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240 results for "ecstasy"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 18.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 159
18.16. "וַיֵּרָאוּ אֲפִיקֵי מַיִם וַיִּגָּלוּ מוֹסְדוֹת תֵּבֵל מִגַּעֲרָתְךָ יְהוָה מִנִּשְׁמַת רוּחַ אַפֶּךָ׃", 18.16. "And the channels of waters appeared, and the foundations of the world were laid bare, at Thy rebuke, O LORD, at the blast of the breath of Thy nostrils.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26, 2.21-2.24, 3.8, 15.12, 18.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 159, 343; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 134
1.26. "וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃", 2.21. "וַיַּפֵּל יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים תַּרְדֵּמָה עַל־הָאָדָם וַיִּישָׁן וַיִּקַּח אַחַת מִצַּלְעֹתָיו וַיִּסְגֹּר בָּשָׂר תַּחְתֶּנָּה׃", 2.22. "וַיִּבֶן יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הַצֵּלָע אֲשֶׁר־לָקַח מִן־הָאָדָם לְאִשָּׁה וַיְבִאֶהָ אֶל־הָאָדָם׃", 2.23. "וַיֹּאמֶר הָאָדָם זֹאת הַפַּעַם עֶצֶם מֵעֲצָמַי וּבָשָׂר מִבְּשָׂרִי לְזֹאת יִקָּרֵא אִשָּׁה כִּי מֵאִישׁ לֻקֳחָה־זֹּאת׃", 2.24. "עַל־כֵּן יַעֲזָב־אִישׁ אֶת־אָבִיו וְאֶת־אִמּוֹ וְדָבַק בְּאִשְׁתּוֹ וְהָיוּ לְבָשָׂר אֶחָד׃", 3.8. "וַיִּשְׁמְעוּ אֶת־קוֹל יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים מִתְהַלֵּךְ בַּגָּן לְרוּחַ הַיּוֹם וַיִּתְחַבֵּא הָאָדָם וְאִשְׁתּוֹ מִפְּנֵי יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים בְּתוֹךְ עֵץ הַגָּן׃", 15.12. "וַיְהִי הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ לָבוֹא וְתַרְדֵּמָה נָפְלָה עַל־אַבְרָם וְהִנֵּה אֵימָה חֲשֵׁכָה גְדֹלָה נֹפֶלֶת עָלָיו׃", 18.2. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה זַעֲקַת סְדֹם וַעֲמֹרָה כִּי־רָבָּה וְחַטָּאתָם כִּי כָבְדָה מְאֹד׃", 18.2. "וַיִּשָּׂא עֵינָיו וַיַּרְא וְהִנֵּה שְׁלֹשָׁה אֲנָשִׁים נִצָּבִים עָלָיו וַיַּרְא וַיָּרָץ לִקְרָאתָם מִפֶּתַח הָאֹהֶל וַיִּשְׁתַּחוּ אָרְצָה׃", 1.26. "And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’", 2.21. "And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the place with flesh instead thereof.", 2.22. "And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from the man, made He a woman, and brought her unto the man.", 2.23. "And the man said: ‘This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.’", 2.24. "Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh.", 3.8. "And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden toward the cool of the day; and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden.", 15.12. "And it came to pass, that, when the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and, lo, a dread, even a great darkness, fell upon him.", 18.2. "and he lifted up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men stood over against him; and when he saw them, he ran to meet them from the tent door, and bowed down to the earth,",
3. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 14.21, 15.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 159
14.21. "וַיֵּט מֹשֶׁה אֶת־יָדוֹ עַל־הַיָּם וַיּוֹלֶךְ יְהוָה אֶת־הַיָּם בְּרוּחַ קָדִים עַזָּה כָּל־הַלַּיְלָה וַיָּשֶׂם אֶת־הַיָּם לֶחָרָבָה וַיִּבָּקְעוּ הַמָּיִם׃", 15.8. "וּבְרוּחַ אַפֶּיךָ נֶעֶרְמוּ מַיִם נִצְּבוּ כְמוֹ־נֵד נֹזְלִים קָפְאוּ תְהֹמֹת בְּלֶב־יָם׃", 14.21. "And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all the night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided.", 15.8. "And with the blast of Thy nostrils the waters were piled up— The floods stood upright as a heap; The deeps were congealed in the heart of the sea.",
4. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 18.22, 28.28 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 100, 134
18.22. "אֲשֶׁר יְדַבֵּר הַנָּבִיא בְּשֵׁם יְהוָה וְלֹא־יִהְיֶה הַדָּבָר וְלֹא יָבוֹא הוּא הַדָּבָר אֲשֶׁר לֹא־דִבְּרוֹ יְהוָה בְּזָדוֹן דִּבְּרוֹ הַנָּבִיא לֹא תָגוּר מִמֶּנּוּ׃", 28.28. "יַכְּכָה יְהוָה בְּשִׁגָּעוֹן וּבְעִוָּרוֹן וּבְתִמְהוֹן לֵבָב׃", 18.22. "When a prophet speaketh in the name of the LORD, if the thing follow not, nor come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD hath not spoken; the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously, thou shalt not be afraid of him.", 28.28. "The LORD will smite thee with madness, and with blindness, and with astonishment of heart.",
5. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 160
6. Hymn To Apollo (Homeric Hymn 21), To Apollo, 146-151, 153-164, 152 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 88
7. Hymn To Apollo, To Apollo, 146-151, 153-164, 152 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 88
8. Hymn To Aphrodite (Homeric Hymn 10), To Aphrodite, 247-255, 46-52, 45 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 44
9. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 146-152, 154-164, 153 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 88
153. Struck all the goddesses. All Delos shone
10. Archilochus, Fragments, None (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 54
11. Archilochus, Fragments, None (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 54
12. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 80 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 321
80. But by your beams through the extremity
13. Homeric Hymns, To Pan, 46 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
14. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140, 11.454, 18.102, 24.82 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 11, 44, 102, 161, 343, 352
6.130. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. / and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 11.454. / Ah Socus, son of wise-hearted Hippasus, tamer of horses, the end of death has been too quick in coming upon thee; thou hast not escaped it. Ah poor wretch, thy father and queenly mother shall not close thine eyes in death, but the birds that eat raw flesh shall rend thee, beating their wings thick and fast about thee; 18.102. / hath he fallen, and had need of me to be a warder off of ruin. Now therefore, seeing I return not to my dear native land, neither proved anywise a light of deliverance to Patroclus nor to my other comrades, those many that have been slain by goodly Hector, but abide here by the ships. Profitless burden upon the earth— 24.82. / Down sped she to the depths hike a plummet of lead, the which, set upon the horn of an ox of the field, goeth down bearing death to the ravenous fishes. And she found Thetis in the hollow cave, and round about her other goddesses of the sea sat in a throng, and she in their midst
15. Hesiod, Theogony, 942 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
942. Causes the sacred earth to melt: just so
16. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 4.4-4.6, 6.3, 7.2, 11.15-11.16, 17.12-17.14, 30.27-30.39, 33.9-33.11 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 159, 343
4.4. "אִם רָחַץ אֲדֹנָי אֵת צֹאַת בְּנוֹת־צִיּוֹן וְאֶת־דְּמֵי יְרוּשָׁלִַם יָדִיחַ מִקִּרְבָּהּ בְּרוּחַ מִשְׁפָּט וּבְרוּחַ בָּעֵר׃", 4.5. "וּבָרָא יְהוָה עַל כָּל־מְכוֹן הַר־צִיּוֹן וְעַל־מִקְרָאֶהָ עָנָן יוֹמָם וְעָשָׁן וְנֹגַהּ אֵשׁ לֶהָבָה לָיְלָה כִּי עַל־כָּל־כָּבוֹד חֻפָּה׃", 4.6. "וְסֻכָּה תִּהְיֶה לְצֵל־יוֹמָם מֵחֹרֶב וּלְמַחְסֶה וּלְמִסְתּוֹר מִזֶּרֶם וּמִמָּטָר׃", 6.3. "וְקָרָא זֶה אֶל־זֶה וְאָמַר קָדוֹשׁ קָדוֹשׁ קָדוֹשׁ יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת מְלֹא כָל־הָאָרֶץ כְּבוֹדוֹ׃", 7.2. "וַיֻּגַּד לְבֵית דָּוִד לֵאמֹר נָחָה אֲרָם עַל־אֶפְרָיִם וַיָּנַע לְבָבוֹ וּלְבַב עַמּוֹ כְּנוֹעַ עֲצֵי־יַעַר מִפְּנֵי־רוּחַ׃", 7.2. "בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא יְגַלַּח אֲדֹנָי בְּתַעַר הַשְּׂכִירָה בְּעֶבְרֵי נָהָר בְּמֶלֶךְ אַשּׁוּר אֶת־הָרֹאשׁ וְשַׂעַר הָרַגְלָיִם וְגַם אֶת־הַזָּקָן תִּסְפֶּה׃", 11.15. "וְהֶחֱרִים יְהוָה אֵת לְשׁוֹן יָם־מִצְרַיִם וְהֵנִיף יָדוֹ עַל־הַנָּהָר בַּעְיָם רוּחוֹ וְהִכָּהוּ לְשִׁבְעָה נְחָלִים וְהִדְרִיךְ בַּנְּעָלִים׃", 11.16. "וְהָיְתָה מְסִלָּה לִשְׁאָר עַמּוֹ אֲשֶׁר יִשָּׁאֵר מֵאַשּׁוּר כַּאֲשֶׁר הָיְתָה לְיִשְׂרָאֵל בְּיוֹם עֲלֹתוֹ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם׃", 17.12. "הוֹי הֲמוֹן עַמִּים רַבִּים כַּהֲמוֹת יַמִּים יֶהֱמָיוּן וּשְׁאוֹן לְאֻמִּים כִּשְׁאוֹן מַיִם כַּבִּירִים יִשָּׁאוּן׃", 17.13. "לְאֻמִּים כִּשְׁאוֹן מַיִם רַבִּים יִשָּׁאוּן וְגָעַר בּוֹ וְנָס מִמֶּרְחָק וְרֻדַּף כְּמֹץ הָרִים לִפְנֵי־רוּחַ וּכְגַלְגַּל לִפְנֵי סוּפָה׃", 17.14. "לְעֵת עֶרֶב וְהִנֵּה בַלָּהָה בְּטֶרֶם בֹּקֶר אֵינֶנּוּ זֶה חֵלֶק שׁוֹסֵינוּ וְגוֹרָל לְבֹזְזֵינוּ׃", 30.27. "הִנֵּה שֵׁם־יְהוָה בָּא מִמֶּרְחָק בֹּעֵר אַפּוֹ וְכֹבֶד מַשָּׂאָה שְׂפָתָיו מָלְאוּ זַעַם וּלְשׁוֹנוֹ כְּאֵשׁ אֹכָלֶת׃", 30.28. "וְרוּחוֹ כְּנַחַל שׁוֹטֵף עַד־צַוָּאר יֶחֱצֶה לַהֲנָפָה גוֹיִם בְּנָפַת שָׁוְא וְרֶסֶן מַתְעֶה עַל לְחָיֵי עַמִּים׃", 30.29. "הַשִּׁיר יִהְיֶה לָכֶם כְּלֵיל הִתְקַדֶּשׁ־חָג וְשִׂמְחַת לֵבָב כַּהוֹלֵךְ בֶּחָלִיל לָבוֹא בְהַר־יְהוָה אֶל־צוּר יִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 30.31. "כִּי־מִקּוֹל יְהוָה יֵחַת אַשּׁוּר בַּשֵּׁבֶט יַכֶּה׃", 30.32. "וְהָיָה כֹּל מַעֲבַר מַטֵּה מוּסָדָה אֲשֶׁר יָנִיחַ יְהוָה עָלָיו בְּתֻפִּים וּבְכִנֹּרוֹת וּבְמִלְחֲמוֹת תְּנוּפָה נִלְחַם־בה [בָּם׃]", 30.33. "כִּי־עָרוּךְ מֵאֶתְמוּל תָּפְתֶּה גַּם־הוא [הִיא] לַמֶּלֶךְ הוּכָן הֶעְמִיק הִרְחִב מְדֻרָתָהּ אֵשׁ וְעֵצִים הַרְבֵּה נִשְׁמַת יְהוָה כְּנַחַל גָּפְרִית בֹּעֲרָה בָּהּ׃", 33.9. "אָבַל אֻמְלְלָה אָרֶץ הֶחְפִּיר לְבָנוֹן קָמַל הָיָה הַשָּׁרוֹן כָּעֲרָבָה וְנֹעֵר בָּשָׁן וְכַרְמֶל׃", 33.11. "תַּהֲרוּ חֲשַׁשׁ תֵּלְדוּ קַשׁ רוּחֲכֶם אֵשׁ תֹּאכַלְכֶם׃", 4.4. "when the Lord shall have washed away the filth of the daughters of Zion, and shall have purged the blood of Jerusalem from the midst thereof, by the spirit of judgment, and by the spirit of destruction.", 4.5. "And the LORD will create over the whole habitation of mount Zion, and over her assemblies, a cloud and smoke by day, and the shining of a flaming fire by night; for over all the glory shall be a canopy.", 4.6. "And there shall be a pavilion for a shadow in the day-time from the heat, and for a refuge and for a covert from storm and from rain.", 6.3. "And one called unto another, and said: Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts; The whole earth is full of His glory.", 7.2. "And it was told the house of David, saying: ‘Aram is confederate with Ephraim.’ And his heart was moved, and the heart of his people, as the trees of the forest are moved with the wind.", 11.15. "And the LORD will utterly destroy the tongue of the Egyptian sea; And with His scorching wind will He shake His hand over the River, And will smite it into seven streams, And cause men to march over dry-shod.", 11.16. "And there shall be a highway for the remt of His people, That shall remain from Assyria, Like as there was for Israel In the day that he came up out of the land of Egypt.", 17.12. "Ah, the uproar of many peoples, That roar like the roaring of the seas; And the rushing of nations, that rush like the rushing of mighty waters!", 17.13. "The nations shall rush like the rushing of many waters; But He shall rebuke them, and they shall flee far off, And shall be chased as the chaff of the mountains before the wind, And like the whirling dust before the storm.", 17.14. "At eventide behold terror; And before the morning they are not. This is the portion of them that spoil us, And the lot of them that rob us.", 30.27. "Behold, the name of the LORD cometh from far, With His anger burning, and in thick uplifting of smoke; His lips are full of indignation, And His tongue is as a devouring fire;", 30.28. "And His breath is as an overflowing stream, That divideth even unto the neck, To sift the nations with the sieve of destruction; And a bridle that causeth to err shall be in the jaws of the peoples.", 30.29. "Ye shall have a song As in the night when a feast is hallowed; And gladness of heart, as when one goeth with the pipe To come into the mountain of the LORD, to the Rock of Israel.", 30.30. "And the LORD will cause His glorious voice to be heard, And will show the lighting down of His arm, With furious anger, and the flame of a devouring fire, With a bursting of clouds, and a storm of rain, and hailstones.", 30.31. "For through the voice of the LORD shall Asshur be dismayed, The rod with which He smote.", 30.32. "And in every place where the appointed staff shall pass, Which the LORD shall lay upon him, It shall be with tabrets and harps; And in battles of wielding will He fight with them.", 30.33. "For a hearth is ordered of old; Yea, for the king it is prepared, Deep and large; The pile thereof is fire and much wood; The breath of the LORD, like a stream of brimstone, doth kindle it.", 33.9. "The land mourneth and languisheth; Lebanon is ashamed, it withereth; Sharon is like a wilderness; And Bashan and Carmel are clean bare.", 33.10. "Now will I arise, saith the LORD; Now will I be exalted; now will I lift Myself up.", 33.11. "Ye conceive chaff, ye shall bring forth stubble; Your breath is a fire that shall devour you.",
17. Hebrew Bible, Judges, 2.9, 2.16, 3.10, 5.24, 6.34, 11.29, 18.12, 19.11-19.13, 19.20, 22.21-22.22 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 159, 160, 343
2.9. "וַיִּקְבְּרוּ אוֹתוֹ בִּגְבוּל נַחֲלָתוֹ בְּתִמְנַת־חֶרֶס בְּהַר אֶפְרָיִם מִצְּפוֹן לְהַר־גָּעַשׁ׃", 2.16. "וַיָּקֶם יְהוָה שֹׁפְטִים וַיּוֹשִׁיעוּם מִיַּד שֹׁסֵיהֶם׃", 5.24. "תְּבֹרַךְ מִנָּשִׁים יָעֵל אֵשֶׁת חֶבֶר הַקֵּינִי מִנָּשִׁים בָּאֹהֶל תְּבֹרָךְ׃", 6.34. "וְרוּחַ יְהוָה לָבְשָׁה אֶת־גִּדְעוֹן וַיִּתְקַע בַּשּׁוֹפָר וַיִזָּעֵק אֲבִיעֶזֶר אַחֲרָיו׃", 11.29. "וַתְּהִי עַל־יִפְתָּח רוּחַ יְהוָה וַיַּעֲבֹר אֶת־הַגִּלְעָד וְאֶת־מְנַשֶּׁה וַיַּעֲבֹר אֶת־מִצְפֵּה גִלְעָד וּמִמִּצְפֵּה גִלְעָד עָבַר בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן׃", 18.12. "וַיַּעֲלוּ וַיַּחֲנוּ בְּקִרְיַת יְעָרִים בִּיהוּדָה עַל־כֵּן קָרְאוּ לַמָּקוֹם הַהוּא מַחֲנֵה־דָן עַד הַיּוֹם הַזֶּה הִנֵּה אַחֲרֵי קִרְיַת יְעָרִים׃", 19.11. "הֵם עִם־יְבוּס וְהַיּוֹם רַד מְאֹד וַיֹּאמֶר הַנַּעַר אֶל־אֲדֹנָיו לְכָה־נָּא וְנָסוּרָה אֶל־עִיר־הַיְבוּסִי הַזֹּאת וְנָלִין בָּהּ׃", 19.12. "וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו אֲדֹנָיו לֹא נָסוּר אֶל־עִיר נָכְרִי אֲשֶׁר לֹא־מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל הֵנָּה וְעָבַרְנוּ עַד־גִּבְעָה׃", 19.13. "וַיֹּאמֶר לְנַעֲרוֹ לְךָ וְנִקְרְבָה בְּאַחַד הַמְּקֹמוֹת וְלַנּוּ בַגִּבְעָה אוֹ בָרָמָה׃", 2.9. "And they buried him in the border of his inheritance in Timnat-ĥeres, in the mount of Efrayim, on the north side of the hill Ga῾ash.", 2.16. "Nevertheless the Lord raised up judges, who saved them from the hand of their plunderers.", 3.10. "And the spirit of the Lord came upon him, and he judged Yisra᾽el, and went out to war: and the Lord delivered Kushan-rish῾atayim, king of Aram, into his hand; and his hand prevailed against Kushan-rish῾atayim.", 5.24. "Blessed above women is Ya᾽el the wife of Ĥever the Qenite, blessed is she more than women in the tent.", 6.34. "But the spirit of the Lord clothed Gid῾on, and he blew a shofar; and Avi-῾ezer mustered behind him.", 11.29. "Then the spirit of the Lord came upon Yiftaĥ and he passed over Gil῾ad, and Menashshe, and passed over Miżpe of Gil῾ad, and from Miżpe of Gil῾ad he passed over to the children of ῾Ammon.", 18.12. "And they went up, and pitched in Qiryat-ye῾arim, in Yehuda: therefore they called that place Maĥane-dan to this day: behold, it is behind Qiryat-ye῾arim.", 19.11. "And when they were by Yevus, the day was far spent; and the servant said to his master, Come, I pray thee, and let us turn in into this city of the Yevusi, and we will spend the night here.", 19.12. "But his master said to him, We will not turn aside here into the city of a stranger, that is not of the children of Yisra᾽el; we will pass over to Giv῾a.", 19.13. "And he said to his servant, Come, and let us draw near to one of these places to lodge all night, in Giv῾a, or in Rama.", 19.20. "And the old man said, Peace be with thee; only let all thy wants lie upon me; but lodge not in the street.",
18. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 26.7-26.10 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 160
19. Hymn To Dionysus \ In Bacchum, To Dionysus, 26.7-26.10 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 160
20. Solon, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 88
21. Alcman, Poems, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 168
22. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
23. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
24. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 9.2, 38.6, 38.15, 39.2 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 154
