, beginning under him, has been continued under other emperors, not only in the case of the Hellenic nations but also in that of all the others, in so far as they are subject to the Romans. 51.20.8 \xa0For in the capital itself and in Italy generally no emperor, however worthy of renown he has been, has dared to do this; still, even there various divine honours are bestowed after their death upon such emperors as have ruled uprightly, and, in fact, shrines are built to them.' "
56.46.4
\xa0While his shrine was being erected in Rome, they placed a golden image of him on a couch in the temple of Mars, and to this they paid all the honours that they were afterwards to give to his statue. Other votes in regard to him were, that his image should not be borne in procession at anybody's funeral, that the consuls should celebrate his birthday with games like the Ludi Martiales, and that the tribunes, as being sacrosanct, were to have charge of the Augustalia." 58.20.4 \xa0After that the candidates went before the people or before the plebs, according as they belonged to the one or the other, and were duly elected; this was done in order to conform to time-honoured precedent, just as is done toâ\x80\x91day, so as to produce the semblance of a valid election. In case there was ever a deficiency of candidates, or in case they became involved in irreconcilable strife, a smaller number were chosen.'' None
64. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.6.2, 1.7.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Elitism • election/elect

 Found in books: Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 193, 197; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 13, 14

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1.6.2 Animal men, again, are instructed in animal things; such men, namely, as are established by their works, and by a mere faith, while they have not perfect knowledge. We of the Church, they say, are these persons. Wherefore also they maintain that good works are necessary to us, for that otherwise it is impossible we should be saved. But as to themselves, they hold that they shall be entirely and undoubtedly saved, not by means of conduct, but because they are spiritual by nature. For, just as it is impossible that material substance should partake of salvation (since, indeed, they maintain that it is incapable of receiving it), so again it is impossible that spiritual substance (by which they mean themselves) should ever come under the power of corruption, whatever the sort of actions in which they indulged. For even as gold, when submersed in filth, loses not on that account its beauty, but retains its own native qualities, the filth having no power to injure the gold, so they affirm that they cannot in any measure suffer hurt, or lose their spiritual substance, whatever the material actions in which they may be involved.
1.7.5
They conceive, then, of three kinds of men, spiritual, material, and animal, represented by Cain, Abel, and Seth. These three natures are no longer found in one person, but constitute various kinds of men. The material goes, as a matter of course, into corruption. The animal, if it make choice of the better part, finds repose in the intermediate place; but if the worse, it too shall pass into destruction. But they assert that the spiritual principles which have been sown by Achamoth, being disciplined and nourished here from that time until now in righteous souls (because when given forth by her they were yet but weak), at last attaining to perfection, shall be given as brides to the angels of the Saviour, while their animal souls of necessity rest for ever with the Demiurge in the intermediate place. And again subdividing the animal souls themselves, they say that some are by nature good, and others by nature evil. The good are those who become capable of receiving the spiritual seed; the evil by nature are those who are never able to receive that seed.'' None
65. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.20.3, 3.20.5, 3.20.8, 4.25, 6.19.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • aedile,, timing of election • elections • elite migration • emperor,, role in elections • praetor,, election • quaestor,, timing of election • senate, in Latin and Greek,, elects magistrates • tribune (of plebs),, timing of election

 Found in books: Tacoma (2016), Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla, 37; Tacoma (2020), Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 112, 113, 114, 115; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 205, 343, 344

