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6 results for "eleazar"
1. Hebrew Bible, Esther, 10.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •eleazar, martyr, similarities to socrates Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 293
10.3. "כִּי מָרְדֳּכַי הַיְּהוּדִי מִשְׁנֶה לַמֶּלֶךְ אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ וְגָדוֹל לַיְּהוּדִים וְרָצוּי לְרֹב אֶחָיו דֹּרֵשׁ טוֹב לְעַמּוֹ וְדֹבֵר שָׁלוֹם לְכָל־זַרְעוֹ׃", 10.3. "For Mordecai the Jew was next unto king Ahasuerus, and great among the Jews, and accepted of the multitude of his brethren; seeking the good of his people and speaking peace to all his seed.",
2. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 4.11, 5.25, 6.22, 6.24, 7.17, 7.25-7.29, 7.39, 9.27, 13.23, 14.9, 14.46 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 289, 293
4.11. He set aside the existing royal concessions to the Jews, secured through John the father of Eupolemus, who went on the mission to establish friendship and alliance with the Romans; and he destroyed the lawful ways of living and introduced new customs contrary to the law.' 5.25. When this man arrived in Jerusalem, he pretended to be peaceably disposed and waited until the holy sabbath day; then, finding the Jews not at work, he ordered his men to parade under arms.' 6.22. o that by doing this he might be saved from death, and be treated kindly on account of his old friendship with them.' 6.24. Such pretense is not worthy of our time of life, he said, 'lest many of the young should suppose that Eleazar in his ninetieth year has gone over to an alien religion,' 7.17. Keep on, and see how his mighty power will torture you and your descendants!' 7.25. Since the young man would not listen to him at all, the king called the mother to him and urged her to advise the youth to save himself.' 7.26. After much urging on his part, she undertook to persuade her son.' 7.27. But, leaning close to him, she spoke in their native tongue as follows, deriding the cruel tyrant: 'My son, have pity on me. I carried you nine months in my womb, and nursed you for three years, and have reared you and brought you up to this point in your life, and have taken care of you.' 7.28. I beseech you, my child, to look at the heaven and the earth and see everything that is in them, and recognize that God did not make them out of things that existed. Thus also mankind comes into being.' 7.29. Do not fear this butcher, but prove worthy of your brothers. Accept death, so that in God's mercy I may get you back again with your brothers.' 7.39. The king fell into a rage, and handled him worse than the others, being exasperated at his scorn.' 9.27. For I am sure that he will follow my policy and will treat you with moderation and kindness.' 13.23. he got word that Philip, who had been left in charge of the government, had revolted in Antioch; he was dismayed, called in the Jews, yielded and swore to observe all their rights, settled with them and offered sacrifice, honored the sanctuary and showed generosity to the holy place.' 14.9. Since you are acquainted, O king, with the details of this matter, deign to take thought for our country and our hard-pressed nation with the gracious kindness which you show to all.' 14.46. with his blood now completely drained from him, he tore out his entrails, took them with both hands and hurled them at the crowd, calling upon the Lord of life and spirit to give them back to him again. This was the manner of his death.'
3. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 9.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •eleazar, martyr, similarities to socrates Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 289
4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 19.347 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •eleazar, martyr, similarities to socrates Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 293
19.347. He therefore looked upon his friends, and said, “I, whom you call a god, am commanded presently to depart this life; while Providence thus reproves the lying words you just now said to me; and I, who was by you called immortal, am immediately to be hurried away by death. But I am bound to accept of what Providence allots, as it pleases God; for we have by no means lived ill, but in a splendid and happy manner.”
5. New Testament, Acts, 7.56, 7.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •eleazar, martyr, similarities to socrates Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 293
7.56. καὶ εἶπεν Ἰδοὺ θεωρῶ τοὺς οὐρανοὺς διηνοιγμένους καὶ τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐκ δεξιῶν ἑστῶτα τοῦ θεοῦ. 7.59. καὶ ἐλιθοβόλουν τὸν Στέφανον ἐπικαλούμενον καὶ λέγοντα Κύριε Ἰησοῦ, δέξαι τὸ πνεῦμά μου· 7.56. and said, "Behold, I see the heavens opened, and the Son of Man standing on the right hand of God!" 7.59. They stoned Stephen as he called out, saying, "Lord Jesus, receive my Spirit!"
6. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 9.27, 9.59 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •eleazar, martyr, similarities to socrates Found in books: Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 293
9.27. Demetrius in his work on Men of the Same Name says that he bit off, not the ear, but the nose. According to Antisthenes in his Successions of Philosophers, after informing against the tyrant's friends, he was asked by the tyrant whether there was anyone else in the plot; whereupon he replied, Yes, you, the curse of the city!?; and to the bystanders he said, I marvel at your cowardice, that, for fear of any of those things which I am now enduring, you should be the tyrant's slaves. And at last he bit off his tongue and spat it at him; and his fellow-citizens were so worked upon that they forthwith stoned the tyrant to death. In this version of the story most authors nearly agree, but Hermippus says he was cast into a mortar and beaten to death. 9.59. and when after the king's death Anaxarchus was forced against his will to land in Cyprus, he seized him and, putting him in a mortar, ordered him to be pounded to death with iron pestles. But he, making light of the punishment, made that well-known speech, Pound, pound the pouch containing Anaxarchus; ye pound not Anaxarchus. And when Nicocreon commanded his tongue to be cut out, they say he bit it off and spat it at him. This is what I have written upon him:Pound, Nicocreon, as hard as you like: it is but a pouch. Pound on; Anaxarchus's self long since is housed with Zeus. And after she has drawn you upon her carding-combs a little while, Persephone will utter words like these: Out upon thee, villainous miller!