9.2. "וְהִנֵּה שִׁשָּׁה אֲנָשִׁים בָּאִים מִדֶּרֶךְ־שַׁעַר הָעֶלְיוֹן אֲשֶׁר מָפְנֶה צָפוֹנָה וְאִישׁ כְּלִי מַפָּצוֹ בְּיָדוֹ וְאִישׁ־אֶחָד בְּתוֹכָם לָבֻשׁ בַּדִּים וְקֶסֶת הַסֹּפֵר בְּמָתְנָיו וַיָּבֹאוּ וַיַּעַמְדוּ אֵצֶל מִזְבַּח הַנְּחֹשֶׁת׃", 38.6. "גֹּמֶר וְכָל־אֲגַפֶּיהָ בֵּית תּוֹגַרְמָה יַרְכְּתֵי צָפוֹן וְאֶת־כָּל־אֲגַפָּיו עַמִּים רַבִּים אִתָּךְ׃", 38.15. "וּבָאתָ מִמְּקוֹמְךָ מִיַּרְכְּתֵי צָפוֹן אַתָּה וְעַמִּים רַבִּים אִתָּךְ רֹכְבֵי סוּסִים כֻּלָּם קָהָל גָּדוֹל וְחַיִל רָב׃", 39.2. "וְשֹׁבַבְתִּיךָ וְשִׁשֵּׁאתִיךָ וְהַעֲלִיתִיךָ מִיַּרְכְּתֵי צָפוֹן וַהֲבִאוֹתִךָ עַל־הָרֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 39.2. "וּשְׂבַעְתֶּם עַל־שֻׁלְחָנִי סוּס וָרֶכֶב גִּבּוֹר וְכָל־אִישׁ מִלְחָמָה נְאֻם אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה׃", 9.2. "And, behold, six men came from the way of the upper gate, which lieth toward the north, every man with his weapon of destruction in his hand; and one man in the midst of them clothed in linen, with a writer’s inkhorn on his side. And they went in, and stood beside the brazen altar.", 38.6. "Gomer, and all his bands; the house of Togarmah in the uttermost parts of the north, and all his bands; even many peoples with thee.", 38.15. "And thou shalt come from thy place out of the uttermost parts of the north, thou, and many peoples with thee, all of them riding upon horses, a great company and a mighty army;", 39.2. "and I will turn thee about and lead thee on, and will cause thee to come up from the uttermost parts of the north; and I will bring thee upon the mountains of Israel;",
25. Pindar, Dithyrambi (Poxy. 1604.), None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 174
26. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.26-1.27, 1.47-1.53, 2.25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 114
27. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 4.73-4.74 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 88
28. Pindar, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 321
29. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 6.47-6.50, 11.1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 88, 273
30. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 396
400c. σῆμά τινές φασιν αὐτὸ εἶναι τῆς ψυχῆς, ὡς τεθαμμένης ἐν τῷ νῦν παρόντι· καὶ διότι αὖ τούτῳ σημαίνει ἃ ἂν σημαίνῃ ἡ ψυχή, καὶ ταύτῃ σῆμα ὀρθῶς καλεῖσθαι. δοκοῦσι μέντοι μοι μάλιστα θέσθαι οἱ ἀμφὶ Ὀρφέα τοῦτο τὸ ὄνομα, ὡς δίκην διδούσης τῆς ψυχῆς ὧν δὴ ἕνεκα δίδωσιν, τοῦτον δὲ περίβολον ἔχειν, ἵνα σῴζηται , δεσμωτηρίου εἰκόνα· εἶναι οὖν τῆς ψυχῆς τοῦτο, ὥσπερ αὐτὸ ὀνομάζεται, ἕως ἂν ἐκτείσῃ τὰ ὀφειλόμενα, τὸ σῶμα, καὶ οὐδὲν δεῖν παράγειν οὐδʼ ἓν γράμμα. 400c. ign ( σῆμα ). But I think it most likely that the Orphic poets gave this name, with the idea that the soul is undergoing punishment for something; they think it has the body as an enclosure to keep it safe, like a prison, and this is, as the name itself denotes, the safe ( σῶμα ) for the soul, until the penalty is paid, and not even a letter needs to be changed.
31. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 1294 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
1294. εὐοῖ εὐοῖ, εὐαί εὐαί.
32. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1752-1756, 1751 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
33. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 164, 386-388, 953 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
34. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 729, 88-92, 87 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 379
87. ὁ Ζεύς με ταῦτ' ἔδρασεν ἀνθρώποις φθονῶν.
35. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1061 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
36. Euripides, Ion, 218, 716-717, 1084 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 310
37. Euripides, Hippolytus, 561, 560 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
38. Aristophanes, Frogs, 316, 340-352, 464-480, 1259 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
1259. τὸν Βακχεῖον ἄνακτα,
39. Euripides, Hecuba, 841 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 343
841. ὦ δέσποτ', ὦ μέγιστον ̔́Ελλησιν φάος,
40. Pherecrates, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
41. Pherecrates, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
42. Euripides, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 11
43. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 174
215c. ὁ μέν γε διʼ ὀργάνων ἐκήλει τοὺς ἀνθρώπους τῇ ἀπὸ τοῦ στόματος δυνάμει, καὶ ἔτι νυνὶ ὃς ἂν τὰ ἐκείνου αὐλῇ—ἃ γὰρ Ὄλυμπος ηὔλει, Μαρσύου λέγω, τούτου διδάξαντος—τὰ οὖν ἐκείνου ἐάντε ἀγαθὸς αὐλητὴς αὐλῇ ἐάντε φαύλη αὐλητρίς, μόνα κατέχεσθαι ποιεῖ καὶ δηλοῖ τοὺς τῶν θεῶν τε καὶ τελετῶν δεομένους διὰ τὸ θεῖα εἶναι. σὺ δʼ ἐκείνου τοσοῦτον μόνον διαφέρεις, ὅτι ἄνευ ὀργάνων ψιλοῖς λόγοις ταὐτὸν 215c. Why, yes, and a far more marvellous one than the satyr. His lips indeed had power to entrance mankind by means of instruments; a thing still possible today for anyone who can pipe his tunes: for the music of Olympus ’ flute belonged, I may tell you, to Marsyas his teacher. So that if anyone, whether a fine flute-player or paltry flute-girl, can but flute his tunes, they have no equal for exciting a ravishment, and will indicate by the divinity that is in them who are apt recipients of the deities and their sanctifications. You differ from him in one point only—that you produce the same effect with simple prose unaided by instruments. For example, when we hear any other person—
44. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 392
364a. καὶ ὑπὸ ποιητῶν. πάντες γὰρ ἐξ ἑνὸς στόματος ὑμνοῦσιν ὡς καλὸν μὲν ἡ σωφροσύνη τε καὶ δικαιοσύνη, χαλεπὸν μέντοι καὶ ἐπίπονον, ἀκολασία δὲ καὶ ἀδικία ἡδὺ μὲν καὶ εὐπετὲς κτήσασθαι, δόξῃ δὲ μόνον καὶ νόμῳ αἰσχρόν· λυσιτελέστερα δὲ τῶν δικαίων τὰ ἄδικα ὡς ἐπὶ τὸ πλῆθος λέγουσι, καὶ πονηροὺς πλουσίους καὶ ἄλλας δυνάμεις ἔχοντας εὐδαιμονίζειν καὶ τιμᾶν εὐχερῶς ἐθέλουσιν δημοσίᾳ τε καὶ ἰδίᾳ, τοὺς δὲ ἀτιμάζειν καὶ ὑπερορᾶν, οἳ ἄν πῃ ἀσθενεῖς τε 364a. employed by both laymen and poets. All with one accord reiterate that soberness and righteousness are fair and honorable, to be sure, but unpleasant and laborious, while licentiousness and injustice are pleasant and easy to win and are only in opinion and by convention disgraceful. They say that injustice pays better than justice, for the most part, and they do not scruple to felicitate bad men who are rich or have other kinds of power to do them honor in public and private, and to dishonor
45. Euripides, Cyclops, 3-4, 521, 519 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
519. Κύκλωψ, ἄκουσον: ὡς ἐγὼ τοῦ Βακχίου
46. Euripides, Bacchae, 1, 10, 100-102, 1020, 103-104, 1043-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1153, 116-118, 1184, 1189, 119-123, 1236, 124, 1241-1247, 1249, 125, 1250, 126-137, 1378, 138-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-166, 1668, 167-169, 17, 172, 176-177, 18, 181-183, 19, 192, 194-195, 2, 20, 206, 21, 215-219, 22, 220-225, 233-238, 242-243, 260-262, 272, 275, 278, 280-281, 284, 286-298, 3, 300, 305, 308, 31, 314-318, 32, 321, 33, 333-336, 34-36, 362, 366, 37-38, 381, 39, 4, 40, 42, 445-446, 449-450, 466, 470, 474, 477, 485-487, 5, 50, 500-502, 51-52, 528-529, 53, 536, 54-59, 592-599, 6, 60, 600-601, 605, 608-609, 61-62, 623, 629, 63, 630-632, 64, 642, 65, 652, 66, 665, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-708, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78, 787-789, 79, 790-791, 80, 800, 81-82, 827-829, 83, 830-838, 84, 848, 85, 850-851, 86, 862, 87-92, 925-929, 93, 930-938, 94-97, 978, 98, 986, 99, 998, 709 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 11, 161, 173
709. ἄκροισι δακτύλοισι διαμῶσαι χθόνα
47. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 391
265b. ΦΑΙ. πάνυ γε. ΣΩ. τῆς δὲ θείας τεττάρων θεῶν τέτταρα μέρη διελόμενοι, μαντικὴν μὲν ἐπίπνοιαν Ἀπόλλωνος θέντες, Διονύσου δὲ τελεστικήν, Μουσῶν δʼ αὖ ποιητικήν, τετάρτην δὲ ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἔρωτος, ἐρωτικὴν μανίαν ἐφήσαμέν τε ἀρίστην εἶναι, καὶ οὐκ οἶδʼ ὅπῃ τὸ ἐρωτικὸν πάθος ἀπεικάζοντες, ἴσως μὲν ἀληθοῦς τινος ἐφαπτόμενοι, τάχα δʼ ἂν καὶ ἄλλοσε παραφερόμενοι, κεράσαντες οὐ παντάπασιν ἀπίθανον λόγον, 265b. Phaedrus. Certainly. Socrates. And we made four divisions of the divine madness, ascribing them to four gods, saying that prophecy was inspired by Apollo, the mystic madness by Dionysus, the poetic by the Muses, and the madness of love, inspired by Aphrodite and Eros, we said was the best. We described the passion of love in some sort of figurative manner, expressing some truth, perhaps, and perhaps being led away in another direction, and after composing a somewhat
48. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 263 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
263. Φαλῆς ἑταῖρε Βακχίου
49. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
815c. ἀναμφισβητήτου διατεμεῖν. τίς οὖν αὕτη, καὶ πῇ δεῖ χωρὶς τέμνειν ἑκατέραν; ὅση μὲν βακχεία τʼ ἐστὶν καὶ τῶν ταύταις ἑπομένων, ἃς Νύμφας τε καὶ Πᾶνας καὶ Σειληνοὺς καὶ Σατύρους ἐπονομάζοντες, ὥς φασιν, μιμοῦνται κατῳνωμένους, περὶ καθαρμούς τε καὶ τελετάς τινας ἀποτελούντων, σύμπαν τοῦτο τῆς ὀρχήσεως τὸ γένος οὔθʼ ὡς εἰρηνικὸν οὔθʼ ὡς πολεμικὸν οὔθʼ ὅτι ποτὲ βούλεται ῥᾴδιον ἀφορίσασθαι· διορίσασθαι μήν μοι ταύτῃ δοκεῖ σχεδὸν ὀρθότατον αὐτὸ εἶναι, 815c. All the dancing that is of a Bacchic kind and cultivated by those who indulge in drunken imitations of Pans, Sileni and Satyrs (as they call them), when performing certain rites of expiation and initiation,—all this class of dancing cannot easily be defined either as pacific or as warlike, or as of any one distinct kind. The most correct way of defining it seems to me to be this—
50. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 531, 871, 879, 895 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 174
51. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 396
62b. καὶ γὰρ ἂν δόξειεν, ἔφη ὁ Σωκράτης , οὕτω γ’ εἶναι ἄλογον: οὐ μέντοι ἀλλ’ ἴσως γ’ ἔχει τινὰ λόγον. ὁ μὲν οὖν ἐν ἀπορρήτοις λεγόμενος περὶ αὐτῶν λόγος, ὡς ἔν τινι φρουρᾷ ἐσμεν οἱ ἄνθρωποι καὶ οὐ δεῖ δὴ ἑαυτὸν ἐκ ταύτης λύειν οὐδ’ ἀποδιδράσκειν, μέγας τέ τίς μοι φαίνεται καὶ οὐ ῥᾴδιος διιδεῖν: οὐ μέντοι ἀλλὰ τόδε γέ μοι δοκεῖ, ὦ Κέβης , εὖ λέγεσθαι, τὸ θεοὺς εἶναι ἡμῶν τοὺς ἐπιμελουμένους καὶ ἡμᾶς τοὺς ἀνθρώπους ἓν τῶν κτημάτων τοῖς θεοῖς εἶναι. ἢ σοὶ οὐ δοκεῖ οὕτως; ἔμοιγε, φησὶν ὁ Κέβης . 62b. but perhaps there is some reason in it. Now the doctrine that is taught in secret about this matter, that we men are in a kind of prison and must not set ourselves free or run away, seems to me to be weighty and not easy to understand. But this at least, Cebes, I do believe is sound, that the gods are our guardians and that we men are one of the chattels of the gods. Do you not believe this? Yes, said Cebes,
52. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 988, 994 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
994. ἀναχορεύων.
53. Theopompus Comicus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
54. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.94.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 178
3.94.5. ἐπιχειρεῖν δ’ ἐκέλευον πρῶτον μὲν Ἀποδωτοῖς, ἔπειτα δὲ Ὀφιονεῦσι καὶ μετὰ τούτους Εὐρυτᾶσιν, ὅπερ μέγιστον μέρος ἐστὶ τῶν Αἰτωλῶν, ἀγνωστότατοι δὲ γλῶσσαν καὶ ὠμοφάγοι εἰσίν, ὡς λέγονται: τούτων γὰρ ληφθέντων ῥᾳδίως καὶ τἆλλα προσχωρήσειν. 3.94.5. The plan which they recommended was to attack first the Apodotians, next the Ophionians, and after these the Eurytanians, who are the largest tribe in Aetolia , and speak, as is said, a language exceedingly difficult to understand, and eat their flesh raw. These once subdued, the rest would easily come in.
55. Theopompus Comicus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
56. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1105-1107, 209-210, 212-215, 211 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273, 275, 289
57. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 669-680 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
58. Sophocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 321
59. Theopompus of Chios, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
60. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 217-221, 216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
61. Sophocles Iunior, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 321
62. Sophocles, Antigone, 1121, 1128-1135, 1146-1152, 149-154, 964-965, 148 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
63. Antiphanes, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
64. Sophocles, Ajax, 610, 695-701 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
65. Antiphanes, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
66. Herodotus, Histories, 2.42, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273, 352, 422
2.42. All that have a temple of Zeus of Thebes or are of the Theban district sacrifice goats, but will not touch sheep. ,For no gods are worshipped by all Egyptians in common except Isis and Osiris, who they say is Dionysus; these are worshipped by all alike. Those who have a temple of Mendes or are of the Mendesian district sacrifice sheep, but will not touch goats. ,The Thebans, and those who by the Theban example will not touch sheep, give the following reason for their ordice: they say that Heracles wanted very much to see Zeus and that Zeus did not want to be seen by him, but that finally, when Heracles prayed, Zeus contrived ,to show himself displaying the head and wearing the fleece of a ram which he had flayed and beheaded. It is from this that the Egyptian images of Zeus have a ram's head; and in this, the Egyptians are imitated by the Ammonians, who are colonists from Egypt and Ethiopia and speak a language compounded of the tongues of both countries. ,It was from this, I think, that the Ammonians got their name, too; for the Egyptians call Zeus “Amon”. The Thebans, then, consider rams sacred for this reason, and do not sacrifice them. ,But one day a year, at the festival of Zeus, they cut in pieces and flay a single ram and put the fleece on the image of Zeus, as in the story; then they bring an image of Heracles near it. Having done this, all that are at the temple mourn for the ram, and then bury it in a sacred coffin. 4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
67. Sophocles, Electra, 1354 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 343
68. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259-18.260 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 166, 289
69. Philochorus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
70. Callimachus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 429
71. Aristotle, Memory And Reminiscence, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic people Found in books: van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 212
72. Aristotle, Soul, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic people Found in books: van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 212
73. Theocritus, Idylls, 26 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 102
74. Plautus, Amphitruo, 703-705 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
75. Plautus, Aulularia, 408 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 188
76. Plautus, Bacchides, 53, 371 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
77. Ennius, Tragoediae, 123-124, 122 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 192
78. Naevius Gnaeus, Tragoediae, 34, 33 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 192
79. Plautus, Mercator, 469 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
80. Plautus, Casina, 979-981 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
81. Nicander of Colophon, Fragments, None (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
82. Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, 1016 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
83. Nicander, Fragments, None (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
84. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5, 1.2.19 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 38
85. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.24.62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 38
86. Cicero, On Laws, 2.8.19, 2.37 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 38, 186
87. Cicero, Brutus, 225 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
225. quos Sex. Titius consecutus est est add. Jahn homo loquax sane et satis acutus, sed tam solutus dissolutus B 1 H et mollis in gestu ut saltatio quaedam nasceretur cui saltationi Titius nomen esset. Ita cavendum est ne quid in agendo dicendove facias, cuius imitatio rideatur ita cavendum... rideatur secl. Stangl : irrideatur Friedrich . sed ad paulo superiorem aetatem revecti reiecti O 1 G sumus; nunc ad eam de qua aliquantum sumus locuti revertamur.
