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41 results for "elements"
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.277, 14.201, 14.245-14.246, 14.302, 24.88 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) •elements, air Found in books: Frede and Laks (2001), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath, 199; Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 43, 325
3.277. / Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 14.201. / For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.245. / Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson, 14.246. / Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson, 14.302. / Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, 24.88. / was wailing for the fate of her peerless son, who to her sorrow was to perish in deep-soiled Troy, far from his native land. And swift-footed Iris drew near, and spake to her:Rouse thee, 0 Thetis; Zeus, whose counsels are everlasting, calleth thee. Then spake in answer Thetis, the silver-footed goddess:
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 115-116, 154, 346-361, 736-766, 784, 795-806, 120 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 85
120. Tell how the gods and Earth first came to be,
3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 121-126, 252-254, 267, 255 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 321, 329
255. of one man often sways whole cities, for
4. Homer, Odyssey, 11.109, 12.323 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 325
5. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 326
6. Epimenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 91
7. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 182
8. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 182
9. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
10. Anaximenes of Miletus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 182
11. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 985-986 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 325
986. Ἥλιος, ἄναγνα μητρὸς ἔργα τῆς ἐμῆς,
12. Herodotus, Histories, 2.123.2, 4.13-4.15 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 92, 299
2.123.2. The Egyptians were the first who maintained the following doctrine, too, that the human soul is immortal, and at the death of the body enters into some other living thing then coming to birth; and after passing through all creatures of land, sea, and air, it enters once more into a human body at birth, a cycle which it completes in three thousand years. 4.13. There is also a story related in a poem by Aristeas son of Caüstrobius, a man of Proconnesus . This Aristeas, possessed by Phoebus, visited the Issedones; beyond these (he said) live the one-eyed Arimaspians, beyond whom are the griffins that guard gold, and beyond these again the Hyperboreans, whose territory reaches to the sea. ,Except for the Hyperboreans, all these nations (and first the Arimaspians) are always at war with their neighbors; the Issedones were pushed from their lands by the Arimaspians, and the Scythians by the Issedones, and the Cimmerians, living by the southern sea, were hard pressed by the Scythians and left their country. Thus Aristeas' story does not agree with the Scythian account about this country. 4.14. Where Aristeas who wrote this came from, I have already said; I will tell the story that I heard about him at Proconnesus and Cyzicus . It is said that this Aristeas, who was as well-born as any of his townsfolk, went into a fuller's shop at Proconnesus and there died; the owner shut his shop and went away to tell the dead man's relatives, ,and the report of Aristeas' death being spread about in the city was disputed by a man of Cyzicus , who had come from the town of Artace, and said that he had met Aristeas going toward Cyzicus and spoken with him. While he argued vehemently, the relatives of the dead man came to the fuller's shop with all that was necessary for burial; ,but when the place was opened, there was no Aristeas there, dead or alive. But in the seventh year after that, Aristeas appeared at Proconnesus and made that poem which the Greeks now call the title Arimaspea /title , after which he vanished once again. 4.15. Such is the tale told in these two towns. But this, I know, happened to the Metapontines in Italy , two hundred and forty years after the second disappearance of Aristeas, as reckoning made at Proconnesus and Metapontum shows me: ,Aristeas, so the Metapontines say, appeared in their country and told them to set up an altar to Apollo, and set beside it a statue bearing the name of Aristeas the Proconnesian; for, he said, Apollo had come to their country alone of all Italian lands, and he—the man who was now Aristeas, but then when he followed the god had been a crow—had come with him. ,After saying this, he vanished. The Metapontines, so they say, sent to Delphi and asked the god what the vision of the man could mean; and the Pythian priestess told them to obey the vision, saying that their fortune would be better. ,They did as instructed. And now there stands beside the image of Apollo a statue bearing the name of Aristeas; a grove of bay-trees surrounds it; the image is set in the marketplace. Let it suffice that I have said this much about Aristeas.
13. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 330
14. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
15. Democritus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 92
16. Epicharmus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 182
17. Sophocles, Electra, 63-66, 62 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 92
18. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 325
413b. ἀκηκοέναι καὶ ἐπιχειροῦσιν, βουλόμενοι ἀποπιμπλάναι με, ἄλλος ἄλλα ἤδη λέγειν, καὶ οὐκέτι συμφωνοῦσιν. ὁ μὲν γὰρ τίς φησιν τοῦτο εἶναι δίκαιον, τὸν ἥλιον· τοῦτον γὰρ μόνον διαϊόντα καὶ κάοντα ἐπιτροπεύειν τὰ ὄντα. ἐπειδὰν οὖν τῳ λέγω αὐτὸ ἅσμενος ὡς καλόν τι ἀκηκοώς, καταγελᾷ μου οὗτος ἀκούσας καὶ ἐρωτᾷ εἰ οὐδὲν δίκαιον οἶμαι εἶναι ἐν τοῖς ἀνθρώποις ἐπειδὰν 413b. διαϊόντα καὶ καίοντα ) them. Then when I am pleased and tell this to some one, thinking it is a fine answer, he laughs at me and asks if I think there is no justice among men when the sun has set. So I beg him to tell me what he thinks it is,
19. Anaxagoras, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
20. Aristotle, Physics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 145
21. Aristotle, Meteorology, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 176
22. Aristotle, Metaphysics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
23. Theophrastus, De Ventis, 29, 15 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 176
24. Philodemus of Gadara, De Pietate \ , None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Frede and Laks (2001), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath, 205
25. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.29-1.30, 1.39-1.40, 2.23-2.32 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •elements, air •air, as vital elemental force Found in books: Frede and Laks (2001), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath, 199; Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 180, 181
1.29. Empedocles again among many other blunders comes to grief most disgracefully in his theology. He assigns divinity to the four substances which in his system are the constituent elements of the universe, although manifestly these substances both come into and pass out of existence, and are entirely devoid of sensation. Protagoras also, who declares he has no clear views whatever about the gods, whether they exist or do not exist, or what they are like, seems to have no notion at all of the divine nature. Then in what a maze of error is Democritus involved, who at one moment ranks as gods his roving 'images,' at another the substance that emits and radiates these images, and at another again the scientific intelligence of man! At the same time his denial of immutability and therefore of eternity, to everything whatsoever surely involves a repudiation of deity so absolute as to leave no conception of a divine be remaining! Diogenes of Apollonia makes air a god; but how can air have sensation, or divinity in any shape? 1.30. The inconsistencies of Plato are a long story. In the Timaeus he says that it is impossible to name the father of this universe; and in the Laws he deprecates all inquiry into the nature of the deity. Again, he holds that god is entirely incorporeal (in Greek, asomatos); but divine incorporeity is inconceivable, for an incorporeal deity would necessarily be incapable of sensation, and also of practical wisdom, and of pleasure, all of which are attributes essential to our conception of deity. Yet both in the Timaeus and the Laws he says that the world, the sky, the stars, the earth and our souls are gods, in addition to those in whom we have been taught to believe; but it is obvious that these propositions are both inherently false and mutually destructive. 1.39. Chrysippus, who is deemed to be the most skilful interpreter of the Stoic dreams, musters an enormous mob of unknown gods — so utterly unknown that even imagination cannot guess at their form and nature, although our mind appears capable of visualizing anything; for he says that divine power resides in reason, and in the soul and mind of the universe; he calls the world itself a god, and also the all‑pervading world-soul, and again the guiding principle of that soul, which operates in the intellect and reason, and the common and all‑embracing nature of things; beside this, the fire that I previously termed aether; and also the power of Fate, and the Necessity that governs future events; and also all fluid and soluble substances, such as water, earth, air, the sun, moon and stars, and the all‑embracing unity of things; and even those human beings who have attained immortality. 1.40. He also argues that the god whom men call Jupiter is the aether, and that Neptune is the air which permeates the sea, and the goddess called Ceres the earth; and he deals in the same way with the whole series of the names of the other gods. He also identifies Jupiter with the mighty Law, everlasting and eternal, which is our guide of life and instructress in duty, and which he entitles Necessity or Fate, and the Everlasting Truth of future events; none of which conceptions is of such a nature as to be deemed to possess divinity. 