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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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27 results for "earth"
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 115-116, 120, 123, 154, 184, 346-361, 493, 58-59, 721-735, 737-766, 775-776, 784, 79, 795-806, 810, 87, 736 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 69, 85, 222, 306
736. The boundless sea roared with a fearful sound
2. Homer, Iliad, 3.2, 4.141, 8.159, 8.368-8.370, 14.201, 14.245-14.246, 14.302 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 43, 298, 300, 306
3.2. / Now when they were marshalled, the several companies with their captains, the Trojans came on with clamour and with a cry like birds, even as the clamour of cranes ariseth before the face of heaven, when they flee from wintry storms and measureless rain, 4.141. / and forthwith the dark blood flowed from the wound.As when a woman staineth ivory with scarlet, some woman of Maeonia or Caria, to make a cheek-piece for horses, and it lieth in a treasure-chamber, though many horsemen pray to wear it; but it lieth there as a king's treasure, 8.159. / nor the wives of the great-souled Trojans, bearers of the shield, they whose lusty husbands thou hast hurled in the dust. So spake he, and turned in flight his single-hooved horses, back through the tumult; and the Trojans and Hector with wondrous shouting poured forth upon them their missiles fraught with groanings. 8.368. / send me forth to succour him. Had I but known all this in wisdom of my heart when Eurystheus sent him forth to the house of Hades the Warder, to bring from out of Erebus the hound of loathed Hades, then had he not escaped the sheer-falling waters of Styx. 8.369. / send me forth to succour him. Had I but known all this in wisdom of my heart when Eurystheus sent him forth to the house of Hades the Warder, to bring from out of Erebus the hound of loathed Hades, then had he not escaped the sheer-falling waters of Styx. 8.370. / Howbeit now Zeus hateth me, and hath brought to fulfillment the counsels of Thetis, that kissed his knees and with her hand clasped his chin, beseeching him to show honour to Achilles, sacker of cities. Verily the day shall come when he shall again call me his flashing-eyed darling. But now make thou ready for us twain our single-hooved horses, 14.201. / For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.245. / Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson, 14.246. / Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson, 14.302. / Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife,
3. Homer, Odyssey, 10.497, 10.514, 11.84, 24.416 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 300
4. Hesiod, Works And Days, 272-273, 765-776, 778-828, 777 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
777. Or over-friendly or no friend at all.
5. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
6. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 69
7. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 85
8. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 85
9. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 85
178b. εἶναι τὸν θεὸν τίμιον, ἦ δʼ ὅς, τεκμήριον δὲ τούτου· γονῆς γὰρ Ἔρωτος οὔτʼ εἰσὶν οὔτε λέγονται ὑπʼ οὐδενὸς οὔτε ἰδιώτου οὔτε ποιητοῦ, ἀλλʼ Ἡσίοδος πρῶτον μὲν Χάος φησὶ γενέσθαι— αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα Γαῖʼ εὐρύστερνος, πάντων ἕδος ἀσφαλὲς αἰεί, ἠδʼ Ἔρος Hes. Theog. 116 Ἡσιόδῳ δὲ καὶ Ἀκουσίλεως σύμφησιν μετὰ τὸ Χάος δύο τούτω γενέσθαι, Γῆν τε καὶ ἔρωτα. Παρμενίδης δὲ τὴν γένεσιν λέγει— πρώτιστον μὲν ἔρωτα θεῶν μητίσατο πάντων. Parmenides Fr. 132 178b. of the most venerable are the honors of this god, and the proof of it is this: parents of Love there are none, nor are any recorded in either prose or verse. Hesiod says that Chaos came first into being— and thereafter rose Broad-breasted Earth, sure seat of all for aye, And Love. Acusilaus also agrees with Hesiod, saying that after Chaos were born these two, Earth and Love. Parmenides says of Birth that she invented Love before all other gods.
10. Anaxagoras, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
11. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 209
12. Herodotus, Histories, 2.123.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 299
2.123.2. The Egyptians were the first who maintained the following doctrine, too, that the human soul is immortal, and at the death of the body enters into some other living thing then coming to birth; and after passing through all creatures of land, sea, and air, it enters once more into a human body at birth, a cycle which it completes in three thousand years.
13. Aristotle, Metaphysics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
14. Aristotle, Meteorology, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 60
15. Aristotle, Heavens, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
16. Aristotle, Fragments, 70 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 60
17. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 60
18. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.627-4.630 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 69
4.627. ἐκ δὲ τόθεν Ῥοδανοῖο βαθὺν ῥόον εἰσαπέβησαν, 4.628. ὅς τʼ εἰς Ἠριδανὸν μετανίσσεται· ἄμμιγα δʼ ὕδωρ 4.629. ἐν ξυνοχῇ βέβρυκε κυκώμενον. αὐτὰρ ὁ γαίης 4.630. ἐκ μυχάτης, ἵνα τʼ εἰσὶ πύλαι καὶ ἐδέθλια Νυκτός,
19. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 2.32.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
20. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 162
21. Censorinus, De Die Natali, 18.10-18.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
22. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 7.29.10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 153
23. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 9.8 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
9.8. Coming now to his particular tenets, we may state them as follows: fire is the element, all things are exchange for fire and come into being by rarefaction and condensation; but of this he gives no clear explanation. All things come into being by conflict of opposites, and the sum of things flows like a stream. Further, all that is is limited and forms one world. And it is alternately born from fire and again resolved into fire in fixed cycles to all eternity, and this is determined by destiny. of the opposites that which tends to birth or creation is called war and strife, and that which tends to destruction by fire is called concord and peace. Change he called a pathway up and down, and this determines the birth of the world.
24. Nonnus, Paraphrasis Sancti Evangelii Joannei (Fort. Auctore Nonno Alio, 10.136 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 298
25. Simplicius of Cilicia, In Aristotelis Physicorum Libros Commentaria, 24.4-24.6 (missingth cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
26. Anon., Scholia In Platonis Rempublicam, None  Tagged with subjects: •earth (element) Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149
27. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 149