88. Cicero, Brutus, 225 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
225. quos Sex. Titius consecutus est est add. Jahn homo loquax sane et satis acutus, sed tam solutus dissolutus B 1 H et mollis in gestu ut saltatio quaedam nasceretur cui saltationi Titius nomen esset. Ita cavendum est ne quid in agendo dicendove facias, cuius imitatio rideatur ita cavendum... rideatur secl. Stangl : irrideatur Friedrich . sed ad paulo superiorem aetatem revecti reiecti O 1 G sumus; nunc ad eam de qua aliquantum sumus locuti revertamur.
89. Seneca The Elder, Suasoriae, 1.6 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 189
90. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 173
91. Livy, History, 39.13.12, 39.14.6-39.14.9, 39.15.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
92. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.300-4.303 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 188
4.300. hoot forth blind fire to terrify the soul 4.301. with wild, unmeaning roar? O, Iook upon 4.302. that woman, who was homeless in our realm, 4.303. and bargained where to build her paltry town,
93. Varro, Ap. Augustine, De Civitate Dei, 6.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 186
94. Ovid, Fasti, 4.457-4.458 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 188
4.457. mentis inops rapitur, quales audire solemus 4.458. Threicias fusis maenadas ire comis, 4.457. She rushed about, distracted, as we’ve heard 4.458. The Thracian Maenads run with flowing hair.
95. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.256-3.315, 3.528-3.537 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 188
3.256. Sola Iovis coniunx non tam culpetne probetne 3.257. eloquitur, quam clade domus ab Agenore ductae 3.258. gaudet et a Tyria conlectum paelice transfert 3.259. in generis socios odium. Subit ecce priori 3.260. causa recens, gravidamque dolet de semine magni 3.261. esse Iovis Semelen. Dum linguam ad iurgia solvit, 3.262. “profeci quid enim totiens per iurgia?” dixit: 3.263. “ipsa petenda mihi est, ipsam, si maxima Iuno 3.264. rite vocor, perdam, si me gemmantia dextra 3.265. sceptra tenere decet, si sum regina Iovisque 3.266. et soror et coniunx, certe soror. At, puto, furto est 3.267. contenta, et thalami brevis est iniuria nostri: 3.268. concipit, id deerat! manifestaque crimina pleno 3.269. fert utero, et mater, quod vix mihi contigit uno 3.270. de Iove vult fieri: tanta est fiducia formae. 3.271. Fallat eam faxo; nec sum Saturnia, si non 3.272. ab Iove mersa suo Stygias penetrabit in undas.” 3.273. Surgit ab his solio fulvaque recondita nube 3.274. limen adit Semeles. Nec nubes ante removit, 3.275. quam simulavit anum posuitque ad tempora canos 3.276. sulcavitque cutem rugis et curva trementi 3.277. membra tulit passu; vocem quoque fecit anilem, 3.278. ipsaque erat Beroe, Semeles Epidauria nutrix. 3.279. Ergo ubi captato sermone diuque loquendo 3.280. ad nomen venere Iovis, suspirat et “opto, 3.281. Iuppiter ut sit” ait: “metuo tamen omnia: multi 3.282. nomine divorum thalamos iniere pudicos. 3.283. Nec tamen esse Iovem satis est: det pignus amoris, 3.284. si modo verus is est, quantusque et qualis ab alta 3.285. Iunone excipitur, tantus talisque, rogato, 3.286. det tibi complexus suaque ante insignia sumat.” 3.287. Talibus ignaram Iuno Cadmeida dictis 3.288. formarat. Rogat illa Iovem sine nomine munus. 3.289. Cui deus “elige” ait: “nullam patiere repulsam. 3.290. Quoque magis credas, Stygii quoque conscia sunto 3.291. numina torrentis: timor et deus ille deorum est“. 3.292. Laeta malo nimiumque potens perituraque amantis 3.293. obsequio Semele “qualem Saturnia” dixit 3.294. “te solet amplecti, Veneris cum foedus initis, 3.295. da mihi te talem.” Voluit deus ora loquentis 3.296. opprimere: exierat iam vox properata sub auras. 3.297. Ingemuit; neque enim non haec optasse, neque ille 3.298. non iurasse potest. Ergo maestissimus altum 3.299. aethera conscendit vultuque sequentia traxit 3.300. nubila, quis nimbos inmixtaque fulgura ventis 3.301. addidit et tonitrus et inevitabile fulmen. 3.302. Qua tamen usque potest, vires sibi demere temptat; 3.303. nec, quo centimanum deiecerat igne Typhoea, 3.304. nunc armatur eo: nimium feritatis in illo est. 3.305. Est aliud levius fulmen, cui dextra Cyclopum 3.306. saevitiae flammaeque minus, minus addidit irae; 3.307. tela secunda vocant superi. Capit illa, domumque 3.308. intrat Agenoream. Corpus mortale tumultus 3.309. non tulit aetherios donisque iugalibus arsit. 3.310. Imperfectus adhuc infans genetricis ab alvo 3.311. eripitur, patrioque tener (si credere dignum est) 3.312. insuitur femori maternaque tempora complet. 3.313. Furtim illum primis Ino matertera cuuis 3.314. educat: inde datum nymphae Nyseides antris 3.315. occuluere suis lactisque alimenta dedere. 3.528. Liber adest, festisque fremunt ululatibus agri; 3.529. turba ruit, mixtaeque viris matresque nurusque 3.530. vulgusque proceresque ignota ad sacra feruntur. 3.531. “Quis furor, anguigenae, proles Mavortia, vestras 3.532. attonuit mentes?” Pentheus ait: “aerane tantum 3.533. aere repulsa valent et adunco tibia cornu 3.534. et magicae fraudes, ut, quos non bellicus ensis, 3.535. non tuba terruerit, non strictis agmina telis, 3.536. femineae voces et mota insania vino 3.537. obscenique greges et iia tympana vincant?
96. Catullus, Poems, 64.251-64.268 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 188
97. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 33-50 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 290
50. and this is the meaning of the oracle recorded in Deuteronomy, "Behold, I have put before thy face life and death; good and evil. Do thou choose life."12 Therefore he teaches us by this sentence both that men have a knowledge of good and of the contrary, evil, and that it is their duty to choose the better in preference to the worse, preserving reason within themselves as an incorruptible judge, to be guided by the arguments which sound sense suggests, and to reject those which are brought forward by the contrary power. XI.
98. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 102
10.3.10. And on this account Plato, and even before his time the Pythagoreians, called philosophy music; and they say that the universe is constituted in accordance with harmony, assuming that every form of music is the work of the gods. And in this sense, also, the Muses are goddesses, and Apollo is leader of the Muses, and poetry as a whole is laudatory of the gods. And by the same course of reasoning they also attribute to music the upbuilding of morals, believing that everything which tends to correct the mind is close to the gods. Now most of the Greeks assigned to Dionysus, Apollo, Hecate, the Muses, and above all to Demeter, everything of an orgiastic or Bacchic or choral nature, as well as the mystic element in initiations; and they give the name Iacchus not only to Dionysus but also to the leader-in-chief of the mysteries, who is the genius of Demeter. And branch-bearing, choral dancing, and initiations are common elements in the worship of these gods. As for the Muses and Apollo, the Muses preside over the choruses, whereas Apollo presides both over these and the rites of divination. But all educated men, and especially the musicians, are ministers of the Muses; and both these and those who have to do with divination are ministers of Apollo; and the initiated and torch-bearers and hierophants, of Demeter; and the Sileni and Satyri and Bacchae, and also the Lenae and Thyiae and Mimallones and Naides and Nymphae and the beings called Tityri, of Dionysus.
99. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 2.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 290
100. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 3.1-3.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 290
101. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.63.3-3.63.4, 4.2.2-4.2.3, 4.2.5, 4.3.2-4.3.3, 4.5.1, 5.50.4, 5.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 43, 161, 164, 166, 167, 172, 186, 352
3.63.3.  This, then, is their account: The most ancient Dionysus was an Indian, and since his country, because of the excellent climate, produced the vine in abundance without cultivation, he was the first to press out the clusters of grapes and to devise the use of wine as a natural product, likewise to give the proper care to the figs and other fruits which grow upon trees, and, speaking generally, to devise whatever pertains to the harvesting and storing of these fruits. The same Dionysus is, furthermore, said to have worn a long beard, the reason for the report being that it is the custom among the Indians to give great care, until their death, to the raising of a beard. 3.63.4.  Now this Dionysus visited with an army all the inhabited world and gave instruction both as to the culture of the vine and the crushing of the clusters in the wine-vats (lenoi), which is the reason why the god was named Lenaeus. Likewise, he allowed all people to share in his other discoveries, and when he passed from among men he received immortal honour at the hands of those who had received his benefactions. 4.2.2.  Semelê was loved by Zeus because of her beauty, but since he had his intercourse with her secretly and without speech she thought that the god despised her; consequently she made the request of him that he come to her embraces in the same manner as in his approaches to Hera. 4.2.3.  Accordingly, Zeus visited her in a way befitting a god, accompanied by thunder and lightning, revealing himself to her as he embraced her; but Semelê, who was pregt and unable to endure the majesty of the divine presence, brought forth the babe untimely and was herself slain by the fire. Thereupon Zeus, taking up the child, handed it over to the care of Hermes, and ordered him to take it to the cave in Nysa, which lay between Phoenicia and the Nile, where he should deliver it to the nymphs that they should rear it and with great solicitude bestow upon it the best of care. 4.2.5.  After he had received his rearing by the nymphs in Nysa, they say, he made the discovery of wine and taught mankind how to cultivate the vine. And as he visited the inhabited world almost in its entirety, he brought much land under cultivation and in return for this received most high honours at the hands of all men. He also discovered the drink made out of barley and called by some zythos, the bouquet of which is not much inferior to that of wine. The preparation of this drink he taught to those peoples whose country was unsuited to the cultivation of the vine. 4.3.2.  And the Boeotians and other Greeks and the Thracians, in memory of the campaign in India, have established sacrifices every other year to Dionysus, and believe that at that time the god reveals himself to human beings. 4.3.3.  Consequently in many Greek cities every other year Bacchic bands of women gather, and it is lawful for the maidens to carry the thyrsus and to join in the frenzied revelry, crying out "Euai!" and honouring the god; while the matrons, forming in groups, offer sacrifices to the god and celebrate his mysteries and, in general, extol with hymns the presence of Dionysus, in this manner acting the part of the Maenads who, as history records, were of old the companions of the god. 4.5.1.  Many epithets, so we are informed, have been given him by men, who have found the occasions from which they arose in the practices and customs which have become associated with him. So, for instance, he has been called Baccheius from Bacchic bands of women who accompanied him, Lenaeus from the custom of treading the clusters of grapes in a wine-tub (lenos), and Bromius from the thunder (bromos) which attended his birth; likewise for a similar reason he has been called Pyrigenes ("Born-of‑Fire"). 5.50.4.  Now some of the islands of the Cyclades had no inhabitants whatsoever and others were sparsely settled; consequently they sailed further, and having been repulsed once from Euboea, they sailed to Thessaly, where Butes and his companions, upon landing, came upon the female devotees of Dionysus as they were celebrating the orgies of the god near Drius, as it is called, in Achaea Phthiotis. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island.
102. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 9.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
103. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 135 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 290
135. But he asserts that the formation of the individual man, perceptible by the external senses is a composition of earthy substance, and divine spirit. For that the body was created by the Creator taking a lump of clay, and fashioning the human form out of it; but that the soul proceeds from no created thing at all, but from the Father and Ruler of all things. For when he uses the expression, "he breathed into," etc., he means nothing else than the divine spirit proceeding form that happy and blessed nature, sent to take up its habitation here on earth, for the advantage of our race, in order that, even if man is mortal according to that portion of him which is visible, he may at all events be immortal according to that portion which is invisible; and for this reason, one may properly say that man is on the boundaries of a better and an immortal nature, partaking of each as far as it is necessary for him; and that he was born at the same time, both mortal and the immortal. Mortal as to his body, but immortal as to his intellect. XLVII.
104. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 173
105. New Testament, 2 Peter, 1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 101
1.18. καὶ ταύτην τὴν φωνὴν ἡμεῖς ἠκούσαμεν ἐξ οὐρανοῦ ἐνεχθεῖσαν σὺν αὐτῷ ὄντες ἐν τῷ ἁγίῳ ὄρει. 1.18. This voice we heard come out of heaven when we were with him in the holy mountain.
106. Martial, Epigrams, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
107. Martial, Epigrams, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
108. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Contestatio, 4.3, 4.5-4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
109. New Testament, Galatians, 3.5, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 343, 356
3.5. ὁ οὖν ἐπιχορηγῶν ὑμῖν τὸ πνεῦμα καὶ ἐνεργῶν δυνάμεις ἐν ὑμῖν ἐξ ἔργων νόμου ἢ ἐξ ἀκοῆς πίστεως; 4.6. Ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί, ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ἡμῶν, κρᾶζον Ἀββά ὁ πατήρ. 3.5. He therefore who supplies the Spirit to you, and worksmiracles among you, does he do it by the works of the law, or byhearing of faith? 4.6. And because you are sons, God sent out theSpirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, "Abba, Father!"
110. New Testament, Romans, 2.13, 3.17, 5.13, 8.15, 11.1, 12.1-12.4, 12.9-12.10, 13.1, 13.8-13.9, 14.1-14.2, 14.5, 14.16, 14.18, 14.23, 14.32, 14.39-14.40, 15.18-15.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 343, 346, 356, 365; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94, 96, 101, 136, 137
2.13. οὐ γὰρ οἱ ἀκροαταὶ νόμου δίκαιοι παρὰ [τῷ] θεῷ, ἀλλʼ οἱ ποιηταὶ νόμου δικαιωθήσονται. 3.17. 5.13. ἄχρι γὰρ νόμου ἁμαρτία ἦν ἐν κόσμῳ, ἁμαρτία δὲ οὐκ ἐλλογᾶται μὴ ὄντος νόμου, 8.15. οὐ γὰρ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα δουλείας πάλιν εἰς φόβον, ἀλλὰ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα υἱοθεσίας, ἐν ᾧ κράζομεν 11.1. Λέγω οὖν, μὴἀπώσατο ὁ θεὸς τὸν λαὸν αὐτοῦ;μὴ γένοιτο· καὶ γὰρ ἐγὼ Ἰσραηλείτης εἰμί, ἐκ σπέρματος Ἀβραάμ, φυλῆς Βενιαμείν. 12.1. Παρακαλῶ οὖν ὑμᾶς, ἀδελφοί, διὰ τῶν οἰκτιρμῶν τοῦ θεοῦ παραστῆσαι τὰ σώματα ὑμῶν θυσίαν ζῶσαν ἁγίαν τῷ θεῷ εὐάρεστον, τὴν λογικὴν λατρείαν ὑμῶν· 12.2. καὶ μὴ συνσχηματίζεσθε τῷ αἰῶνι τούτῳ, ἀλλὰ μεταμορφοῦσθε τῇ ἀνακαινώσει τοῦ νοός, εἰς τὸ δοκιμάζειν ὑμᾶς τί τὸ θέλημα τοῦ θεοῦ, τὸ ἀγαθὸν καὶ εὐάρεστον καὶ τέλειον. 12.3. Λέγω γὰρ διὰ τῆς χάριτος τῆς δοθείσης μοι παντὶ τῷ ὄντι ἐν ὑμῖν μὴ ὑπερφρονεῖν παρʼ ὃ δεῖ φρονεῖν, ἀλλὰ φρονεῖν εἰς τὸ σωφρονεῖν, ἑκάστῳ ὡς ὁ θεὸς ἐμέρισεν μέτρον πίστεως. 12.4. καθάπερ γὰρ ἐν ἑνὶ σώματι πολλὰ μέλη ἔχομεν, τὰ δὲ μέλη πάντα οὐ τὴν αὐτὴν ἔχει πρᾶξιν, 12.9. ἡ ἀγάπη ἀνυπόκριτος. 12.10. ἀποστυγοῦντες τὸ πονηρόν, κολλώμενοι τῷ ἀγαθῷ· τῇ φιλαδελφίᾳ εἰς ἀλλήλους φιλόστοργοι, τῇ τιμῇ ἀλλήλους προηγούμενοι, 13.1. Πᾶσα ψυχὴ ἐξουσίαις ὑπερεχούσαις ὑποτασσέσθω, οὐ γὰρ ἔστιν ἐξουσία εἰ μὴ ὑπὸ θεοῦ, αἱ δὲ οὖσαι ὑπὸ θεοῦ τεταγμέναι εἰσίν· 13.8. Μηδενὶ μηδὲν ὀφείλετε, εἰ μὴ τὸ ἀλλήλους ἀγαπᾷν· ὁ γὰρ ἀγαπῶν τὸν ἕτερον νόμον πεπλήρωκεν. 13.9. τὸ γάρΟὐ μοιχεύσεις, Οὐ φονεύσεις, Οὐ κλέψεις, Οὐκ ἐπιθυμήσεις,καὶ εἴ τις ἑτέρα ἐντολή, ἐν τῷ λόγῳ τούτῳ ἀνακεφαλαιοῦται, [ἐν τῷ]Ἀγαπήσεις τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν. 14.1. Τὸν δὲ ἀσθενοῦντα τῇ πίστει προσλαμβάνεσθε, μὴ εἰς διακρίσεις διαλογισμῶν. 14.2. ὃς μὲν πιστεύει φαγεῖν πάντα, ὁ δὲ ἀσθενῶν λάχανα ἐσθίει. 14.5. ὃς μὲν [γὰρ] κρίνει ἡμέραν παρʼ ἡμέραν, ὃς δὲ κρίνει πᾶσαν ἡμέραν· ἕκαστος ἐν τῷ ἰδίῳ νοῒ πληροφορείσθω· 14.16. μὴ βλασφημείσθω οὖν ὑμῶν τὸ ἀγαθόν. 14.18. ὁ γὰρ ἐν τούτῳ δουλεύων τῷ χριστῷ εὐάρεστος τῷ θεῷ καὶ δόκιμος τοῖς ἀνθρώποις. 14.23. ὁ δὲ διακρινόμενος ἐὰν φάγῃ κατακέκριται, ὅτι οὐκ ἐκ πίστεως· πᾶν δὲ ὃ οὐκ ἐκ πίστεως ἁμαρτία ἐστίν. 15.18. οὐ γὰρ τολμήσω τι λαλεῖν ὧν οὐ κατειργάσατο Χριστὸς διʼ ἐμοῦ εἰς ὑπακοὴν ἐθνῶν, λόγῳ καὶ ἔργῳ, 15.19. ἐν δυνάμει σημείων καὶ τεράτων, ἐν δυνάμει πνεύματος [ἁγίου]· ὥστε με ἀπὸ Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ κύκλῳ μέχρι τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ πεπληρωκέναι τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τοῦ χριστοῦ, 2.13. For it isn't the hearers of the law who are righteous before God, but the doers of the law will be justified 3.17. The way of peace, they haven't known." 5.13. For until the law, sin was in the world; but sin is not charged when there is no law. 8.15. For you didn't receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!" 11.1. I ask then, Did God reject his people? May it never be! For I also am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin. 12.1. Therefore I urge you, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your spiritual service. 12.2. Don't be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what is the good and acceptable and perfect will of God. 12.3. For I say, through the grace that was given me, to every man who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think reasonably, as God has apportioned to each person a measure of faith. 12.4. For even as we have many members in one body, and all the members don't have the same function, 12.9. Let love be without hypocrisy. Abhor that which is evil. Cling to that which is good. 12.10. In love of the brothers be tenderly affectionate one to another; in honor preferring one another; 13.1. Let every soul be in subjection to the higher authorities, for there is no authority except from God, and those who exist are ordained by God. 13.8. Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law. 13.9. For the commandments, "You shall not commit adultery," "You shall not murder," "You shall not steal," "You shall not give false testimony," "You shall not covet," and whatever other commandments there are, are all summed up in this saying, namely, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself." 14.1. Now receive one who is weak in faith, but not for disputes over opinions. 14.2. One man has faith to eat all things, but he who is weak eats only vegetables. 14.5. One man esteems one day as more important. Another esteems every day alike. Let each man be fully assured in his own mind. 14.16. Then don't let your good be slandered, 14.18. For he who serves Christ in these things is acceptable to God and approved by men. 14.23. But he who doubts is condemned if he eats, because it isn't of faith; and whatever is not of faith is sin. 15.18. For I will not dare to speak of any things except those which Christ worked through me, for the obedience of the Gentiles, by word and deed, 15.19. in the power of signs and wonders, in the power of God's Spirit; so that from Jerusalem, and around as far as to Illyricum, I have fully preached the gospel of Christ;
111. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 7.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 93
7.1. For even though certain persons desired to deceive me after the flesh, yet the spirit is not deceived, being from God; for it knoweth whence it cometh and where it goeth, and it searcheth out the hidden things. I cried out, when I was among you; I spake with a loud voice, with God's own voice, Give ye heed to the bishop and the presbytery and deacons.
112. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 7.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 93
7.1. For even though certain persons desired to deceive me after the flesh, yet the spirit is not deceived, being from God; for it knoweth whence it cometh and where it goeth, and it searcheth out the hidden things. I cried out, when I was among you; I spake with a loud voice, with God's own voice, Give ye heed to the bishop and the presbytery and deacons.
113. Iulia Balbilla, Epigrams, 608 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 197
114. New Testament, Luke, 1.15, 1.41-1.45, 1.67, 9.28-9.36, 24.49 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 89; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 135
1.15. ἔσται γὰρ μέγας ἐνώπιον Κυρίου, καὶ οἶνον καὶ σίκερα οὐ μὴ πίῃ, καὶ πνεύματος ἁγίου πλησθήσεται ἔτι ἐκ κοιλίας μητρὸς αὐτοῦ, 1.41. καὶ ἐγένετο ὡς ἤκουσεν τὸν ἀσπασμὸν τῆς Μαρίας ἡ Ἐλεισάβετ, ἐσκίρτησεν τὸ βρέφος ἐν τῇ κοιλίᾳ αὐτῆς, καὶ ἐπλήσθη πνεύματος ἁγίου ἡ Ἐλεισάβετ, 1.42. καὶ ἀνεφώνησεν κραυγῇ μεγάλῃ καὶ εἶπεν Εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν, καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου. 1.43. καὶ πόθεν μοι τοῦτο ἵνα ἔλθῃ ἡ μήτηρ τοῦ κυρίου μου πρὸς ἐμέ; 1.44. ἰδοὺ γὰρ ὡς ἐγένετο ἡ φωνὴ τοῦ ἀσπασμοῦ σου εἰς τὰ ὦτά μου, ἐσκίρτησεν ἐν ἀγαλλιάσει τὸ βρέφος ἐν τῇ κοιλίᾳ μου. 1.45. καὶ μακαρία ἡ πιστεύσασα ὅτι ἔσται τελείωσις τοῖς λελαλημένοις αὐτῇ παρὰ Κυρίου. 1.67. καὶ γὰρ χεὶρ Κυρίου ἦν μετʼ αὐτοῦ. Καὶ Ζαχαρίας ὁ πατὴρ αὐτοῦ ἐπλήσθη πνεύματος ἁγίου καὶ ἐπροφήτευσεν λέγων 9.28. Ἐγένετο δὲ μετὰ τοὺς λόγους τούτους ὡσεὶ ἡμέραι ὀκτὼ παραλαβὼν Πέτρον καὶ Ἰωάνην καὶ Ἰάκωβον ἀνέβη εἰς τὸ ὄρος προσεύξασθαι. 9.29. καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ προσεύχεσθαι αὐτὸν τὸ εἶδος τοῦ προσώπου αὐτοῦ ἕτερον καὶ ὁ ἱματισμὸς αὐτοῦ λευκὸς ἐξαστράπτων. 9.30. καὶ ἰδοὺ ἄνδρες δύο συνελάλουν αὐτῷ, οἵτινες ἦσαν Μωυσῆς καὶ Ἠλείας, 9.31. οἳ ὀφθέντες ἐν δόξῃ ἔλεγον τὴν ἔξοδον αὐτοῦ ἣν ἤμελλεν πληροῦν ἐν Ἰερουσαλήμ. 9.32. ὁ δὲ Πέτρος καὶ οἱ σὺν αὐτῷ ἦσαν βεβαρημένοι ὕπνῳ· διαγρηγορήσαντες δὲ εἶδαν τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ καὶ τοὺς δύο ἄνδρας τοὺς συνεστῶτας αὐτῷ. 9.33. καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ διαχωρίζεσθαι αὐτοὺς ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ εἶπεν ὁ Πέτρος πρὸς τὸν Ἰησοῦν Ἐπιστάτα, καλόν ἐστιν ἡμᾶς ὧδε εἶναι, καὶ ποιήσωμεν σκηνὰς τρεῖς, μίαν σοὶ καὶ μίαν Μωυσεῖ καὶ μίαν Ἠλείᾳ, μὴ εἰδὼς ὃ λέγει. 9.34. ταῦτα δὲ αὐτοῦ λέγοντος ἐγένετο νεφέλη καὶ ἐπεσκίαζεν αὐτούς· ἐφοβήθησαν δὲ ἐν τῷ εἰσελθεῖν αὐτοὺς εἰς τὴν νεφέλην. 9.35. καὶ φωνὴ ἐγένετο ἐκ τῆς νεφέλης λέγουσα Οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἐκλελεγμένος, αὐτοῦ ἀκούετε. 9.36. καὶ ἐν τῷ γενέσθαι τὴν φωνὴν εὑρέθη Ἰησοῦς μόνος. καὶ αὐτοὶ ἐσίγησαν καὶ οὐδενὶ ἀπήγγειλαν ἐν ἐκείναις ταῖς ἡμέραις οὐδὲν ὧν ἑώρακαν. 24.49. καὶ ἰδοὺ ἐγὼ ἐξαποστέλλω τὴν ἐπαγγελίαν τοῦ πατρός μου ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς· ὑμεῖς δὲ καθίσατε ἐν τῇ πόλει ἕως οὗ ἐνδύσησθε ἐξ ὕψους δύναμιν. 1.15. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord, and he will drink no wine nor strong drink. He will be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb. 1.41. It happened, when Elizabeth heard Mary's greeting, that the baby leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. 1.42. She called out with a loud voice, and said, "Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb! 1.43. Why am I so favored, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? 1.44. For behold, when the voice of your greeting came into my ears, the baby leaped in my womb for joy! 1.45. Blessed is she who believed, for there will be a fulfillment of the things which have been spoken to her from the Lord!" 1.67. His father, Zacharias, was filled with the Holy Spirit, and prophesied, saying, 9.28. It happened about eight days after these sayings, that he took with him Peter, John, and James, and went up onto the mountain to pray. 9.29. As he was praying, the appearance of his face was altered, and his clothing became white and dazzling. 9.30. Behold, two men were talking with him, who were Moses and Elijah, 9.31. who appeared in glory, and spoke of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. 9.32. Now Peter and those who were with him were heavy with sleep, but when they were fully awake, they saw his glory, and the two men who stood with him. 9.33. It happened, as they were parting from him, that Peter said to Jesus, "Master, it is good for us to be here. Let's make three tents: one for you, and one for Moses, and one for Elijah," not knowing what he said. 9.34. While he said these things, a cloud came and overshadowed them, and they were afraid as they entered into the cloud. 9.35. A voice came out of the cloud, saying, "This is my beloved Son. Listen to him!" 9.36. When the voice came, Jesus was found alone. They were silent, and told no one in those days any of the things which they had seen. 24.49. Behold, I send forth the promise of my Father on you. But wait in the city of Jerusalem until you are clothed with power from on high."
115. Juvenal, Satires, 6.67-6.70, 7.82-7.87 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 194
116. New Testament, John, 14.12, 14.26, 15.26, 16.13-16.15, 20.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 343, 346, 365
14.12. Ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ὁ πιστεύων εἰς ἐμὲ τὰ ἔργα ἃ ἐγὼ ποιῶ κἀκεῖνος ποιήσει, καὶ μείζονα τούτων ποιήσει, ὅτι ἐγὼ πρὸς τὸν πατέρα πορεύομαι· 14.26. ὁ δὲ παράκλητος, τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον ὃ πέμψει ὁ πατὴρ ἐν τῷ ὀνόματί μου, ἐκεῖνος ὑμᾶς διδάξει πάντα καὶ ὑπομνήσει ὑμᾶς πάντα ἃ εἶπον ὑμῖν ἐγώ. 15.26. Ὅταν ἔλθῃ ὁ παράκλητος ὃν ἐγὼ πέμψω ὑμῖν παρὰ τοῦ πατρός, τὸ πνεῦμα τῆς ἀληθείας ὃ παρὰ τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκπορεύεται, ἐκεῖνος μαρτυρήσει περὶ ἐμοῦ· καὶ ὑμεῖς δὲ μαρτυρεῖτε, 16.13. ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ ἐκεῖνος, τὸ πνεῦμα τῆς ἀληθείας, ὁδηγήσει ὑμᾶς εἰς τὴν ἀλήθειαν πᾶσαν, οὐ γὰρ λαλήσει ἀφʼ ἑαυτοῦ, ἀλλʼ ὅσα ἀκούει λαλήσει, καὶ τὰ ἐρχόμενα ἀναγγελεῖ ὑμῖν. 16.14. ἐκεῖνος ἐμὲ δοξάσει, ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ ἐμοῦ λήμψεται καὶ ἀναγγελεῖ ὑμῖν. 16.15. πάντα ὅσα ἔχει ὁ πατὴρ ἐμά ἐστιν· διὰ τοῦτο εἶπον ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ ἐμοῦ λαμβάνει καὶ ἀναγγελεῖ ὑμῖν. 20.23. ἄν τινων ἀφῆτε τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἀφέωνται αὐτοῖς· ἄν τινων κρατῆτε κεκράτηνται. 14.12. Most assuredly I tell you, he who believes in me, the works that I do, he will do also; and greater works than these will he do; because I am going to my Father. 14.26. But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things, and will remind you of all that I said to you. 15.26. "When the Counselor has come, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will testify about me. 16.13. However when he, the Spirit of truth, has come, he will guide you into all truth, for he will not speak from himself; but whatever he hears, he will speak. He will declare to you things that are coming. 16.14. He will glorify me, for he will take from what is mine, and will declare it to you. 16.15. All things whatever the Father has are mine; therefore I said that he takes of mine, and will declare it to you. 20.23. Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained."
117. New Testament, Ephesians, 5.19, 5.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 346; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 134
5.19. λαλοῦντες ἑαυτοῖς ψαλμοῖς καὶ ὕμνοις καὶ ᾠδαῖς πνευματικαῖς, ᾁδοντες καὶ ψάλλοντες τῇ καρδίᾳ ὑμῶν τῷ κυρίῳ, 5.32. τὸ μυστήριον τοῦτο μέγα ἐστίν, ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω εἰς Χριστὸν καὶ [εἰς] τὴν ἐκκλησίαν. 5.19. speaking to one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs; singing, and singing praises in your heart to the Lord; 5.32. This mystery is great, but I speak concerning Christ and of the assembly.
118. New Testament, Mark, 9.2-9.8, 13.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 346, 365; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 135
9.2. Καὶ μετὰ ἡμέρας ἓξ παραλαμβάνει ὁ Ἰησοῦς τὸν Πέτρον καὶ τὸν Ἰάκωβον καὶ Ἰωάνην, καὶ ἀναφέρει αὐτοὺς εἰς ὄρος ὑψηλὸν κατʼ ἰδίαν μόνους. καὶ μετεμορφώθη ἔμπροσθεν αὐτῶν, 9.3. καὶ τὰ ἱμάτια αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο στίλβοντα λευκὰ λίαν οἷα γναφεὺς ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς οὐ δύναται οὕτως λευκᾶναι. 9.4. καὶ ὤφθη αὐτοῖς Ἠλείας σὺν Μωυσεῖ, καὶ ἦσαν συνλαλοῦντες τῷ Ἰησοῦ. 9.5. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Πέτρος λέγει τῷ Ἰησοῦ Ῥαββεί, καλόν ἐστιν ἡμᾶς ὧδε εἶναι, καὶ ποιήσωμεν τρεῖς σκηνάς, σοὶ μίαν καὶ Μωυσεῖ μίαν καὶ Ἠλείᾳ μίαν. 9.6. οὐ γὰρ ᾔδει τί ἀποκριθῇ, ἔκφοβοι γὰρ ἐγένοντο. 9.7. καὶ ἐγένετο νεφέλη ἐπισκιάζουσα αὐτοῖς, καὶ ἐγένετο φωνὴ ἐκ τῆς νεφέλης Οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός, ἀκούετε αὐτοῦ. 9.8. καὶ ἐξάπινα περιβλεψάμενοι οὐκέτι οὐδένα εἶδον μεθʼ ἑαυτῶν εἰ μὴ τὸν Ἰησοῦν μόνον. 13.11. καὶ ὅταν ἄγωσιν ὑμᾶς παραδιδόντες, μὴ προμεριμνᾶτε τί λαλήσητε, ἀλλʼ ὃ ἐὰν δοθῇ ὑμῖν ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ὥρᾳ τοῦτο λαλεῖτε, οὐ γάρ ἐστε ὑμεῖς οἱ λαλοῦντες ἀλλὰ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον. 9.2. After six days Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John, and brought them up onto a high mountain privately by themselves, and he was changed into another form in front of them. 9.3. His clothing became glistening, exceedingly white, like snow, such as no launderer on earth can whiten them. 9.4. Elijah and Moses appeared to them, and they were talking with Jesus. 9.5. Peter answered Jesus, "Rabbi, it is good for us to be here. Let's make three tents: one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah." 9.6. For he didn't know what to say, for they were very afraid. 9.7. A cloud came, overshadowing them, and a voice came out of the cloud, "This is my beloved Son. Listen to him." 9.8. Suddenly looking around, they saw no one with them any more, except Jesus only. 13.11. When they lead you away and deliver you up, don't be anxious beforehand, or premeditate what you will say, but say whatever will be given you in that hour. For it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit.
119. New Testament, Matthew, 12.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 346
12.28. εἰ δὲ ἐν πνεύματι θεοῦ ἐγὼ ἐκβάλλω τὰ δαιμόνια, ἄρα ἔφθασεν ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ. 12.28. But if I by the Spirit of God cast out demons, then the Kingdom of God has come upon you.
120. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 11.3.71 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
121. New Testament, Colossians, 1.5-1.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy, ecstatic Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 346, 356
1.5. διὰ τὴν ἐλπίδα τὴν ἀποκειμένην ὑμῖν ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς, ἣν προηκούσατε ἐν τῷ λόγῳ τῆς ἀληθείας τοῦ εὐαγγελίου τοῦ παρόντος εἰς ὑμᾶς, 1.6. καθὼς καὶ ἐν παντὶ τῷ κόσμῳ ἐστὶν καρποφορούμενον καὶ αὐξανόμενον καθὼς καὶ ἐν ὑμῖν, ἀφʼ ἧς ἡμέρας ἠκούσατε καὶ ἐπέγνωτε τὴν χάριν τοῦ θεοῦ ἐν ἀληθείᾳ· 1.5. because of the hope which is laid up for you in the heavens, whereof you heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel, 1.6. which has come to you; even as it is in all the world and is bearing fruit and increasing, as it does in you also, since the day you heard and knew the grace of God in truth;
122. Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
123. Tacitus, Annals, 11.31.10, 11.36.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 189, 194
124. Suetonius, Claudius, 26.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 191
125. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 195
126. Plutarch, Virtues of Women, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 168
127. Plutarch, Fragments, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 343
128. Plutarch, On The Delays of Divine Vengeance, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 155
129. Plutarch, On The Principle of Cold, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 168
953d. And at Delphi you yourself heard, in the case of those who climbed Parnassus to rescue the Thyiades when they were trapped by a fierce gale and snowstorm, that their capes were frozen so stiff and wooden that when they were opened out, they broke and split apart. Excessive cold, because of its hardness and immobility, also stiffens the muscles and renders the tongue speechless, for it congeals the moist and tender parts of the body. In view of these considerations, regard the facts in the following light: every force, presumably, whenever it prevails, by a law of nature changes and turns into itself whatever it overcomes. What is mastered by heat is reduced to flames, what is mastered by wind turns to air; and anything that falls into the water,
130. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 422
131. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 179
417c. in which it is possible to gain the clearest reflections and adumbrations of the truth about the demigods, 'let my lips be piously sealed,' as Herodotus says; but as for festivals and sacrifices, which may be compared with ill-omened and gloomy days, in which occur the eating of raw flesh, rending of victims, fasting, and beating of breasts, and again in many places scurrilous language at the shrines, and Frenzy and shouting of throngs in excitement With tumultuous tossing of heads in the air, Ishould say that these acts are not performed for any god, but are soothing and appeasing rites for the averting of evil spirits. Nor is it credible that the gods demanded or welcomed the human sacrifices of ancient days,
132. Suetonius, Augustus, 70.1-70.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 189
133. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 189
134. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
5.2. ταύτην ἄν τις ἀπὸ τῶν δρωμένων ἱερῶν μάλιστα Λευκοθέαν νομίσειεν εἶναι, καὶ γὰρ θεράπαιναν εἰς τὸν σηκὸν εἰσάγουσαι ῥαπίζουσιν, εἶτʼ ἐξελαύνουσι καὶ τὰ τῶν ἀδελφῶν τέκνα πρὸ τῶν ἰδίων ἐναγκαλίζονται καὶ δρῶσι περὶ τὴν θυσίαν ἃ ταῖς Διονύσου τροφοῖς καὶ τοῖς διὰ τὴν παλλακὴν πάθεσι τῆς Ἰνοῦς προσέοικε. μετὰ δὲ τὰς εὐχὰς ὁ Κάμιλλος εἰς τὴν Φαλίσκων ἐνέβαλε, καὶ μάχῃ μεγάλῃ τούτους τε καὶ Καπηνάτας προσβοηθήσαντας αὐτοῖς ἐνίκησεν. 5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.
135. Silius Italicus, Punica, 15.80, 17.645 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 535
136. New Testament, Acts, 1.5, 1.8, 2.1-2.13, 4.31, 5.1-5.10, 7.55, 8.39, 10.1, 11.28, 13.2, 13.9, 22.17, 26.2-26.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014), The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 63, 66, 85, 89, 346; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 134
1.5. ὅτι Ἰωάνης μὲν ἐβάπτισεν ὕδατι, ὑμεῖς δὲ ἐν πνεύματι βαπτισθήσεσθε ἁγίῳ οὐ μετὰ πολλὰς ταύτας ἡμέρας. 1.8. ἀλλὰ λήμψεσθε δύναμιν ἐπελθόντος τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς, καὶ ἔσεσθέ μου μάρτυρες ἔν τε Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ [ἐν] πάσῃ τῇ Ἰουδαίᾳ καὶ Σαμαρίᾳ καὶ ἕως ἐσχάτου τῆς γῆς. 2.1. Καὶ ἐν τῷ συνπληροῦσθαι τὴν ἡμέραν τῆς πεντηκοστῆς ἦσαν πάντες ὁμοῦ ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό, 2.2. καὶ ἐγένετο ἄφνω ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἦχος ὥσπερ φερομένης πνοῆς βιαίας καὶ ἐπλήρωσεν ὅλον τὸν οἶκον οὗ ἦσαν καθήμενοι, 2.3. καὶ ὤφθησαν αὐτοῖς διαμεριζόμεναι γλῶσσαι ὡσεὶ πυρός, καὶ ἐκάθισεν ἐφʼ ἕνα ἕκαστον αὐτῶν, 2.4. καὶ ἐπλήσθησαν πάντες πνεύματος ἁγίου, καὶ ἤρξαντο λαλεῖν ἑτέραις γλώσσαις καθὼς τὸ πνεῦμα ἐδίδου ἀποφθέγγεσθαι αὐτοῖς. 2.5. Ἦσαν δὲ [ἐν] Ἰερουσαλὴμ κατοικοῦντες Ἰουδαῖοι, ἄνδρες εὐλαβεῖς ἀπὸ παντὸς ἔθνους τῶν ὑπὸ τὸν οὐρανόν· 2.6. γενομένης δὲ τῆς φωνῆς ταύτης συνῆλθε τὸ πλῆθος καὶ συνεχύθη, ὅτι ἤκουσεν εἷς ἕκαστος τῇ ἰδίᾳ διαλέκτῳ λαλούντων αὐτῶν· 2.7. ἐξίσταντο δὲ καὶ ἐθαύμαζον λέγοντες Οὐχὶ ἰδοὺ πάντες οὗτοί εἰσιν οἱ λαλοῦντες Γαλιλαῖοι; 2.8. καὶ πῶς ἡμεῖς ἀκούομεν ἕκαστος τῇ ἰδίᾳ διαλέκτῳ ἡμῶν ἐν ᾗ ἐγεννήθημεν; 2.9. Πάρθοι καὶ Μῆδοι καὶ Ἐλαμεῖται, καὶ οἱ κατοικοῦντες τὴν Μεσοποταμίαν, Ἰουδαίαν τε καὶ Καππαδοκίαν, Πόντον καὶ τὴν Ἀσίαν, 2.10. Φρυγίαν τε καὶ Παμφυλίαν, Αἴγυπτον καὶ τὰ μέρη τῆς Λιβύης τῆς κατὰ Κυρήνην, καὶ οἱ ἐπιδημοῦντες Ῥωμαῖοι, 2.11. Ἰουδαῖοί τε καὶ προσήλυτοι, Κρῆτες καὶ Ἄραβες, ἀκούομεν λαλούντων αὐτῶν ταῖς ἡμετέραις γλώσσαις τὰ μεγαλεῖα τοῦ θεοῦ. 2.12. ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες Τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι; 2.13. ἕτεροι δὲ διαχλευάζοντες ἔλεγον ὅτι Γλεύκους μεμεστωμένοι εἰσίν. 4.31. καὶ δεηθέντων αὐτῶν ἐσαλεύθη ὁ τόπος ἐν ᾧ ἦσαν συνηγμένοι, καὶ ἐπλήσθησαν ἅπαντες τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος, καὶ ἐλάλουν τὸν λόγον τοῦ θεοῦ μετὰ παρρησίας. 5.1. Ἀνὴρ δέ τις Ἁνανίας ὀνόματι σὺν Σαπφείρῃ τῇ γυναικὶ αὐτοῦ ἐπώλησεν κτῆμα 5.2. καὶ ἐνοσφίσατο ἀπὸ τῆς τιμῆς, συνειδυίης καὶ τῆς γυναικός, καὶ ἐνέγκας μέρος τι παρὰ τοὺς πόδας τῶν ἀποστόλων ἔθηκεν. 5.3. εἶπεν δὲ ὁ Πέτρος Ἁνανία, διὰ τί ἐπλήρωσεν ὁ Σατανᾶς τὴν καρδίαν σου ψεύσασθαί σε τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον καὶ νοσφίσασθαι ἀπὸ τῆς τιμῆς τοῦ χωρίου; 5.4. οὐχὶ μένον σοὶ ἔμενεν καὶ πραθὲν ἐν τῇ σῇ ἐξουσίᾳ ὑπῆρχεν; τί ὅτι ἔθου ἐν τῇ καρδίᾳ σου τὸ πρᾶγμα τοῦτο; οὐκ ἐψεύσω ἀνθρώποις ἀλλὰ τῷ θεῷ. 5.5. ἀκούων δὲ ὁ Ἁνανίας τοὺς λόγους τούτους πεσὼν ἐξέψυξεν· 5.6. καὶ ἐγένετο φόβος μέγας ἐπὶ πάντας τοὺς ἀκούοντας. ἀναστάντες δὲ οἱ νεώτεροι συνέστειλαν αὐτὸν καὶ ἐξενέγκαντες ἔθαψαν. 5.7. Ἐγένετο δὲ ὡς ὡρῶν τριῶν διάστημα καὶ ἡ γυνὴ αὐτοῦ μὴ εἰδυῖα τὸ γεγονὸς εἰσῆλθεν. 5.8. ἀπεκρίθη δὲ πρὸς αὐτὴν Πέτρος Εἰπέ μοι, εἰ τοσούτου τὸ χωρίον ἀπέδοσθε; ἡ δὲ εἶπεν Ναί, τοσούτου. 5.9. ὁ δὲ Πέτρος πρὸς αὐτήν Τί ὅτι συνεφωνήθη ὑμῖν πειράσαι τὸ πνεῦμα Κυρίου; ἰδοὺ οἱ πόδες τῶν θαψάντων τὸν ἄνδρα σου ἐπὶ τῇ θύρᾳ καὶ ἐξοίσουσίν σε. 5.10. ἔπεσεν δὲ παραχρῆμα πρὸς τοὺς πόδας αὐτοῦ καὶ ἐξέψυξεν· εἰσελθόντες δὲ οἱ νεανίσκοι εὗρον αὐτὴν νεκράν, καὶ ἐξενέγκαντες ἔθαψαν πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρα αὐτῆς. 7.55. ὑπάρχων δὲ πλήρης πνεύματος ἁγίου ἀτενίσας εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν εἶδεν δόξαν θεοῦ καὶ Ἰησοῦν ἑστῶτα ἐκ δεξιῶν τοῦ θεοῦ, 8.39. ὅτε δὲ ἀνέβησαν ἐκ τοῦ ὕδατος, πνεῦμα Κυρίου ἥρπασεν τὸν Φίλιππον, καὶ οὐκ εἶδεν αὐτὸν οὐκέτι ὁ εὐνοῦχος, ἐπορεύετο γὰρ τὴν ὁδὸν αὐτοῦ χαίρων. 10.1. Ἀνὴρ δέ τις ἐν Καισαρίᾳ ὀνόματι Κορνήλιος, ἑκατοντάρχης ἐκ σπείρης τῆς καλουμένης Ἰταλικῆς, 11.28. ἀναστὰς δὲ εἷς ἐξ αὐτῶν ὀνόματι Ἄγαβος ἐσήμαινεν διὰ τοῦ πνεύματος λιμὸν μεγάλην μέλλειν ἔσεσθαι ἐφʼ ὅλην τὴν οἰκουμένην· ἥτις ἐγένετο ἐπὶ Κλαυδίου. 13.2. Λειτουργούντων δὲ αὐτῶν τῷ κυρίῳ καὶ νηστευόντων εἶπεν τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον Ἀφορίσατε δή μοι τὸν Βαρνάβαν καὶ Σαῦλον εἰς τὸ ἔργον ὃ προσκέκλημαι αὐτούς. 13.9. Σαῦλος δέ, ὁ καὶ Παῦλος, πλησθεὶς πνεύματος ἁγίου ἀτενίσας εἰς αὐτὸν εἶπεν 22.17. Ἐγένετο δέ μοι ὑποστρέψαντι εἰς Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ προσευχομένου μου ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ γενέσθαι με ἐν ἐκστάσει καὶ ἰδεῖν αὐτὸν λέγοντά μοι 26.2. Περὶ πάντων ὧν ἐγκαλοῦμαι ὑπὸ Ἰουδαίων, βασιλεῦ Ἀγρίππα, ἥγημαι ἐμαυτὸν μακάριον ἐπὶ σοῦ μέλλων σήμερον ἀπολογεῖσθαι, 26.3. μάλιστα γνώστην ὄντα σε πάντων τῶν κατὰ Ἰουδαίους ἐθῶν τε καὶ ζητημάτων· διὸ δέομαι μακροθύμως ἀκοῦσαί μου. 26.4. Τὴν μὲν οὖν βίωσίν μου ἐκ νεότητος τὴν ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς γενομένην ἐν τῷ ἔθνει μου ἔν τε Ἰεροσολύμοις ἴσασι πάντες Ἰουδαῖοι, 26.5. προγινώσκοντές με ἄνωθεν, ἐὰν θέλωσι μαρτυρεῖν, ὅτι κατὰ τὴν ἀκριβεστάτην αἵρεσιν τῆς ἡμετέρας θρησκείας ἔζησα Φαρισαῖος. 26.6. καὶ νῦν ἐπʼ ἐλπίδι τῆς εἰς τοὺς πατέρας ἡμῶν ἐπαγγελίας γενομένης ὑπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ ἕστηκα κρινόμενος, 26.7. εἰς ἣν τὸ δωδεκάφυλον ἡμῶν ἐν ἐκτενείᾳ νύκτα καὶ ἡμέραν λατρεῦον ἐλπίζει καταντῆσαι· περὶ ἧς ἐλπίδος ἐγκαλοῦμαι ὑπὸ Ἰουδαίων, βασιλεῦ· 26.8. τί ἄπιστον κρίνεται παρʼ ὑμῖν εἰ ὁ θεὸς νεκροὺς ἐγείρει; 26.9. Ἐγὼ μὲν οὖν ἔδοξα ἐμαυτῷ πρὸς τὸ ὄνομα Ἰησοῦ τοῦ Ναζωραίου δεῖν πολλὰ ἐναντία πρᾶξαι· 26.10. ὃ καὶ ἐποίησα ἐν Ἰεροσολύμοις, καὶ πολλούς τε τῶν ἁγίων ἐγὼ ἐν φυλακαῖς κατέκλεισα τὴν παρὰ τῶν ἀρχιερέων ἐξουσίαν λαβών, ἀναιρουμένων τε αὐτῶν κατήνεγκα ψῆφον, 26.11. καὶ κατὰ πάσας τὰς συναγωγὰς πολλάκις τιμωρῶν αὐτοὺς ἠνάγκαζον βλασφημεῖν, περισσῶς τε ἐμμαινόμενος αὐτοῖς ἐδίωκον ἕως καὶ εἰς τὰς ἔξω πόλεις. 26.12. Ἐν οἷς πορευόμενος εἰς τὴν Δαμασκὸν μετʼ ἐξουσίας καὶ ἐπιτροπῆς τῆς τῶν ἀρχιερέων 26.13. ἡμέρας μέσης κατὰ τὴν ὁδὸν εἶδον, βασιλεῦ, οὐρανόθεν ὑπὲρ τὴν λαμπρότητα τοῦ ἡλίου περιλάμψαν με φῶς καὶ τοὺς σὺν ἐμοὶ πορευομένους· 26.14. πάντων τε καταπεσόντων ἡμῶν εἰς τὴν γῆν ἤκουσα φωνὴν λέγουσαν πρός με τῇ Ἐβραΐδι διαλέκτῳ Σαούλ Σαούλ, τί με διώκεις; σκληρόν σοι πρὸς κέντρα λακτίζειν. 26.15. ἐγὼ δὲ εἶπα Τίς εἶ, κύριε; ὁ δὲ κύριος εἶπεν Ἐγώ εἰμι Ἰησοῦς ὃν σὺ διώκεις· 26.16. ἀλλὰ ἀνάστηθι καὶ στῆθι ἐπὶ τοὺς πόδας σου· εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ ὤφθην σοι, προχειρίσασθαί σε ὑπηρέτην καὶ μάρτυρα ὧν τε εἶδές με ὧν τε ὀφθήσομαί σοι, 26.17. ἐξαιρούμενός σε ἐκ τοῦ λαοῦ καὶ ἐκ τῶν ἐθνῶν, εἰς οὓς ἐγὼ ἀποστέλλω σε ἀνοῖξαι ὀφθαλμοὺς αὐτῶν, 26.18. τοῦ ἐπιστρέψαι ἀπὸ σκότους εἰς φῶς καὶ τῆς ἐξουσίας τοῦ Σατανᾶ ἐπὶ τὸν θεόν, τοῦ λαβεῖν αὐτοὺς ἄφεσιν ἁμαρτιῶν καὶ κλῆρον ἐν τοῖς ἡγιασμένοις πίστει τῇ εἰς ἐμέ. 26.19. Ὅθεν, βασιλεῦ Ἀγρίππα, οὐκ ἐγενόμην ἀπειθὴς τῇ οὐρανίῳ ὀπτασίᾳ, 26.20. ἀλλὰ τοῖς ἐν Δαμασκῷ πρῶτόν τε καὶ Ἰεροσολύμοις, πᾶσάν τε τὴν χώραν τῆς Ἰουδαίας, καὶ τοῖς ἔθνεσιν ἀπήγγελλον μετανοεῖν καὶ ἐπιστρέφειν ἐπὶ τὸν θεόν, ἄξια τῆς μετανοίας ἔργα πράσσοντας. 26.21. ἕνεκα τούτων με Ἰουδαῖοι συλλαβόμενοι ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ ἐπειρῶντο διαχειρίσασθαι. 26.22. ἐπικουρίας οὖν τυχὼν τῆς ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ ἄχρι τῆς ἡμέρας ταύτης ἕστηκα μαρτυρόμενος μικρῷ τε καὶ μεγάλῳ, οὐδὲν ἐκτὸς λέγων ὧν τε οἱ προφῆται ἐλάλησαν μελλόντων γίνεσθαι καὶ Μωυσῆς, 26.23. εἰ παθητὸς ὁ χριστός, εἰ πρῶτος ἐξ ἀναστάσεως νεκρῶν φῶς μέλλει καταγγέλλειν τῷ τε λαῷ καὶ τοῖς ἔθνεσιν. 26.24. Ταῦτα δὲ αὐτοῦ ἀπολογουμένου ὁ Φῆστος μεγάλῃ τῇ φωνῇ φησίν Μαίνῃ, Παῦλε· τὰ πολλά σε γράμματα εἰς μανίαν περιτρέπει. 1.5. For John indeed baptized in water, but you will be baptized in the Holy Spirit not many days from now." 1.8. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come on you. You will be witnesses to me in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the uttermost parts of the earth." 2.1. Now when the day of Pentecost had come, they were all with one accord in one place. 2.2. Suddenly there came from the sky a sound like the rushing of a mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. 2.3. Tongues like fire appeared and were distributed to them, and it sat on each one of them. 2.4. They were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and began to speak with other languages, as the Spirit gave them the ability to speak. 2.5. Now there were dwelling at Jerusalem Jews, devout men, from every nation under the sky. 2.6. When this sound was heard, the multitude came together, and were bewildered, because everyone heard them speaking in his own language. 2.7. They were all amazed and marveled, saying to one another, "Behold, aren't all these who speak Galileans? 2.8. How do we hear, everyone in our own native language? 2.9. Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and people from Mesopotamia, Judea, Cappadocia, Pontus, Asia, 2.10. Phrygia, Pamphylia, Egypt, the parts of Libya around Cyrene, visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, 2.11. Cretans and Arabians: we hear them speaking in our languages the mighty works of God!" 2.12. They were all amazed, and were perplexed, saying one to another, "What does this mean?" 2.13. Others, mocking, said, "They are filled with new wine." 4.31. When they had prayed, the place was shaken where they were gathered together. They were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and they spoke the word of God with boldness. 5.1. But a certain man named Aias, with Sapphira, his wife, sold a possession, 5.2. and kept back part of the price, his wife also being aware of it, and brought a certain part, and laid it at the apostles' feet. 5.3. But Peter said, "Aias, why has Satan filled your heart to lie to the Holy Spirit, and to keep back part of the price of the land? 5.4. While you kept it, didn't it remain your own? After it was sold, wasn't it in your power? How is it that you have conceived this thing in your heart? You haven't lied to men, but to God." 5.5. Aias, hearing these words, fell down and died. Great fear came on all who heard these things. 5.6. The young men arose and wrapped him up, and they carried him out and buried him. 5.7. About three hours later, his wife, not knowing what had happened, came in. 5.8. Peter answered her, "Tell me whether you sold the land for so much."She said, "Yes, for so much." 5.9. But Peter asked her, "How is it that you have agreed together to tempt the Spirit of the Lord? Behold, the feet of those who have buried your husband are at the door, and they will carry you out." 5.10. She fell down immediately at his feet, and died. The young men came in and found her dead, and they carried her out and buried her by her husband. 7.55. But he, being full of the Holy Spirit, looked up steadfastly into heaven, and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing on the right hand of God, 8.39. When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught Philip away, and the eunuch didn't see him any more, for he went on his way rejoicing. 10.1. Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment, 11.28. One of them named Agabus stood up, and indicated by the Spirit that there should be a great famine over all the world, which also happened in the days of Claudius. 13.2. As they served the Lord and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, "Separate Barnabas and Saul for me, for the work to which I have called them." 13.9. But Saul, who is also called Paul, filled with the Holy Spirit, fastened his eyes on him, 22.17. "It happened that, when I had returned to Jerusalem, and while I prayed in the temple, I fell into a trance, 26.2. "I think myself happy, King Agrippa, that I am to make my defense before you this day concerning all the things whereof I am accused by the Jews, 26.3. especially because you are expert in all customs and questions which are among the Jews. Therefore I beg you to hear me patiently. 26.4. "Indeed, all the Jews know my way of life from my youth up, which was from the beginning among my own nation and at Jerusalem; 26.5. having known me from the first, if they are willing to testify, that after the strictest sect of our religion I lived a Pharisee. 26.6. Now I stand here to be judged for the hope of the promise made by God to our fathers, 26.7. which our twelve tribes, earnestly serving night and day, hope to attain. Concerning this hope I am accused by the Jews, King Agrippa! 26.8. Why is it judged incredible with you, if God does raise the dead? 26.9. "I myself most assuredly thought that I ought to do many things contrary to the name of Jesus of Nazareth. 26.10. This I also did in Jerusalem. I both shut up many of the saints in prisons, having received authority from the chief priests, and when they were put to death I gave my vote against them. 26.11. Punishing them often in all the synagogues, I tried to make them blaspheme. Being exceedingly enraged against them, I persecuted them even to foreign cities. 26.12. "Whereupon as I journeyed to Damascus with the authority and commission from the chief priests, 26.13. at noon, O King, I saw on the way a light from the sky, brighter than the sun, shining around me and those who traveled with me. 26.14. When we had all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.' 26.15. "I said, 'Who are you, Lord?' "He said, 'I am Jesus, whom you persecute. 26.16. But arise, and stand on your feet, for to this end have I appeared to you, to appoint you a servant and a witness both of the things which you have seen, and of the things which I will reveal to you; 26.17. delivering you from the people, and from the Gentiles, to whom I send you, 26.18. to open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive remission of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in me.' 26.19. "Therefore, King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision, 26.20. but declared first to them of Damascus, at Jerusalem, and throughout all the country of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, doing works worthy of repentance. 26.21. For this reason the Jews seized me in the temple, and tried to kill me. 26.22. Having therefore obtained the help that is from God, I stand to this day testifying both to small and great, saying nothing but what the prophets and Moses did say should come, 26.23. how the Christ must suffer, and how he first by the resurrection of the dead should proclaim light both to these people and to the Gentiles." 26.24. As he thus made his defense, Festus said with a loud voice, "Paul, you are crazy! Your great learning is driving you insane!"
137. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 11.3.71 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 193
138. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 8.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 535
139. Plutarch, Greek And Roman Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 170
140. Statius, Thebais, 7.602 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
141. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 50
142. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 2.7. (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 168
143. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, 241-245 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 535
144. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.3, 3.5.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 44
3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε.
145. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 17.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 50
146. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
7. Justin: Should any one, then, employ a teacher? Or whence may any one be helped, if not even in them there is truth? Old Man: There existed, long before this time, certain men more ancient than all those who are esteemed philosophers, both righteous and beloved by God, who spoke by the Divine Spirit, and foretold events which would take place, and which are now taking place. They are called prophets. These alone both saw and announced the truth to men, neither reverencing nor fearing any man, not influenced by a desire for glory, but speaking those things alone which they saw and which they heard, being filled with the Holy Spirit. Their writings are still extant, and he who has read them is very much helped in his knowledge of the beginning and end of things, and of those matters which the philosopher ought to know, provided he has believed them. For they did not use demonstration in their treatises, seeing that they were witnesses to the truth above all demonstration, and worthy of belief; and those events which have happened, and those which are happening, compel you to assent to the utterances made by them, although, indeed, they were entitled to credit on account of the miracles which they performed, since they both glorified the Creator, the God and Father of all things, and proclaimed His Son, the Christ [sent] by Him: which, indeed, the false prophets, who are filled with the lying unclean spirit, neither have done nor do, but venture to work certain wonderful deeds for the purpose of astonishing men, and glorify the spirits and demons of error. But pray that, above all things, the gates of light may be opened to you; for these things cannot be perceived or understood by all, but only by the man to whom God and His Christ have imparted wisdom.
147. Lucian, The Dance, 35, 79, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
148. Tertullian, Apology, 39.1-39.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 137
39.1. Corpus sumus de conscientia religionis et disciplinae unitate et spei foedere. Coimus in coetum et congregationem, 39.2. 39.3. exhortationes, castigationes et censura divina. Nam et iudicatur magno cum pondere, ut apud certos de dei conspectu, summumque futuri iudicii praeiudicium est, si quis ita deliquerit, ut a communicatione orationis et conventus et omnis sancti commercii relegetur. Praesident probati quique seniores, honorem istum non pretio, sed testimonio adepti. Neque enim pretio ulla res dei constat. 39.4. 39.5. quasi deposita pietatis sunt.
149. Tertullian, Against Marcion, 1.29.4, 3.24.4, 4.22.4-4.22.5, 5.8.12 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129, 130, 133, 134, 135
150. Tertullian, Against Praxeas, 1.5, 1.7, 8.5, 30.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
151. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 96
152. Tertullian, On The Soul, 9.4, 11.4, 21.2, 45.3-45.4, 45.6, 55.5, 58.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 99, 129, 134, 135, 136
153. Polyaenus, Excerpts of Polyaenus, 7.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
154. Tertullian, On Flight In Persecution, 1.1, 9.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
155. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.22.1-2.22.2, 2.34.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40, 101, 102; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
156. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 61.31.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 191
157. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.7.5-2.7.6, 2.20.4, 2.22.1, 2.23.7-2.23.8, 3.13.7, 3.20.3, 5.16.5-5.16.7, 9.12.3-9.12.4, 9.16.7, 9.29.7, 10.4.3, 10.32.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 16, 50, 104, 167, 168, 292, 429
2.7.5. ἐν δὲ τῇ νῦν ἀκροπόλει Τύχης ἱερόν ἐστιν Ἀκραίας, μετὰ δὲ αὐτὸ Διοσκούρων· ξόανα δὲ οὗτοί τε καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα τῆς Τύχης ἐστί. τοῦ θεάτρου δὲ ὑπὸ τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ᾠκοδομημένου τὸν ἐν τῇ σκηνῇ πεποιημένον ἄνδρα ἀσπίδα ἔχοντα Ἄρατόν φασιν εἶναι τὸν Κλεινίου. μετὰ δὲ τὸ θέατρον Διονύσου ναός ἐστι· χρυσοῦ μὲν καὶ ἐλέφαντος ὁ θεός, παρὰ δὲ αὐτὸν Βάκχαι λίθου λευκοῦ. ταύτας τὰς γυναῖκας ἱερὰς εἶναι καὶ Διονύσῳ μαίνεσθαι λέγουσιν. ἄλλα δὲ ἀγάλματα ἐν ἀπορρήτῳ Σικυωνίοις ἐστί· ταῦτα μιᾷ καθʼ ἕκαστον ἔτος νυκτὶ ἐς τὸ Διονύσιον ἐκ τοῦ καλουμένου κοσμητηρίου κομίζουσι, κομίζουσι δὲ μετὰ δᾴδων τε ἡμμένων καὶ ὕμνων ἐπιχωρίων. 2.7.6. ἡγεῖται μὲν οὖν ὃν Βάκχειον ὀνομάζουσιν—Ἀνδροδάμας σφίσιν ὁ Φλάντος τοῦτον ἱδρύσατο—, ἕπεται δὲ ὁ καλούμενος Λύσιος, ὃν Θηβαῖος Φάνης εἰπούσης τῆς Πυθίας ἐκόμισεν ἐκ Θηβῶν. ἐς δὲ Σικυῶνα ἦλθεν ὁ Φάνης, ὅτε Ἀριστόμαχος ὁ Κλεοδαίου τῆς γενομένης μαντείας ἁμαρτὼν διʼ αὐτὸ καὶ καθόδου τῆς ἐς Πελοπόννησον ἥμαρτεν. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ Διονυσίου βαδίζουσιν ἐς τὴν ἀγοράν, ἔστι ναὸς Ἀρτέμιδος ἐν δεξιᾷ Λιμναίας. καὶ ὅτι μὲν κατερρύηκεν ὁ ὄροφος, δῆλά ἐστιν ἰδόντι· περὶ δὲ τοῦ ἀγάλματος οὔτε ὡς κομισθέντος ἑτέρωσε οὔτε ὅντινα αὐτοῦ διεφθάρη τρόπον εἰπεῖν ἔχουσιν. 2.20.4. τὸ δὲ μνῆμα τὸ πλησίον Χορείας μαινάδος ὀνομάζουσι, Διονύσῳ λέγοντες καὶ ἄλλας γυναῖκας καὶ ταύτην ἐς Ἄργος συστρατεύσασθαι, Περσέα δέ, ὡς ἐκράτει τῆς μάχης, φονεῦσαι τῶν γυναικῶν τὰς πολλάς· τὰς μὲν οὖν λοιπὰς θάπτουσιν ἐν κοινῷ, ταύτῃ δὲ—ἀξιώματι γὰρ δὴ προεῖχεν—ἰδίᾳ τὸ μνῆμα ἐποίησαν. 2.22.1. τῆς δὲ Ἥρας ὁ ναὸς τῆς Ἀνθείας ἐστὶ τοῦ ἱεροῦ τῆς Λητοῦς ἐν δεξιᾷ καὶ πρὸ αὐτοῦ γυναικῶν τάφος. ἀπέθανον δὲ αἱ γυναῖκες ἐν μάχῃ πρὸς Ἀργείους τε καὶ Περσέα, ἀπὸ νήσων τῶν ἐν Αἰγαίῳ Διονύσῳ συνεστρατευμέναι· καὶ διὰ τοῦτο Ἁλίας αὐτὰς ἐπονομάζουσιν. ἀντικρὺ δὲ τοῦ μνήματος τῶν γυναικῶν Δήμητρός ἐστιν ἱερὸν ἐπίκλησιν Πελασγίδος ἀπὸ τοῦ ἱδρυσαμένου Πελασγοῦ τοῦ Τριόπα, καὶ οὐ πόρρω τοῦ ἱεροῦ τάφος Πελασγοῦ. 2.23.7. ἄλλα δέ ἐστιν Ἀργείοις θέας ἄξια· κατάγαιον οἰκοδόμημα, ἐπʼ αὐτῷ δὲ ἦν ὁ χαλκοῦς θάλαμος, ὃν Ἀκρίσιός ποτε ἐπὶ φρουρᾷ τῆς θυγατρὸς ἐποίησε· Περίλαος δὲ καθεῖλεν αὐτὸν τυραννήσας. τοῦτό τε οὖν τὸ οἰκοδόμημά ἐστι καὶ Κροτώπου μνῆμα καὶ Διονύσου ναὸς Κρησίου. Περσεῖ γὰρ πολεμήσαντα αὐτὸν καὶ αὖθις ἐλθόντα ἐς λύσιν τοῦ ἔχθους τά τε ἄλλα τιμηθῆναι μεγάλως λέγουσιν ὑπὸ Ἀργείων καὶ τέμενός οἱ δοθῆναι τοῦτο ἐξαίρετον· 2.23.8. Κρησίου δὲ ὕστερον ὠνομάσθη, διότι Ἀριάδνην ἀποθανοῦσαν ἔθαψεν ἐνταῦθα. Λυκέας δὲ λέγει κατασκευαζομένου δεύτερον τοῦ ναοῦ κεραμέαν εὑρεθῆναι σορόν, εἶναι δὲ Ἀριάδνης αὐτήν· καὶ αὐτός τε καὶ ἄλλους Ἀργείων ἰδεῖν ἔφη τὴν σορόν. πλησίον δὲ τοῦ Διονύσου καὶ Ἀφροδίτης ναός ἐστιν Οὐρανίας. 3.13.7. ἀπαντικρὺ δὲ ἥ τε ὀνομαζομένη Κολώνα καὶ Διονύσου Κολωνάτα ναός, πρὸς αὐτῷ δὲ τέμενός ἐστιν ἥρωος, ὃν τῆς ὁδοῦ τῆς ἐς Σπάρτην Διονύσῳ φασὶ γενέσθαι ἡγεμόνα· τῷ δὲ ἥρωι τούτῳ πρὶν ἢ τῷ θεῷ θύουσιν αἱ Διονυσιάδες καὶ αἱ Λευκιππίδες. τὰς δὲ ἄλλας ἕνδεκα ἃς καὶ αὐτὰς Διονυσιάδας ὀνομάζουσι, ταύταις δρόμου προτιθέασιν ἀγῶνα· 3.20.3. διαβᾶσι δὲ αὐτόθεν ποταμὸν Φελλίαν, παρὰ Ἀμύκλας ἰοῦσιν εὐθεῖαν ὡς ἐπὶ θάλασσαν Φᾶρις πόλις ἐν τῇ Λακωνικῇ ποτε ᾠκεῖτο· ἀποτρεπομένῳ δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Φελλίας ἐς δεξιὰν ἡ πρὸς τὸ ὄρος τὸ Ταΰγετόν ἐστιν ὁδός. ἔστι δὲ ἐν τῷ πεδίῳ Διὸς Μεσσαπέως τέμενος· γενέσθαι δέ οἱ τὴν ἐπίκλησιν ἀπὸ ἀνδρὸς λέγουσιν ἱερασαμένου τῷ θεῷ. ἐντεῦθέν ἐστιν ἀπιοῦσιν ἐκ τοῦ Ταϋγέτου χωρίον ἔνθα πόλις ποτὲ ᾠκεῖτο Βρυσίαι· καὶ Διονύσου ναὸς ἐνταῦθα ἔτι λείπεται καὶ ἄγαλμα ἐν ὑπαίθρῳ. τὸ δὲ ἐν τῷ ναῷ μόναις γυναιξὶν ἔστιν ὁρᾶν· γυναῖκες γὰρ δὴ μόναι καὶ τὰ ἐς τὰς θυσίας δρῶσιν ἐν ἀπορρήτῳ. 5.16.5. ἐς δὲ τὰς ἑκκαίδεκα γυναῖκας καὶ ἄλλον τοιόνδε λέγουσιν ἐπὶ τῷ προτέρῳ λόγον. Δαμοφῶντά φασι τυραννοῦντα ἐν Πίσῃ πολλά τε ἐργάσασθαι καὶ χαλεπὰ Ἠλείους· ὡς δὲ ἐτελεύτησεν ὁ Δαμοφῶν—οὐ γὰρ δὴ οἱ Πισαῖοι συνεχώρουν μετέχειν δημοσίᾳ τοῦ τυράννου τῶν ἁμαρτημάτων, καί πως ἀρεστὰ καὶ Ἠλείοις ἐγένετο καταλύεσθαι τὰ ἐς αὐτοὺς ἐγκλήματα—, οὕτως ἑκκαίδεκα οἰκουμένων τηνικαῦτα ἔτι ἐν τῇ Ἠλείᾳ πόλεων γυναῖκα ἀφʼ ἑκάστης εἵλοντο διαλύειν τὰ διάφορά σφισιν, ἥτις ἡλικίᾳ τε ἦν πρεσβυτάτη καὶ ἀξιώματι καὶ δόξῃ τῶν γυναικῶν προεῖχεν. 5.16.6. αἱ πόλεις δὲ ἀφʼ ὧν τὰς γυναῖκας εἵλοντο, ἦσαν Ἦλις . ἀπὸ τούτων μὲν αἱ γυναῖκες οὖσαι τῶν πόλεων Πισαίοις διαλλαγὰς πρὸς Ἠλείους ἐποίησαν· ὕστερον δὲ καὶ τὸν ἀγῶνα ἐπετράπησαν ὑπʼ αὐτῶν θεῖναι τὰ Ἡραῖα καὶ ὑφήνασθαι τῇ Ἥρᾳ τὸν πέπλον. αἱ δὲ ἑκκαίδεκα γυναῖκες καὶ χοροὺς δύο ἱστᾶσι καὶ τὸν μὲν Φυσκόας τῶν χορῶν, τὸν δὲ Ἱπποδαμείας καλοῦσι· τὴν Φυσκόαν δὲ εἶναι ταύτην φασὶν ἐκ τῆς Ἤλιδος τῆς Κοίλης, τῷ δήμῳ δὲ ἔνθα ᾤκησεν ὄνομα μὲν Ὀρθίαν εἶναι. 5.16.7. ταύτῃ τῇ Φυσκόᾳ Διόνυσον συγγενέσθαι λέγουσι, Φυσκόαν δὲ ἐκ Διονύσου τεκεῖν παῖδα Ναρκαῖον· τοῦτον, ὡς ηὐξήθη, πολεμεῖν τοῖς προσοίκοις καὶ δυνάμεως ἐπὶ μέγα ἀρθῆναι, καὶ δὴ καὶ Ἀθηνᾶς ἱερὸν ἐπίκλησιν Ναρκαίας αὐτὸν ἱδρύσασθαι· Διονύσῳ τε τιμὰς λέγουσιν ὑπὸ Ναρκαίου καὶ Φυσκόας δοθῆναι πρώτων. Φυσκόας μὲν δὴ γέρα καὶ ἄλλα καὶ χορὸς ἐπώνυμος παρὰ τῶν ἑκκαίδεκα γυναικῶν, φυλάσσουσι δὲ οὐδὲν ἧσσον Ἠλεῖοι καὶ τἄλλα καταλυθεισῶν ὅμως τῶν πόλεων· νενεμημένοι γὰρ ἐς ὀκτὼ φυλὰς ἀφʼ ἑκάστης αἱροῦνται γυναῖκας δύο. 9.12.3. φασὶ δὲ οἱ Θηβαῖοι, καθότι τῆς ἀκροπόλεως ἀγορά σφισιν ἐφʼ ἡμῶν πεποίηται, Κάδμου τὸ ἀρχαῖον οἰκίαν εἶναι· θαλάμων δὲ ἀποφαίνουσι τοῦ μὲν Ἁρμονίας ἐρείπια καὶ ὃν Σεμέλης φασὶν εἶναι, τοῦτον δὲ καὶ ἐς ἡμᾶς ἔτι ἄβατον φυλάσσουσιν ἀνθρώποις. Ἑλλήνων δὲ τοῖς ἀποδεχομένοις ᾆσαι Μούσας ἐς τὸν Ἁρμονίας γάμον τὸ χωρίον ἐστὶν ἐπὶ τῆς ἀγορᾶς, ἔνθα δή φασι τὰς θεὰς ᾆσαι. 9.12.4. λέγεται δὲ καὶ τόδε, ὡς ὁμοῦ τῷ κεραυνῷ βληθέντι ἐς τὸν Σεμέλης θάλαμον πέσοι ξύλον ἐξ οὐρανοῦ· Πολύδωρον δὲ τὸ ξύλον τοῦτο χαλκῷ λέγουσιν ἐπικοσμήσαντα Διόνυσον καλέσαι Κάδμον. πλησίον δὲ Διονύσου ἄγαλμα, καὶ τοῦτο Ὀνασιμήδης ἐποίησε διʼ ὅλου πλῆρες ὑπὸ τοῦ χαλκοῦ· τὸν βωμὸν δὲ οἱ παῖδες εἰργάσαντο οἱ Πραξιτέλους . 9.16.7. καὶ οἰκίας τῆς Λύκου τὰ ἐρείπια καὶ Σεμέλης μνῆμά ἐστιν, Ἀλκμήνης δὲ οὐ μνῆμα· γενέσθαι δὲ αὐτὴν ὡς ἀπέθανε λίθον φασὶν ἐξ ἀνθρώπου, καὶ Μεγαρεῦσι τὰ ἐς αὐτὴν οὐχ ὁμολογοῦσι· διάφορα δὲ καὶ τὰ λοιπὰ ὡς τὸ πολὺ ἀλλήλοις λέγουσιν Ἕλληνες. Θηβαίοις δὲ ἐνταῦθα καὶ τὰ μνήματα πεποίηται τῶν Ἀμφίονος παίδων, χωρὶς μὲν τῶν ἀρσένων, ἰδίᾳ δὲ ταῖς παρθένοις. 9.29.7. ἀποθανόντος δὲ τοῦ Λίνου τὸ ἐπʼ αὐτῷ πένθος διῆλθεν ἄρα καὶ ἄχρι τῆς βαρβάρου πάσης, ὡς καὶ Αἰγυπτίοις ᾆσμα γενέσθαι Λίνον· καλοῦσι δὲ τὸ ᾆσμα Αἰγύπτιοι τῇ ἐπιχωρίῳ φωνῇ Μανέρων. οἱ δὲ Ἕλλησιν ἔπη ποιήσαντες, Ὅμηρος μέν, ἅτε ᾆσμα Ἕλλησιν ὂν ἐπιστάμενος τοῦ Λίνου τὰ παθήματα, ἐπὶ τοῦ Ἀχιλλέως ἔφη τῇ ἀσπίδι ἄλλα τε ἐργάσασθαι τὸν Ἥφαιστον καὶ κιθαρῳδὸν παῖδα ᾄδοντα τὰ ἐς Λίνον· τοῖσι δʼ ἐνὶ μέσσοισι πάις φόρμιγγι λιγείῃ ἱμερόεν κιθάριζε, Λίνον δʼ ὑπὸ καλὸν ἄειδεν· Hom. Il. 18.569-70 Pausanias misquotes. 10.4.3. τὸ ἕτερον δὲ οὐκ ἐδυνήθην συμβαλέσθαι πρότερον, ἐφʼ ὅτῳ καλλίχορον τὸν Πανοπέα εἴρηκε, πρὶν ἢ ἐδιδάχθην ὑπὸ τῶν παρʼ Ἀθηναίοις καλουμένων Θυιάδων. αἱ δὲ Θυιάδες γυναῖκες μέν εἰσιν Ἀττικαί, φοιτῶσαι δὲ ἐς τὸν Παρνασσὸν παρὰ ἔτος αὐταί τε καὶ αἱ γυναῖκες Δελφῶν ἄγουσιν ὄργια Διονύσῳ. ταύταις ταῖς Θυιάσι κατὰ τὴν ἐξ Ἀθηνῶν ὁδὸν καὶ ἀλλαχοῦ χοροὺς ἱστάναι καὶ παρὰ τοῖς Πανοπεῦσι καθέστηκε· καὶ ἡ ἐπίκλησις ἡ ἐς τὸν Πανοπέα Ὁμήρου ὑποσημαίνειν τῶν Θυιάδων δοκεῖ τὸν χορόν. 10.32.7. τὸ δὲ ἄντρον τὸ Κωρύκιον μεγέθει τε ὑπερβάλλει τὰ εἰρημένα καὶ ἔστιν ἐπὶ πλεῖστον ὁδεῦσαι διʼ αὐτοῦ καὶ ἄνευ λαμπτήρων· ὅ τε ὄροφος ἐς αὔταρκες ἀπὸ τοῦ ἐδάφους ἀνέστηκε, καὶ ὕδωρ τὸ μὲν ἀνερχόμενον ἐκ πηγῶν, πλέον δὲ ἔτι ἀπὸ τοῦ ὀρόφου στάζει, ὥστε καὶ δῆλα ἐν τῷ ἐδάφει σταλαγμῶν τὰ ἴχνη διὰ παντός ἐστι τοῦ ἄντρου. ἱερὸν δὲ αὐτὸ οἱ περὶ τὸν Παρνασσὸν Κωρυκίων τε εἶναι Νυμφῶν καὶ Πανὸς μάλιστα ἥγηνται. ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ Κωρυκίου χαλεπὸν ἤδη καὶ ἀνδρὶ εὐζώνῳ πρὸς τὰ ἄκρα ἀφικέσθαι τοῦ Παρνασσοῦ· τὰ δὲ νεφῶν τέ ἐστιν ἀνωτέρω τὰ ἄκρα καὶ αἱ Θυιάδες ἐπὶ τούτοις τῷ Διονύσῳ καὶ τῷ Ἀπόλλωνι μαίνονται. 