2.23. "However, having begun to treat the subject in a different way from that which I proposed at the beginning (for I said that this part required no discussion, since the existence of god was manifest to everybody), in spite of this I should like to prove even this point by means of arguments drawn from Physics or Natural Philosophy. It is a law of Nature that all things capable of nurture and growth contain within them a supply of heat, without which their nurture and growth would not be possible; for everything of a hot, fiery nature supplies its own source of motion and activity; but that which is nourished and grows possesses a definite and uniform motion; and as long as this motion remains within us, so long sensation and life remain, whereas so soon as our heat is cooled and quenched we ourselves perish and are extinguished. 2.24. This doctrine Cleanthes enforces by these further arguments, to show how great is the supply of heat in every living body: he states that there is no food so heavy that it is not digested in twenty-four hours; and even the residue of our food which nature rejects contains heat. Again, the veins and arteries never cease throbbing with a flame-like pulse, and frequent cases have been observed when the heart of an animal on being torn out of its body has continued to beat with a rapid motion resembling the flickering of fire. Every living thing therefore, whether animal or vegetable, owes its vitality to the heat contained within it. From this it must be inferred that this element of heat possesses in itself a vital force that pervades the whole world. 2.25. "We shall discern the truth of this more readily from a more detailed account of this all‑permeating fiery element as a whole. All the parts of the world (I will however only specify the most important) are supported and sustained by heat. This can be perceived first of all in the element of earth. We see fire produced by striking or rubbing stones together; and when newly dug, 'the earth doth steam with warmth'; and also warm water is drawn from running springs, and this occurs most of all in the winter-time, because a great store of heat is confined in the caverns of the earth, which in winter is denser and therefore confines more closely the heat stored in the soil. 2.26. It would require a long discourse and a great many arguments to enable me to show that all the seeds that earth receives in her womb, and all the plants which she spontaneously generates and holds fixed by their roots in the ground, owe both their origin and growth to this warm temperature of the soil. That water also contains an admixture of heat is shown first of all by its liquid nature; water would neither be frozen into ice by cold nor congealed into snow and hoar-frost unless it could also become fluid when liquefied and thawed by the admixture of heat; this is why moisture both hardens when exposed to a north wind or a frost from some other quarter, and also in turn softens when warmed, and evaporates with heat. Also the sea when violently stirred by the wind becomes warm, so that it can readily be realized that this great body of fluid contains heat; for we must not suppose the warmth in question to be derived from some external source, but stirred up from the lowest depths of the sea by violent motion, just as happens to our bodies when they are restored to warmth by movement and exercise. Indeed the air itself, though by nature the coldest of the elements, is by no means entirely devoid of heat; 2.27. indeed it contains even a considerable admixture of heat, for it is itself generated by exhalation from water, since air must be deemed to be a sort of vaporized water, and this vaporization is caused by the motion of the heat contained in the water. We may see an example of the same process when water is made to boil by placing fire beneath it. — There remains the fourth element: this is itself by nature glowing hot throughout and also imparts the warmth of health and life to all other substances. 2.28. Hence from the fact that all the parts of the world are sustained by heat the inference follows that the world itself also owes its continued preservation for so long a time to the same or a similar substance, and all the more so because it must be understood that this hot and fiery principle is interfused with the whole of nature in such a way as to constitute the male and female generative principles, and so to be the necessary cause of both the birth and the growth of all living creatures, whether animals or those whose roots are planted in the earth. 2.29. "There is therefore an element that holds the whole world together and preserves it, and this an element possessed of sensation and reason; since every natural object that is not a homogeneous and simple substance but a complex and composite one must contain within it some ruling principle, for example in man the intelligence, in the lower animals something resembling intelligence that is the source of appetition. With trees and plants the ruling principle is believed to be located in the roots. I use the term 'ruling principle' as the equivalent of the Greek hēgemonikon, meaning that part of anything which must and ought to have supremacy in a thing of that sort. Thus it follows that the element which contains the ruling principle of the whole of nature must also be the most excellent of all things and the most deserving of authority and sovereignty over all things. 