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4.25 To Messius Maximus. I wrote and told you that there was a danger of the ballot leading to abuses. * Events have confirmed my view. At the last comitia a number of flippant jests were written on some of the voting cards and even obscenities, while on one of them were found, not the names of the candidates, but those of the voters. The senate was furious, and loudly called upon the offended Emperor to punish the writer. But the guilty person kept quiet and was not discovered - he possibly was one of those who professed the greatest indignation. Yet what conduct may we not consider him capable of at home when he plays such disgraceful jokes in a matter of such importance and at such a serious moment, and yet in the senate is an incisive, courteous, and witty speaker? However, people of no principle are encouraged to act in this shameful way when they feel they can safely say, "Who will find me out?" Such a man asks for a voting card, takes a pen in his hand, bends his head, has no fear of anyone, and holds himself cheap. That is the origin of scurrilities only worthy of the stage and the platform. But where can one turn, and where is one to look for a cure? On every hand the evils are more powerful than the remedies. Yet "all these things will be seen to by one above us," ** whose daily working hours are lengthened and whose labours are considerably increased by this lumpish, yet unbridled, perversity. Farewell. 0
6.19.4
To Nepos. You know that the price of land, especially in the suburbs of Rome, has gone up. The cause of this sudden increase in value has been the theme of general discussion. At the last elections the senate passed the following wholesome resolutions; "That no candidates should provide public entertainments, send presents, and deposit sums of money.\'\' The first two practices had gone on openly, and been carried beyond all reasonable lengths ; the last-named had been indulged in secretly, but still to every one\'s knowledge. So our friend Homullus clearly availed himself of the uimity of the senate, and, instead of making a speech, he asked that the consuls should acquaint the Emperor with the wishes of the whole body of senators, and beg him to take steps to devise means to put a stop to this evil, as he had already done to other scandals. He has done so, for by means of the Corrupt Practices Act he has restricted the shameful and scandalous expenses which candidates used to incur, and he has issued orders that all candidates shall have invested a third of their patrimony in land. He very justly took the view that it was disgraceful that candidates for public offices should regard Rome and Italy, not as their mother country, but as a mere inn or lodging-place, in which they were staying as travellers. So the candidates are busy running about buying up whatever they hear is on sale, and they are forcing a number of estates into the market. Consequently if you are tired of your Italian estates, now is the real good time to sell them and buy others in the provinces, for the candidates have to sell their provincial properties to enable them to purchase here. Farewell. ' ' None
66. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Election, Isis elects people near end of life • Isis, elects people near end of life • dress, elite

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 244; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 280

67. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apuleius, worries about elite status • Election, Isis elects people near end of life, appointed and destined by Isis • Election, Isis elects people near end of life, markedly favoured by her grace • King, election of • dress, elite • elites, Romans govern through, emperor, divinity of

 Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 369; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 240, 252, 253; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 253, 281, 284; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 279, 283, 285

68. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, elite • elite

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 245; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 70

69. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • aedile,, timing of election • elections • emperor,, role in elections • praetor,, election • quaestor,, timing of election • senate, in Latin and Greek,, elects magistrates • tribune (of plebs),, timing of election

 Found in books: Tacoma (2020), Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship, 114, 117; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 205, 343

70. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • bishops, between universalism and elitism • controversy, episcopal elections

 Found in books: Hanghan (2019), Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus, 52; Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 52; Niccolai (2023), Christianity, Philosophy, and Roman Power: Constantine, Julian, and the Bishops on Exegesis and Empire. 290, 291

71. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Old Comedy (Attic), countering arrogance of elites • Roman era, elite self-image-making

 Found in books: Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 210; Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169

72. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • electio, election • election • election, and free will

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 76, 77; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 238; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 259, 260

73. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • electio, election • election/elect

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 266; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 152, 198

74. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elites, Romans govern through, emperor, divinity of • elites, Romans govern through, empire, division of • manhood (elite late-Roman)

 Found in books: Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 270, 391; Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 88, 139

75. Demosthenes, Orations, 2.24, 42.22
 Tagged with subjects: • demos, and elite in fourth-century Athens • elite, Athenian • elite, ideological agency • elites/masses

 Found in books: Barbato (2020), The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past, 71; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 200; Spatharas (2019), Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens, 146

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2.24 Nay, I am surprised that you, men of Athens, who once withstood the Lacedaemonians in defence of the rights of Hellas, who spurned the opportunity, repeatedly offered, of self-aggrandizement, who lavished your treasure and jeoparded your lives in the field that others might enjoy their rights, now shrink from service and grudge to pay your contributions for the sake of your own possessions. I am surprised that you, who have so often saved the other states, both all of them together and each separately in turn, should sit down under the loss of what is your own.
42.22
Yet my father left to each of us, my brother and myself, an estate of forty-five minae merely, on which it is not easy to live, while your fathers were possessed of such wealth that each of them set up a tripod in honor of choregic victories at the Dionysia. And I do not begrudge them this, for it is the duty of the wealthy to render service to the state. Do you, therefore, show that you have expended one single copper coin on the state—you, who have inherited two estates which performed public services.'' None
76. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 47
 Tagged with subjects: • deme, elections • elite politicians

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1120; Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 73