2.7.5. On the modern citadel is a sanctuary of Fortune of the Height, and after it one of the Dioscuri. Their images and that of Fortune are of wood. On the stage of the theater built under the citadel is a statue of a man with a shield, who they say is Aratus, the son of Cleinias. After the theater is a temple of Dionysus. The god is of gold and ivory, and by his side are Bacchanals of white marble. These women they say are sacred to Dionysus and maddened by his inspiration. The Sicyonians have also some images which are kept secret. These one night in each year they carry to the temple of Dionysus from what they call the Cosmeterium (Tiring-room), and they do so with lighted torches and native hymns. 2.7.6. The first is the one named Baccheus, set up by Androdamas, the son of Phlias, and this is followed by the one called Lysius (Deliverer), brought from Thebes by the Theban Phanes at the command of the Pythian priestess. Phanes came to Sicyon when Aristomachus, the son of Cleodaeus, failed to understand the oracle I To wait for “the third fruit,” i.e. the third generation. It was interpreted to mean the third year. given him, and therefore failed to return to the Peloponnesus . As you walk from the temple of Dionysus to the market-place you see on the right a temple of Artemis of the lake. A look shows that the roof has fallen in, but the inhabitants cannot tell whether the image has been removed or how it was destroyed on the spot. 2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos , and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus. 2.23.7. for instance, an underground building over which was the bronze chamber which Acrisius once made to guard his daughter. Perilaus, however, when he became tyrant, pulled it down. Besides this building there is the tomb of Crotopus and a temple of Cretan Dionysus. For they say that the god, having made war on Perseus, afterwards laid aside his enmity, and received great honors at the hands of the Argives, including this precinct set specially apart for himself. 2.23.8. It was afterwards called the precinct of the Cretan god, because, when Ariadne died, Dionysus buried her here. But Lyceas says that when the temple was being rebuilt an earthenware coffin was found, and that it was Ariadne's. He also said that both he himself and other Argives had seen it. Near the temple of Dionysus is a temple of Heavenly Aphrodite. 3.13.7. Opposite is what is called the Knoll, with a temple of Dionysus of the Knoll, by which is a precinct of the hero who they say guided Dionysus on the way to Sparta . To this hero sacrifices are offered before they are offered to the god by the daughters of Dionysus and the daughters of Leucippus. For the other eleven ladies who are named daughters of Dionysus there is held a footrace; this custom came to Sparta from Delphi . 3.20.3. Crossing from here a river Phellia, and going past Amyclae along a road leading straight towards the sea, you come to the site of Pharis, which was once a city of Laconia . Turning away from the Phellia to the right is the road that leads to Mount Taygetus. On the plain is a precinct of Zeus Messapeus, who is surnamed, they say, after a man who served the god as his priest. Leaving Taygetus from here you come to the site of the city Bryseae . There still remains here a temple of Dionysus with an image in the open. But the image in the temple women only may see, for women by themselves perform in secret the sacrificial rites. 5.16.5. Besides the account already given they tell another story about the Sixteen Women as follows. Damophon, it is said, when tyrant of Pisa did much grievous harm to the Eleans. But when he died, since the people of Pisa refused to participate as a people in their tyrant's sins, and the Eleans too became quite ready to lay aside their grievances, they chose a woman from each of the sixteen cities of Elis still inhabited at that time to settle their differences, this woman to be the oldest, the most noble, and the most esteemed of all the women. 5.16.6. The cities from which they chose the women were Elis , The women from these cities made peace between Pisa and Elis . Later on they were entrusted with the management of the Heraean games, and with the weaving of the robe for Hera. The Sixteen Women also arrange two choral dances, one called that of Physcoa and the other that of Hippodameia. This Physcoa they say came from Elis in the Hollow, and the name of the parish where she lived was Orthia. 5.16.7. She mated they say with Dionysus, and bore him a son called Narcaeus. When he grew up he made war against the neighboring folk, and rose to great power, setting up moreover a sanctuary of Athena surnamed Narcaea. They say too that Narcaeus and Physcoa were the first to pay worship to Dionysus. So various honors are paid to Physcoa, especially that of the choral dance, named after her and managed by the Sixteen Women. The Eleans still adhere to the other ancient customs, even though some of the cities have been destroyed. For they are now divided into eight tribes, and they choose two women from each. 9.12.3. The Thebans assert that on the part of their citadel, where to-day stands their market-place, was in ancient times the house of Cadmus. They point out the ruins of the bridal-chamber of Harmonia, and of one which they say was Semele's into the latter they allow no man to step even now. Those Greeks who allow that the Muses sang at the wedding of Harmonia, can point to the spot in the market-place where it is said that the goddesses sang. 9.12.4. There is also a story that along with the thunderbolt hurled at the bridalchamber of Semele there fell a log from heaven. They say that Polydorus adorned this log with bronze and called it Dionysus Cadmus. Near is an image of Dionysus; Onasimedes made it of solid bronze. The altar was built by the sons of Praxiteles. 9.16.7. There are also ruins of the house of Lycus, and the tomb of Semele, but Alcmena has no tomb. It is said that on her death she was turned from human form to a stone, but the Theban account does not agree with the Megarian. The Greek legends generally have for the most part different versions. Here too at Thebes are the tombs of the children of Amphion. The boys lie apart; the girls are buried by themselves. 9.29.7. On the death of Linus, mourning for him spread, it seems, to all the foreign world, so that even among the Egyptians there came to be a Linus song, in the Egyptian language called Maneros. of the Greek poets, Homer shows that he knew that the sufferings of Linus were the theme of a Greek song when he says that Hephaestus, among the other scenes he worked upon the shield of Achilles, represented a boy harpist singing the Linus song:— In the midst of them a boy on a clear-toned lyre Played with great charm, and to his playing sang of beautiful Linus. Pausanias misquotes. Hom. Il. 18.569-70 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads. 10.32.7. But the Corycian cave exceeds in size those I have mentioned, and it is possible to make one's way through the greater part of it even without lights. The roof stands at a sufficient height from the floor, and water, rising in part from springs but still more dripping from the roof, has made clearly visible the marks of drops on the floor throughout the cave. The dwellers around Parnassus believe it to be sacred to the Corycian nymphs, and especially to Pan. From the Corycian cave it is difficult even for an active walker to reach the heights of Parnassus . The heights are above the clouds, and the Thyiad women rave there in honor of Dionysus and Apollo.
158. Anon., Odes of Solomon, 6.1-6.2, 42.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 93, 94
159. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
160. Tertullian, Exhortation To Chastity, 10.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
161. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 4.17 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 174
162. Hermas, Similitudes, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 294
163. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.21 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
4.21. ἐπιπλῆξαι δὲ λέγεται περὶ Διονυσίων ̓Αθηναίοις, ἃ ποιεῖταί σφισιν ἐν ὥρᾳ τοῦ ἀνθεστηριῶνος: ὁ μὲν γὰρ μονῳδίας ἀκροασομένους καὶ μελοποιίας παραβάσεών τε καὶ ῥυθμῶν, ὁπόσοι κωμῳδίας τε καὶ τραγῳδίας εἰσίν, ἐς τὸ θέατρον ξυμφοιτᾶν ᾤετο, ἐπεὶ δὲ ἤκουσεν, ὅτι αὐλοῦ ὑποσημήναντος λυγισμοὺς ὀρχοῦνται καὶ μεταξὺ τῆς ̓Ορφέως ἐποποιίας τε καὶ θεολογίας τὰ μὲν ὡς ̔͂Ωραι, τὰ δὲ ὡς Νύμφαι, τὰ δὲ ὡς Βάκχαι πράττουσιν, ἐς ἐπίπληξιν τούτου κατέστη καὶ “παύσασθε” εἶπεν “ἐξορχούμενοι τοὺς Σαλαμινίους καὶ πολλοὺς ἑτέρους κειμένους ἀγαθοὺς ἄνδρας, εἰ μὲν γὰρ Λακωνικὴ ταῦτα ὄρχησις, εὖγε οἱ στρατιῶται, γυμνάζεσθε γὰρ πολέμῳ καὶ ξυνορχήσομαι, εἰ δὲ ἁπαλὴ καὶ ἐς τὸ θῆλυ σπεύδουσα, τί φῶ περὶ τῶν τροπαίων; οὐ γὰρ κατὰ Μήδων ταῦτα ἢ Περσῶν, καθ' ὑμῶν δὲ ἑστήξει, τῶν ἀναθέντων αὐτὰ εἰ λίποισθε. κροκωτοὶ δὲ ὑμῖν καὶ ἁλουργία καὶ κοκκοβαφία τοιαύτη πόθεν; οὐδὲ γὰρ αἱ ̓Αχαρναί γε ὧδε ἐστέλλοντο, οὐδὲ ὁ Κολωνὸς ὧδε ἵππευε. καὶ τί λέγω ταῦτα; γυνὴ ναύαρχος ἐκ Καρίας ἐφ' ὑμᾶς ἔπλευσε μετὰ Ξέρξου, καὶ ἦν αὐτῇ γυναικεῖον οὐδέν, ἀλλ' ἀνδρὸς στολὴ καὶ ὅπλα, ὑμεῖς δὲ ἁβρότεροι τῶν Ξέρξου γυναικῶν ἐφ' ἑαυτοὺς στέλλεσθε οἱ γέροντες οἱ νέοι τὸ ἐφηβικόν, οἳ πάλαι μὲν ὤμνυσαν ἐς ̓Αγραύλου φοιτῶντες ὑπὲρ τῆς πατρίδος ἀποθανεῖσθαι καὶ ὅπλα θήσεσθαι, νῦν δὲ ἴσως ὀμοῦνται ὑπὲρ τῆς πατρίδος βακχεύσειν καὶ θύρσον λήψεσθαι κόρυν μὲν οὐδεμίαν φέρον, γυναικομίμῳ δὲ μορφώματι, κατὰ τὸν Εὐριπίδην, αἰσχρῶς διαπρέπον. ἀκούω δὲ ὑμᾶς καὶ ἀνέμους γίγνεσθαι καὶ λῄδια ἀνασείειν λέγεσθε ἔπιπλα μετεώρως αὐτὰ κολποῦντες. ἔδει δὲ ἀλλὰ τούτους γε αἰδεῖσθαι, ξυμμάχους ὄντας καὶ πνεύσαντας ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν μέγα, μηδὲ τὸν Βορέαν κηδεστήν γε ὄντα καὶ παρὰ πάντας τοὺς ἀνέμους ἄρσενα ποιεῖσθαι θῆλυν, οὐδὲ γὰρ τῆς ̓Ωρειθυίας ἐραστὴς ἄν ποτε ὁ Βορέας ἐγένετο, εἰ κἀκείνην ὀρχουμένην εἶδε.” 4.21. And he is said to have rebuked the Athenians for their conduct of the festival of Dionysus, which they hold at the season of the month Anthesterion. For when he saw them flocking to the theater he imagined that the were going to listen to solos and compositions in the way of processional and rhythmic hymns, such as are sung in comedies and tragedies; but when he heard them dancing lascivious jigs to the rondos of a pipe, and in the midst of the sacred epic of Orpheus striking attitudes as the Hours, or as nymphs, or as bacchants, he set himself to rebuke their proceedings and said: Stop dancing away the reputations of the victors of Salamis as well as of many other good men deported this life. For if indeed this were a Lacedaemonian form of dance, I would say, “Bravo, soldiers; for you are training yourselves for war, and I will join in your dance'; but as it is a soft dance and one of effeminate tendency, what am I to say of your national trophies? Not as monuments of shame to the Medians or Persians, but to your own shame they will have been raised, should you degenerate so much from those who set them up. And what do you mean by your saffron robes and your purple and scarlet raiment? For surely the Acharnians never dressed themselves up in this way, nor ever the knights of Colonus rode in such garb. A woman commanded a ship from Caria and sailed against you with Xerxes, and about her there was nothing womanly, but she wore the garb and armor of a man; but you are softer than the women of Xerxes' day, and you are dressing yourselves up to your own despite, old and young and striplings alike, all those who of old flocked to the shrine of Agraulus in order to swear to die in battle on behalf of the fatherland. And now it seems that the same people are ready to swear to become bacchants and don the thyrsus in behalf of their country; and no one bears a helmet, but disguised as female harlequins, to use the phrase of Euripides, they shine in shame alone. Nay more, I hear that you turn yourselves into winds, and wave your skirts, and pretend that you are ships bellying their sails aloft. But surely you might at least have some respect for the winds that were your allies and once blew mightily to protect you, instead of turning Boreas who was your patron, and who of all the winds is the most masculine, into a woman; for Boreas would never have become the lover of Oreithya, if he had seen her executing, like you, a skirt dance.
164. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 25.2, 41.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
165. Tertullian, On The Resurrection of The Flesh, 1.1, 11.2, 63.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
166. Tertullian, On Modesty, 14.16, 21.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129, 137
167. Tertullian, On Monogamy, 1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
168. Tertullian, On Fasting, Against The Psychics, 1.1, 1.3, 3.1, 11.1, 12.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
169. Pollux, Onomasticon, 4.52-4.53, 8.108 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 114, 429
170. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.37.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
171. Origen, Against Celsus, 7.9 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 97
7.9. But as Celsus promises to give an account of the manner in which prophecies are delivered in Phœnicia and Palestine, speaking as though it were a matter with which he had a full and personal acquaintance, let us see what he has to say on the subject. First he lays it down that there are several kinds of prophecies, but he does not specify what they are; indeed, he could not do so, and the statement is a piece of pure ostentation. However, let us see what he considers the most perfect kind of prophecy among these nations. There are many, he says, who, although of no name, with the greatest facility and on the slightest occasion, whether within or without temples, assume the motions and gestures of inspired persons; while others do it in cities or among armies, for the purpose of attracting attention and exciting surprise. These are accustomed to say, each for himself, 'I am God; I am the Son of God; or, I am the Divine Spirit; I have come because the world is perishing, and you, O men, are perishing for your iniquities. But I wish to save you, and you shall see me returning again with heavenly power. Blessed is he who now does me homage. On all the rest I will send down eternal fire, both on cities and on countries. And those who know not the punishments which await them shall repent and grieve in vain; while those who are faithful to me I will preserve eternally.' Then he goes on to say: To these promises are added strange, fanatical, and quite unintelligible words, of which no rational person can find the meaning: for so dark are they, as to have no meaning at all; but they give occasion to every fool or impostor to apply them to suit his own purposes.
172. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.14 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9
173. Pseudo-Justinus, Letters, 1.5, 1.7, 8.5, 30.5 (3rd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
8.5. ἀνθρώπων δὲ οὐδεὶς οὔτε εἶδεν οὔτε ἐγνώρισεν, αὐτὸς δὲ ἑαυτὸν ἐπέδειξεν. 8.5.
174. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 2.9.10, 2.73 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
175. Cyprian, Letters, 75.1, 75.7.3-75.7.4, 75.19.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 80, 122
176. Cyprian, Letters, 75.1, 75.7.3-75.7.4, 75.19.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 80, 122
177. Cyprian, Letters, 75.1, 75.7.3-75.7.4, 75.19.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 80, 122
178. Cyprian, Letters, 75.1, 75.7.3-75.7.4, 75.19.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 80, 122
179. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.31.4, 3.37.1, 4.3.2, 4.23.1, 4.23.8, 4.23.12-4.23.13, 5.16.3-5.16.4, 5.16.7-5.16.10, 5.16.17-5.16.19, 5.17.1-5.17.5, 5.18.2-5.18.3, 5.18.5, 5.18.8, 5.18.11, 5.18.13, 5.19.1-5.19.3, 6.12.1 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 12, 14, 15, 27, 53, 93, 94, 95, 96, 98, 100, 101, 102, 129, 133, 137, 138, 340
3.31.4. So much concerning their death. And in the Dialogue of Caius which we mentioned a little above, Proclus, against whom he directed his disputation, in agreement with what has been quoted, speaks thus concerning the death of Philip and his daughters: After him there were four prophetesses, the daughters of Philip, at Hierapolis in Asia. Their tomb is there and the tomb of their father. Such is his statement. 3.37.1. Among those that were celebrated at that time was Quadratus, who, report says, was renowned along with the daughters of Philip for his prophetical gifts. And there were many others besides these who were known in those days, and who occupied the first place among the successors of the apostles. And they also, being illustrious disciples of such great men, built up the foundations of the churches which had been laid by the apostles in every place, and preached the Gospel more and more widely and scattered the saving seeds of the kingdom of heaven far and near throughout the whole world. 4.3.2. He himself reveals the early date at which he lived in the following words: But the works of our Saviour were always present, for they were genuine: — those that were healed, and those that were raised from the dead, who were seen not only when they were healed and when they were raised, but were also always present; and not merely while the Saviour was on earth, but also after his death, they were alive for quite a while, so that some of them lived even to our day. Such then was Quadratus. 4.23.1. And first we must speak of Dionysius, who was appointed bishop of the church in Corinth, and communicated freely of his inspired labors not only to his own people, but also to those in foreign lands, and rendered the greatest service to all in the catholic epistles which he wrote to the churches. 4.23.8. Pinytus, replying to this epistle, admires and commends Dionysius, but exhorts him in turn to impart some time more solid food, and to feed the people under him, when he wrote again, with more advanced teaching, that they might not be fed continually on these milky doctrines and imperceptibly grow old under a training calculated for children. In this epistle also Pinytus' orthodoxy in the faith and his care for the welfare of those placed under him, his learning and his comprehension of divine things, are revealed as in a most perfect image. 4.23.12. The same writer also speaks as follows concerning his own epistles, alleging that they had been mutilated: As the brethren desired me to write epistles, I wrote. And these epistles the apostles of the devil have filled with tares, cutting out some things and adding others. For them a woe is reserved. It is, therefore, not to be wondered at if some have attempted to adulterate the Lord's writings also, since they have formed designs even against writings which are of less account.There is extant, in addition to these, another epistle of Dionysius, written to Chrysophora, a most faithful sister. In it he writes what is suitable, and imparts to her also the proper spiritual food. So much concerning Dionysius. 5.16.3. He commences his work in this manner:Having for a very long and sufficient time, O beloved Avircius Marcellus, been urged by you to write a treatise against the heresy of those who are called after Miltiades, I have hesitated till the present time, not through lack of ability to refute the falsehood or bear testimony for the truth, but from fear and apprehension that I might seem to some to be making additions to the doctrines or precepts of the Gospel of the New Testament, which it is impossible for one who has chosen to live according to the Gospel, either to increase or to diminish. 5.16.4. But being recently in Ancyra in Galatia, I found the church there greatly agitated by this novelty, not prophecy, as they call it, but rather false prophecy, as will be shown. Therefore, to the best of our ability, with the Lord's help, we disputed in the church many days concerning these and other matters separately brought forward by them, so that the church rejoiced and was strengthened in the truth, and those of the opposite side were for the time confounded, and the adversaries were grieved. 5.16.7. There is said to be a certain village called Ardabau in that part of Mysia, which borders upon Phrygia. There first, they say, when Gratus was proconsul of Asia, a recent convert, Montanus by name, through his unquenchable desire for leadership, gave the adversary opportunity against him. And he became beside himself, and being suddenly in a sort of frenzy and ecstasy, he raved, and began to babble and utter strange things, prophesying in a manner contrary to the constant custom of the Church handed down by tradition from the beginning. 5.16.8. Some of those who heard his spurious utterances at that time were indigt, and they rebuked him as one that was possessed, and that was under the control of a demon, and was led by a deceitful spirit, and was distracting the multitude; and they forbade him to talk, remembering the distinction drawn by the Lord and his warning to guard watchfully against the coming of false prophets. But others imagining themselves possessed of the Holy Spirit and of a prophetic gift, were elated and not a little puffed up; and forgetting the distinction of the Lord, they challenged the mad and insidious and seducing spirit, and were cheated and deceived by him. In consequence of this, he could no longer be held in check, so as to keep silence. 5.16.9. Thus by artifice, or rather by such a system of wicked craft, the devil, devising destruction for the disobedient, and being unworthily honored by them, secretly excited and inflamed their understandings which had already become estranged from the true faith. And he stirred up besides two women, and filled them with the false spirit, so that they talked wildly and unreasonably and strangely, like the person already mentioned. And the spirit pronounced them blessed as they rejoiced and gloried in him, and puffed them up by the magnitude of his promises. But sometimes he rebuked them openly in a wise and faithful manner, that he might seem to be a reprover. But those of the Phrygians that were deceived were few in number.And the arrogant spirit taught them to revile the entire universal Church under heaven, because the spirit of false prophecy received neither honor from it nor entrance into it. 5.16.10. For the faithful in Asia met often in many places throughout Asia to consider this matter, and examined the novel utterances and pronounced them profane, and rejected the heresy, and thus these persons were expelled from the Church and debarred from communion. 5.16.17. He writes as follows:And let not the spirit, in the same work of Asterius Urbanus, say through Maximilla, 'I am driven away from the sheep like a wolf. I am not a wolf. I am word and spirit and power.' But let him show clearly and prove the power in the spirit. And by the spirit let him compel those to confess him who were then present for the purpose of proving and reasoning with the talkative spirit, — those eminent men and bishops, Zoticus, from the village Comana, and Julian, from Apamea, whose mouths the followers of Themiso muzzled, refusing to permit the false and seductive spirit to be refuted by them. 5.16.18. Again in the same work, after saying other things in refutation of the false prophecies of Maximilla, he indicates the time when he wrote these accounts, and mentions her predictions in which she prophesied wars and anarchy. Their falsehood he censures in the following manner: 5.16.19. And has not this been shown clearly to be false? For it is today more than thirteen years since the woman died, and there has been neither a partial nor general war in the world; but rather, through the mercy of God, continued peace even to the Christians. These things are taken from the second book. 5.17.1. In this work he mentions a writer, Miltiades, stating that he also wrote a certain book against the above-mentioned heresy. After quoting some of their words, he adds:Having found these things in a certain work of theirs in opposition to the work of the brother Alcibiades, in which he shows that a prophet ought not to speak in ecstasy, I made an abridgment. 5.17.2. A little further on in the same work he gives a list of those who prophesied under the new covet, among whom he enumerates a certain Ammia and Quadratus, saying:But the false prophet falls into an ecstasy, in which he is without shame or fear. Beginning with purposed ignorance, he passes on, as has been stated, to involuntary madness of soul. 5.17.3. They cannot show that one of the old or one of the new prophets was thus carried away in spirit. Neither can they boast of Agabus, or Judas, or Silas, or the daughters of Philip, or Ammia in Philadelphia, or Quadratus, or any others not belonging to them. 5.17.4. And again after a little he says: For if after Quadratus and Ammia in Philadelphia, as they assert, the women with Montanus received the prophetic gift, let them show who among them received it from Montanus and the women. For the apostle thought it necessary that the prophetic gift should continue in all the Church until the final coming. But they cannot show it, though this is the fourteenth year since the death of Maximilla. 5.17.5. He writes thus. But the Miltiades to whom he refers has left other monuments of his own zeal for the Divine Scriptures, in the discourses which he composed against the Greeks and against the Jews, answering each of them separately in two books. And in addition he addresses an apology to the earthly rulers, in behalf of the philosophy which he embraced. 5.18.2. His actions and his teaching show who this new teacher is. This is he who taught the dissolution of marriage; who made laws for fasting; who named Pepuza and Tymion, small towns in Phrygia, Jerusalem, wishing to gather people to them from all directions; who appointed collectors of money; who contrived the receiving of gifts under the name of offerings; who provided salaries for those who preached his doctrine, that its teaching might prevail through gluttony. 5.18.3. He writes thus concerning Montanus; and a little farther on he writes as follows concerning his prophetesses: We show that these first prophetesses themselves, as soon as they were filled with the Spirit, abandoned their husbands. How falsely therefore they speak who call Prisca a virgin. 5.18.5. And again a little farther on he speaks thus concerning one of their confessors:So also Themiso, who was clothed with plausible covetousness, could not endure the sign of confession, but threw aside bonds for an abundance of possessions. Yet, though he should have been humble on this account, he dared to boast as a martyr, and in imitation of the apostle, he wrote a certain catholic epistle, to instruct those whose faith was better than his own, contending for words of empty sound, and blaspheming against the Lord and the apostles and the holy Church. 5.18.11. Again, in another part of his work he speaks as follows of the prophets of whom they boast:If they deny that their prophets have received gifts, let them acknowledge this: that if they are convicted of receiving them, they are not prophets. And we will bring a multitude of proofs of this. But it is necessary that all the fruits of a prophet should be examined. Tell me, does a prophet dye his hair? Does a prophet stain his eyelids? Does a prophet delight in adornment? Does a prophet play with tables and dice? Does a prophet lend on usury? Let them confess whether these things are lawful or not; but I will show that they have been done by them. 5.18.13. And he says also that Zoticus, who was mentioned by the former writer, when Maximilla was pretending to prophesy in Pepuza, resisted her and endeavored to refute the spirit that was working in her; but was prevented by those who agreed with her. He mentions also a certain Thraseas among the martyrs of that time.He speaks, moreover, of a tradition that the Saviour commanded his apostles not to depart from Jerusalem for twelve years. He uses testimonies also from the Revelation of John, and he relates that a dead man had, through the Divine power, been raised by John himself in Ephesus. He also adds other things by which he fully and abundantly exposes the error of the heresy of which we have been speaking. These are the matters recorded by Apollonius. 5.19.1. Serapion, who, as report says, succeeded Maximinus at that time as bishop of the church of Antioch, mentions the works of Apolinarius against the above-mentioned heresy. And he alludes to him in a private letter to Caricus and Pontius, in which he himself exposes the same heresy, and adds the following words: 5.19.2. That you may see that the doings of this lying band of the new prophecy, so called, are an abomination to all the brotherhood throughout the world, I have sent you writings of the most blessed Claudius Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis in Asia. 5.19.3. In the same letter of Serapion the signatures of several bishops are found, one of whom subscribes himself as follows:I, Aurelius Cyrenius, a witness, pray for your health.And another in this manner:Aelius Publius Julius, bishop of Debeltum, a colony in Thrace. As God lives in the heavens, the blessed Sotas in Anchialus desired to cast the demon out of Priscilla, but the hypocrites did not permit him. And the autograph signatures of many other bishops who agreed with them are contained in the same letter.So much for these persons. 6.12.1. It is probable that others have preserved other memorials of Serapion's literary industry, but there have reached us only those addressed to a certain Domninus, who, in the time of persecution, fell away from faith in Christ to the Jewish will-worship; and those addressed to Pontius and Caricus, ecclesiastical men, and other letters to different persons, and still another work composed by him on the so-called Gospel of Peter.
180. Cyprian, Letters To Jovian, 75.1, 75.7.3-75.7.4, 75.19.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 80, 122
181. Servius, In Vergilii Georgicon Libros, 1.5, 1.7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 38
182. Epiphanius, Panarion, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 101
183. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 9.114-9.115, 12.391, 14.345-14.346, 14.384-14.385, 16.386, 16.401, 19.330, 27.214, 32.98-32.150, 46.147 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 44, 172, 175
184. Jerome, Letters, 5.5-5.6, 41.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
185. Proclus, Theologia Platonica ( ), None (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 174
186. Hesychius of Miletus, Fragments, None (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
187. Jerome, On Illustrious Men, 24, 40, 53 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 130
188. Jerome, Letters, 5.5-5.6, 41.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
189. Jerome, Letters, 5.5-5.6, 41.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
190. Justinian, Digest, 1.4.1 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
191. Epigraphy, Igdolbia, 95  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 60
192. Anon., Vita Sancti Auxibii, 9  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
193. Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q371, 10.1  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 294, 340
194. Epigraphy, Cil, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 187
195. Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q370, 5.12  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 294, 340
196. Horatius Flaccus, Carmina, 2.19.10, 2.29.29, 3.3.10-3.3.15  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 11, 535
197. Anon., Miracula St. Demetrii, 8.19.1  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 53
198. Hebrew Bible, Letter of Aristeas, 2  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 94
199. Carmina Popularia, Pmg, 871, 879(1), 929, 879  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 166
200. Leontius of Byzantium, Ap. Hippol. Haer., 1.1  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
201. Anon., Suda, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 289
202. Bacchylides, Odes, 13.228-13.231, 18.49  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 44, 88
203. Epigraphy, I. Mont, 68  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 136
204. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 9.248., 16.156, 16.289.1, 16.289.2, 16.289.3, 16.289.4, 16.289.5, 16.289.6  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
205. Epigraphy, Ig, 12.5.972  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 101, 161
206. Pratinas Phliasius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
207. Pratinas Phliasius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 161
208. Anon., Scholia On Aristophanes Ach., 242, 378  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 101
209. Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q372, 3.41.3  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
210. Hippolytus, Gcs 1, 297  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 340
212. Leskhes, Il. Parv., 1.1, 11.2, 63.9  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 129
213. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 175
215. Nicander Calchedonius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
217. Plato, Io, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 11
218. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 485.2, 578.14  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 179, 366, 391
219. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 45.2, 49.1, 49.3, 52.1, 52.3, 52.7, 52.8., 53, 54.5, 54.10, 54.11  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 273
220. Pratinas, Pmg, 711  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 168
221. Anon., Scholia On Plato, Republic, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 101
222. Bacchylides, Fr., None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 114
223. Papyri, P.Flor., 3.356-3.357  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 535
224. Papyri, P.Gur., None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 179
226. Etymologicum Magnum, Catasterismi, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 429
228. Photius, Lexicon, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 40
229. Anon., Scholia On Clement of Alexandria, Protrepticus, 1.2.2, 16.25  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 102, 429
230. Epigraphy, Hirschfeld 1916, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 102
231. Anon., Pmg, 1003, 1027, 929, 1024  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 166, 167
232. Epigraphy, Imagn., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 166
235. Eusebius of Caesarea, Chronicon, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 15
236. Epigraphy, Seg, 19.379, 26.683  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 9, 161
237. Epigraphy, Miletos, 457, 8  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 179
238. Mekilta D’Rabbi YišmaʿEl, Vayehi Bešalaḥ, PetiḥTa, Ed. Horovitz And Rabi, None  Tagged with subjects: •ecstasy/ecstatic prophecy Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 15
239. Epigraphy, Bcar 1963-1964, 143-146  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 188