2.30. Now we observe that the parts of the world (and nothing exists in all the world which is not a part of the whole world) possess sensation and reason. Therefore it follows that that part which contains the ruling principle of the world must necessarily possess sensation and reason, and these in a more intense and higher form. Hence it follows that the world possesses wisdom, and that the element which holds all things in its embrace is pre‑eminently and perfectly rational, and therefore that the world is god, and all the forces of the world are held together by the divine nature. "Moreover that glowing heat of the world is far purer and more brilliant and far more mobile, and therefore more stimulating to the senses, than this warmth of ours by which the things that we know are preserved and vitalized. 2.31. As therefore man and the animals are possessed by this warmth and owe to this their motion and sensation, it is absurd to say that the world is devoid of sensation, considering that it is possessed by an intense heat that is stainless, free and purpose, and also penetrating and mobile in the extreme; especially as this intense world-heat does not derive its motion from the operation of some other force from outside, but is self-moved and spontaneous in its activity: for how can there be anything more powerful than the world, to impart motion and activity in the warmth by which the world is held together? 2.32. For let us hear Plato, that divine philosopher, for so almost he is to be deemed. He holds that motion is of two sorts, one spontaneous, the other derived from without; and that that which moves of itself spontaneously is more divine than that which has motion imparted to it by some force not its own. The former kind of motion he deems to reside only in the soul, which he considers to be the only source and origin of motion. Hence, since all motion springs from the world-heat, and since that heat moves spontaneously and not by any impulse from something else, it follows that that heat is soul; which proves that the world is an animate being. "Another proof that the world possesses intelligence is supplied by the fact that the world is unquestionably better than any of its elements; for even as there is no part of our body that is not of less value than we are ourselves, so the whole universe must needs be of higher worth than any portion of the universe; and if this be so, it follows that the world must be endowed with wisdom, for, if it were not, man, although a part of the world, being possessed of reason would necessarily be of higher worth than the world as a whole.
26. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.61-1.66 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air, as vital elemental force Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 174
1.61. Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit 1.62. Persidaque et radiis iuga subdita matutinis; 1.63. vesper et occiduo quae litora sole tepescunt, 1.64. proxima sunt Zephyro: Scythiam septemque triones 1.65. horrifer invasit Boreas: contraria tellus 1.66. nubibus adsiduis pluviaque madescit ab Austro.
27. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.114-2.122, 6.685 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air, as vital elemental force Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 175, 183
2.114. contemplator enim, cum solis lumina cumque 2.115. inserti fundunt radii per opaca domorum: 2.116. multa minuta modis multis per ie videbis 2.117. corpora misceri radiorum lumine in ipso 2.118. et vel ut aeterno certamine proelia pugnas 2.119. edere turmatim certantia nec dare pausam, 2.120. conciliis et discidiis exercita crebris; 2.121. conicere ut possis ex hoc, primordia rerum 2.122. quale sit in magno iactari semper ii. 6.685. ventus enim fit, ubi est agitando percitus aeer aeër .
28. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.819-3.822 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 145
29. Strabo, Geography, 10.4.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 91
10.4.14. of the three cities that were united under one metropolis by Minos, the third, which was Phaestus, was razed to the ground by the Gortynians; it is sixty stadia distant from Gortyn, twenty from the sea, and forty from the seaport Matalum; and the country is held by those who razed it. Rhytium, also, together with Phaestus, belongs to the Gortynians: and Phaestus and Rhytium. Epimenides, who performed the purifications by means of his verses, is said to have been from Phaestus. And Lissen also is in the Phaestian territory. of Lyctus, which I have mentioned before, the seaport is Cherronesus, as it is called, where is the sanctuary of Britomartis. But the cities Miletus and Lycastus, which are catalogued along with Lyctus, no longer exist; and as for their territory, the Lyctians took one portion of it and the Cnossians the other, after they had razed the city to the ground.