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47 . . . upon the table the following: . . . 1 mast-head cup; mast-head cup(s?) . . . a mast-head cup(?) into which the olive oil . . . another mast-head cup; a drinking cup (5) . . . made of metal(?); a statuette . . . a canteen-flask; a box; an incense-censer . . . a small tripod; small shield(s?) . . . 2 large shields; a large cupping-glass with a chain attached; 1 strigil (10) with a chain attached; a large strigil; another one with a chain attached; 2 cupping-glasses; a drinking cup; a canteen- flask or small cup; a cooling vessel; a brooch; 4 crowns Uninscribed line The following objects made of iron: (15) a large ring with a chain attached; a large strigil; medical forceps; 5 surgeon’s knives and forceps; 2 tablets/platters . . . tongs; 3 medical forceps; 4 strigils; (20) a ring with a chain; a statuette and . . . throughout the sanctuary worked in low relief . . . Decree The People decided. Athenodoros proposed. Concerning what the priest of Asklepios, Euthydemos, says, the People (25) shall resolve: in order that the preliminary sacrifices (prothumata) may be offered which Euthydemos the priest of Asklepios recommends (exegetai), and the other sacrifices take place on behalf of the People of the Athenians, the People shall resolve: that the overseers (epistatas) of the Asklepieion shall make the preliminary sacrifices (prothumata) that Euthydemos recommends (exegetai), (30) with money from the quarry set aside for the god, and pay the other money towards the building of the sanctuary; and in order that the Athenians may distribute as much meat as possible, the religious officials (hieropoios) in office shall take care of the (35) festival with respect to what comes from the People (dēmo); and distribute the meat of the leading ox to the prytany members and to the nine archons and the religious officials and those participating in the procession, and distribute the other meat to the Athenians . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
47 - Assembly decree concerning sacrifices in cult of Asklepios in Piraeus
'' None
77. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.53
 Tagged with subjects: • elites • social elite, Egyptian

 Found in books: Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 130; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 122

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17.1.53 Egypt was from the first disposed to peace, from having resources within itself, and because it was difficult of access to strangers. It was also protected on the north by a harbourless coast and the Egyptian Sea; on the east and west by the desert mountains of Libya and Arabia, as I have said before. The remaining parts towards the south are occupied by Troglodytae, Blemmyes, Nubae, and Megabari, Ethiopians above Syene. These are nomads, and not numerous nor warlike, but accounted so by the ancients, because frequently, like robbers, they attacked defenceless persons. Neither are the Ethiopians, who extend towards the south and Meroe, numerous nor collected in a body; for they inhabit a long, narrow, and winding tract of land on the riverside, such as we have before described; nor are they well prepared either for war or the pursuit of any other mode of life.At present the whole country is in the same pacific state, a proof of which is, that the upper country is sufficiently guarded by three cohorts, and these not complete. Whenever the Ethiopians have ventured to attack them, it has been at the risk of danger to their own country. The rest of the forces in Egypt are neither very numerous, nor did the Romans ever once employ them collected into one army. For neither are the Egyptians themselves of a warlike disposition, nor the surrounding nations, although their numbers are very large.Cornelius Gallus, the first governor of the country appointed by (Augustus) Caesar, attacked the city Heroopolis, which had revolted, and took it with a small body of men. He suppressed also in a short time an insurrection in the Thebais, which originated as to the payment of tribute. At a later period Petronius resisted, with the soldiers about his person, a mob of myriads of Alexandrines, who attacked him by throwing stones. He killed some, and compelled the rest to desist.We have before related how Aelius Gallus, when he invaded Arabia with a part of the army stationed in Egypt, exhibited a proof of the unwarlike disposition of the people; and if Syllaeus had not betrayed him, he would have conquered the whole of Arabia Felix.'' None
78. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Local elite, and societal image • dress, elite

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 142; Ferrándiz (2022), Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms: Gone Under Sea, 110

79. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Priesthoods, by election • priesthoods, elected

 Found in books: Connelly (2007), Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, 50; Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 46

80. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Pompeian graffiti, election notices in • Terracina, election notice from • election posters, candidatorum programmata, at Pompeii • elections • elections, in local municipalities • elite continuity • elites, local, Italy and western provinces • municipal governance, elections • non-elites • provincial elites • regional elites

 Found in books: Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 103, 233, 237, 242, 243, 244, 502; Clark (2007), Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome, 274, 275; Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 297; Tacoma (2020), Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship, 68, 70, 74, 75, 82, 83, 85, 86, 89

81. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Elites • elite • elites, civic, in religious life of Ephesos

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 34; Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 129; Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 94; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 150

82. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Priesthoods, by election • priesthoods, elected

 Found in books: Connelly (2007), Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, 50; Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 47

83. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Iulius Philippus, C., elite lineage of • elites, local, Greek East

 Found in books: Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 261, 262; Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 79

84. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • elite, ideological agency • elites/masses

 Found in books: Barbato (2020), The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past, 73; Spatharas (2019), Emotions, persuasion, and public discourse in classical Athens, 178, 180




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