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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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5 results for "earth"
1. Herodotus, Histories, 4.197 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth, people generated by Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135
4.197. These are all the Libyans whom we can name, and the majority of their kings cared nothing for the king of the Medes at the time of which I write, nor do they care for him now. ,I have this much further to say of this country: four nations and no more, as far as we know, inhabit it, two of which are aboriginal and two not; the Libyans in the north and the Ethiopians in the south of Libya are aboriginal; the Phoenicians and Greeks are later settlers.
2. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth, people generated by Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 132
3. Cicero, Pro Flacco, 62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth, people generated by Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 131
62. adsunt Athenienses, unde humanitas, doctrina, religio, fruges, iura, leges ortae atque in omnis terras distributae putantur; de quorum urbis possessione propter pulchritudinem etiam inter deos certamen fuisse proditum est; quae vetustate ea est ut ipsa ex sese suos civis genuisse ducatur, et eorum eadem terra parens, altrix, patria dicatur, auctoritate autem tanta est ut iam fractum prope ac debilitatum Graeciae nomen huius urbis laude nitatur.
4. Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico, 5.12.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth, people generated by Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135
5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.9.3, 2.38.1, 3.2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •earth, people generated by Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135
1.9.3.  Again, with respect to the antiquity of the human race, not only do Greeks put forth their claims but many of the barbarians as well, all holding that it is they who were autochthonous and the first of all men to discover the things which are of use in life, and that it was the events in their own history which were the earliest to have been held worthy of record. 2.38.1.  Now India as a whole, being of a vast extent, is inhabited, as we are told, by many other peoples of every description, and not one of them had its first origin in a foreign land, but all of them are thought to be autochthonous; it never receives any colony from abroad nor has it ever sent one to any other people. 3.2.1.  Now the Ethiopians, as historians relate, were the first of all men and the proofs of this statement, they say, are manifest. For that they did not come into their land as immigrants from abroad but were natives of it and so justly bear the name of "autochthones" is, they maintain, conceded by practically all men; furthermore, that those who dwell beneath the noon-day sun were, in all likelihood, the first to be generated by the earth, is clear to all; since, inasmuch as it was the warmth of the sun which, at the generation of the universe, dried up the earth when it was still wet and impregnated it with life, it is reasonable to suppose that the region which was nearest the sun was the first to bring forth living creatures.