30. New Testament, Titus, 1.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 91
1.12. εἶπέν τις ἐξ αὐτῶν, ἴδιος αὐτῶν προφήτης, Κρῆτες ἀεὶ ψεῦσται, κακὰ θηρία, γαστέρες ἀργαί· 1.12. One of them, a prophet of their own, said, "Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, and idle gluttons."
31. Seneca The Younger, Agamemnon, 431-464, 466-578, 465 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 183
465. nox prima caelum sparserat stellis, iacent
32. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183
33. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 162
34. Aelian, Nature of Animals, 12.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 91
35. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 10.18-10.19 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 145, 182
36. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 7.29.10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
37. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.109, 3.10-3.11, 8.32, 10.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 91, 145, 182, 329, 330
1.109. 10. EPIMEDESEpimenides, according to Theopompus and many other writers, was the son of Phaestius; some, however, make him the son of Dosiadas, others of Agesarchus. He was a native of Cnossos in Crete, though from wearing his hair long he did not look like a Cretan. One day he was sent into the country by his father to look for a stray sheep, and at noon he turned aside out of the way, and went to sleep in a cave, where he slept for fifty-seven years. After this he got up and went in search of the sheep, thinking he had been asleep only a short time. And when he could not find it, he came to the farm, and found everything changed and another owner in possession. Then he went back to the town in utter perplexity; and there, on entering his own house, he fell in with people who wanted to know who he was. At length he found his younger brother, now an old man, and learnt the truth from him. 3.10. The assumption is that the things from which you take away number are no longer equal nor determinate, nor have they quantity or quality. These are the things to which becoming always, and being never, belongs. But the object of thought is something constant from which nothing is subtracted, to which nothing is added. This is the nature of the eternal things, the attribute of which is to be ever alike and the same. And indeed Epicharmus has expressed himself plainly about objects of sense and objects of thought.a. But gods there always were; never at any time were they wanting, while things in this world are always alike, and are brought about through the same agencies.b. Yet it is said that Chaos was the first-born of the gods.a. How so? If indeed there was nothing out of which, or into which, it could come first.b. What! Then did nothing come first after all?a. No, by Zeus, nor second either, 3.11. at least of the things which we are thus talking about now; on the contrary, they existed from all eternity. . . .a. But suppose some one chooses to add a single pebble to a heap containing either an odd or an even number, whichever you please, or to take away one of those already there; do you think the number of pebbles would remain the same?b. Not I.a. Nor yet, if one chooses to add to a cubit-measure another length, or cut off some of what was there already, would the original measure still exist?b. of course not.a. Now consider mankind in this same way. One man grows, and another again shrinks; and they are all undergoing change the whole time. But a thing which naturally changes and never remains in the same state must ever be different from that which has thus changed. And even so you and I were one pair of men yesterday, are another to-day, and again will be another to-morrow, and will never remain ourselves, by this same argument. 8.32. The whole air is full of souls which are called genii or heroes; these are they who send men dreams and signs of future disease and health, and not to men alone, but to sheep also and cattle as well; and it is to them that purifications and lustrations, all divination, omens and the like, have reference. The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or to evil. Blest are the men who acquire a good soul; they can never be at rest, nor ever keep the same course two days together. 10.2. For some time he stayed there and gathered disciples, but returned to Athens in the archonship of Anaxicrates. And for a while, it is said, he prosecuted his studies in common with the other philosophers, but afterwards put forward independent views by the foundation of the school called after him. He says himself that he first came into contact with philosophy at the age of fourteen. Apollodorus the Epicurean, in the first book of his Life of Epicurus, says that he turned to philosophy in disgust at the schoolmasters who could not tell him the meaning of chaos in Hesiod. According to Hermippus, however, he started as a schoolmaster, but on coming across the works of Democritus turned eagerly to philosophy.
38. Adrian, Isagoge, 33 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •air, as vital elemental force Found in books: Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 177
39. Maximus Tyrius, Maximus Tyrius, 38.3  Tagged with subjects: •air (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 92
40. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 326
41. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 3.322, 4.322-4.323, 6.8-6.10, 6.323, 8.4-8.5, 15.3-15.5, 19.1-19.4, 25.9-25.12  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 325, 326, 329, 330, 331